I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Whau Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 24 November 2021

6.00pm

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Whau Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay Thomas

 

Deputy Chairperson

Fasitua Amosa

 

Members

Catherine Farmer

 

 

Ulalemamae Te'eva Matafai

 

 

Warren Piper

 

 

Jessica Rose

 

 

Susan Zhu

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rodica Chelaru

Democracy Advisor

 

18 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 02185527

Email: rodica.chelaru@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: ReadingWarrior literacy project                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Whau Ward Councillor's update                                                                                  7

12        Whau Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocation               13

13        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Whau Local Board quarter one 2021/2022                                                                                                                                       91

14        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                               151

15        Draft Contributions Policy 2021                                                                               187

16        Reporting back a decision made under delegation                                               221

17        Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission                                                  227

18        Whau Local Board Workshop Records                                                                   235

19        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      241

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Specifically, members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

 

The following are declared interests of the Whau Local Board:

 

Member

Organisation

Position

Kay Thomas

·         New Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau

·         Friends of Arataki

·         Western Quilters

·         Citizens Advice Bureau
 Waitākere Board

Volunteer

Committee member

Member

Chair

Susan Zhu

·         Chinese Oral History Foundation

·         The Chinese Garden Steering Committee of Auckland

Committee member

Board member

Fasitua Amosa

·         Equity NZ

·         Massive Theatre Company

·         Avondale Business Association

Vice President

Board member

A family member is the Chair

Catherine Farmer

·         Avondale-Waterview Historical Society

·         Blockhouse Bay Historical Society

·         Portage Licensing Trust

·         Blockhouse Bay Bowls

·         Forest and Bird organisation

·         Grey Power

Member

 

Member

Trustee

Patron

Member

Member

Te’eva Matafai

·         Pacific Events and Entertainment Trust

·         Miss Samoa NZ

·         Malu Measina Samoan Dance Group

·         Aspire Events

Co-Founder

 

Director

Director/Founder

 

Director

Warren Piper

·         New Lynn RSA

·         New Lynn Business Association

Associate member

Member

Jessica Rose

·         Women in Urbanism-Aotearoa, Auckland Branch

·         Forest & Bird

·         Big Feels Club

·         Frocks on Bikes

·         Bike Auckland

·         Department of Conservation

Committee member

 

Member

Patron

Former co-chair

Former committee member

Employee

Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council.

External organisation

Leads

Alternate

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Warren Piper

Catherine Farmer

Avondale Business Association

Kay Thomas

Warren Piper

Blockhouse Bay Business Association

Warren Piper

Fasitua Amosa

New Lynn Business Association

Susan Zhu

Kay Thomas
Warren Piper

Rosebank Business Association

Fasitua Amosa

Warren Piper

Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust

Fasitua Amosa

Jessica Rose

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Whau Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 27 October 2021,  as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Whau Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: ReadingWarrior literacy project

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       David Riley, teacher, writer and publisher of children's books, will be in attendance to present on the ReadingWarrior literacy project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       David Riley started writing books for and with communities that aren't represented much in literature. He worked with groups such as Auckland Tuvalau Community Trust, National Kiribati Trust and the Vagahau Niue Trust to write and publish bilingual children's stories.

3.       He endeavours to extend this literacy project to West Auckland, the Whau area.

4.       He taught Drama and English at Tangaroa College for 23 years.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation on the ReadingWarrior literacy project and thank David Riley for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          ReadingWarrior presentation....................................................................... 247

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Whau Ward Councillor's update

File No.: CP2021/11581

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Whau Ward Councillor to have an opportunity to update the Whau Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the report and thank Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland, for her update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Ward Councillor Update

9

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Whau Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocation

File No.: CP2021/16592

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Whau Local Board with information on applications in Whau Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Whau Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (Attachment A).

3.       The Whau Local Board adopted the Whau Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 24 March 2021 (Attachment B). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $109,909 for the 2021/2022 financial year (WH/2021/51). The local board allocated $5,920 in Quick Response Round One (WH/2021/82), leaving a total of $103,989 to allocate.

5.       Thirty-two applications were received for Local Grants Round One 2021/2022, including sixteen Multiboard applications, requesting a total of $138,633.79. A total of $30,500 was allocated, leaving a total of $73,489 to be allocated in one local grant and one quick response round.

6.       Fifteen applications were received for Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $25,022.65.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Whau Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022, listed in Table One:

Table One: Whau Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2221-201

Charlotte Museum Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue costs, printing and facilitation at Charlotte Museum from 1 December 2021 to 28 February 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2221-203

Green Bay Community House

Community

Towards blinds and desk at Green Bay Community House from 6 December 2021 to 25 February 2022

$1,336.70

Eligible

QR2221-204

More for Kidz Foundation Trust

Community

Towards programme resources from 1 December 2021 to 31 May 2022

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2221-205

West Auckland Community Toy Library

Community

Towards rent at 229 Portage Road from 1 December 2021 to 28 February 2022

$1,950.00

Eligible

QR2221-206

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching, basketballs and basketball bags from 1 December 2021 to 28 June 2022

$1,954.25

Eligible

QR2221-207

New Zealand Blue Light Ventures Inc

Community

Towards production and printing of Street Smart handbooks at Avondale College from 31 December 2021 to 31 March 2022

$1,960.00

Eligible

QR2221-208

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Inc

Community

Towards fuel costs from 1 December 2021 to 30 November 2022

$500.00

Eligible

QR2221-209

Afghans Funeral Services Charity in New Zealand

Community

Towards education and sporting equipment from 15 December 2021 to 15 December 2022

$1,632.00

Eligible

QR2221-210

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards counselling and advertising at Youthline House from 1 December 2021 to 30 June 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2221-211

Everybody Eats Charitable Trust

Community

Towards kitchen equipment at 1790 Great North Road from 1 February 2022 to 31 March 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2221-212

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards venue hire and facilitation at The Trusts Arena from 1 November 2021 to 30 June 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2221-214

Crescendo Trust of Aotearoa

Community

Towards designer fees for webpage and flyer at Crescendo Studio from 1 December 2021 to 31 March 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2221-216

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards native plants, recycling bins and courier costs from 1 January 2022 to 31 December 2022

$1,989.70

Eligible

QR2221-217

Friends of Oakley (Te Auaunga) Creek Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards mural design and installation at Oakley Creek from 1 December 2021 to 30 June 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2221-219

Waitakere Japanese Supplementary School

Community

Towards art supplies at 23 Kaurilands Road from 8 February 2022 to 10 April 2022

$700.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$25,022.65

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

10.     The Whau Local Board adopted the Whau Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 24 March 2021 (Attachment B). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Whau Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

18.     A summary of each application received through Whau Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (Attachment A) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

21.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $109,909 for the 2021/2022 financial year (WH/2021/51). The local board allocated $5,920 in Quick Response Round One (WH/2021/82), leaving a total of $103,989 to allocate.

22.     Thirty-two applications were received for Local Grants Round One 2021/2022, including sixteen Multiboard applications, requesting a total of $138,633.79. A total of $30,500 was allocated, leaving a total of $73,489 to be allocated in one local grant and one quick response round.

23.     Fifteen applications were received for Quick Response round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $25,022.65.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes including this one and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Whau Local Board allocation of funding for the Quick Response Grants Round Two, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau 2021-2022 Quick Response Grants Round Two -  Application Summary

19

b

Whau 2021-2021 Grants Programme

87

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Boyd – Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations and Data Management

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Whau Local Board quarter one 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/16532

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Whau Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       Some of the key activity updates from this period are referenced in the Key Activities section of this report.

4.       These key activities are reported in more detail in the updated work programme provided by all operating departments with agreed work programmes (Attachment A). Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged).

5.       Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming and places) (3117) is the only project under a red flag status (behind delivery, significant risk or removed) in quarter one.  There has been partial delivery with some names formally adopted and gazetted. However, there has been significant delay as staff await external parties to resolve the outstanding list of proposed dual names in the Whau.

The financial performance report compared to budget 2021/2022 is attached (Attachment B). There are some points for the local board to note.  Net operating performance overall for the Whau local board area is 11 per cent below budget for the quarter ended September 2021. Operating expenditure is 12 per cent below budget and operating revenue of $56,000 running at 38 percent below planned budget levels. Capital expenditure is approximately 54 per cent behind budget for the quarter. Associated cost escalations and supply chain risks are recognised to possibly further impact future delivery.

6.         The Customer and Community Services capital expenditure budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2021.

b)      note that the Customer and Community Services Capex work programme has been updated to reflect financial deferrals (Attachment C).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Whau Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Auckland Unlimited.

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph. Nor are the activities undertaken by the Council Controlled Organisations, for example, Miranda Reserve play mitigation (Water Care), Avondale streetscape improvements (Auckland Transport) and the progression of the Avondale Multi-purpose Community Facility (Eke Panuku).

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

COVID-19 restrictions

9.       Auckland has faced COVID-19 restrictions (Level 3 and 4) from 17 August 2021 - six weeks of quarter one (just under half the period this report covers).

10.     Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were closed.

11.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update (Attachment A).

12.     Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department noted that most of their programmes use quarter one to finalise contracts and procurement. As such the impacts of the COVID-19 lockdown that began on 17 August have generally not significantly impacted the work programme for this quarter. Additionally, many programmes have been designed to be at least partially operational during different lockdown levels. The impacts of continued lockdown restrictions will be reported on for the quarter two updates.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

14.     The graphs below show the status of activities as well as what stage activities are at, within each department’s work programme. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programme.

Graph 3: Whau work programme activity status by department

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graph 4: Whau work programme by activity status

Key activity updates

15.     Some of the key activities in the first quarter are summarised here and can be viewed in more detail, and along with all the other activities, in Attachment A.

·    560 – Community Arts Broker. Whau’s Arts Broker of seven years, Melissa Laing, stepped down, but not before inducting two new, high achieving personas into the role – Jody Yawa McMillan and Janet Lilo. Despite six weeks of COVID-19 lockdown in the first quarter, some activities were delivered and the call for expressions of interest for future activities was progressed online.

·    563 – Diverse Participation, Pacific Voices. The Whau Pasifika Komiti has grown its influence within the Whau and were actively involved in the successful grant applications by community groups for local activations; the very well-received youth Talanoa-hosted youth leadership event, and the also well-received Whau Pacific Festival which was a series of events delivered over four days.

·    564 – Diverse Participation, Ethnic Voices. Recommendations in the adopted Whau Ethnic Peoples Plan continued to be a focus for staff working alongside our Ethnic Co-ordinator. This quarter delivered a database for locally based ethnic groups, communities and organisations; issued COVID-19 packs for youth in the ethnically diverse Ambrico community – many of whom are new migrants; took first steps to upskilling two individuals for future leadership; and collaborated with Ethnic Immigration Officer to widen and strengthen networks.

·    Whau’s libraries continued to diversify in these challenging times; some highlights for the first quarter were:

1265 – Access to Library Services. Lockdown impacted physical use of libraries and witnessed a significant shift to digital online services. From 1 September overdue penalties were removed, providing equitable access for all and fostering literacy and lifelong learning. During Auckland lockdown, all libraries telephoned older people 80 + within their communities, offering information or support on both library and welfare services.

1268 – Libraries also delivered celebrations and strengthened Māori responsiveness through programmes such as weekly te reo beginner’s classes, Māori book give-away for Matariki and Te Taura Whiri challenge to learn a kaikohu (expression of hope). The Huinga Takaro (playgroup) actively celebrated Matariki; there were free Tiriti o Waitangi workshops as well as Traditional Māori Healing Clinic / Rongoā. Learning opportunities moved online included website links promoting Digital te reo upskilling and pepeha templates for practice amongst other initiatives.

·    Ecological and Environmental topics were addressed through several departments and a variety of programmes:

758 – Parks Sports and Recreation (PSR), through ecological and environmental programmes racked up voluntary hours through Whau River Catchment Trust, and Friends of Oakley Creek for pest plant and pest animal control. Numerous plants were planted, maintenance work carried out on existing plants and forward planning undertaken for sites right across the Whau.

780 – Infrastructure and Environmental Services’ programme saw EcoMatters’ volunteers continued contributions to the nursery, enabling the potting of 2,268 plants. This involved students from Glen Eden Intermediate School and St Peter’s College. Essential worker exemption ensured continued care for the plants during lockdown, thereby remaining on track to achieve the target of at least 2,000 plants available for community planting projects within the Whau Local Board area during the winter 2022 planting season.

1274 – Libraries continued regular activities that support rangitahi (children and youth) to focus on the care and sustainability of our immediate environment. This quarter included creating a Bug Hotel and shelter for small garden insects; exploration of local ngahere (forest) and donations of food and items for the NZ Bird Rescue in Green Bay. Waste Wise advised on benefits of making and using homemade natural cleaning products, and other sessions explored access to food including growing gardens, education on nutrition, sustainability and food waste.

3081 – PSR progressed forward planning on the Urban Ngahere project which had been researching the current status in the “knowing” stage, preparing for the imminent progression to the next stage which will be the “growing” stage. The future, final stage of the project involves “protecting” the urban forest.

·    568 – The Youth Capacity Building programme saw Creative Souls’ continued guidance for young adults toward employment. Workshops covered funding options, CV/portfolios, securing references, budget planning and development from ideas into business. Lockdown saw the move to Zoom mentoring sessions, connected young people to inspirational professionals in their field, begun work with some new young people and for the most part worked on ideas that share the joy of creativity with people who needed it.

Activities on hold

16.     Eleven work programme activities are flagged as amber (in progress but with issues that are being managed). Four of these relate to delivery of Te Whau Pathway and the issues around quarter one relate to the as yet unsigned external funding agreement with Crown partners.  Activities are being managed and progressed (refer Attachment A). However, two amber projects have been put on hold - the Olympic Park Masterplan and Miranda Reserve playground renewal, and are explained below.

17.     Te Kete Rukuruku has a red flag status. Some Māori names of parks have been formally adopted by the board and gazetted. The remaining names in tranche one require external parties’ resolution and therefore not fully within staff’s control and has been significantly delayed. Hence the activity is identified as being on hold.

·        1561 – Olympic Park Masterplan: no activity this quarter. Project on hold due to other priority projects in local parks management plans programme. Project will recommence in Q3 (further decision points to be updated in Q2 reporting, December 2021).

·        24210 – Miranda Reserve: renew playground and associated park furniture. Project on hold while Water Care’s Central Interceptor construction is undertaken on site. Estimate completion: late financial year 2022/2023. Site to be reinstated upon completion. In the interim, with community input, Water Care undertook to instal a temporary playground nearby to mitigate loss during construction work on site.

·        3117 – Whau - Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming and places) tranche one. Discussions ongoing with iwi to reach agreement on additional names from tranche one. Council's proposed Māori naming policy is underway and when adopted will assist on informing a way forward.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

·    The following four activities have been flagged as cancelled in the attached work programme because the identified source funding will not be utilised, However, in reality the activities have been or will be undertaken. The local board was made aware of the proposed minor changes and had agreed in principle, although the workshop to discuss this will not occur until the early part of quarter two.

·    23880 – Tahurangi/Crum Park – renew fencing at old depot site. After conversation with the local board, this activity was considered to be a low priority in the current economic climate and has been pushed out to be readdressed in future years.

·    30465 – Archibald Park – refurbish pontoon. It is proposed that this activity be funded by sports facility management using minor urgent capex.

·    30471 – Green Bay Community Centre – replace roof. This activity was concluded using minor urgent capex.

·    30488 - Wingate Park – refurbish gravel carpark. Works have been included as part of maintenance minor works. There was no funding to be redirected.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

19.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     When developing the work programme council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This report informs the Whau Local Board of the performance for quarter ending 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The programme of activities undertaken in the first quarter is peppered with initiatives focused on better Māori outcomes:

·    Te Toi Uku: new oral history project, interviewing Māori and Pasifika Crown Lynn workers in order to be able to preserve that history.

·    Māori Responsiveness: E Tu – meetings completed with the Whau hub managers prior to completing all funding agreements that enables and supports Whau community led Matariki Celebrations and Te Reo Māori. The Te Ao/Te Reo Māori Glenavon programme, Taumata Whau operations, Matariki celebrations at Green Bay Community House, Blockhouse Bay Community Centre, Kelston Hub, Rosebank Hub, Glenavon Hub and New Windsor Hub agreements are completed. A meeting was held with west strategic brokers, prior to confirming the funding agreements and payments towards the Kaiwhakaawe (Māori broker) role. Currently awaiting the signing off of the funding agreement for the Ra Mokopuna (children's day) at Te Kotuku Kura Kaupapa to be signed off. Discussions took place with the Kaiwhakaawe for the Kaumatua day to be held at Hoani Waititi Marae for this business year. Currently awaiting on the report for the previous year before progressing with the new agreement for this business year.

·    Engagement: meetings were held with The Asian Network Incorporated (TANI) and EmpowerMe Consulting to discuss an opportunity with these organisations to begin the initial engagement with the Whau’s Māori, Asian and Pacific communities. Funding agreements were signed with both organisations to support Māori, Chinese, Indian and Pacific communities within the Whau area, to democratically engage with the Whau Local Board. Outcomes of the agreements will be reported on in Q2 (December 2021).

·    Whakatipu i te reo Māori: we grow the Māori language Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori – The Whau Libraries celebrate te ao Māori and are committed to promoting te reo Māori through their individual communities programming, events and collections. Whanau Reo is a weekly beginner’s class with tutor Darren Yates. For Matariki there was a Māori book give-away and undertaking the Te Taura Whiri challenge to learn a kaikōhu (expression of hope). The Huinga Tākaro (playgroup) celebrated with star biscuits from Rampant Café, decorations and sang a star themed waiata. The latest Whau Libraries free Tiriti o Waitangi workshop was run by Tauiwi facilitators from Tangata Tiriti – Treaty People. Traditional Māori Healing Clinic: a healing opportunity for members of the local community to experience traditional Māori healing techniques / Rongoā. From mid-August to September learning opportunities moved online to connect with communities via social media platforms. Examples included website links promoting Tupu my name, Digital te reo upskilling and pepeha templates for practice. A Kōrero community te reo catchup, Whānau Reo, Rongoā: Traditional Māori Healing with Emma Haslam.

·    Whai Pūmanawa Literacy: Libraries support communities to thrive (Pre-school). Special Matariki Wriggle and Rhyme celebrated songs and rhymes in Te Reo Māori or bilingual, followed by morning tea with home baking. Young children were learning to count with the “Twinkle Matariki” by Rebecca Larsen which was one of the most popular story books. Waipunarangi Storytime included an interactive retelling of a traditional Matariki legend, two songs in te reo Māori as well as stories and action rhyme about rain. Tupuārangi Storytime included an interactive bird conservation activity, and stories and songs about native birds.

·    Whai Pūmanawa Literacy: Libraries support communities to thrive (Children and Youth). Matariki School Holiday programmes included engagement through games, silent disco, special wishing jars for Hiwa-I-te-rangi, whānau photo frames, Poi making, Dance and Dream Board Making. An environmentally themed cubby with native bird and flower pictures was created. Haiku’s in English and te reo Māori were created and published on the library television screen.

·    Taonga tuku iho: Legacy – we preserve our past, ensure our future (Heritage). A presentation was held on Wayfinding: an introduction to the art and science of traditional Polynesian Navigation by Darren Yates, from the Te Toki Voyaging Trust. This covered how the ancestors of Māori navigated and settled the entire Pacific Ocean using mātauranga (knowledge).

·    Te Kete Rukuruku: Discussions ongoing with iwi to reach agreement on additional names from tranche one. Council's proposed Māori naming policy is underway and when adopted will assist on informing a way forward.

·    EcoMatters Environmental Centre and Sustainability Hub delivered workshops that covered Te Iwa o Matariki – The Nine Stars of Matariki, and Maramataka, the Māori lunar calendar – how the planting seasons relate.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     This report is provided to enable Whau Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programme against the intentions of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial comments

24.       Operating expenditure of $3.32 million is $444,000 below budget. Asset Based Services operating expenditure (ABS Opex) is $403,000 below budget and Locally Driven Initiatives operating expenditure (LDI Opex) is $41,000 below budget. Some programmes and community initiatives, with restrictions on attendance at events, have been disrupted under COVID-19 constraints.

25.     Operating revenue of $56,000 is $34,000 below budget. The shortfall is mainly in venues for hire with New Lynn Community Centre accounting for sixty five percent of the total. This is mitigated by expenditure being under budget for these facilities.

26.     Capital Expenditure of $468,000 is below budget by $543,000 with delivery of capital programmes impacted by COVID-19 disruptions.

27.     The financial report for the three months ended September 2021 for the Whau local board area is in Appendix B.

Revised Capex Budget

28.     Capex budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

29.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2021 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

30.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2021 to reflect early completion.

31.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

32.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

33.     The Customer and Community Services Capex work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards (refer attachment C).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g., building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board Quarter 1 - Updated Work Programme

101

b

Whau Local Board Quarter 1 - Financial Performance Report

131

c

Whau Local Board Quarter 1 - Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021/2022

137

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Antonina Georgetti - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 



Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16870

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as Council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau.

3.   These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive.

4.   Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy.

5.   The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important.

6.   The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving:

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life:

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection:
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment.

 

7.   The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from one-size fits all to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership.

8.   Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.   A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the proposed strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10. Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the Council is not the primary deliverer.

11. The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.

 

Horopaki

Context

12. The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’.

13. Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as Council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive.

14. In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it to the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

15. The new draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the draft strategy and how it will be used. 

16. During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.

17. Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021 which can be accessed here.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities

18. At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11 per cent since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[1].

19. Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40 per cent of the population were born overseas.

20. Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.

21. Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them.

22. Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.

23. Over a third (38.5 per cent) of Pasifika people and 46per cent of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[2].

24. Only 50 per cent of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49per cent have felt isolated and lonely[3].

25. Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.

 

Challenge 1

Challenge 2

Challenge 3

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive.

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection.

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling.

 

26.
More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:

 

Changing the way council works can help address community challenges

27. In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:

 

FROM

TO

WHAT CHANGES WILL WE MAKE?

1

Ad hoc and siloed



Integrated and connected

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning.

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and environmental).

2

One-size-fits all



Targeted approaches

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities.

3

Council as expert



Council as enabler

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

We will measure our success based on the outcomes we enable rather than just the services and activities that we deliver.

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy

28. To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving

29. The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities.  

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment.

Objectives: Where should we focus our action

30. To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes.

Application

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

31. While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focussed on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.

32. These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference

33. The draft strategy proposes we invest our resource to make the biggest impact and this will be guided by four key principles:

34. Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.

35. Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.

Strengths of the draft strategy

36. As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.

37. The high-level outcomes and objectives in the draft strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action.

38. The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.

39. This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.

40. It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy

41. Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges.

42. A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for.

43. Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44. A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the draft strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the draft strategy’s new objectives.

45. New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes.

46. There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (2022-2025).

47. The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective. This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48. During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau.

49. The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50. This is a proposed strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.

51. Staff and teams from across the Council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.

52. Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53. Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54. Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.

55. The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page.

56. Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include:

·   concern for isolated communities

·   a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Local boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·   concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement57.     The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5 per cent of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa.

58. The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population.

59. Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tāmaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000.

60. By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whānau and hapori.

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities

61. To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.

62. Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes

63. The Council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.

64. The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.

65. Mana whenua and mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66. There is currently no additional budget attached to the proposed Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

If <event>:

Then <impact>:

Possible mitigations:

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources. 

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy.

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction.

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67. Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68. This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.

69. The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032

159

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Draft Contributions Policy 2021

File No.: CP2021/16565

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Contributions Policy 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community.

3.       The Finance and Performance Committee adopted the draft Contributions Policy 2021 for consultation at its meeting on 16 September 2021, FIN/2021/84.

4.       Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      resolve feedback on the Contributions Policy 2021 on the key consultation topics:

i)        updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

ii)       inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

iii)      requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

iv)      proposal to support Māori development with grants

v)      any other issues.

Horopaki

Context

5.       Auckland’s population is expected to grow by 260,000 in the next ten years on top of the rapid population growth experienced in the last decade, bringing the projected population to approximately 1.9 million by 2031.

6.       Construction of 145,800 new dwellings is forecast in the next ten years. To support the development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan, the council is facing immediate demands for infrastructure in key growth areas and in response to construction on upzoned land, plan changes and the impact of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.       Development contributions allow for an equitable and proportionate share of the total cost of growth-related capital expenditure to be recovered from the development community. The Contributions Policy sets out how the council will recover from new development an appropriate and fair share of the cost of infrastructure investment attributable to growth. There were four key consultation topics:

i)     Updating policy for capital projects in the 10-year Budget

          The draft policy provides for the recovery of $2.4 billion of development contributions revenue from $9.0 billion of projects with a growth component included in the10-year budget. The draft policy also included updated forecasts of population growth and dwelling construction. The combined impact of these changes is to lower the weighted average Development Contributions price from $23,900 to $21,100.

ii)  Inclusion of projects beyond 10-years to the policy in stages starting with Drury

          Extensive work has been undertaken in recent years on the infrastructure requirements to support growth in the investment priority areas. However, further work is required before these costs can be included in the contributions policy. Area specific amendments to the contributions policy will be proposed for consultation as the information becomes available.

          The first step in the Contributions Policy 2021 will be to add a programme of expenditure to fund some of the key infrastructure required to support growth in the Drury area. The impact of this change is to raise the Development Contributions price in Drury to $84,900 from between $11,000 and $18,300.

iii) Requiring developers to pay their contributions earlier

          The council proposed that Development Contributions be paid at the time of building consent for all development (residential and non-residential) except non-commercial development on Māori land (explained further below). This requires Development Contributions due at building consent to be paid 6 to 24 months earlier than under the current policy and reverses the changes made to the policy in 2019. When combined with the other changes proposed this lower the weighted average Development Contributions price to $19,300.

iv) A proposal to support Māori development with grants

          The draft policy proposed continuing the support for marae development and papakāinga and Māori housing[4] on Māori land through grants available through the Cultural Initiatives Fund. These grants can cover payment of development contributions in appropriate circumstances, along with other kinds of development costs.

8.       The proposed changes to the Contributions Policy 2021 were reported to the Finance and Performance Committee at its meeting on 16 September (see Attachment A Draft Contributions Policy 2021).

Consultation

9.       Formal public consultation was held in September and October 2021. To support the consultation a number of documents were made available on the Have Your Say website, https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/dc-policy.

10.     Two online Have Your Say events were held to provide opportunities for developers and other interested parties to learn more about the draft policy, ask questions and provide their feedback. A third event was also held to allow interested parties to present their views directly to the Finance and Performance Committee. All comments have been captured and will be reported through to the Finance and Performance Committee to inform decision-making on the final policy.

11.     A summary of the feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement guidance

12.       Recommendations in this report have a neutral climate impact as they relate to the funding of capital investment rather than decisions on the activities to be undertaken.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views guidance

13.       The information presented on the projects included in the draft Contributions Policy 2021 was developed in conjunction with the following council-controlled organisations and council units:

·    Auckland Transport

·    Eke Panuku Development Auckland

·    Healthy Waters

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy.

14.        The Chief Economist Unit, and Research Investigations and Monitoring Unit worked with us on the impact of higher development contributions on the pace of development and on land and house prices. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.        The development contribution price varies by location depending on the cost of infrastructure required to support development in an area.

16.        Local board feedback is being sought to inform the Finance and Performance Committee’s consideration of the adoption of the Contribution Policy 2021 in December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.        Recent legislative changes require the contributions policy to support the development of Māori land. Feedback from iwi on the draft policy was sought as part of consultation and via engagement with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum. All developers, including mana whenua, were provided an opportunity to present their feedback to the Finance and Performance Committee on 12 October.

18.        The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum have provided their feedback which has been included in Attachment B: Draft Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The 10-year budget assumes development contributions revenue of $2.7 billion. After completing the analysis of the cost of investments in the 10-year budget that can be recovered with development contributions and the impact of the proposed policy changes, it is estimated that the revenue will be $2.6 billion. The achievement of this revised revenue forecast requires as a first step the implementation of a contributions policy updated for the capital expenditure decisions in the 10-year budget and the other changes proposed in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     The recommendation requesting local boards views does not present any risk. The risks associated with amending the contributions policy are set out in the report to the 16 September Finance and Performance Committee, Attachment A: Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Feedback from the public consultation will be reported to the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 10 November 2021.

22.     Potential changes to the draft will be reported at the Finance and Performance Committee workshop on 1 December 2021. Staff will report to Finance and Performance Committee for the final policy adoption on 9 December 2021. Local board feedback will be included in the report.

23.     The Contributions Policy 2021 is proposed to be implemented in January 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Development Contributions Policy 2021 Consultation (report to the Finance and Performance Committee)

191

b

Draft Development Contributions Policy 2021 – Analysis of feedback received

207

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrew Duncan - Manager Financial Policy

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Reporting back a decision made under delegation

File No.: CP2021/16616

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back a previously confidential decision of the Whau Local Board made under delegation to provide feedback on the Auckland Light Rail project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In March 2021 the Minister of Transport Hon Michael Wood announced next steps for consideration of light rail linking Auckland’s city centre to Māngere.

3.       This process included the creation of an Establishment Unit Board to provide the public face of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project, undertake stakeholder and community engagement, and take forward work to resolve key outstanding questions in relation to project scope and delivery.

4.       On 23 June 2021 the Whau Local Board delegated authority to Member Warren Piper to provide feedback on behalf of the local board to the Establishment Unit Board of the City Centre to Māngere light rail project (resolution number WH/2021/56).

5.       On 31 August 2021 Member Piper signed off under delegation feedback from the Whau Local Board on the Auckland Light Rail project. As the feedback referred to information that was, at that time, confidential, staff were advised to delay reporting back of feedback until the requirement for confidentiality had lapsed.

6.       In October 2021 Minister Wood publicly announced a proposal for light rail following stakeholder and community engagement and work led by the Establishment Unity Board.

7.       The local board’s feedback is no longer confidential and is appended as Attachment A.

8.       Further information can be found on the Auckland Light Rail website: https://www.lightrail.co.nz/.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the decision of the Whau Local Board made under delegation on 31 August 2021 providing feedback on the Auckland Light Rail project.

b)      note that the delay in reporting back this feedback was due to a requirement for confidentiality which has subsequently lapsed.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback from the Whau Local Board on the Auckland Light Rail project

223


Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Binney - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission

File No.: CP2021/16860

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the Government’s Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper, circulated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE), and to seek feedback from local boards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

3.       The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

4.       The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

5.       Final submissions from Auckland Council to Government on this topic are due at 5pm on 20 December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      provide feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

7.       The issues of economic regulation and consumer protection for three waters services in New Zealand is related, but separate, to the broader issue of the Water Services Bill. They require separate submissions as they are two different processes run by two different bodies and on different timeframes. There is a separate process to provide feedback about the reform in general. This process is to provide feedback on only the proposed economic regulation.

8.       According to central government, economic regulation will have a crucial role to play in driving the level of efficiency that will be required to keep water services affordable in the long run.

9.       Economic regulation ensures that the best outcomes for consumers will occur when there are monopoly markets, and the suppliers have a large amount of market power.

10.     In this case, it is proposed that the economic regulator will also act as the consumer protection regulator and be funded through levies.

11.     It is proposed that the Commerce Commission act in both capacities to regulate the newly-formed three waters industry in New Zealand after the Water Services Bill is enacted.

12.     The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     What follows is a short summary of the discussion document and the areas where feedback is sought through the submissions process.

What is economic regulation and why do we need it?

14.     Economic regulation protects consumers from the problems that can occur in markets with little or no competition and/or a large amount of market power. The regulation is intended to make businesses in the market behave similarly to how they would in a competitive market.

15.     Utilities tend to be what is known as a “natural monopoly”. These markets are more cheaply served by one firm rather than many because of massive, fixed costs.

16.     Without regulation, markets with natural monopolies tend to have higher prices and/or lower outputs and/or lower output quality.

17.     While consumer involvement in the governance of natural monopolies is helpful, it is not sufficient to ensure the best outcomes for consumers. Consumer involvement must work in concert with regulation.

18.     Ultimately, the purpose of economic regulation is to advance the long-term interests of consumers. This ensures that suppliers deliver high-quality services that reflect consumer demand and incentivises improved efficiency. It also ensures any gains by the suppliers are passed through to the consumers.

What type of regulation is being proposed and who would pay the costs?

19.     There are several types of regulation – price-quality, information disclosure, and quality-only. In this case, it is proposed that the regulator be a price-quality regulator.

20.     Price-quality regulators essentially set upper limits on the price that can be charged by the supplier while setting lower limits on the quality of service that must be delivered.

21.     Typically, price-quality regulators operate on regulatory cycles of four to six years. It is proposed that the economic regulator operate on a five-year cycle, with the possibility of the first regulatory cycle being shorter.

22.     Economic regulation has costs. These costs come from two places. On one hand, the economic regulator costs money to operate and administer. On the other hand, the suppliers incur compliance costs to meet the requirements of the regulator.

23.     It is proposed that the administrative costs of the regulator be recovered through levies. This is a straightforward, transparent, and standard way of recovering these costs. Ultimately these costs are borne by the consumers.

24.     The cost to the supplier of complying with regulation is also ultimately borne by the consumers. Since both categories of regulatory costs are borne by the consumers, it is necessary to design the regulations to ensure they are net beneficial to consumers.

25.     Given the amalgamation proposed by the Water Services Bill will increase the market power of the water providers, it is likely that regulation is necessary. Further, the research for the Water Services Bill finds that even the current absence of profit motives, and the obligations to promote the social, cultural, environmental, and financial wellbeing of communities has been insufficient to ensure delivery of effective and efficient three waters service. Put another way, there is probably a case for economic regulation, even in the absence of the proposed three waters amalgamation.

26.     Thus, the MBIE’s recommendation is that three waters be price-quality regulated.

27.     However, there is also a question as to whether the regulation should be applied generically across all suppliers or tailored to individual suppliers. Given the inflexibility of generic regulation and Government’s strong commitment to water service quality, it is recommended that the price-quality regulation be flexible to allow for different incentives to the different suppliers.

What parts of three waters should regulation apply to?

28.     The delivery of stormwater services is fundamentally different to drinking water and wastewater.

29.     While drinking water and wastewater services are delivered directly to the beneficiaries (that is, the person drinking the water or flushing the toilet), stormwater services have a public good element as well. When the stormwater in one area is managed, it could make other areas less likely to flood, for instance. This means that it is difficult to identify and charge the consumers of stormwater services.

30.     Additionally, while drinking water and wastewater infrastructure is easily identified, stormwater infrastructure is more difficult. Stormwater systems are often integrated into roading networks, use natural topographical features, and are owned by various land holders and infrastructure providers.

31.     Internationally, when stormwater systems are operated alongside drinking water and wastewater, they tend to be economically regulated.

32.     The preliminary view put forward by the MBIE is that stormwater should be economically regulated, but it will be less straightforward to demonstrate that it is net beneficial.

Should the regulation apply to all providers?

33.     Three waters reform is proposed to result in four main entities serving approximately 85 per cent of the population. The remainder would be served by small community or private schemes, or through self-supply. A recent study for Taumata Arowai suggested that there could be between 75,000 and 130,000 unregistered drinking water suppliers.

34.     None of these small-scale suppliers serves more than 5,000 customers. There are only three non-defense force suppliers that serve between 500 and 5,000 customers.

35.     For even smaller (less than 500 customers) providers, it is likely that the owners of three waters supplier and the consumers of the services are largely the same people. Therefore, it is less critical to have a regulatory framework to ensure consumer wellbeing.

36.     Since the goal of the reform is to further consumer wellbeing, these other suppliers should only be regulated if the cost of regulation is outweighed by the benefits.

37.     Given the small scale and relatively high compliance costs, the MBIE has recommended that regulatory framework only apply to the new water service entities created by the Water Services Bill.

How and when should regulation be implemented?

38.     To be effective, price-quality regulation requires high quality information on the assets, costs and quality of service provided by regulated suppliers. However, the Three Waters Reform Programme has found that the scope and quality of the available information is not currently at the level that would be required to implement an effective economic regulation regime.

39.     Because of this information gap, it is unlikely that the regulatory regime would be operational by the time the new three waters entities are set to begin operation on 1 July 2024.

40.     However, starting the new entities operations without a regulatory framework in place poses its own risk.

41.     Therefore, the Government’s recommendation is that there should be a graduated approach to implementing a conventional cost-based price-quality path, with the first regulatory pricing period beginning 1 July 2027. In the interim the industry would improve its data and the regulator would work with the industry on information disclosure.

42.     This interim period from 1 July 2024 through to 30 June 2027 would leave the supplies unregulated in terms of price-quality. There are two potential solutions to this gap. The first is that the regulator impose a price-quality path based on incomplete information but using its best judgment. The second option is that an interim price-quality path be implemented by government. There are significant pros and cons to each option and the MBIE is seeking feedback on this issue.

What should be the statutory objectives of the regulation regime?

43.     Recently in New Zealand, regulatory regimes are set to achieve four goals.

a)     There must be incentives to innovate and invest.

b)     There should be incentives to improve efficiency.

c)     That the efficiency gains must be shared with consumers.

d)     Lastly, suppliers are limited in their ability to turn profits. This point is irrelevant to the three waters reform scenario.

44.     However, there is scope for the economic regulator to have responsibility for a broader range of objectives (including issues such as climate change and Te mana o te Wai).

45.     There is also a question as to how Te Tiriti o Waitangi considerations factor into the design of any economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector.

46.     The MBIE seeks feedback on what the precise role of the economic regulator should be and whether it should be expanded in the ways described above.

What should compliance and enforcement look like?

47.     Compliance and enforcement are essential for regulation to be effective.

48.     An economic regulator’s compliance and enforcement toolkit typically includes education initiatives, warning letters, infringement offences, pecuniary penalties, enforceable undertakings, and other civil remedies such as out-of-court settlements.

49.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on whether there needs to be any other tools in the toolkit.

Who should the economic regulator be?

50.     To be effective, regulators need to be at arms-length from government, transparent, accountable, credible, freely share information, and act in a coordinated way with policy agencies.

51.     There are three potential options for the economic regulator: Taumata Arowai, the Commerce Commission, or a new regulatory authority created specifically for economic regulation of three waters.

52.     The MBIE’s multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission is best suited to be the economic regulator. 

Do we need additional consumer protections and how are those regulated?

53.     Due to the nature of the three waters sector, there may be other consumer protections required. There likely needs to be rules around the acceptable likelihood and duration of supply outages, the acceptable level of leakage from reticulated supply networks, the level of resilience to natural and man-made hazards, and the amount of innovation and efficiencies delivered to consumers.

54.     These protections will be required because three waters is a natural monopoly and consumers cannot go elsewhere when unhappy with their service.

55.     Importantly, the current democratic, consultation, and governance mechanisms that are provided for in the Local Government Act 2002 will not apply to the proposed new Water Services Entities. In addition, the Ombudsman’s current role in dealing with complaints about local government agencies will cease.

56.     These points suggest that regulation needs to consider these angles of consumer protection above and beyond the standard roles of an economic regulator.

57.     There is also a need for additional protections for vulnerable consumers. It is recommended that that there should be a positive obligation on the regulator to consider interests of vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough able to accommodate a wide range of approaches to addressing consumer harm and vulnerability.

58.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on how the consumer protection regime could be designed in a way that contributes to equitable outcomes and mitigates unintended impacts on Māori. This includes impacts on different iwi/hapū, Māori landowners, urban Māori consumers, and rural Māori consumers. Additionally, views are sought on how the consumer protection regulator could be expected to consider Treaty obligations, and the cultural competency of the economic regulator to recognise the significance of water as a taonga for Māori.

59.     As with economic regulation, a multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission should be the consumer protection regulator.

How should consumer disputes be resolved?

60.     There are several ways that consumer disputes can be resolved.

61.     The preliminary preferred option put forward by the MBIE is for mandatory provision of consumer dispute resolution services, but feedback is sought as to whether this should be achieved through a new scheme or by expanding the mandate of an existing scheme.

62.     Traditionally, vulnerable populations face difficulties in accessing dispute resolution schemes. Therefore, it is important that both suppliers and the dispute resolution provider ensure that underserved and vulnerable communities can participate in processes that affect them including dispute resolution processes.

Local Board Feedback

63.     While the MBIE has posed 46 questions to submitters in the discussion document, only a few are acutely relevant. The following 11 questions are the most critical for the council family to provide feedback:

a)      What are your views on whether the stormwater networks that are currently operated by local authorities should be economically regulated, alongside drinking water and wastewater?

b)      Do you consider that the economic regulation regime should be implemented gradually from 2024 to 2027, or do you consider that a transitional price-quality path is also required?

c)      If you consider a transitional price-quality path is required, do you consider that this should be developed and implemented by an independent economic regulator, or by Government and implemented through a Government Policy Statement?

d)      What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of an economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector?

e)      Who do you consider should have primary responsibility for determining the structure of three waters prices: a. The Water Services Entity, following engagement with their governance group, communities, and consumers; b. The economic regulator; or c. The Government or Ministers?

f)       Who do you think is the most suitable body to be the economic regulator for the three waters sector? Please provide reasons for your view.

g)      What are your views on whether minimum service level requirements should be able to vary across different types of consumers?

h)      What are your views on whether the regulatory regime should include a positive obligation to protect vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of approaches to protecting vulnerable consumers?

i)        What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of a consumer protection regime for the three waters sector?

j)        Do you agree with the preliminary view that the Commerce Commission is the most suitable body to be the consumer protection regulator for the three waters sector?

k)      Do you consider that there should be special considerations for traditionally under-served or vulnerable communities? If so, how do you think these should be given effect?

64.     A resolution requesting the views of local boards on the proposal is included in this report.

65.     Local board views are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

66.     The discussion paper acknowledges that addressing climate change challenges and ensuring water service resilience is one of the drivers of the overall Three Waters Reform. However, the economic regulation regime is not being considered for these reasons directly.

67.     The proposed economic regulation framework does not have direct impacts on greenhouse gas emissions or climate. However, it may be in the purview of the regulator to ensure consumer expectations are met with regards to environmental and climate outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

68.     Relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations have been identified and contributions will be sought from them in developing the council group’s response to the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper.

69.     While overall three waters reform will have a direct impact on council and council-controlled organisations, economic regulation put in place after that reform will not have any impact on council or remaining council-controlled organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

70.     Local board views are sought as part of the development of the council’s submission and will be reported back to Governing Body. Local board resolutions will be included as part of council’s submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

71.     The overall three waters reform is, in part, to recognise and provide for iwi/Māori rights and interests with a specific focus on service delivery. It is proposed that iwi/Māori will have a greater role in the new Three Waters system, including pathways for enhanced participation by whānau and hapū as these services relate to their Treaty rights and interests.

72.     On a price-quality basis, economic regulation of the three waters industry does not directly impact on Māori any differently than other three waters services consumers. However, the overall three waters reform and specific topics within the economic regulation of three waters are likely to be of significant interest. In particular, how Treaty obligations are considered, the recognition of water as taonga for Māori, and the overrepresentation of Māori in the group of consumers vulnerable to price shocks.

73.     Māori outcomes leads within the council family are being consulted on these topics.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     The submission can be developed within existing budget provision and as part of business-as-usual central government advocacy activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

75.     There is little risk in making a submission on the economic regulation of three waters. Conversely, there is high risk if we do not make a submission. As the work programme progresses, staff can provide further information about the potential impacts on council’s activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     The office of the Chief Economist is current drafting a submission on behalf of Auckland Council.

77.     Staff are preparing a report for the Governing Body seeking a delegation of Governing Body members to approve the council’s submission.

78.     The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by the 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

79.     The deadline for the final submission to Government is 20 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shane Martin - Senior Economist

Authorisers

Jim Stabback - Chief Executive

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Whau Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2021/11465

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the records of the workshop held by the Whau Local Board on 20 October and 3 November 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshops were as follows:

20 October 2021 (Attachment A)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation

Ngahere Canopy (Analysis report final draft)

Volunteer programme

·    Whau Local and Multiboard Grants Round One 2021/2022

·    National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS UP)

·    Annual Planning workshop #1.

 

3 November 2021 (Attachment B)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Connected Communities and Community & Social Innovation (CSI) work programme: Update Sept – Oct 2021

·    LB Annual Planning workshop #2: Annual Budget regional topics (Confidential)

·    Auckland Transport (AT):

Monthly update

Maioro Street Dynamic Bus Lane Concept.



Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)   note the records of the workshops held on 20 October and 3 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board workshop records - 20 October 2021

237

b

Whau Local Board workshop records - 3 November 2021

239

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/11459

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the local board the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Whau Local Board is appended as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar - November 2021

243

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

PDF Creator 


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    ReadingWarrior presentation                        Page 247


Whau Local Board

24 November 2021

 

 



[1] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[3] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[4] Māori housing grants are only available for housing developments undertaken in conjunction with an urban marae and must fill the same general purpose as papakāinga