I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 14 December 2021

2.00pm

This meeting will be held virtually via Skype for Business

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ruth Jackson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jan O'Connor, QSM

 

Members

Aidan Bennett

 

 

Trish Deans

 

 

Toni van Tonder

 

 

George Wood, CNZM

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Michelle Riley

Democracy Advisor

 

9 December 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 0272298404

Email: michelle.riley@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               6

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          6

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          6

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Hamish Anderson - Steps at Castor Bay Beach                                               6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Approval of the concept design for Montgomery Reserve playground renewal at 21 Montgomery Avenue, Belmont                                                                                    9

12        Approval of the developed concept design for Woodall Reserve pump track    27

13        Name for Takapuna public space; 40 Anzac Street and 38 Hurstmere Road       65

14        Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)                     71

15        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                   135

16        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                               191

17        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents        229

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for quarter one, 2021/2022 financial year                                                                      239

19        Chairpersons' Report                                                                                                291

20        Elected Members' Reports                                                                                        293

21        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops November 2021     323

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      333

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The meeting was opened with a karakia

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta

Kia mātaratara ki tai

E hī ake ana te atakura

He tio

He huka

He hau hū

Tīhei mauri ora!

 

Cease o winds from the west

Cease o winds from the south

Bring calm breezes over the land

Bring calm breezes over the sea

And let the red-tipped dawn come

With a touch of frost

A sharpened air

And promise of a glorious day

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.  

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest: 

 

              i.financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member 

 

             ii.non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination. 

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest. 

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request.   

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance. 

 

 

 

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 November 2021 and the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 30 November 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Hamish Anderson - Steps at Castor Bay Beach

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Hamish Anderson, Castor Bay Ratepayers' and Residents' Association, will be in attendance to address the board regarding a need for new steps at Castor Bay Beach

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Hamish Anderson and thank him for his attendance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Approval of the concept design for Montgomery Reserve playground renewal at 21 Montgomery Avenue, Belmont

File No.: CP2021/18348

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board of the concept design for the playground renewal at Montgomery Reserve, located at 21 Montgomery Avenue, Belmont, and progress the project to detailed design and construction.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The renewal of the playground located on Montgomery Reserve was identified the Play Provision and SunSmart audit of all the reserves of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area in 2018.

3.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board has allocated $381,000 of ABS: Capex Local Renewal funding towards the playground renewal. The project was approved by the local board as part of the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services capital work programme (DT/2021/83).

4.       The project will deliver on Devonport – Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 Outcomes 1 and 2:

·          Outcome 1:  Environment and heritage

·          Outcome 2: Parks, facilities, and open spaces

5.       A concept design has been developed, incorporating the recommendations and feedback from consultation with key stakeholders, iwi and the local community.

6.       The draft concept design was presented to the local board at the 8 June 2021 workshop. Minor changes were requested, and the concept design has since been updated to incorporate feedback received from the local board.

7.       The estimated cost for the renewal is within the approved budget for the project.

8.       Staff now seek approval of the proposed concept design before progressing the project to detailed design and construction.

9.       Following the approval of the proposed concept design, the development of the detailed design will begin. Physical works to undertake the construction of the proposed design is expected to commence in January 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design for the playground renewal at Montgomery Reserve, located at 21 Montgomery Avenue, Belmont, shown as Attachment A on the agenda report and request staff to progress the project to detailed design and construction.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Montgomery Reserve is located on the corner of Montgomery Avenue and Wicklow Road, Belmont. The playground consists of a large timber ship multi-play unit and several pieces of supporting equipment.

11.     The playground assets have reached the end of their serviceable life. Issues of rotting timber, corrosion, and multiple areas of non-compliance with the New Zealand playground standards were identified during the annual asset assessment completed by the full facilities contractor.

Background

12.     Auckland Council parks and places staff undertook a Play Provision and SunSmart audit of all the reserves located in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area in 2018 (Attachment B). The local board adopted the recommendations from this audit in 2019. (DTCF/2019/92)

13.     A summary of the audit findings and recommendations for the playground at Montgomery Reserve are as below:

·    improve play provision for junior-senior age groups and additional elements to accommodate early childhood age groups

·    provide sliding, creative, and sound/music play

·    explore and implement challenging, inclusive, multiple-use, and connected play elements

·    use existing groves of mature trees to provide informal shade and respite

·    consider the provision of specimen shade trees and formal shade structures as part of overall playground renewal

14.     As a part of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board financial year 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services Work Programme, the local board approved a project to renew the playground at Montgomery Reserve and allocated $381,000 of ABS: Capex Local Renewal budget.

15.     The project aligns with the following Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Table 1: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Objective

Outcome one: Environment and heritage

Improve biodiversity outcomes and mitigate effects of carbon emissions

Outcome two: Parks, facilities, and open spaces

Parks and facilities are designed and maintained to meet the needs of our growing and diverse communities

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Community consultation / Engagement

16.     Consultation with the local community for the renewal was undertaken in February 2020 through an online survey on the Auckland Council Have Your Say webpage and the Local Board Facebook page.

17.     The survey was also delivered to houses within a 500m radius of the playground including the local school via a letter drop. Signage at the playground indicating the online survey and a local board Facebook post were also part of the engagement plan.

18.     A total of 108 responses were received. A summary of these responses is noted below:

·    majority of the respondents (61%) walked to the reserve

·    most preferred play activities were sliding, climbing, and swinging

·    27 requests to keep the ship/boat theme, with many also requesting bespoke design like the existing playground

·    20 requests for provision of a toilet

·    23 requests for shading over the playground and picnic areas

19.     The consultation feedback included request for toilet provision which has not been considered as it is out of scope for this renewal project and will require further budget allocation.

Proposed concept design

20.     The proposed playground concept design (Attachment A - Montgomery Reserve - Concept Design) incorporates most of the elements from the consultation feedback received from the community and mana whenua engagement, along with recommendations from the Play Space and SunSmart audit. Details of mana whenua engagement are noted under Māori impact statement of the report.

21.     The Community Facilities landscape architect developed the concept design. Suitable play modules and equipment placement were investigated to deliver the project within the allocated budget. The proposed concept design includes:

a)         replacement of all existing play equipment with a new nautical-themed play space to fit within the existing footprint and provide multiple-use play values, such as sliding, climbing, hiding, and balancing

b)         a triple bay swing set, including a basket which will cater to a wide age range surrounding the main structure

c)         a modern twist to the classic flying fox which will launch on the port side of the boat, while the starboard side will be installed with a junior play module, trampolines and rockers filling the gaps to accommodate the early childhood age group as identified in the Play Space and SunSmart audit

d)         the existing nature trail located towards east side of the playground will be enhanced

e)         picnic tables and seats will be relocated at strategic locations to benefit from shade

f)         new specimen trees will be planted towards north side of the playground to follow the natural course of the sun and will provide amenity and shade for the junior area play space

g)         wetpour surface will cover the junior area and under the boat structure for accessibility

22.     The renewal of the playground will deliver significant improvements to the play and recreation needs of the community surrounding the local area. 

23.     It is recommended that the local board approve the concept design attached to the agenda report (Attachment A), to allow the project to continue to detailed design, procurement, and construction.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     The council's climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan are:

·     to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 and

·     to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

25.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible when delivering the project. 

26.     Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material, aligned with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle), will also be prioritised to ensure minimum impact.

27.     Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved by sourcing low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

28.     The proposed concept design incorporates planting of new specimen trees and retention of all existing vegetation to ensure natural shade provision for park users and potential further reduction in greenhouse gas emission.

29.     Climate change is unlikely to negatively impact the playground as the reserve is not located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services as well as Auckland Transport have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed concept design as it incorporates their service provision requirements.

31.     Once completed, collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the playground development is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems.

32.     No impact on any other department or CCO has been identified.

33.     The renewal of the playground will deliver significant improvements to the play and recreation needs of the community surrounding the local area. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The renewal of the playground at Montgomery Reserve is one of the priority projects for the local board and will improve the play experience provided in Belmont. The renewal will benefit the community by offering enhanced play value, accessibility and shade as identified in Playspace and SunSmart audit (Attachment B).

35.     A draft concept design was presented to the local board at a workshop held on 8 June 2021. The local board indicated their support of the design in principle and provided feedback which has been incorporated into the proposed concept design.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council's key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

37.     The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the broader community by providing a place to undertake physical activity, socialise and learn through play. 

38.     The draft concept design was circulated to all iwi interested in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area in February 2020 as part of the consultation process. 

39.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Te Kawerau registered their interest and requested engagement via email only. 

40.     Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki expressed interest for a hui. A site visit was held in March 2020 and following feedback was received:

·    potential for the shaded area to be a nature-play area

·    request to discuss opportunities to incorporate mana whenua design input.

41.     The request for shaded area to be a nature-play area has been incorporated into the proposed design. Multiple requests were subsequently sent to Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki to seek their feedback and input into design. However, no further feedback has been received.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The estimated cost to deliver the project is $379,753 (Table 2 below). This includes professional services, contingency, and construction costs. The estimated cost is within the total allocated budget for the project which was approved by the local board as part of 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme.

Table 2: Cost estimate and allocated budget to deliver the Montgomery Reserve Playground renewal

Item 

Cost estimate 

Professional services (including those spent to date, design, consultation, project management and consent) 

$22,753

Physical works 

$357,000

Project Total (estimate)

$379,753

Budget (allocated)

$381,000 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     Cost estimates are based on current product supply and installation costs. There is a risk that these costs could change as the project progresses due to product availability and supply. If the delivery cost escalates over the budget, this will be discussed with the local board before proceeding further with the project. 

44.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the delivery of programmed work if the COVID-19 alert level changes. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     Table 3 below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. However, unforeseen delays in the procurement and delivery due to COVID 19 can potentially delay the completion of the project beyond the specified timeframe. 

Table 3:  Project phasing and timelines

 

Phases

Timelines

Procurement of physical works

December 2021

Physical works

From January 2022 - end of February 2022

Opening of playground

March 2022

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Montgomery Reserve playground - Concept Design

15

b

Playspace and SunSmart Analysis and Recommendations (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Stéphanie Barker - Project Manager

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Approval of the developed concept design for Woodall Reserve pump track

File No.: CP2021/18343

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the developed concept design for the Pump Track at Woodall Park to progress the project to resource consent and hand over to the Devonport Rotary for construction.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the approved Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) work programme 2018/2019, a service assessment was undertaken to identify possible sites for a BMX pump track within the Devonport peninsula. As a result, Woodall Park was the preferred site for further investigation by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board, Community Facilities and PSR staff.

3.       The local board allocated a total of $46,000 of LDI funding towards the implementation of the BMX concept plan for Woodall Reserve from the 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 work programmes.  

4.       The project will deliver on Outcome two of the Devonport – Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020: Parks and facilities are designed and maintained to meet the needs of our growing and diverse communities.

5.       Community Facilities staff have been working with Devonport Rotary, Devonport BMX Club, Waitemata Golf Club (General Manager), and other council teams on the project and have completed consultation with the local community.

6.       The concept design was presented to the local board at a workshop on 1 September 2020, and feedback was very positive.

7.       Staff now seek approval for the final concept design before progressing the project to detailed design and consenting.

8.       Following the approval of the proposed concept design, the consent process will begin in parallel with the development of the detailed design. Physical works to undertake the construction of the proposed design are expected to commence in December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design of the Woodall Pump Track as shown on Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The existing informal pump track is located at Woodall Reserve beside the Waitemata Golf Club, as per the picture below.

Map

Description automatically generated

Pump track site location

10.     The option assessment, design and consenting phases of the Woodall Reserve - implement BMX concept plan project were funded through LDI CAPEX – DTCF/19/20. There will be no construction funding allocated, but the Devonport Rotary Club has indicated it can source funding.

Background

11.     The community has built and uses an informal track situated in the trees between Woodall Park and the Waitemata Golf Club. The track is located partially in the golf club’s leased area. The council’s full facilities contract does not include maintain of the track.

12.     Following conversations with the Devonport Rotary Club in 2018/2019, a service assessment was completed by Parks Sport and Recreation.

13.     Community Facilities staff have worked with Devonport Rotary, Devonport BMX Club, Waitemata Golf Club (General Manager), and other council teams on the project.

14.     Progress has been made investigating options and constraints for the community to partner with Community Facilities for the different phases of the project.

15.     The project aligns with Outcome to of the Devonport Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020: Parks, facilities, and open spaces and the objective to develop parks and facilities that are designed and maintained to meet the needs of our growing and diverse communities

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The proposal of a community-style BMX pump track complements the existing network as there are currently no facilities located within the Devonport peninsula. The closest similar style of facility is the skate park at Ngataringa Park.

17.     Investment in the potential BMX pump track will meet the service outcomes identified in the service assessment, which is delivering a small to medium scale community facility. This facility will provide an area for active recreation and youth placemaking.

18.     The proposed pump track design was developed in consultation with key council and user group stakeholders. Two options were produced for review from which option 1 was chosen by the community for planning and staging advantages.

Consultation / Engagement

19.     A letter outlining the project and the partnership with the Devonport Rotary Club was sent to neighbours of Woodall Park in January 2020. Five responses were received, all supporting the development.

20.     The design was circulated to all iwi with an interest within the Devonport area, no feedback was received.

Preferred option

21.     The developed concept design option 1 was developed using feedback from stakeholders and environmental and planning constraints. 

22.     It is recommended that the local board approve the developed concept design attached to the agenda report (Attachment A).

Map

Description automatically generated

Developed concept plan

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

24.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions. The Devonport Rotary Club is committed to using local contractors; this will also reduce carbon emissions.

25.     The nature of this project should be of relatively low impact since most of it will be dirt track shaping.

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The Community Facilities Operational Maintenance and Management team will maintain the built structures after construction, provided it meets design specifications and requirements. The BMX Club, under the umbrella of the Rotary Club and in conjunction with Community Facilities staff, will maintain the dirt track portion. The group are working with the land advisory team and leasing team to formalise these arrangements.

27.     Council staff from Community Facilities and Parks, Sports and Recreation have been consulted, and several site meetings were organised. Staff support the project as it will improve the quality of the park and the recreational outcomes. Their feedback was incorporated as part of the concept design development process.

28.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the track is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The concept was presented to the local board at the 1 September 2020 workshop, including constraints, risks and estimated costs. The local board indicated support for the concept design.

30.     The current concept for the BMX pump track is within the Waitematā Golf Course leased area, being Part Lot 2 DP 19288. The golf course manager has been approached and is supportive of the pump track facility. Once the project has progressed, the Community Leasing team will work with the golf club to amend the leased area to exclude the footprint of the pump track ause of the site.nd formalise the

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

32.     The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the broader community by providing a place to undertake physical activity, socialise and learn through play.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The local board has approved a total budget of $46,000 for the Community Facilities Work Programme (adopted on 18 August 2020 - resolution DT/2020/116) in the following financial years:

Budget source

FY19/20

FY20/21

Total ($)

LDI

$25,000

$21,000

 

Total allocated budget

 

 

$46,000

Maintenance cost

 

 

$1,500

 

 

 

34.     The LDI budget was approved to cover the design and consent phases.

35.     The community-led build process has been indicated by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board as a possible low-cost solution for the delivery of the BMX pump track.

36.     The ongoing maintenance costs for the expected lifespan of the assets are $1,500 annually.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     The site is located within a coastal inundation and flood sensitive area. Resource consent has been granted. 

38.     The required tree asset owner approval has been granted from the Community Facilities Arborist. There is an additional requirement for an independent works arborist to oversee the works within the driplines of parks trees.

39.     The community-led delivery process will require a principal contractor to manage the community group. Delivery of the project must be in line with the design specifications and requirements of Auckland Council.

40.     The new asset must be accepted by the Auckland Council Asset Management Information Systems team and Operations and Maintenance staff. The costs of maintenance, and maintenance responsibility, have not been confirmed. Due to the style of the proposed pump track, it is expected that annual resurfacing will be required to maintain a baseline minimum to keep the facility in a safe and rideable condition. The volunteers will deliver this maintenance, and the proposed license to occupy process and agreement will outline the requirements.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Table 1 below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. Unforeseen delays in the procurement of a design and or the resource consent process have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe. 

42.     41. Table 1 below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. Unforeseen delays in the procurement of a design and or the resource consent process have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe. 

Table 1:  Project phasing and timelines

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Consenting

April 2021

Construction

Start December 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Woodall Reserve Pump Track - Concept Design

33

   

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

 Stéphanie Barker - Project Manager

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Name for Takapuna public space; 40 Anzac Street and 38 Hurstmere Road

File No.: CP2021/17104

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to approve the name gifted by mana whenua for the new public space at 40 Anzac Street and 38 Hurstmere Road, Takapuna.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board has the power to name the new public space at 40 Anzac Street and 38 Hurstmere Road, Takapuna.

3.       Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) is delivering the public space as part of its Unlock Takapuna programme.

4.       Eke Panuku has engaged with mana whenua throughout the design and delivery of the public space.

5.       At a workshop, the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board agreed to a dual name for the public space and to support a mana whenua request to bestow a name on the public space.

6.       Several mana whenua groups put forward names for the public space. The name preferred by most mana whenua groups is Waiwharariki.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      Approve the name Waiwharariki for the new public space delivered by Eke Panuku on part of 40 Anzac Street and 38 Hurstmere Road, Takapuna.

b)      Acknowledge and thank Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust and its other mana whenua partners for gifting the name Waiwharariki to the public space.

c)      Invite mana whenua to attend a ceremony to reveal the name when construction of the public space is complete.

d)      Approve Waiwharariki be the only name for the new public space and no dual English name be selected.

e)      Delegate local board members to work with Eke Panuku and Auckland Council to research an English name for the new public space if recommendation d) is not approved, noting that an English name would be reported for approval in early 2022.

Horopaki

Context

7.       In July 2019, the Auckland Council Environment and Community Committee approved a new public space in Takapuna on parts of 40 Anzac Street and 38 Hurstmere Road.

8.       On 20 October 2020 (file number CP2020/14499), the local board approved the design for the new public space.

9.       On 25 January 2021, the local board and mana whenua met to discuss the request from mana whenua to gift the public space a name. Following further discussion, the local board informally supported a dual name for the new public space and welcomed the opportunity for mana whenua to gift a name for the new public space.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Development of a Te Reo name

10.     On 1 May 2021, mana whenua met to discuss the process for them to gift a name to the public space. Each of the 19 iwi and hapū in Tāmaki Makaurau were invited to submit a name for mana whenua to consider.

11.     On 5 November 2021, the majority of mana whenua selected Waiwharariki as their preferred name for the public space. The name was gifted by Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust.

12.     Waiwharariki is the mana whenua place name for the area now known as Takapuna, the beach, and town centre.

13.     Staff recommend the local board approve Waiwharariki as the only name for the new public space and do not consider a dual English name.

Development of an English name

14.     During discussions with the local board to develop a dual name, staff recommended that the English name should be underpinned and guided by research. Due to a range of factors and challenges, staff have been unable to progress the development of an English name. The reasons include:

·    the project was not included in the 2021/2022 local board work programme;

·    there was no available council resource to undertake the necessary work;

·    there was uncertainty from the local board about whether externally commissioned research to determine an English name was necessary or required; and

·    new projects could not be commissioned during the recent COVID-19 lockdown.

15.     If the local board would prefer to progress with a dual name for this new public space, staff seek additional and formal direction from the local board to complete the public space naming process.

Options to complete naming the public space

16.     To progress naming the public space, the following options have been developed for the local board to consider:

Option one: Adopt Te Reo only name (recommended option)

Description

That the local board reconsider their initial direction and adopt a Te Reo only name for the public space.

Benefits

·      Delivers on statutory Te Treaty o Waitangi obligations, as outlined in Section 4 of the Local Government Act 2002.

·      Delivers all objectives detailed in Outcome 6: Māori values ngā tikanga a te Māori of the local board plan.

Risks

None

Implications

The Te Reo name can immediately be embedded into the development of the public space and become the common, known name.

 

 

 

Option two: Delegate to local board members the development of an English name to go alongside the Teo Reo name 

Description

A local board delegation uses their local knowledge and understanding to research, determine and recommend an English name to go alongside the Te Reo name. The recommended name could then be presented to the February 2022 business meeting.

Benefits

·      Still completes the dual naming process.

·      Allows additional time for the local board to consider, then agree a name for the public space.

·      Benefits in option one will be retained.

Risks

·      Taking additional time to determine a name will impact on key project milestones. For example, sod turning and construction for the public space commences in January 2022. If this option is supported, the milestones will occur without a finalise dual name.

·      Commencing construction without a finalised name will impact the embedding of a common, known name for the public space. The public may as a result refer to the area as something else.

·      At the time of reporting, elected member availability during the Christmas and holiday period is unclear. This delegation would need to have this process completed by early-February, to meet reporting deadlines.  

Implications

The additional time to complete the process will impact on the ability to quickly embed the new name for the public space. As a result, other names or terms may be used for the public space.

 

Option three: Allocate operational funding to research an English name to go alongside the Te Reo name

Description

The local board reallocate its 2021/2022 operational budget to procure external research to an English name to go alongside the Te Reo name.

Benefits

This option ensures the English name is underpinned by research, advice, and avoids ad-hoc decision-making.

Risks

·      There continues to be no council resource available to undertake the required work. As a result, the work will need to be contracted to an external supplier.

·      All costs are unknown as no scoping work has been undertaken to date.

·      It is estimated that it could take up to six months to complete this process.

Implications

·      Funding this project would need to come from the local board’s community grants budget, as there are no other discretionary budget sources available. 

·      The additional time required means that it will be very difficult to embed a new name approximately six months following the commencement of construction.

 

Naming conventions and considerations

17.     Should option two above be selected by the local board as the process to determine an English name, staff recommend that the local board follow the council’s Naming Parks, Park Features and Facilities guidelines (the guidelines) to develop an English name to go alongside the Te Reo name for the public space. 

18.     The following tables outlines the key and relevant protocols to inform the development of a new name:

Key and relevant protocols

Advice and other matters for consideration

Consultation on the cultural and historical associations of sites is required. 

This includes consultation with iwi regarding their specific associations with the land and where appropriate, consulting with local historical contacts over European historical issues.

This has been undertaken through the development of the Te Reo name

Where a reserve management plan doesn't exist, the name of a new park will generally be in accordance with the following criteria in descending order of priority, where applicable:

1.   Name of person or family gifting the land to the public where it is a condition of the gifting

2.   A name which reflects:

·      tangata whenua values,

·      a natural feature within the park,

·      a historic name for the land,

·      a historical feature or association with the park,

·   historically or culturally significant individual or event, or the name of previous long-standing landowner

·      the locality.

Suggest these criteria guide the development of an English name

Providing the proposed name is not already in use or strongly associated with another existing location or feature, and therefore is likely to cause confusion.

It will cause confusion should the local board name the public space Anzac Square, but then not support the cenotaph’s relocation from 1 The Strand to the new site.

Where appropriate, and in consultation with iwi, council should use both the Maori and English form of names for parks. 

Note: Where a Maori name is used, care should be taken to ensure that there is not duplication in English.

It is not appropriate to dual name the public space Waiwharariki / Takapuna, as this is duplication.

Parks should not be named after people unless they are an important historical figure or have a strong connection to the park.  For example, parks should not be named after developers or their families.

This is protocol to guide the development of an English name.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Waiwharariki will be the name used in any signage for the new public space. If the local board decides to progress with an English dual name then this would also be used in signage for the new public space.

20.     Eke Panuku supported mana whenua to lead the naming process to select a name for the public space. This process aligns with other naming processes with mana whenua in the Auckland Council Group.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     There are no financial implications associated with accepting the Māori name Waiwharariki for this new public space. Eke Panuku intends to deliver signage and wayfinding within the current capital expenditure budget.

22.     The name will be used for any signage and information about the new space.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

23.     Construction for the new public square will commence in January 2022 and is estimated to be complete in June 2023.

24.     Eke Panuku, on behalf of the local board, will invite mana whenua to lead a ceremony to reveal the name for the public space after construction is complete.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kate Cumberpatch - Priority Location Director

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor

Daniel Haines - Head of Māori Outcomes

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)

File No.: CP2021/17753

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formalise local board feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Through Vision Zero, Auckland Transport (AT) has adopted the goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050. One of the faster and most cost-effective ways to prevent DSI is to set safe and appropriate speed limits for the function, safety, design and layout of roads.

3.       As part of Tranche 1 of Auckland Transports Safe Speeds Programme safe speed limits were set on many high risk urban and rural roads and within town centres across Auckland between June 2020 and June 2021.

4.       Roads where safe speed limits were set on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent  reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries[1]. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced on these roads by seven per cent, compared to an upward trend in road trauma seen on the rest of the road network.

5.       Further changes to speed limits are now being proposed for a number of roads across Auckland where current speed limits are not deemed safe and appropriate. This is referred to as Tranche 2A of the Safe Speeds Programme.

6.       Details of the changes proposed in each local board area are provided as Attachment A

7.       Public consultation on Tranche 2A closed on 14 November 2021. A summary of  the consultation feedback is provided as Attachment B.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Horopaki

Context

8.       AT is the road controlling authority for all roads within the Auckland transport system. Generally, this is the local road network which includes public roads and beaches but excludes state highways for which Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) has responsibility.

9.       Reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at speeds that are appropriate for road function, safety, design and use, is one of the key measures that AT is undertaking to improve safety on Auckland’s roads. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits will contribute to a reduction in deaths and serious injuries on our roads and ensure speed limit consistency on the network.

10.     Setting safe and appropriate speed limits also supports AT’s Vision Zero approach (adopted by the AT Board in September 2019), which provides that no deaths or serious injuries are acceptable while travelling on our transport network.

11.     AT controls more than 7,300 kilometres of roads and - through the Safe Speeds Programme - is working through a multi-year programme to review all speed limits across its network.

12.     Speed limits must be reviewed and set by bylaw in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017. In line with government strategy and legislation, AT is prioritising high risk roads for review.

13.     Previously AT made the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 under the Land Transport Act 1998 which set new speed limits for the highest risk roads following AT’s first tranche of speed limit reviews. Within this first tranche, speed limits were reviewed on around 10 per cent of the local road network. Where new safe and appropriate speed limits were required to be set, these came into effect from mid-2020 to mid-2021.

All road performance

14.     Roads where speed limits were changed on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced by seven per cent.

15.     This equals four lives saved and 48 less injury crashes on roads treated with safe and appropriate speeds.

Rural road performance

16.     Rural roads where speeds were changed on 30 June 2020 have seen a 78 per cent reduction in fatalities and a small reduction in serious injuries.

17.     This equates to a DSI reduction of 16 per cent on the rural network where speed limit changes have been made. The overall number of crashes is similar to pre-implementation, but the crash severity rates have reduced, this is what would be expected on higher speed roads.

18.     While it will take additional time to confirm that these trends are sustained, initial indications are promising.

19.     AT is now proposing further speed limit changes for a number of roads across Auckland after reviewing and finding that their current speed limits are not safe and appropriate. This is part of the second tranche of reviews under the Safe Speeds Programme (Tranche 2A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     AT is proposing to amend the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 and set new safe and appropriate speed limits for 823 roads across Auckland with a total length of 614km (approximately eight per cent of the road network), with these new limits proposed to come into force mid-2022.

21.     AT has reviewed the existing speed limits for each of the roads identified and found they are not safe and appropriate for the function, design and use of the roads. This means there is now a legal obligation to improve the safety of the roads. Making no change is not an option. This means AT is required to either:

·    set a new safe and appropriate speed limit, or

·    install engineering measures to improve the safety of the road, like road widening, resurfacing, barriers, road markings, speed humps etc.

22.     Physical constraints and the corresponding costs involved mean that it isn’t viable to ‘engineer up’ these roads to support their existing speed limits. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits is one of the fastest and most cost-effective ways of reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

Community Engagement

23.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Tranche 2A took place from 27 September – 14 November 2021, including:

·    a flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes on/near the roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

·    advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist/ethnic media:

Central Leader, East & Bays Courier, Eastern Courier, Manukau Courier, North Harbour News, North Shore Times, Nor-West News, Papakura Courier, Rodney Times, Franklin County News, Western Leader, Hibiscus Matters, Pohutukawa Times, Chinese Herald, Mandarin Pages, Ponsonby News

·    radio advertising on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    radio interviews and adlibs on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    media release and on-going media management

·    published an article in Our Auckland

·    translated consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Tongan, Samoan, Simplified Chinese, Korean and NZ Sign Language

·    sent flyers, posters and hardcopy Freepost feedback forms, in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

·    put posters on trains, buses and ferries that could reach 280,000 commuters each day

·    15 online webinars.

24.     Feedback has been provided through a number of channels:

·    online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

·    via a survey

·    via a mapping tool

·    at public hearings held on 25 November.

25.     Local boards have also had the opportunity to present at public hearings.

26.     A summary of feedback from the local community has been provided as Attachment B. This includes feedback on specific streets in the local board area, as well as broad feedback about the Safe Speeds Programme more generally.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

28.     For town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced under the first tranche of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of respondents advising they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The Safe Speeds Programme has been endorsed by the AT Board, the Auckland Council Planning Committee and conforms with direction from the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2018/19 – 2027/28 and the Auckland Transport Alignment Project.

30.     In March 2021, Auckland Transport staff held a workshop with Auckland Council’s Planning Committee to provide an update to councillors on Vision Zero, road safety performance over the past three years and sought feedback on the direction and priorities for Tranche 2 of the programme. The Committee expressed informal strong support for the direction of the Safe Speeds Programme, with a number of members supportive of the programme moving faster into their community areas.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Public submissions and feedback are provided as Attachment B.

32.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide feedback on changes proposed in Tranche 2A.

33.     Feedback provided in relation to Tranche 1 has also been considered by Auckland Transport in the development of the current proposals.

34.     For the residential areas where speed limits have been reduced under the first tranche of the Safe Speeds Programme, there has been strong positive feedback on the safety improvements, with 79 per cent of respondents commenting that the area feels safer overall. As noted above, 19 per cent of respondents advised they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Engagement on Tranche 2 has been undertaken with kaitiaki at northern, central and southern transport hui during 2021 alongside detailed engagement on the rural marae workstream, which is part of the second stage of Tranche 2.

36.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of the second phase of Tranche 2.

37.     Further engagement will be undertaken following the public engagement period to determine feedback on and support for the final proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines.

40.     When Auckland moved into Alert Level Four, a temporary pause was put on all new consultations to allow time to adapt our consultation strategy and increase our digital engagement. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    the consultation start date was delayed by three weeks from 6 September to 27 September

·    the consultation length was extended from 5 to 7 weeks

·    the number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased

·    digital advertising spend was increased, and digital engagement plans were put in place with Auckland Council’s Engagement Partners who helped reach our diverse communities.

41.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline, and local boards will be kept up to date with any changes to the dates that the new speed limits will take effect.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Early in 2022 Auckland Transport will finalise an analysis and feedback report, including feedback from both the public and local boards.

43.     On 31 March 2022 staff will present this report and recommendations to the AT Board.

44.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force on 31 May 2022 for the majority of roads, and 13 June 2022 for roads associated with schools, allowing for school speed changes to be made at the start of a school week.

45.     These dates may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept updated if any changes are made.

46.     More speed limit changes (Tranche 2B) are planned to be publicly consulted in 2022. AT has engaged with all local boards affected by Tranche 2B and will continue to keep local boards updated as the speed reviews are finalised.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

8 December 2021 - Devonport Takapuna Local Board Business Meeting - Devonport Takapuna Local Board Proposed speed limit changes – Tranche 2A

91

b

Feedback Report - Local Board - Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Oliver Roberts - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 


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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022

File No.: CP2021/19351

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (the draft policy).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Significance and Engagement Policy, adopted in 2014, is undergoing a policy refresh to make it more contemporary and user-friendly.

3.       The goal of the policy refresh is to provide for a simplified decision-making process through a high-level guiding document that allows for case-by-case assessments.

4.       Minor updates are needed in both the significance and engagement components of the policy.

5.       Updates around the significance component of the draft policy include:

·     the assessment of significance in terms of a continuum

·     taking a cumulative approach to a package of proposals or decisions

·     adjusting the list of strategic assets to include only assets critical for the delivery of services and clarifying that most strategic assets are identified as groups or networks of assets to reflect the way in which they deliver services

·     adding guidance for assessing the significance of decisions for assets that do not meet the criteria for being strategic.

6.       Updates around the engagement component of the draft policy include:

·     simplifying existing text to make the policy more user-friendly

·     ensuring the engagement principles capture a more diverse Tāmaki Makaurau

·     capturing the need to safeguard staff, elected members and the community during consultation and engagement

·     giving more visibility to the connection between the policy and the forthcoming and separate refresh of the Engagement Guidelines, which will support staff to operationalise the policy.

7.       The draft policy was adopted for public consultation by Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 meeting, resolution number GB/2021/111.

8.       Public consultation ran from 27 September to 18 October 2021.

9.       Adoption of the final policy is projected for February 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy as part of the overall consideration for final adoption in February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Significance and Engagement Policy (the 2014 policy) was created and adopted in 2014 to fulfill the legislative requirements outlined in section 76AA of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).

11.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is a key document for decision-making and the consultation process. It is comprised of two interrelated sections on significance and engagement.

12.     The significance section sets out how and when communities can expect the council to engage before making decisions, describes the council’s approach to determining the significance of proposals and decisions, and lists the council’s strategic assets.

13.     The engagement section provides high-level principles on how to engage inclusively with the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau. These high-level principles ensure that engagement is fit-for-purpose according to the level of significance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have undertaken a policy refresh as the 2014 policy has not undergone changes since its initial adoption.

15.     An internal assessment of the 2014 policy found that that it was largely easy to use, but minor improvements would allow for more efficient decision-making and more fit-for-purpose engagement processes.

16.     General high-level updates and clarifications are being proposed for the draft policy to create a more contemporary policy.

17.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to be a prescriptive policy document, and any accepted changes to the draft policy will not change the purpose for which it is used.

18.     The proposed changes to the Significance and Engagement Policy 2021 were reported to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September – refer to Attachment A Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation, also found online with associated documents.

Consultation

19.     Formal public consultation was held from 27 September to 18 October 2021. The consultation document is part of Attachment A of this agenda report, or online here.

20.     Given COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the region, consultation was conducted entirely virtually and consisted of:

·     consultation materials and online feedback forms made available on the council’s engagement website (AK Have Your Say)

·     virtual workshops with community partners with demographic advisory panels

·     working with community partners to reach diverse groups.

21.     All feedback has been captured and will be reported through to the Governing Body meeting in February 2022 to inform decision-making on the final policy.

22.     A summary of the regional feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B and local board specific feedback in Attachment C of the agenda report.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi
Climate impact statement

23.     Accepting the proposed changes to the draft policy allows for a fit-for-purpose and contemporary significance and engagement policy that will encourage a richer engagement process during future consultations around climate change issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Any strategic asset under the draft policy that is held or managed by a substantive Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) will be identified in the CCO Accountability Policy. CCO’s must comply with that policy when making decisions on strategic assets under their control.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local boards play a key role in engaging with their local communities. The change to enable more fit-for-purpose consultation and engagement for some asset-based decisions may provide local boards with greater flexibility to customise some engagement processes to better meet the needs of their community.

26.     Local board chairs were invited to a workshop held on 4 August 2021 that also included the Parks, Arts, Community and Events, and Finance and Performance committees for a high-level overview on proposed amendments to the draft policy.

27.     Formalised local board views from this workshop and report will be incorporated into the February 2022 Governing Body report for the policy adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The refresh of the Significance and Engagement Policy will strengthen the council’s capacity and capability to engage with and meet the needs of the Māori community. This will be achieved through the delivery of bespoke training initiatives and resources which align to best practice engagement that responds to the needs and is supported by Māori. Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides a foundation to build council’s engagement approach and supports initiatives already underway such as Te Matapuna 2 as a pilot for spatial-based engagement. Work on relationship agreements is progressing, and there is good support for capacity contracts. Further work is required to streamline engagement forums to ensure they are fit for purpose and respond to priorities from Māori.

29.     Ongoing collaboration on the development of the Māori engagement practice and approach will inform the Engagement Guidelines and will ensure council’s size and engagement reach is leveraged effectively. This collaboration will ensure that the operational execution of the Engagement Guidelines is well-informed and aligned with best practice in te ao Māori.

30.     This focus on practice, capacity and capability will guide operational performance so that the aspirations for Māori engagement in Tāmaki Makaurau are progressed, aligned and achievable. Further work on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau performance measures will be aligned with the engagement approach as it continues to be developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed changes to the significance section of the policy assists in the assessment of significance and may reduce the financial costs of engagement approaches that are not fit-for-purpose.

32.     Reclassifying some assets as non-strategic will also remove the burden of audit costs if the council seeks to make any future decisions around changing ownership or control of those assets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present any risk. The risks associated with refreshing the draft policy are set out in the report to the 23 September Governing Body meeting in Attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Feedback from the consultation along with local board views will be reported to the 24 February 2022 Governing Body meeting as part of the materials for the finalised draft policy approval.

35.     The final Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 is proposed to be implemented following approval at the same Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

8 December 2021 - Devonport Takapuna Local Board Business Meeting - Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation

153

b

8 December 2021 - Devonport Takapuna Local Board Business Meeting - Summary of regional feedback

193

c

8 December 2021 - Devonport Takapuna Local Board Business Meeting - Devonport Takapuna Local Board specific feedback

201

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Yu - Senior Advisor - Financial Strategy and Planning

Eddie Tuiavii - Principal Advisor - Democracy and Engagement

Authorisers

 Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Kenneth Aiolupotea - General Manager Democracy and Engagement

Oliver Roberts – Acting General Manger Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16889

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive. 

4.       Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy. 

5.       The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important. 

6.       The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving: 

·      Manaakitanga | Quality of life: 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection: 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

·      Kotahitanga | Collective action:  
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:  
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

7.       The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from “one-size fits all” to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, and shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.       Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.       A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10.     Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.  

11.     The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.  

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’ 

13.     Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive. 

14.     In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.  

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15.     The refreshed draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy (Attachment A) has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the strategy and how it will be used.  

16.     During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.  

17.     Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021 and can be viewed by the public by following this link: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/thriving-communities

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18.     At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[2].

19.     Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.  

20.     Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.  

21.     Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them. 

22.     Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.  

23.     Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[3].

24.     Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[4]. 

25.     Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.   

Challenge 1 

Challenge 2 

Challenge 3 

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive. 

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection. 

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling. 

 

26.     More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:  

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Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27.     In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:  

 

From

To

Ad hoc and siloed

Working in integrated ways

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning. 

 

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and economic).

One size fits all

Targeting our responses

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.  

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities. 

Council as expert

Enabling community leadership

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy 

28.     To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.  

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving 

29.     The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities. 

·    Manaakitanga |Quality of life 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

 

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection 
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong 

 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action 
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures 
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

 

Objectives: Where should we focus our action 

30.     To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes. 

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31.     While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focused on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.  

32.     These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.  

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

33.     The draft strategy proposes we invest in our resource to make the biggest impact, and this will be guided by four key principles:

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34.     Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.  

35.     Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.  

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36.     As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.  

37.     The high-level outcomes and objective in the strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action.   

38.     The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.  

39.     This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.  

40.     It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.  

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41.     Nga Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges. 

42.     A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for. 

43.     Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44.     A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the strategy’s new objectives.  

45.     New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes. 

46.     There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY22-25). 

47.     The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

49.     The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     This is a strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.  

51.     Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.  

52.     Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54.     Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.  

55.     The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page. 

56.     Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include: 

·    concern for isolated communities

·    a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·    concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa[5].

58.     The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population. 

59.     Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tamaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000[6]. 

60.     By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whanau and hapori.  

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities 

61.     To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.  

62.     Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes 

63.     The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.  

64.     The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tamaki Makaurau. 

65.     Mana whenua and Mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     There is currently no additional budget attached to the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.    

If <event>: 

Then <impact>: 

Possible mitigations: 

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources.   

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy. 

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.  

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.  

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction.

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.  

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.  

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.  

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact. 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

69.     This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.  

70.     The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

215

     

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18322

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname. 

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the other of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology. 

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e. the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e. the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data show that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/local-impacts-local-board-views-reports.aspx

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori, and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetical order. Having voting documents in alphabetical order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias.  If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ballot order effects and Auckland Council elections_November 2021

249

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board for quarter one, 2021/2022 financial year

File No.: CP2021/19443

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Devonport Takapuna Local Board (the local board) with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July to 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report and its attachments include financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the local board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The local board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme with the following operating departments:

Date approved

Council department and / or unit

Resolution number

15 June 2021

·      Customer and Community Services

·      Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES)

·      External Partnerships

·      Auckland Emergency Management

·      Auckland Unlimited

DT/2021/83

DT/2021/86

DT/2021/87

DT/2021/88

DT/2021/89

 

4.       The local board work programme is tracking against its key objectives, milestones and timelines for delivery.  A number of notable project updates from the 1 July to 30 September period include:

·    all operational grants to community partners and organisations (i.e. Devonport Peninsular Trust, ANCAD, North Shore Brass Band and The Pumphouse) and have been administered.  This has provided funding continuity and security during the 18 August 2021 COVID-19 lockdown;

·    programmes such as Age Friendly Approach (ID 111), Inclusion and participation of cultural and diverse communities (ID 114) and Activation of community places (ID 119) were disrupted due to the 18 August 2021 COVID-19 lockdown, and subsequently put on hold;

·    access to library services (ID 1426): eBooks borrowed from Auckland Libraries has increased by over 50 percent during the lockdown, and adjustments continue to meet supply and demand at a regional level;

·    whai pūmanawa literacy:

Pre-school services (ID 1430): prior to lockdown, Children’s programmes run by staff were very popular, with overwhelming numbers of attendees at Wriggle and Rhyme sessions aimed at babies and toddlers.  During lockdown, Storytime and Rhymetime continued on Facebook;

Services and programmes (ID 1432): Takapuna and Devonport libraries continue to support community with expert help from online banking experts.  Customers have also learnt tips on preventing online scams.  Due to lockdown, book groups have continued online via Zoom meetings.  This has enabled connections during the pandemic and help people keep in touch and stay connected.  Libraries have also contributed to welfare phone calls to seniors in the community to check in with library customers and offer assistance when necessary;

·    Takapuna Pool and Leisure Centre Operations (ID 30): The centre has been closed since 18 August 2021, due to the COVID-19 lockdown.  Visitation in July 2021 and the first half of August 2021 grew by four percent compared to the same period last year.  Staff have been producing online fitness classes daily and checking in on vulnerable members.  The annual maintenance shutdown was brought forward and completed in alert level three.

The centre and our leisure services are preparing to re-open safely when government alert levels allow;

·    Ecological and environmental programme (ID 610): School plantings this quarter were undertaken at Philomel Reserve with Bayswater School (700 plants) and at Sylvan Park with Carmel College (125 plants).

There were 941 volunteer hours invested through 'Restoring Takarunga Hauraki' across 10 reserves and 267 volunteer hours through Pupuke Birdsong across seven reserves.

There were 4291 trees planted across eight reserves, highlights being Braemar Reserve wetland and the Patuone Reserve community and corporate planting day.  There were 11 separate community planting days. 

Volunteer activity paused on 18 August 2021 to end of quarter one due to COVID-19 lockdowns.

·    the completion of the following renewals:

Devonport Community House - renew heat pumps and fire exit ramp (ID 23935);

Melrose Reserve playspace (ID 20462);

Lansdowne Reserve playspace (ID 24256);

Nile Reserve playspace (ID 24358); and

Sunnynook Park - develop community area (ID 20685).

5.       The $3.62 million operating expenditure is $561,000 below budget for the first quarter.  Asset Based Services (ABS: OPEX) is $694,000 below budget and the Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget (LDI: OPEX) is $133,000 above budget.  The decrease in revenue is due to council-owned facilities (i.e. leisure facilities, venue for hire and libraries) being closed because of the 18 August 2021 COVID-19 lockdown.

6.       An additional $213,731 of LDI: OPEX has been added to the 2021/2022 financial year. The additional budget is comprised of:

·    $8,809 in film revenue; and

·    $204,922 in LDI OPEX carry forwards from the previous 2020/2021 financial year.

7.       There is no funding available in the Locally Driven Initiatives capital budget (LDI: CAPEX).  The entire budget was allocated to the new toilet at the Tonkin Road end of Sunnynook Park at the June 2021 business meeting (DT/2021/83).  This means that there is no budget to consider new assets for the remainder of the term.

 

 

 

8.       The following attachments are included to this report:

·    Attachment A: all activity updates from the local board work programme;

·    Attachment B: approved local board three-year capital work programme; and

·    Attachment C: financial report for quarter one.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for 1 July to 30 September 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme update for quarter one, 2021/2022 financial year

257

b

Approved three-yer local board capital work programme

287

c

Quarter one financial update - Devonport-Takapuna

299

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tristan Coulson - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Chairpersons' Report

File No.: CP2021/00592

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson Ruth Jackson for her verbal report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

File No.: CP2021/00602

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the November 2021 Meeting

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank member George Wood for his reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

George Wood - members report December 2021

309

b

The Takapuna Centre Plan

311

c

Letter to the Police Commissioner

331

d

Waitemata Police District Speed infringement fines 2019 to 2021

333

e

Waitemata Police District Speed infringement tickets issued 2019 to 2021

335

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops November 2021

File No.: CP2021/00612

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during November and December 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on 9 November 2021, the board was briefed on:

·    Parks, Sports and Recreation

- Draft Activations Programme 21/22

 

·    Local Board Financial Advisors

- Development Contributions

 

·    Local Board Financial Advisors

- LB Ann Plan WS2 and WS3

- Regional Budget topics and Regional Input and Advocacy

 

·    Community Facilities

- Allenby playground update

 

·    Community Facilities

- Rationalise play space discussion

 

3.       At the workshop held on 7 December 2021, the board was briefed on:

 

·    Auckland Transport

-     Lake Road improvements

 

·    Auckland Transport

-     Capital Works Program

 

·    Community Facilities

-     Sunnynook Wheeled Sports consultation feedback

 

·    Parks, Sport and Recreation

-     Barry's Point Reserve Service Assessment Dec 2018 (Refresh of 2010 development plan)

 

4.       Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the workshops held in November and December 2021

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport - Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 9 November 2021

339

b

Devonport - Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 7 December 2021

343

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/00625

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The December 2021 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A. The information contained within this attachment is as accurate as possible under covid-19 circumstances.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for December 2021 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar December 2021

349

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michelle Riley - PA/Office Manager

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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[1] For the 12-month period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021, compared to an average of the prior five years.

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[3] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[4] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[5] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[6] ibid