I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be held on:

 

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 2 December 2021

10.00am

This meeting will be held remotely and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website
https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

 

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Pippa Coom

 

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

IMSB Member Terrence Hohneck

 

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Greg Sayers

 

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Wayne Walker

 

 

Cr Alf Filipaina

Cr John Watson

 

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Suad Allie

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

29 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6953

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities.   The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·        climate change mitigation and adaptation policy, and implementation (with other committee chairs where cross over of responsibilities exists)

·        coastal renewals, slips and remediation

·        Auckland’s Climate Action Framework

·        natural heritage (including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters, such as kauri dieback)

·        protection and restoration of Auckland’s ecological health

·        water, including Auckland’s Water Strategy

·        waste minimisation

·        acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·        grants for regional environmental outcomes.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)      The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Environment and Climate Change Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iii)     The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·          Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·          Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·          Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·          In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·          The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·          However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·          All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·          Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·          Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·          All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·          Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·          Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·          Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

ITEM    TABLE OF CONTENTS    PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                   9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                            9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                           9

4          Petitions                                                                                   9  

5          Public Input                                                                             9

6          Local Board Input                                                                   9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                       10

8          Auckland Water Strategy Framework                                11

9          Transport Emissions Reduction Plan - Progress Update                                                                                                53

10        Annual update on delivery of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan 2021                                             81

11        Allocation of the 2021/2022 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant                                                       115

12        Allocation of the 2021/2022 Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund                                                                  183

13        Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings (including forward work programme) - 2 December 2021                                                                                              205

14        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

15        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                           215

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Allocation of the 2021/2022 Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund                                   215


1  Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2  Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3  Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)     confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 14 October 2021, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4            Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5            Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6            Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7            Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)           The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

Auckland Water Strategy Framework

File No.: CP2021/17792

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         To seek approval of the Auckland Water Strategy framework and endorsement of its core content.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         The Auckland Water Strategy (the Water Strategy) sets a vision for Auckland’s waters and provides strategic direction for investment and action across the Auckland Council Group.

3.         The vision of the Water Strategy is: te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water, is protected and enhanced.

4.         The Water Strategy framework describes the vision for the future and strategic shifts to guide change. It articulates Auckland’s context, challenges, aims, and required actions related to water. The framework is designed to make implementation steps clear for council to track progress, and so that communities and partners can hold council group accountable to progress over time.

5.         The intent of the Water Strategy is that the council fulfils its obligations to identify and plan for future challenges across its broad range of functions that affect water outcomes. These challenges are:

i)             protecting and enhancing the health of waterbodies and their ecosystems

ii)           delivering three-waters services at the right time, in the right place, at the right scale, as the city grows

iii)          having enough water for people now and in the future

iv)          reducing flood and coastal inundation risk over time

v)           water affordability for Aucklanders

vi)          improving how the council works with its treaty partners

vii)        improving how the council organises itself to achieve these outcomes.

6.      The Water Strategy project began as a response to the 2017 Section 17A Value for Money review of three waters[1] delivery across the council group. The review recommended the council produce a three waters strategy. The scope of the water strategy was subsequently expanded to incorporate other water related responsibilities, outcomes, and domains (e.g. natural waterbodies, groundwater, coastal waters, etc.).

7.      A discussion document (Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei) was consulted on in February 2019.

8.      Council developed the strategy throughout 2021 drawing on:

i)             relevant legislation and central government direction

ii)            Auckland Council strategies, policies and plans, and guidance

iii)          Auckland Council’s Three Waters Value for Money (s17A) Review 2017

iv)          the Our Water Future Discussion Document framework and feedback from community and mana whenua 2019

v)           individual iwi engagement and Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum engagement in 2021

vi)          internal staff engagement 2020-2021

vii)         Water Sensitive Cities framework and benchmarking 2021.

9.         Staff workshopped the Water Strategy framework, including each strategic shift and associated aims and actions, with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Local Board Chairs throughout September-November 2021. Feedback during those workshops has shaped the content in this report.

10.       The framework consists of:

i)             A vision

ii)           Treaty context

iii)          Over-arching challenges

iv)          Cross-cutting themes

v)           Strategic Shifts and associated aims and actions

vi)          Implementation

11.       Appendix A: Core Content for Auckland Water Strategy framework provides content for each element of the framework. This report recommends that Attachment A be endorsed as the core content of the Water Strategy. The content will then be drafted into a final document and will be brought to Environment and Climate Change Committee for consideration and adoption in 2022.

12.       The Water Strategy has been developed during a period of significant uncertainty for the council group. Central government has recently indicated that participation in the proposed Three Waters Reforms will be mandated in the planned enabling legislation. The reforms would move management of three waters assets to a new inter-regional entity. Economic regulation is also planned.

13.       The Water Strategy provides strategic direction to the council group. Auckland Council will continue to be a group until at least mid-2024. Over the next few years, as the shape and impacts of proposed reform become clearer, the council would use the strategy in appropriate ways to provide direction to any processes that arise. This strategy would become council’s position on the aims and outcomes sought from any new entity. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      tango/adopt the Auckland Water Strategy Framework consisting of:

i)             vision

ii)            foundational partnership

iii)          challenges

iv)          cross-cutting themes

v)           strategic shifts

b)      endorse the aims, context and actions related to each strategic shift, as set out in Appendix A of the agenda report, as the core content of the Auckland Water Strategy.

c)      tuhi/note that the actions related to each strategic shift may require further refinement and that the core content requires editing appropriate for an external facing document and will be brought to committee for consideration and adoption as part of the final water Auckland Water Strategy document in the first half of 2022.

Horopaki

Context

14.       The Auckland Council group has a broad role in delivering water outcomes:

i)             Auckland Council provides storm water infrastructure and services; resource management consenting and regulation, monitoring, compliance for effects on fresh water and coastal water; and research, reporting, policy, and strategy functions

ii)           Watercare provides drinking water and wastewater infrastructure and services

iii)          Auckland Transport influences land use and the storm water network. The transport network is Auckland’s largest public realm asset and investment.

15.       The Auckland Water Strategy (the Water Strategy) sets a vision for Auckland’s waters and provides strategic direction for investment and action across the Auckland Council group. The strategy takes direction from and builds on existing council strategic documents including:

i)             The Auckland Plan 2050 - includes high-level approaches for how we can prioritise the health of water in Auckland by adopting a te ao Māori approach to protecting our waters; adapting to a changing water future; developing Aucklanders’ stewardship; restoring our damaged environments; protecting our significant water bodies; and using Auckland’s growth to achieve better water outcomes.

ii)           Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri Auckland's Climate Action Plan - acknowledges that climate change will mean a changing water future and identifies integrated, adaptive planning approaches and water-sensitive design as key enablers of a climate-ready Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland.

16.       The Water Strategy project began as a response to the 2017 Section 17A Value for Money review of three waters[2] delivery across the council group. The review recommended the council produces a three waters strategy. The scope of the water strategy was subsequently expanded to incorporate other water related responsibilities, outcomes, and domains (e.g. natural waterbodies, groundwater, coastal waters, etc.).

17.       A discussion document (Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei) was consulted on in February 2019. The purpose of the discussion document was to elicit community views on the future of Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland’s water and how the council should be planning for these in its water strategy. This process established a high-level vision for Auckland’s waters, ‘te Mauri o te Wai o Tāmakai Makaurau - the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water - is protected and enhanced’, and presented key values, issues and principles that were designed to inform strategy development. Actions and targets were not discussed. Actions and targets have been identified as part of the subsequent strategy development. 

18.       Council has developed the strategy drawing on:

i)             relevant legislation and central government direction

ii)           the council’s strategies, policies and plans, and guidance

iii)          the council’s Three Waters Value for Money (s17A) Review 2017

iv)          the Our Water Future discussion document framework and feedback from community and mana whenua from 2019

v)           individual iwi engagement and Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum engagement in 2021

vi)          internal staff engagement during 2020-2021

vii)        the Water Sensitive Cities Index and benchmarking in 2021.

19.       The Water Strategy is intended to guide decision-making to 2050. Staff have therefore considered Tāmaki Makaurau’s broader context over the life of the strategy including:

i)             land use change, in particular as driven by population growth

ii)           mitigating and adapting to climate change

iii)          partnership approach with mana whenua

iv)          growing iwi capacity and further settlements that will affect governance structures

v)           technological change.

20.       Council has also considered the direction from central government to deliver management of freshwater, land use and development in catchments in an integrated and sustainable way to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects, including cumulative effects[3].

21.       Staff workshopped the Water Strategy framework, including each strategic shift and associated aims and actions, with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Local Board Chairs throughout September-November 2021. Feedback during those workshops has shaped the content in this report. The Chair of the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum’s Te Pou Taiao also attended a workshop to introduce the ongoing work for a mātauranga-led framework (see Benchmarking section).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.       The purpose of this report is to present the framework and core content of the Auckland Water Strategy for adoption.

23.       The council group can and must improve coordination and delivery of its broad role in delivering water outcomes and meeting community expectations.

24.       The following sections describes the benchmarking approach undertaken as part of strategy development and the strategy framework.

Benchmarking

25.       The Environment and Climate Change Committee directed that staff undertake benchmarking as a key input to the development of the Water Strategy. A dual benchmarking approach is considered to best suit the Auckland context. This dual benchmarking approach has been tentatively referred to as ‘whakapapa-sensitive catchments’. The dual benchmarking approach will apply two benchmarking frameworks:

i)             Water-Sensitive Cities Index

ii)            a mātauranga-led framework in development.

26.       The Water-Sensitive Cities[4] Index was selected for its participatory approach and holistic set of indicators. The Index was developed by the Co-operative Research Centre based at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Staff worked with the Centre and a local provider to deliver the benchmarking in Auckland. The 2017 s17A Three Waters Value for Money review profiled the Water-Sensitive Cities Benchmarking tool.

27.       The council group completed the Water-Sensitive Cities benchmarking in early October 2021. The results of the exercise were workshopped with the committee and local board chairs and a report will be released alongside the final Auckland Water Strategy. Staff referred to the indicator framework and the benchmarking results as key inputs for the Water Strategy’s development. The strategic shifts and associated aims and actions are designed to address areas where council can improve on its journey towards being a water-sensitive region.

28.       The council, through the Water Strategy project, is also partnering with Te Pou Taiao (the environment subcommittee of the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum) to develop a mātauranga-led framework that would be used alongside the Water-Sensitive Cities index to assess how water is cared for across Auckland.

29.       The Water-Sensitive Cities framework has the benefit of a decade of testing and implementation. The mātauranga-led framework, while drawing on deep insights from traditional knowledge, is still under development. Further development work will be done once the Water Strategy is adopted and will include testing with mana whenua. How the mātauranga-led framework is implemented will be informed by that process. The framework is planned to go to the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum in December 2021.

30.       The dual benchmarking approach provides:

i)             for mātauranga and mana whenua values to be reflected in the Water Strategy, enhancing Te Tiriti o Waitangi partnerships with a shared understanding of ‘what good looks like’

ii)           a current-state assessment that drives strategy and action development

iii)          for progress-tracking by re-scoring against the framework at agreed intervals.

31.       It is intended that:

i)             the council supports ongoing development and testing of the mana whenua-led framework with iwi

ii)           that the Water-Sensitive Cities and mana whenua-led benchmarking be completed at a regional level alongside the State-of-Environment reporting

iii)          that future decisions of whether to refresh the Water Strategy or not be informed by the results of the dual Water-Sensitive Cities index and mana whenua-led benchmarking.

Water Strategy framework

32.       The Water Strategy framework sets a vision for the future (previously adopted in 2019), a foundational partnership and eight key strategic shifts to guide change. It articulates Auckland’s context, challenges, aims, and required actions. The framework is designed to make implementation steps clear for council to track progress and so that communities and partners can hold council accountable to progress over time.

33.       The framework consists of:

i)             A vision

ii)           Treaty context

iii)          Over-arching challenges

iv)          Cross-cutting themes

v)           Strategic Shifts and associated aims and actions

vi)          Implementation

34.       The diagram below shows the Auckland Water Strategy Framework:

A picture containing table

Description automatically generated

 

35.       The following sections briefly explain each element of the framework (see Appendix A for additional detail).

Vision: te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water, is protected and enhanced

36.       Auckland’s vision for the future is ‘te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s waters, is protected and enhanced’.

37.       The Water Strategy vision describes Tāmaki Makaurau’s desired long-term future and will guide council decision-making over time towards that agreed goal. The vision outlines a future for Tāmaki Makaurau where the region’s waters are healthy, thriving, and treasured. This vision also describes a future where the deep connections between water, the environment and people are recognised and valued.

38.       The mauri – the life sustaining capacity – of water is a fundamentally intuitive concept.  It is something all Aucklanders can appreciate. There is a qualitative difference that is readily felt and sensed when walking alongside a healthy waterbody compared to a waterbody that has been channeled, polluted, or piped, for example.

39.       The Our Water Future public discussion document received strong support for the vision. In the document, the vision was explained as:

i)             special to this place (Auckland)

ii)           recognising the vital relationship between our water and our people

iii)          recognising the role of mana whenua as kaitiaki within the region

iv)          representing values that can unify us in our actions

v)           setting a long-term aspiration for the way we take care of our waters.

40.       The council set a long-term aspiration for Auckland when it adopted this vision in 2019. An aspiration for a future in which:

i)             Aucklanders are able to swim in, and harvest from, our rivers, estuaries and harbours

ii)           life in and sustained by water is thriving

iii)          everyone has access to enough water of the appropriate quality to meet their needs.

41.       Adopting this vision recognised that addressing Auckland’s water issues and challenges over time requires a bold vision and new ways of working together with council’s treaty partners and communities. The vision signals a greater recognition of a Māori worldview, of environmental limits and interconnectedness of people and environment.

42.       The vision is also consistent with council’s obligations and aspirations, as well as central government direction. For example,

i)             the purpose of local government is to take a sustainable development approach to the broad role of promoting the four well-beings[5].

ii)           the purpose of the Resource Management Act is sustainable management of natural and physical resources in ways that enables the four well-beings.

iii)         Te Mauri o te Wai aligns with te Mana o te Wai in the National Policy Statement – Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM), which provides for local expression.

iv)          the Auckland Plan directs council to ‘Apply a Māori worldview to treasure and protect our natural environment (taonga tuku iho)’.

v)           mauri is embedded in the Auckland Unitary Plan[6].

vi)          the Our Water Future public discussion document introduced the vision of te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau and applying a Māori world view,

vii)       Te mauri o te wai is referenced in the council’s 2021 Infrastructure Strategy.

Over-arching challenges

43.       The intent of the Water Strategy is that the council fulfils its obligations to identify and plan for future challenges across its broad range of functions that affect water outcomes. Tāmaki Makaurau faces several overarching challenges that inform the strategic direction set by the Water Strategy. These are:

i)             protecting and enhancing the health of waterbodies and their ecosystems

ii)           delivering three-waters services at the right time, in the right place, at the right scale, as the city grows

iii)          having enough water for people now and in the future

iv)          reducing flood and coastal inundation risk over time

v)           affordability for Aucklanders

vi)          improving how the council works with its treaty partners

vii)        improving how the council organises itself.

44.    Appendix A provides a more detailed description of each over-arching challenge.

Treaty Context

45.       Māori have enduring rights and interests related to water as a taonga and as indigenous peoples. These rights are affirmed under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and international law. 

46.       Auckland Council “is committed to meeting its statutory Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi responsibilities”. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland context. Like the council, mana whenua are long-term contributors to water outcomes.

47.       This section within the framework acknowledges that the treaty provides the context for partnership between council and mana whenua for the protection, management, and enhancement of water.

Cross-cutting themes

48.       In addition to over-arching challenges, there are cross-cutting themes that inform the council’s strategic approach in the Water Strategy. The cross-cutting themes must be accounted for as the actions in the strategy are delivered.

Climate Change

49.       Water and climate change are intrinsically linked. The twin challenges of mitigation and adaptation have been integrated within the strategy.

Equity

50.       The Auckland Plan 2050 describes sharing prosperity with all Aucklanders as a key challenge now and for the future. Auckland has equitable access to water supply and sanitation and performs well against international peers; however, there are areas for improvement that are captured in the strategy. Other equity issues such as flood protection and access to blue-green space for recreation are also considered within the strategy.

Strategic Shifts

51.       The Water Strategy framework includes eight overarching strategic shifts. Each strategic shift is intended to represent long-term change in the council’s approach towards a stated aim. To achieve this, each strategic shift has associated actions with indicative implementation timings identified. Shifts are designed so that the council can add actions over time to the framework as progress is made.

52.       The strategic shifts were arrived at by considering the changes that the council must make to respond to the challenges and cross-cutting themes above, as well as responding to the water sensitive cities benchmarking undertaken. Actions were developed and grouped according to council functions so that they might be more easily implemented by areas in the council group.

53.       Table one shows the eight strategic shifts and associated aims. The more detailed text that form the core of the strategy is included as Attachment A: Core Content for Auckland Water Strategy framework.


 

Table one: Water Strategy Strategic Shifts and Associated Aims

Strategic shift

Aim

Te Tiriti Partnership

The council and mana whenua working together in agreed ways on agreed things.

The council and mana whenua iwi are partners in the protection, management, and enhancement of water.

Empowering Aucklanders

Working with Aucklanders for better water outcomes.

Aucklanders are empowered to shape decisions about and are prepared for our changing water future.

Regenerative Water Infrastructure

Auckland’s water infrastructure is regenerative, resilient, low carbon, and increases the mauri of water. It’s able to be seen and understood by Aucklanders.

 

Regenerative infrastructure systems enhance the life-sustaining capacity of water (mauri).

Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access

Prioritising mauri when using water, to sustain the environment and people in the long term.

 

When the council allocates water from the natural environment, water use is sustainable, and considers the health and wellbeing of ecosystems and people.

Water Security

Water abundance and security for growing population through efficient use and diverse sources.

Auckland captures, uses, and recycles water efficiently so that everyone has access to enough water of the appropriate quality to meet their needs.

Integrated Land use and Water Planning

Integrating land use and water planning at a regional, catchment and site scale.

Water and its life-sustaining capacity is a central principle in land management and planning decisions.

Restoring and Enhancing Water Ecosystems

Catchment-based approaches to the health of water ecosystems.

Auckland has thriving and sustainable natural water ecosystems that support life, food gathering and recreation.

Pooling Knowledge

Shared understanding enabling better decisions for our water future.

Auckland has the knowledge about water needed to make good quality, timely, and strategic decisions about water.

Implementation

54.       Successfully delivering on the vision and integrated aims of the Water Strategy will require and sustained approach to delivery across the council group. 

55.       To implement the Water Strategy, the council will need:

i)             to take a consistent, sustained approach to putting te mauri o te wai at the centre of council group planning and investment decisions and action

ii)           the skills and capacity to deliver on the water strategy, legislative requirements, and partnership relationships

iii)          a strong culture of holistic planning, action, reporting and post-implementation review that feeds back into adaptive planning processes

iv)          clarity of the roles and responsibilities across the council group, with all teams directed and accountable for their role and function

v)           to give mana whenua clear sight of the council’s work on water and enable participation/direction.

56.       Changes required to give effect to the implementation of the strategy include:

i)             appoint Executive Lead Team Water Lead (complete)

ii)           Water Strategy programme implementation coordinator

iii)          coordinated workforce planning to fill gaps and changing needs

iv)          update investment prioritisation criteria to reflect the Water Strategy

v)           council reporting on te mauri o te wai

vi)          integrated Asset Investment and Asset Management Planning, with an independent audit process.

Central government context

57.       The Water Strategy considers and responds to current and expected direction from central government to:

i)             deliver management of freshwater, land use and development in catchments in an integrated and sustainable way

ii)           a strengthening of the partnership between the council and mana whenua in environmental management goal setting and decision-making frameworks

iii)          the inclusion of Te Mana o Te Wai in the Auckland Unitary Plan

iv)          a switch from an individual activity effects-based assessment (under the Resource Management Act 1991) to a more holistic limits-based approach, reflecting the need to better manage cumulative effects on water bodies

v)           an expectation of stronger enforcement of regulatory environmental obligations through policy effectiveness reporting (feedback loops between policy and actions) and improved compliance monitoring and enforcement reporting.

Three Waters Reform

58.       The Water Strategy has been developed during a period of significant uncertainty for the council group. Central government has recently indicated that participation in the proposed Three Waters Reforms will be mandated in the planned enabling legislation. The reforms would move management of three waters assets to a new inter-regional entity. Economic regulation is also planned.

59.       While the final form of the proposed structures is not known, it is important to understand that the proposed reform would not affect all areas of delivery for the Water Strategy. Council would retain its:

i)             core role as environmental regulator

ii)           core role as regulatory planning authority

iii)          core treaty partnership role for local government

iv)          core role to engage and be the voice for Auckland communities

v)           management of the council group’s own water consumption (towards consumption targets).

60.       The Water Strategy provides strategic direction to the council group. Auckland Council will continue to be a group until at least mid-2024. Over the next few years, as the shape and impacts of proposed reform become clearer, the council would use the strategy in appropriate ways to provide direction to any processes that arise. This strategy would become council’s position on the aims and outcomes sought from any new entity. 

61.       The Water Strategy identifies specific near-term (1-3 years) as well as longer-term actions. It is noted that this specificity for the near-term is helpful considering the proposed reform timeline that new structures be established mid-2024. It is also noted that strong direction in the Water Strategy for coordination across water in Auckland becomes more important should a new water entity be created as part of central government reforms. 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

62.       Water and climate change are intrinsically linked. Climate change is a cross cutting theme of the Water Strategy (along with equity). The twin challenges of mitigation and adaptation were integrated into the strategy’s core content as it was developed.

63.       Climate change will have wide-ranging implications for the issues raised in the Water Strategy, including:

i)             influencing demand for water use

ii)           affecting water availability of a given water source over time

iii)          increasing flood and coastal inundation hazard risk to life and property.

64.       Improving our mitigation of and resilience to these impacts via the approaches described in the Water Strategy aligns with council’s existing goals and work programmes for climate action.

65.       The physical impacts of climate change will have implications both for water management (including Māori water rights) in Auckland, and for related issues such as energy supply, social welfare, food security, and Māori land.

66.       Water infrastructure has significant embodied carbon emissions. The regenerative water infrastructure strategic shift sets the council on a path to zero or low emissions water infrastructure.

67.       The projected impacts of climate change on Auckland’s aquatic environments, and the associated risks, are detailed in two key report series: the Auckland Region Climate Change Projections and Impacts[7] and the Climate Change Risk in Auckland technical report series[8].

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

68.       There is broad agreement across the council group that better integration in water-related matters is needed, and that improvements in investment and decision-making processes are possible.

69.       Staff have worked across the council group to develop the Water Strategy’s core content through working groups, workshops, and review of material.

70.       The strategic shifts and actions in the Water Strategy represent significant change in the way that the council group approaches water-related challenges and opportunities in Auckland. In time, the way that staff work and the tools they have available will change. Greater and more coordinated oversight of resources that are used to deliver water outcomes is essential.

71.       The Water Strategy embeds concepts like mauri and water-sensitive design into council’s approach going forward. Actions require careful, considered partnership with mana whenua to create new frameworks that will guide decision-making. Coordinated education and upskilling programmes for staff will be needed to enable successful implementation.

72.       Of note is the action to implement a council group knowledge governance framework for water. This will mean review and redesign of processes governing the production of knowledge; how council mobilises knowledge for different users and uses; and how council promotes the use of knowledge. The framework will help facilitate a culture change across the council group, encouraging the sharing of knowledge across departments and organisations, and better connecting teams in the ownership of knowledge and insights.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

73.       Staff held workshops with all local boards in late 2018 on the Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei discussion document and sought their feedback through formal business meetings. Local board resolutions were provided to the Environment and Community Committee in December 2018 when the discussion document was approved for public consultation.

74.       During public engagement, local boards hosted many of the Have Your Say consultation events and helped to ensure local views were fed into the feedback. This feedback has been an input to the development of the strategy. There was broad support for the vision, values, issues, processes and principles presented in the discussion document. The Environment and Climate Change Committee adopted the framework as the basis for developing the Auckland water strategy.

75.       More information on local board feedback is available in supporting material to the ‘Public feedback on the Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei’ discussion document (CP2018/25165). Key themes from local board engagement are presented below. Staff have designed the strategic shifts and actions to address these key themes – these are noted in italics:

i)             a desire to improve engagement with local communities and deliver targeted education programmes – Empowering Aucklanders strategic shift

ii)           recognising water is a limited resource, that access to water is a human right and supply must be allocated fairly – Water Security and Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access strategic shifts

iii)          a need to improve the diminishing water quality of local water bodies including urban streams, gulfs and harbours – Restoring and Enhancing water ecosystems strategic shift

iv)          a need to carefully manage urban development and take up opportunities to embed water-sensitive design - Integrated Land use and Water Planning strategic shift

v)           a need for proactive monitoring and enforcement, supported by a robust and transparent evidence base – Pooling Knowledge strategic shift.

76.       Note also that local boards provided feedback on several water-related topics that were not part of discussion document’s scope. This included water infrastructure, the importance of future proofing our assets, incorporating sustainable options such as grey-water reuse and roof collection, and the management of contaminant run-off and stormwater discharges. These issues have been incorporated into the strategy – see regenerative water infrastructure strategic shift.

77.       Local Board Chairs were invited to workshops held with the Environment and Climate Change Committee during strategy development. Chairs received explanatory memos and supporting material ahead of workshops.

78.       Local boards will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the draft strategy in the first half of 2022.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

79.       Every iwi and hapū has associations with particular waterbodies[9] that are reflected in their whakapapa, waiata, and whaikōrero tuku iho (stories of the past). Protecting the health and mauri of our freshwater ecosystems is fundamental to providing for the food, materials, customary practices, te reo Māori, and overall well-being of iwi and hapū.

80.       Water is recognised as a significant issue in the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum 10-year Strategic Plan, particularly in its objectives to fulfil member iwi’s roles as kaitiaki and to improve and enhance te mauri o te wai. Involvement in the Auckland Water Strategy also features in the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum’s 2021-22 Annual Plan.

81.       The Water Strategy project reported monthly to Te Pou Taiao (the Environment subcommittee of the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum).

82.       Engagement with Māori that has informed this work includes:

i)             Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum Guidance to the Water Strategy 2019

ii)           submissions to the Our Water Future Public Discussion Document 2019

iii)          Te Pou Taiao engagement throughout 2021

iv)          individual engagement with iwi partners 2021 including face-to-face hui.

83.       See Our Water Future: Report on Māori response to Auckland Council Water Strategy consultation for further information on the submissions of Māori who responded to public discussion document consultation. Key themes from Māori engagement are presented below. Staff have designed the strategic shifts and actions to address these key themes – these are noted in italics:

i)             Māori are committed to the maintenance of the mauri of water and they want to be a part of the conversation – Te Tiriti Partnership and Empowering Aucklanders strategic shifts

ii)           Awareness/Education (concerns for peoples’ priorities, climate change has arrived – inevitable there will be changing water patterns) – Empowering Aucklanders strategic shift

iii)          Water sovereignty (should be allowed water tanks on our properties) – Water Security strategic shift

iv)          Reciprocity (look after our environment it will continue to look after us) – Restore and Enhance Water Ecosystems, Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access and Regenerative Water Infrastructure strategic shifts.

84.       During 2021 the council combined engagement for three significant work programmes focused on water:

i)             the development of the Auckland Water Strategy

ii)           council’s implementation programme for the National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management

iii)          sharing information on central government’s Three Waters Reform programme.

85.       Staff worked together to coordinate their mana whenua engagement and provide a ‘joined-up’ engagement process for mana whenua. This approach sought to respond to mana whenua requests for the council to be coordinated and aligned in its mana whenua engagement.


 

 

86.       Feedback has been organised into high-level themes below:

i)             the council should align engagement on water to mana whenua aspirations. Successful Engagement requires the council to work carefully, sensitively, and collaboratively

ii)           engagement with individual entities should be prioritised. Collective engagement, such as that undertaken through Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum (TMMWF), can play an important role.

iii)          the council should use existing statutory provisions available to them to devolve environmental monitoring, consenting and allocation decisions[10]. Some of the specific functions mentioned included water monitoring, resource consenting, and water allocation decisions

iv)          Several groups expressed a desire for what one group called ‘kaitiaki flows’: water allocations specific to local iwi and may be for any combination of commercial, environmental, or cultural uses.

v)           mana whenua were concerned mauri and te maui or te wai might lose its wider significance if its meaning was reduced to a single indicator such as water quality, or if the council re-frames mauri into bureaucratic and/or policy terms

vi)          mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) can play a role in helping council deliver on the vision of te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau; however, this was accompanied by specific views on how mātauranga Māori should be used and by whom including that engagement with mātauranga Māori requires mana whenua leadership and direction as mātauranga has a local expression - the mātauranga of wai (water) is held by local people, at the level of the whānau and marae.

87.       In response to this feedback, the Water Strategy provides for a growing partnership with Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua over time. Specific elements of the strategy that address partnership include:

i)             reflecting the treaty context at a higher level within the framework

ii)           clearly articulating where there is opportunity for mana whenua to direct and/or lead on actions

iii)          ensuring the actions that refer to mauri also link to provisions for mana whenua participation/direction

iv)          supporting accountability and implementation by putting timeframes and responsible parties alongside the Water Strategy actions (see Appendix A).

88.       Note that the council, through the Water Strategy project, has also partnered with Te Pou Taiao to develop a mātauranga-led benchmarking framework. Staff intend to return to the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum to provide opportunity to feedback on the draft strategy before final adoption.

89.       Note that the secretariat of the Independent Māori Statutory Board participated in staff workshops and was invited to input into the development of the emerging framework and actions during their development.


 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

90.       The proposed Water Strategy sets out a range of actions to be implemented over time for the council group. The actions fall within two broad timeframes: near term (year one and years one – three) and medium term (years four – ten). Near term actions are prescriptive and specific. Medium term actions are more illustrative and require further development to implement successfully.

91.       Implementing the proposed Water Strategy actions will have budgetary implications in time.  Cost scenarios have not been undertaken for the actions as this is work that is required as the group works through the implementation of the strategy.  Most actions do not commit the council group to a singular solution, but rather to investigate options and their associated cost within the action, for subsequent decision making.  From a cost perspective it is expected that the actions associated with each strategic shift will be possible through:

i)             providing clear strategic direction to improve current processes (no new spend)

ii)           redirecting current spend to higher priority activity aligned to strategic direction

iii)          new spend, prioritised through council processes (i.e. Annual Budget and Long-Term Plan)

92.       Over the next 30 years, the council expects to spend approximately $85 billion on infrastructure for three waters alone (capital and operational expenditure). There is considerable scope to align that spend to the vision of the water strategy.

93.       Where actions do require additional spend, such spend must be considered through council’s Annual Plan and Long-term Plan processes. Additional spend would not be limited the three waters and would include all council group functions related to water outcomes.

94.       It is also noted that central government’s messaging for its Three Waters Reform programme suggests the proposed new water entities may have access to greater lending facilities. This would presumably impact delivery of three waters infrastructure and services in Auckland, some of which would relate to the proposed Water Strategy’s strategic shifts and associated actions. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Assessment

Mitigation/Control measures

Insufficient or inconsistent implementation of the strategy

Medium risk

 

Poor coordination is a key driver for the strategy and implementation must respond to this reality.

The Strategy needs buy-in across the council leadership and consistent political leadership to ensure coherent implementation.

 

Staff with responsibilities for shifts and actions have been engaged in the development of the strategy.

 

A Water Strategy programme implementation coordinator will provide support to implementation.

 

Central government reform: if established, a new three waters entity disregards strategic intent of Water Strategy

High risk

 

The council should use the Water Strategy to assist in articulating the long-term aims for water in Auckland. The Strategy may also be useful to guide discussions during any transition process.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

95.       This report recommends that Appendix A be endorsed as the core content of the Water Strategy. If endorsed, the immediate next step will be to draft a final document based on that content for the Environment and Climate Change Committee’s consideration and adoption in 2022. A high-level implementation plan for the Water Strategy, with action-owners, will accompany the final document.

96.       The actions related to each strategic shift may require further refinement and the core content will require editing appropriate for an external-facing document. A workshop of the Environment and Climate Change Committee on actions and the draft strategy will be scheduled prior to the Water Strategy document being presented to Environment and Climate Change Committee for adoption.

97.       Local Boards will have the opportunity to provide feedback on a draft Strategy in 2022.

98.       Note also that the mātauranga-led framework under development is planned to go to the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum for endorsement in December 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Core Content for Auckland Water Strategy framework

27

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Toby Shephard – Strategist

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

Transport Emissions Reduction Plan - Progress Update

File No.: CP2021/13763

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide a progress update on the development Transport Emissions Reduction Plan and seek approval for early implementation of key interventions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are developing a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to give effect to the commitments in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri commits to halving regional emissions by 2030 and transitioning to net zero emissions by 2050.

3.      The Environment and Climate Change Committee endorsed the proposed approach for the TERP and its governance framework in August 2021. The TERP will provide an evidenced approach (a recommended pathway) that achieves a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions in Auckland by 2030, as modelled in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri’s decarbonisation pathway.

4.      The development of the TERP is guided by a Transport Emissions Reference Group that includes elected members, and representatives from the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum, Independent Māori Statutory Board and the Auckland Transport Board. The reference group will recommend pathway to the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Auckland Transport Board for endorsement by June 2022. Implementation of the TERP pathway will require significant additional funding and urgent action by Government and the Auckland Council group.

5.      The future of Auckland’s transport system is crucial to our response to climate change, as transport currently accounts for over 40 per cent of the region’s emissions. Achieving the modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions will require transformational change in how people and goods travel in Tāmaki Makaurau. Local and central government will also need to reform many of their planning and investment processes in order to move away from business-as-usual approaches.

6.      The TERP will require significant improvements to public transport and active modes, greater enablement of urban intensification, policies that discourage car use such as road pricing and work from home policies, increased uptake of low emissions vehicles (including freight vehicles) and a range of behaviour change programmes that work for different communities.

7.      The TERP is being developed in the wider context of increasing Government action on climate change. This includes the development of the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), which is expected to introduce policy changes and additional funding to better enable the delivery of sustainable transport modes.

8.      A bespoke TERP emissions model has been developed to identify the scale of the challenge. Preliminary modelling indicates that change is possible, but the level of transformation required is immense. Three key observations arise from the modelling work so far:

·        although central government has outlined a number of actions in its ERP, these do not go far enough, nor do they act fast enough to achieve a 64 per cent reduction in emissions. TERP must fill a large gap between the baseline and the target.

·        all levers across transport and a range of other sectors will need to be pulled as hard as they can be within the timeframe available.

·        among the levers, mode shift is by far the most powerful to meet the 2030 target. However, significant mode shift to all sustainable modes is required, especially active modes. A compact urban form and accelerated decarbonisation of the public and private vehicle fleet are also crucial.

9.      Auckland has less than 100 months to meet its 2030 emissions reduction target – urgent action is required. This report includes recommendations for enabling early interventions which can be progressed in advance of the approval of a TERP pathway.

10.    Achieving a low carbon transport system will bring many other benefits for all Aucklanders, including cleaner air, safer streets, reduced transport costs and easier ways of getting around the city. The TERP will set out a pathway to deliver this vision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      tuhi /note the progress update provided on the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan, in particular the scale of the challenge to meet Auckland’s transport emissions reduction target and that every available lever will have to be pulled as hard as possible to meet that target

b)      tuhi /note the emphasis that Auckland Transport is already placing on climate change

c)      tuhi /note that mode shift is the most powerful lever for reducing transport emissions, and that some action can be taken in advance of having an emission reduction pathway endorsed

d)      request Auckland Council staff to progress the following actions, and to report back to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in March 2022 with a progress update:

i)             an investigation into council’s own corporate mobility to ensure alignment with the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan, which would cover, amongst other things, the provision of corporate car parking

ii)            further and more detailed research into all people’s willingness and ability to change travel behaviour, taking note of the equity implications of mode shift, the barriers that people face, and the importance of a just transition

iii)          an investigation into a methodology and feasibility of a region-wide spatial assessment of access via walking, cycling and public transport

e)      request Auckland Transport and Auckland Council staff jointly progress the following for early delivery and report back to the Transport Emissions Reference Group with a progress update in March 2022:

i)             development of a public communications campaign on climate change to present a vision of a low carbon transport system and build momentum for action

ii)            a tactical behavioural change programme focused on mode shift to public transport and active modes, for implementation as soon as possible

iii)          work to ensure that all capital and renewals projects on corridors designated as part of the Future Connect active modes strategic networks include safe walking, cycling and micro-mobility infrastructure

iv)          the development of a pipeline of active and public transport projects that could be ready for delivery to capitalise on any potential funding injection from central government

v)           an investigation into the feasibility of different options of public transport fare reductions for particular groups in advance of Government providing further details on its commitment to reducing public transport fares

vi)          an assessment of how the faster roll-out of the public transport related minor infrastructure programme could be resourced

 

Horopaki

Context

Recap

11.    On 11 March 2021 (PLA/2021/15) and 24 June 2021 (PLA/2021/61), the Planning Committee directed Auckland Council and Auckland Transport staff to jointly develop a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP).

12.    The aim of the TERP is to establish a pathway to achieve a modelled 64 percent reduction in transport emissions in Auckland by 2030.

13.    The proposed approach to this work, and its governance framework, were endorsed by the Environment and Climate Change Committee in August 2021 (ECC/2021/32). As part of this approach the TERP will identify:

·        a wide range of actions that will reduce the region’s transport emissions, drawing on international and local best practice

·        the scale of change required to achieve the 2030 target and an evidenced approach to implement this change (a recommended pathway)

·        the costs, benefits and equity impacts of delivering the recommended pathway, as well as strategies to minimise adverse impacts and amplify co-benefits

·        the structural, regulatory and other impediments that will need to be addressed to enable rapid reductions in transport emissions

·        critical next steps to support the successful implementation of the recommended pathway, e.g. delivery targets and monitoring framework.

14.    The Committee also established a Transport Emissions Reference Group to provide direction on the development of the TERP. There are nine members in the reference group including three councillors, two representatives from the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, one member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board, and three Auckland Transport board members.

15.    The Reference Group has met twice to date.  The group has provided strong direction that urgent and innovative change is required, and that a business as usual approach based on incremental change cannot achieve the transformation the climate change emergency demands.  The group will recommend a pathway for endorsement by the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Auckland Transport Board in the second quarter of 2022.  

Auckland Council policy context and key upcoming decisions 

16.    The TERP is intended to deliver on commitments made in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan (Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri), specifically the commitment to halve Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 2030. The decarbonisation pathway in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri models potential contributions from different sectors to the overall target. This includes a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions, the scale of which reflects the even greater difficulty in reducing emissions in other sectors.           

17.    The 50 per cent reduction target and the pathway set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri have been endorsed by the C40 cities network as compliant with the need to keep global warming below 1.5°C.   

18.    For council to play its role in achieving emissions reductions of this magnitude, it is critical that decision-making across the organisation aligns with the need to reduce transport emissions.  In the near future elected members will be required to make decisions in relation to the parking strategy and the delivery of cycling facilities, both of which are crucial to mode shift. 

19.    Similarly, Auckland Council’s response to and implementation of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS – UD) will be equally critical.  Enabling greater intensification in the existing urban area, while substantially cutting back greenfield development, will be key to long term mode shift and reduced average journey distances.   

20.    The review of Auckland Council’s Development Contributions (DCs) policy will also have a material impact on transport emissions. DCs are a mechanism for Council to fund bulk infrastructure costs attributed to growth. Ensuring DCs reflect the true cost of infrastructure provision, particularly in greenfields where DCs have been kept artificially low, will remove some of the perverse incentives that have encouraged urban sprawl.

21.    High levels of public support are crucial in transforming the way Aucklanders get around their city.  Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri was consulted on widely and received significant public support, with 91 per cent of respondents agreeing that it either fully or partially takes Auckland in the right direction to act on climate change. Public submissions on the draft Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-31 (RLTP) also showed strong support for sustainable modes such as public transport, cycling and walking, to receive greater priority in the plan.

Government policy context

22.    The TERP is being developed in the wider context of increasing Government action on climate change. Central government is due to finalise its Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) in May 2022.  Its recent ERP discussion document set out targets in key areas, including a 20 per cent reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled, and a large number of high-level policy interventions that will be required to achieve those targets.

23.    Although Government shares council’s long-term goal of net zero emissions by 2050, the discussion document was released prior to the Government’s recent commitment to halving emissions by 2030 and thus the targets do not reflect this interim goal.  Nevertheless, the document describes a set of very ambitious policy interventions that would bring about substantial change to the transport system and are well aligned with the developing TERP.

24.    This alignment is critical given urgent and radical Government action is required for Auckland to achieve its emission reduction targets.  Similarly, Government requires transformation of Auckland’s transport system to achieve its own nation-wide targets.        

25.    Key interventions signalled by Government in the ERP discussion document include:

·        substantially increasing funding to improve public and active transport linked to clearer expectations for delivery

·        cheaper public transport fares

·        enabling and implementing congestion pricing in Auckland (by 2025) and elsewhere

·        reforming the land transport funding system

·        regulatory improvements to enable road space to be more easily reallocated for active and public transport 

·        require transport emissions assessments for urban developments and factor these into planning decisions

·        changing policy settings to better enable improvements when delivering renewals projects.    

26.    Auckland Council recently submitted on the discussion document offering its strong support for the proposed transport interventions, while noting the need for even greater ambition from Government and the need to consider additional approaches to reducing emissions.

27.    The Government’s resource management reforms will also place a much greater emphasis on the need for climate action, including the need for developments to demonstrate how they will mitigate their emissions impact. As a result of these reforms, councils will be expected to factor in climate mitigation and sequestration in planning documents.

28.    The NPS - UD is another key instrument due to take effect in the near future that, over time, has the potential to enable significant emissions reductions through more compact urban forms.  As mentioned above, Auckland Council’s response to the NPS will be crucial.        It is important to note that systemic changes of the nature that will be delivered through the ERP, resource management reforms and the NPS - UD, will create an environment that is much more conducive to reducing transport emissions than is currently the case – the near future context will be very different from what it is today.  In turn, council and Government should expect increasingly greater returns on their investment in mode shift and fleet decarbonisation.      

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Scale of the challenge

29.    Analysis is being undertaken to understand the scale of the challenge for Auckland. In particular, modelling is seeking to understand:

·    the baseline context, including the impact of current planned investment and the impact of emission targets set out in the Government’s draft ERP;

·    the gap remaining, after taking into account the baseline reductions expected;

·    the levers available, in terms of the areas of our transport system (and associate behaviour change) that the plan will need to intervene in; and

·    the impact of these levers on emissions reductions.

30.    Preliminary modelling shows that even with Government’s ERP targets, a very large gap remains between the baseline and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri’s modelled 64 per cent pathway. This reflects the fact that the ERP’s targets are aligned to a 2035 timeframe and are not configured to deliver a halving of emissions by then (let alone 2030). For example, although the ERP sets a target of 30% electric vehicles (EVs) in the light vehicle fleet by 2035, much of this uptake is expected to occur between 2030-2035. Consequently, the projections for EVs by 2030 are only around 8%, which is still too low to have a significant impact.

31.    The below figure illustrates the gap between the projected baseline (shown in red) and the target (shown in green).

 

Chart, pie chart

Description automatically generated

32.    Because central government’s timeframe is different to the TERP, the TERP needs to pull hard on the levers available and advocate for Government to bring forward the actions and investment it outlines in its ERP. In its present state, the ERP leaves too many of its actions until after 2030. Therefore, the TERP cannot rely on Government’s ERP alone to meet its target; the ERP is not sufficient to meet Auckland’s commitment to halve its emissions by 2030.

33.    TERP modelling, therefore, seeks to understand what additional levers the plan will need to pull, including both the areas in which central government might be able to increase its ambition (such as EVs) as well as areas more under the influence of Auckland Council (such as public transport and active modes investments and land use planning). In addition to Government actions, modelling also demonstrates that the scale of the challenge is such that it will require significant actions from business as well, notably freight, shipping, and aviation (acknowledging the role that both central and local government has to play in these sectors).

Graphical user interface, application

Description automatically generated

34.    As the above graph shows, although there is some reduction of light vehicle emissions expected in the baseline by 2030 (baseline projection), this is not enough. The transport sector also includes significant emissions from road freight, as well as shipping and aviation. These must be addressed in order to meet the modelled 64% reduction across the whole transport sector.

 

 

35.    Moreover, although the initial intention of this work was to explore multiple pathways to meet the target, modelling is showing that there likely is only one pathway available to Auckland Council: the plan needs every lever available, and it needs to pull each of them as hard as it can.

36.    For example, as mentioned above, the modelling unpinning the draft ERP includes an assumption of a complete ban on ICE light vehicle imports from 2030 onwards. Modelling has analysed the impact of even stronger action in this area. Instead of 8% at 2030, TERP modelled a faster EV uptake scenario, around twice that of the ERP. However, even this assumption nets only a 5% reduction in overall emissions, far short of the 64 percent target. Consequently, TERP cannot assume that there is a pathway that favours EVs versus (for example) another pathway that favours mode shift. It needs to be both.

37.    Importantly, modelling shows mode shift is consistently performing significantly above any other lever available. Current modelling indicates around 60% of the necessary emissions reductions will come from shifting car trips into other modes, such as walking, cycling, and PT trips. Mode shift is clearly the most potent lever TERP has, offering more than triple the emissions reductions of any other lever. There are two important further observations to make regarding mode shift:

·    the plan needs maximum mode shift to all sustainable modes; and

·    in addition to the requisite extra services and infrastructure, the capacity for mode shift depends heavily on Council’s land use planning.

38.    TERP will require maximum mode shift to all sustainable modes. Modelling has shown that there is not a plausible public transport mode shift scenario vs a scenario that favours active modes; rather the plan will need a pathway that maximises mode shift to both public transport and active modes.

39.    Auckland requires as much shift as possible away from car trips. Active modes are absolutely essential in spreading this shift. If council does not invest in walking and cycling, modelling shows that the public transport system would need to carry over 10 times as many trips per year as the pre-COVID peak of around 100 million in order to shift enough trips away from cars. It would likely be impossible in the timeframe available to develop that much public transport infrastructure.

40.    Yet active modes will not be enough on their own either, since the distances Aucklanders travel often exceed the reach of a typical active journey and not everyone can walk or cycle with the same ease. Therefore, the TERP needs a public transport network that is significantly faster, more connected, and more convenient, as well as a vastly improved network of safe walking and cycling infrastructure. 

41.    The ability to achieve the requisite level of mode shift depends heavily on land use. The plan will require active modes to relieve the cost of developing enough public transport to take the full amount of mode shift required. In turn, this requires land use planning processes to help support the transition of the city over time into one that better enables people to walk and cycle more. This means two things in particular:

·    any development that would lead to Auckland growing sparser and more disconnected must be avoided; and conversely,

·    development that leads to a more closely connected urban environment must be actively supported.

42.    To reach a modelled 64 per cent reduction, Aucklanders need to have more options for walking, cycling, or catching PT to make their trips, and in many cases this is shaped by our urban form.

 

 

43.    Auckland’s urban form is an integral part of the TERP and therefore it too requires transformational change. The TERP depends on an urban form that is significantly different to the car-dependent form that has characterised Auckland for the past few decades. However, just as our current form has taken years to develop, so too will change. Most importantly, since land use effects necessarily lag their implementation, council and Government need to ensure that decisions made now enable the compact urban form required to deliver emissions reductions in the future. 

44.    Overall, indicative modelling is showing that it is possible to reduce our emissions by 64 percent. While the scale of what can plausibly be achieved across different levers is still being analysed, it is clear that the pathway will be extremely ambitious and will require all actors to play their part: central and local government, businesses, and Aucklanders themselves. It’s also clear that there will not be a selection of different pathways to choose from: there will be only one core pathway, comprised of every lever pulling as hard as it can.

45.    The scale of the challenge is enormous; but so too is the significance of the moment. To meet the target, Auckland cannot rely on incremental change; it needs transformation. There is so much that will need to shift and only 8 years (less than 100 months) remaining to achieve it. Therefore, the task is time-critical: council must act now to halve emissions by 2030 and thus do its part to limit global warming to 1.5C.

46.    This is not only possible, but also necessary, to transform our transportation system into the kind of system that will support equitable, multi-modal, healthy, fast, and efficient transport long into the future.

Case study research

47.    Research is being undertaken into the approaches that other cities are taking to reducing their transport emissions. More than a dozen case studies have been investigated so far from across Aotearoa and around the world, including cities spanning all six continents.

48.    The research has been looking both at the actions which cities have already taken as well as their plans for achieving transport emissions reductions in the future. An important focus has been understanding the similarities and differences between Auckland and the case study cities, to determine the extent to which the research findings are applicable to the Auckland context.

49.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri’s targets of halving emissions by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050 are shared by more than 1,000 cities globally which have joined the Cities Race to Zero campaign, an initiative coordinated by a range of international organisations including C40. While some cities have had climate plans in place for several decades, many others are at a similar stage to Auckland in their emissions reduction journeys. A common theme across all the case studies is a recognition of the integral role that transport needs to play in achieving emissions reductions.

50.    Some case study cities have historically had lower transport emissions than Auckland, but there are also examples of formerly car-dependent cities which have achieved transformational change, particularly in shifting journeys from private vehicles to more sustainable modes such as walking, cycling and public transport.

51.    Initial findings include the need for a multi-faceted approach which addresses all aspects of a city’s transport system and focuses on achieving fundamental system-wide change. Cities which are on a trajectory to reduce their transport emissions tend to have adopted an integrated package of measures, consisting of a mixture of policy changes, infrastructure projects and service improvements.

52.    Examples of specific actions which other cities are pursuing include the rapid roll out of cycling infrastructure in cities such as London, Paris and Vancouver; expansion of rapid transit systems in Copenhagen, Seattle and Singapore; and electrification of bus fleets in Oslo, Coventry and Medellín. Other key trends from the case study research include incentivising the uptake of electric vehicles, increasing the efficiency of freight distribution and aligning future development and intensification with public transport networks.

53.    While large infrastructure projects feature as a core element of many cities’ plans, the long lead-in times and high capital costs of such projects mean that cities have also recognised the importance of utilising existing infrastructure more effectively, including reallocating road space to facilitate mode shift. In many cases, large infrastructure projects are supported by a range of complementary initiatives to maximise their potential to achieve emissions reductions, such as upzoning land around new rapid transit stations or installing large bicycle parking facilities at transport hubs to accommodate multi-modal journeys.

54.    Research work on case study cities continues and lessons learned will be considered for the TERP as is applicable.

Wider impacts of transport emissions reduction

55.    Auckland has the fifth highest rate of car ownership per capita in the OECD, reflecting many decades of transport and land use policies that have prioritised car travel over public transport, walking and cycling. As a result, Auckland also has one of the highest rates of transport emissions per capita in the world.

56.    Auckland’s car dependency has resulted in a series of social, financial and environmental challenges, including a serious road safety problem, higher infrastructure costs, traffic congestion, lack of travel choices, and a range of negative environmental impacts such as air and noise pollution, and higher transport emissions relative to comparable international cities.

57.    In addition, those without car access in Auckland suffer disadvantage. These groups include children, the elderly, the disabled community, women and LGBTQI+, people on low-incomes, Māori and ethnic minority groups.

58.    Many of the low carbon policies and investments introduced for emissions reduction purposes would also achieve other social, cultural, environmental, and financial objectives for the region. These include greater access and travel choice, improved public health and road safety, reduced transport costs, improved air quality and noise levels, and greater community resilience.

59.    A cost-benefit analysis of the recommended TERP pathway will be undertaken in 2022 to evaluate the net cost or benefit to Aucklanders of the proposed interventions required to meet the region’s 2030 target. The costs and benefits will be assessed against the counterfactual of policies and investments described in Auckland’s current land use and transport plans.

60.    In practice, not every impact can be quantified. In these circumstances, reasonable proxies and/or description (where proxies are not possible) will be provided for decision-makers to understand the cost or benefit associated with the recommended pathway.  

Impediments to the implementation of TERP

61.    The recommended pathway will set out the need for urgent and transformative change across all aspects of the transport system to achieve the scale of emissions reduction required.  However, transforming the way Aucklanders get around their city and the composition of the vehicle fleet cannot be achieved in an acceptable timeframe using existing tools and within the current planning and funding framework. 

62.    Significant reform of the institutional, fiscal, regulatory, cultural and other settings that govern the planning of the transport system is urgently required.  An important aspect of the TERP is a workstream to identify the impediments to the rapid and effective implementation of the recommended pathway. 

63.    While this workstream is still in its early stages, several key areas of investigation have been identified including (but not limited to):

·        business case assessment processes

·        impediments to road space reallocation

·        transport funding framework

·        regulatory frameworks that disincentivise walking and cycling

·        bus driver shortage.     

64.    Work is already underway outside of the TERP to bring about improvement in some of these areas (the Accessible Streets and Reshaping Streets work programmes, for example, led by Waka Kotahi and the Ministry of Transport respectively).  The TERP will identify and prioritise actions to address key impediments to implementation, leveraging off existing work where possible.  This will require close collaboration between officials from Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi and the Ministry of Transport.       

Stakeholder engagement feedback

65.    The development of the TERP is supported by targeted engagement with elected members, Mana Whenua and Mataawaka, central government, and a diverse group of stakeholders from representative organisations.

66.    The TERP stakeholder engagement process is divided into two phases:

·        Phase 1 (October – December 2021): To support the development of pathways by identifying actions that will contribute to a rapid and substantial reduction in transport emissions in Auckland, and barriers that prevent Aucklanders, businesses and industry from transitioning to low carbon transport modes.

·        Phase 2 (February – April 2022): To support the identification of the costs and benefits of transport decarbonisation (including the impacts on disadvantaged communities) and the development of a recommended pathway that will achieve rapid emissions reduction while having a high degree of deliverability.

67.    Staff have met with a range of transport advocacy groups and council’s demographic advisory panels in Phase 1 of the engagement process (see Attachment B for a list of stakeholders).

68.    In general, there is strong consensus that Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have an important role to play in reducing the region’s transport emissions. In addition, most groups support the strong emphasis on mode shift as the key action to take to meet Auckland’s 2030 target.

69.    Some stakeholders have provided helpful technical feedback on the TERP emissions model and supported its use as part of the development of the recommended pathway.

70.    Some groups have stressed the need to understand the underlying barriers that prevent different communities from transitioning to low carbon modes. These barriers include the high cost of electric vehicles, shift work and low-density employment areas that are hard to be serviced by public transport, and personal safety concerns for certain groups, especially when travelling at night.

71.    The need to ensure a Just Transition and address current inequities of the transport system is a common theme. Deliberative democracy and more participatory decision-making have been suggested as ways to ensure that decisions made on emissions reduction reflect the views of Auckland’s diverse communities.

72.    Communications is another common theme. Some stakeholders have offered to support Auckland Council and Auckland Transport in the messaging around the TERP, recognising the criticality of communicating the scale of change required in a way that resonates with Aucklanders. Others point to the importance of providing the necessarily infrastructure and service improvements before requesting travel behaviour change.

73.    Some stakeholders have pointed to the internal consistencies within Auckland Council and Auckland Transport that prevent full implementation of the TERP, e.g. revenue generated from parking provision that contradicts mode shift goals. Some of these are included in the next section as areas for priority improvements.

 

Auckland Transport climate emphasis

74.    It is to be noted that Auckland Transport has increased its emphasis on addressing climate change by stepping up its planning across a range of programmes. Delivery of these programmes will be greatly enhanced with changed parking policy.

75.    This programme of stepped-up planning includes:

·    a parking policy that will unlock the ability to repurpose strategic routes for active modes and public transport and establish principles for its implementation

·    a refresh of the cycling programme business case, focusing on delivering a greater number of kilometres, and, where possible, providing those kilometres at lower cost

·    development of the walking programme business case (a first for Aotearoa New Zealand)

·    an environment action plan which sets a range of environmental targets

·    reducing emissions through trials of low carbon materials and green infrastructure (e.g. green walls and roofs)

·    the RTN stations access study

·    the single stage business case for bus network improvements

·    establishing a dedicated, executive-level sustainability forum to focus on meeting sustainability goals and targets.

76.    The 2021-2031 Regional Land Transport Plan supports the eight ‘priorities for action’ set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. It includes extensive investment in network infrastructure and services, designed to encourage mode shift away from private vehicles and towards lower emission public and active transport options. Over $10.5 billion, or 57 percent of the total capital improvement programme proposed to be made over the next 10 years is invested in public transport or walking and cycling. The programme will also make significant progress towards decarbonising Auckland’s public transport fleet by electrifying the rail line to Pukekohe, accelerating the Low Emissions Bus Roadmap, and starting decarbonisation of the ferry fleet.

Early implementation

77.    Climate change is complex, and the implementation of a decarbonisation pathway is uncertain. Both the TERP reference group and the wider Auckland Transport Board have provided strong direction that the climate emergency requires decision-makers and agencies to take quick and decisive action, even when full information of the impacts of those actions are not yet available. In many cases however, the positive impacts of these actions are clear and compelling.

78.    Given the need for quick action staff propose the following policies as areas to consider for early implementation. These actions can and should be taken now and need not wait for the adoption of a recommended pathway.

79.    These proposed actions also align with recent feedback from stakeholders that, for the council group to be able to lead on climate change (as previous feedback strongly indicated it should), it needs to lead by example and ‘walk the talk’. Council cannot expect communities and business to change when it follows policies and practices itself that do not support a reduction in emissions.

Leadership on corporate sustainable mobility

80.    There is a risk to Auckland Council’s efforts to build public support for the TERP should it not be perceived by stakeholders and Aucklanders in general as role modelling best practice in terms of reducing emissions from its own corporate activities.  This was a key theme that came out of public feedback in relation to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.

 

 

81.    Council has a goal to reduce corporate fleet emissions by 50 per cent by 2025. To achieve this target, the council is making a concerted effort to reduce the size of its corporate vehicle fleet and transition the remaining fleet to electric vehicles. As part of this, e-bikes and HOP cards have been made available for staff business travel, and online meetings are encouraged.

82.    However, it is likely that Auckland Council can do more to demonstrate leadership and good role modelling in terms of emissions reduction. Staff recommend that the committee requests an investigation that would look into the emissions arising from Auckland Council’s corporate activities including, amongst other things, fleet composition, utilisation, and the provision of corporate car parking. It is worth noting that Auckland Transport no longer provides car parking for its senior staff.  

Region-wide spatial assessment of access via walking, cycling and public transport to inform future transport investment and land use planning decisions

83.    Improving the ability of Aucklanders to access most of their daily needs easily and safely by walking, cycling or some other form of micro-mobility, is crucial if the scale of mode shift required by the TERP is to be achieved.  This concept is often known as the 15 minute city.

84.    The council group needs to better understand the current state of accessibility to amenities via walking, cycling and public transport in order to make informed decisions on where improvements are most needed. To do this a spatial accessibility assessment is required.  An example is the Rapid Transit Network (RTN) Stations study which Auckland Transport has recently embarked upon. This assessment would not only inform transport investment decisions but could also be a key input into land use planning processes.   

85.    Assessments of this nature are not currently in work programmes and if they are to proceed would have to be prioritised in light of resource constraints and by geographic area.  Further work into the potential methodology and feasibility of this assessment is required.

Delivering the Future Connect strategic walking, cycling and micro-mobility strategic networks

86.    Improving road safety and providing better travel choices are core priorities for Auckland Transport. These two objectives are synergistic and there are many opportunities to achieve both outcomes in transport projects.

87.    Auckland Transport’s Future Connect is an important planning tool that identifies the strategic networks for modes such as walking, cycling and micromobility, and public transport. In the past, a number of roading improvement and safety projects have been delivered on corridors that are part of Future Connect’s strategic networks for walking, cycling and micromobility, without provision for these modes. 

88.    There is a need to align the delivery of the renewals, safety, and network optimisation programmes with the provision of safe active mode infrastructure. However various barriers have prevented this.

89.    Cost is one such barrier. Looking into this matter should consider whether safe active modes infrastructure that relies on road space reallocation and avoids kerb movements, could be provided relatively cost-effectively, without significantly adding to the project cost envelope. Also, if there is insufficient funding, whether a lower cost interim solution could be put in place until more funding is obtained or the street is renewed and a permanent solution is introduced.

Provision for safe active mode infrastructure in all capital and renewal projects on the Future Connect strategic walking, cycling and micro-mobility networks will assist greatly with enabling mode shift.

 

Developing a pipeline of sustainable transport projects ready for implementation and enabling faster delivery

90.    The Government is expected to announce details of a substantial increase in funding for walking, cycling and public transport as part of the final ERP and its budget 2022. In addition, work will soon commence on the Government Policy Statement on land transport 2024/25 – 2034/35 (GPS 2024), emphasising climate change outcomes and providing more clarity for decision makers that the National Land Transport Fund (NLTF) will support local projects with an emissions reduction focus. 

91.    To successfully leverage this potential funding injection, a pipeline of sustainable transport projects will be of great value so that it can be presented to the Government for consideration in 2022.

92.    Some pipeline projects would need to be delivered quickly, which requires a focus on achieving outcomes rather than abiding by business-as-usual planning and delivery processes. For example, tactical ‘street betterment’ that comes from inserting pop-up cycle and bus lanes as part of the planned renewal of road corridors. Interim improvements can be made quickly on the rapid and frequent transit networks, following the approach taken for the Northwestern Bus Improvements project. In this way, many more kilometres of sustainable transport improvements can be delivered across the region at a faster pace and lower cost, and with less disruption.

93.    It is critical, however, that pipeline projects have real impact, are worthy of receiving scarce funding and will bring about genuine benefits at a local level and across the network.

94.    A pipeline of active and public transport projects ready for delivery should be compiled to capitalise on any potential funding injection from central government.

Engagement and awareness campaigns to encourage mode shift

95.    ‘Avoid’ and ‘shift’ interventions will require a strong focus on behaviour change as more sustainable transport options are introduced.  The TERP Reference Group, elected members and the Auckland Transport Board have provided direction that a strong focus on marketing and behaviour change is required to deliver the scale of mode shift required.

96.    An intentional programme of interventions through social marketing, marketing campaigns, events, and community engagement is critical to help shift social norms. Strategically working with communities as and when new low carbon transport options are available to them is a cheap and effective way to ensure the successful uptake of new infrastructure and services. For example, Auckland Transport implemented the New Network – the radical restructuring of the city’s bus services – between 2016 and 2019. The New Network led to a significant increase in bus service kilometres across the region, with a particular boost in local services feeding train stations and providing local connections in the south and west rather than paralleling the rail network into the city centre.

However, Auckland Transport’s research indicates that more than half of all Aucklanders perceive that public transport does not go where they need to go, but this has not been tested against the real options available for the individuals surveyed. It is likely that many Aucklanders have an out-of-date perception of the public transport options available to them (pre-New Network rollout). It would therefore be beneficial to develop and implement an ongoing tactical marketing programme which is personalised, community-based and focused on educating Aucklanders about how the public transport system works (including fares), informing people about their local public transport options and equipping them to use public transport where it provides a viable alternative for particular journeys. A similar approach could be taken for Auckland Transport’s cycling programme. Reducing public transport fares

97.    In its ERP discussion document, Government stated that it will work with local government to reduce public transport fares.  From 1 July 2022 the Community Connect programme will be trialled in Auckland. This programme will enable Community Services Card holders to access half-price public transport fares at all times.

98.    This will go some way towards addressing concerns about the high cost of public transport fares for transport disadvantaged residents. However, there may be more that can be done in the short term to enable Auckland to leverage off the Government’s commitment to cheaper public transport.    

99.    Short distance fares are relatively low in Auckland, but longer-distance fares are relatively highly priced. With appropriate funding support, Auckland Transport could address this through measures such as capping long-distance fares at, for example, the 3-zone fare; by capping daily and weekly fares for individual HOP-card users at levels that would encourage more public transport use; and by introducing fare products which would encourage families and other groups to use public transport for travel off-peak including weekends.

100.  Similarly, council could ask the Government to remove its funding cap for the Super Gold fare concession, so that Auckland Transport could actively market public transport to the over-65 age group.

101.  The financial impacts and funding options for such an approach are not known at this stage. An investigation into the feasibility of different options for such an approach is required, and these findings should be available for consideration in advance of Government providing further details on its commitment to reducing public transport fares.

Public transport infrastructure programmes

102.  A comprehensive programme of major public transport projects will be completed by the second half of this decade, including the City Rail Link, the Northern Busway extension and the Eastern Busway.

103.  However, Auckland Transport’s minor infrastructure programme is potentially not as well resourced as major public transport projects.  A focus on accelerating the minor capex programme would see greater provision of minor public transport infrastructure throughout the network. This would include better located bus stops which prioritise walking catchments over traffic flow; safe and more direct access to and from stops, especially across busy roads; and better lighting in and around and leading to bus stops.

104.  This programme also needs to include the rapid roll-out of neighbourhood interchanges wherever frequent bus routes intersect with each other, to optimise the “network effect” which the New Network was designed to enable.

105.  These initiatives will inevitably require a “pop-up” approach which will enable a comprehensive programme to be implemented in the short term, albeit at a lower than ideal urban design standard, with a follow-up programme to improve the urban realm once the mode shift benefits have been realised.

106.  Accelerating the delivery of the minor capital expenditure programme for public transport will have funding implications.

107.  This would require an assessment of how the faster roll-out of the public transport related minor infrastructure programme could be resourced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

108.  Auckland has less than 100 months to transform its current transport and land use system to meet its 2030 emissions reduction target. Meeting this target will require a fundamental shift from traditional transport planning and investment processes. Incremental change, reliance on existing practices and focusing on standalone policy instruments will simply not be enough.

109.  Traditional transport planning focuses on increasing the utility of transport by making transport bigger, better or more efficient. These can be infrastructure projects that increase the capacity of the transport system to relieve congestion, and network and service improvements that enable more people to travel.

110.  These interventions tend to focus on improving performance at a congested point, either during rush hour traffic, or at a network choke point. Many of these projects also tend to include in their baseline assumption the goal to not make travel worse for existing drivers.

111.  A transport emissions reduction plan is fundamentally different to conventional transport plans for the simple reason that it is not aimed at increasing the utility of the transport system. The overriding strategic aim is to reduce emissions that result from transport. This means driving less and, when we have to get from one place to another, using shared and low emissions modes wherever possible.

112.  A transport emissions reduction plan needs an integrated mix of policies. Supply-side interventions that make public transport, walking and cycling more attractive will only lead to emissions reduction if they replace trips that were previously made in private cars. A stronger focus on demand-side approaches is also required, e.g. congestion pricing and changes to the supply and cost of parking.

113.  While technological innovation and fleet improvements will play an important role in the transition to low carbon transport, particularly beyond 2030, these policies need to be combined with interventions that reduce the demand for travel in private vehicles and increase the use of sustainable transport modes.

114.  The update aspects and related recommendations in this report have no direct climate impacts. Recommendations related to early implementation do have a direct bearing and have the aim of bringing about change that will help reduce transport emissions in both the short and long term.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

115.  Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are jointly developing the TERP. This is reflected in the composition of the working groups and in all levels of the governance framework. 

116.  The Auckland Transport Board is represented in the Transport Emissions Reference Group, which provides staff with oversight and direction on the TERP.

117.  The TERP’s recommended pathway will be recommended to both the Environment and Climate Change committee and the Auckland Transport Board for their endorsement in the second quarter of 2022.       

118.  Implementation of the TERP will require concerted action from multiple agencies. Auckland Transport will be particularly critical to the success of implementation given its key role in relation to many aspects of Auckland’s transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

119.  The TERP is a strategic regional plan and will not include area-specific projects. However, implementation of a transport decarbonisation pathway will have significant impacts at the local level.

120.  Local board feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice and the government’s Emissions Reduction Plan shows overwhelming support for more investment in sustainable transport. There is also broad support for policies that suppress private vehicle travel, such as congestion pricing, subject to a range of caveats, such as the adequate provision of alternatives.

121.  Local boards have a critical role to play in advocating for specific improvements that support their communities to transition to low carbon travel, e.g. addressing safety hotspots and improving the coverage, frequency and hours of operation for public transport.

122.  Successful implementation of the TERP at a local level will require CCOs to urgently review how they currently design, consult on, fund and implement minor capital works, as recommended in the Independent Panel’s review of Auckland Council’s CCOs.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

123.  Addressing climate change for the benefit of current and future generations aligns strongly with Māori values of environmental and inter-generational wellbeing.

124.  Some of the low carbon transport interventions that Mana Whenua and Mataawaka have advocated for in previous submissions include more reliable and affordable public transport as well as safe walking and cycling facilities.

125.  Partnership with iwi, hapū and Māori organisations in delivering climate action is a common theme in submissions received. Equity is also a strong focus for many submitters, highlighting the need for a transport system that increases access, choice and affordability, particularly for lower income groups and those living outside of the urban core.

126.  Reducing transport emissions to mitigate against the worst impacts of climate change has significant positive implications for Māori. These include cleaner air, fewer traffic-related deaths and serious injuries, lower transport costs, and more equitable access to opportunities for whānau. However, without additional support, some low carbon transport policies could adversely impact on disadvantaged communities.

127.  The Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and Independent Māori Statutory Board are represented on the Transport Emissions Reference Group, which provides staff with oversight and direction on the TERP. The Forum is a governance-level independent forum with membership of the 19 Mana Whenua entities with interests in the Auckland Council area. The purpose of the Forum is to support Mana Whenua in their role as Te Tiriti partner with Auckland Council and the Crown by partnering on all region-shaping decisions that require a collective voice. The Board has a statutory purpose and role to assist the Auckland Council group to make decisions and to promote the issues of significance to Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau.

128.  A series of hui will be held between February 2022 and April 2022 to seek input from Mana Whenua and Mataawaka on the TERP, including solutions that will support Māori communities in Tāmaki Makaurau to transition to low carbon travel. Council expects to continue working with Mana Whenua and Mataawaka to co-design solutions as part of the implementation of the TERP.

129.  Staff have presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum twice on the TERP and have also written directly to iwi chairs and chief executives to seek early feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

130.  Development of the TERP is being funded from within existing Auckland Council and Auckland Transport budgets.   

131.  Delivery of the recommended pathway will require very significant investment from both Auckland Council and Government over a period of many years. As part of the assessment of the wider impacts of the TERP, high level costings of the recommended pathway will be worked up.  Detailed costings of specific interventions is beyond the scope of the project but this work will be undertaken over time as specific projects move closer to implementation.   

132.  Some of the early interventions identified in this report may require additional funding to that which is signalled in the Long-term Plan (LTP) and RLTP.  Funding implications will be investigated and reported back to the committee as part of the pre-implementation decision making process.           


 

 

133.  In the ERP discussion document Government indicated its intention to substantially increase funding for public transport and active modes. Auckland would expect to benefit from a good proportion of any additional Government funding given its greater potential for mode shift than other parts of New Zealand. Any confirmation of additional Government funding would likely come through the final ERP and the Government’s budget process, both due in May 2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

134.  The table below updates the risk register presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 August 2021.  It identifies risks associated with the TERP project overall as opposed to risks associated with the content of this paper only.

Risks

Mitigation update

The project is constrained by the ability of existing transport models to reliably capture and portray the impacts of the interventions that are likely to be proposed.

A customised approach to assessing the potential scale of intervention impacts has been developed.  This is based on available evidence, international best practice, existing work by central government, and specific outputs derived from previous transport modelling runs. The customised tool charts the contributions key variables such as mode shift and fleet decarbonisation make to emissions reduction.    

 

There may not be sufficient evidence to credibly support the assumptions that will go into the model, especially if there is a delay to the technical work required, and some interventions will be difficult to model.

A consultancy has been engaged to provide advice on international best practice in terms of assessing the likely emissions reduction potential of interventions.  This is being augmented by work undertaken internally to document the experiences of a large number of international and domestic cities that have implemented the types of interventions that will be included in the recommended pathway. 

Given the complexity of the work and the tight timeframes involved, any slippage may endanger the ability to deliver a recommended pathway in 2022.

The project is still on course for delivery of a recommended pathway in the second quarter of 2022. A project manager has been engaged to assist with keeping the project on track. 

The Transport Emissions Reference Group will continue to be briefed on progress and will be advised if there is an increase in the risk of project slippage.

Resourcing constraints present a potential risk to project timing (see below).      

 

Uncertainty with the Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan and its implications for Auckland’s decarbonisation.

A discussion document was recently released that gave a strong steer as to the types of interventions Government will include in the final ERP (currently scheduled for May 2022). The discussion document, augmented by ongoing engagement with central government officials, has provided enough information to model the baseline impacts of likely Government interventions (this is subject to ongoing refinement).

The discussion document also provided confidence that Government and council are aligned on the scale of transformation required.    

 

 

 

Risk that available resources will not be sufficient to deliver a recommended pathway in 2022.

Resourcing remains a key risk for the project.  Key council staff working on the TERP are also heavily involved in other related work and are stretched to the limit.  There also remains some uncertainty around the availability of funding to engage necessary external expertise.  

Staff will keep the Project Sponsors updated on the risks this presents to the project.

Current central and local government funding, planning and regulatory frameworks are not reformed quickly enough to enable the transformation required to meet the transport emissions reduction goals in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. 

Work on identifying barriers to implementation and potential ways of unlocking them is an important aspect of the TERP.  Responsibility for addressing many of them lies with other agencies and continued collaboration will be essential as the work proceeds.  Government’s ERP discussion document proposes solutions for several key regulatory, fiscal and legislative barriers.    

Disruption from the scale of change required could disproportionately impact disadvantaged communities.

Equity has been one a key focus area for the work to date.  Many of the interventions proposed will help address current transport inequities, e.g. vastly improved public and active transport will help address lower levels of access and travel choice for certain parts of Auckland.  Other interventions such as road pricing will require specific mitigation measures.

The equity impacts of the recommended pathway will be assessed and presented to Committee.

Strong support for climate action does not always translate into support for specific action at the local level.

A public communications campaign is needed to identify the wider benefits of decarbonisation, the risks of inaction and the ways to ensure a Just Transition. Early work on this has started with the Reference Group.  

The implementation of specific actions within the chosen pathway will be subject to public consultation processes.

Auckland Council is not seen to model good emissions reducing behaviours within its own corporate activities (new)

Auckland Council will be asking Aucklanders to make considerable adjustments to the way they travel around the city. It is important for the perceived credibility of the plan that council’s own practices are seen to role model best practice in reducing transport emissions. While the transition to a lower emissions fleet is a start, work should be undertaken immediately to consider what else could be done, particularly around site specific travel plans, encouragement for staff to use public transport, parking privileges.          

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

135.  A second briefing for local boards will take place on 6 December 2021.

136.  Further engagement with elected members, Mana Whenua, Mataawaka, key stakeholders and central government will take place between February and April 2022.

137.  Central government will finalise its Emissions Reduction Play by the end of May 2022. 

 

138.  The Transport Emissions Reference Group will continue its work to provide direction to staff in developing the TERP, which will ultimately result in endorsing the pathway that is recommended to the Environment and Climate Change Committee and the Auckland Transport Board by June 2022. 

139.  Implementation of the chosen pathway will take place after June 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Transport Emissions Reduction Plan Terms of Reference

73

b

Phase 1 engagement stakeholders list

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Szening Ooi - Principal Transport Advisor

Josh Firth – Strategic Analytics Specialist

Robert Simpson – Manager Transport Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

Annual update on delivery of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan 2021

File No.: CP2021/03273

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an annual update on the delivery of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report (Progress Report), November 2021 is attached to this report (Attachment A).

3.      Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report Overview (Attachment B) provides a one-page summary, including progress of actions and an outline of headline indicators.

4.      Auckland Council has different levels of responsibility and control over the actions reflecting the regional focus of the plan. 33 per cent of actions are on track, 39 per cent are underway and 28 per cent are not in progress.

5.      The Progress Report includes key initiatives planned for 2022 and beyond, including the establishment of a Regional Leadership Group to accelerate climate action and further engagement with mana whenua to discuss the delivery of Te Tāruke a Tāwhiri.

6.      Despite the progress being made as shown in the Progress Report, Auckland’s emissions are not remotely tracking in line with the target to reduce emissions by 50 per cent by 2030. Emissions in 2018 had increased by 2.5 percent on 2016 levels. This gradual upwards trend in gross emissions continues.

7.      Work on the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan shows the stark reality of the scale of the challenge and the level of intervention required. The adequacy of progress made is therefore insufficient against council’s targets. The TERP can also not rely on Government’s Emissions Reduction Plan to meet its target; the ERP is not sufficient to meet Auckland’s commitment to halve its emissions by 2030. More will have to be done.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      riro/receive the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report, November 2021 included as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      tuhi/note that the publication of future progress reports will align with the Auckland Plan 2050 and Annual Plan monitoring and reporting cycles (future progress reports to be published around September 2022 depending on committee dates)

Horopaki

Context

8.      Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan is a long-term approach to climate action for the Auckland region. It sets out eight priority action areas to deliver our goals to reduce emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. Key action are outlined within these priorities as well as key partners required to deliver on these actions

9.      Regular monitoring and reporting are fundamental to understanding progress towards the main goals of reducing emissions and adapting to climate change impacts.

10.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri states we will report on progress of actions contained within the plan annually and that we will use a series of indicators to identify trends and measure success in delivery against our climate goals.

11.    This is the first annual update on the progress of actions. The plan was launched in December 2020, the reporting period for this annual update is December 2020 to December 2021.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.    The Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report, November 2021 (Attachment A) outlines the percentage of actions that are completed, on track, partially underway or not in progress. It also provides highlights of progress and key challenges for each priority in the plan along with a summary of key initiatives planned for next year.

13.    There are a total of 58 action areas, and 179 actions, in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri with Auckland Council having different levels of responsibility and control, reflecting the regional focus of the plan. Auckland Council has direct control of 111 actions, partial control of 30 actions and has an influencing role (including advocacy) for 32 actions. Six actions are Māori led.

14.    33 per cent of actions in the plan are on-track, 39 per cent are underway and28 per cent not in progress.

15.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri sets out eight priorities to deliver our goals to reduce emissions and adapt to the impacts of climate change. Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai outlines principles that are interwoven across other priorities, it does not outline actions in the same way as other priorities. It is therefore not possible to assess the status of actions for this priority. Highlights and challenges relevant to Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai are outlined in the Progress Report. 

16.    We established a baseline for the indicators this year, therefore we do not yet report on trends and measures of success in this annual update. Headline indicators will be reported against annually. All indicators will be reported on every three years. The indicators will be reviewed each year to ensure they are fit-for-purpose.

17.    The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum, a collective of the 19 hapū and iwi authorities of Tāmaki Makaurau, worked closely with Auckland Council throughout the development of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. The next step in working together is to engage further with the orum to discuss a proposed approach for ongoing hui that focus on climate change related projects and the delivery of Te Tāruke a Tāwhiri.

18.    A Regional Leadership Group will be established in 2022 to accelerate the implementation of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri through cross-sectoral partnerships and climate action. The Regional Leadership Group will consist of key stakeholders including leaders from the Auckland Council, mana whenua, central government, business, community, district health boards and youth.

19.    The Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report Overview (Attachment B) provides a one-page summary, including progress of actions and an outline of headline indicators.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.    This is an update report with no climate impacts. There is no decision associated with this report that could impact on greenhouse gas emissions or be affected by climate change.

 

21.    The delivery of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and the progress of actions impact on greenhouse gas emissions and the extent to which Auckland is impacted by climate change. Auckland’s current trajectory is still one of increasing emissions. Meeting our targets set in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri, and meeting commitments to the Paris Agreement, is therefore becoming harder. This means the emissions curve is getting steeper and the interventions required are becoming more drastic.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.    There is no decision associated with this report that could impact on the council group.

23.    The Progress Report includes initiatives and activities from across the council group. Information for the Progress Report, including updates on the progress of actions, was received from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.    There is no decision associated with this report that could impact on local boards.

25.    The views of local boards were not sought in the development of the Progress Report.

26.    Local boards have a critical role to play in advocating for specific initiatives or improvements that support their communities to transition to low carbon/ low impact lifestyles and to adapt to the impacts of climate change. Local boards therefore drive and fund various initiatives and projects that enable this, and that contribute to the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.    There is no decision associated with this report that could have particular beneficial or adverse effects on Māori.

28.    The impacts of climate change on the cultural, social, environmental, and economic wellbeing of Māori are potentially profound. Therefore our response to climate change through the delivery of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri and the progress of actions impacts on Māori.

29.    Addressing climate change for the benefit of current and future generations aligns strongly with Māori values of environmental and inter-generational wellbeing.

30.    Partnership with iwi, hapū and Māori organisations in delivering climate action is a common theme in their submissions on Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri for example, as is a strong focus on equity.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.    There are no financial implications associated with this report.

32.    However, it is clear climate action to date, and particularly action to reduce emissions, is vastly inadequate. We are not on modelled pathways to meet our targets as we should be. Additional funding will be required, and existing funding allocation and priorities will have to be reconsidered.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.    There is no decision associated with this report to present a risk.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.    Staff to add Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report, November 2021 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report Overview to the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri digital plan website - climateakl.co.nz

35.    A second annual update on progress of actions contained within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri will be prepared for around September 2022, depending on committee dates.

36.    The final section of the Progress Report outlines key climate action initiatives and deliverables for 2022 and beyond.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report, November 2021

85

b

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Progress Report Overview

113

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Matthew Blaikie - Acting Chief Sustainability Officer

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator



Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator



Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

Allocation of the 2021/2022 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant

File No.: CP2021/09783

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve grant allocations for the 2021/2022 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme funding round.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant is a contestable grants programme designed to support the protection, restoration and enhancement of Auckland’s regionally significant natural heritage areas. It also funds projects that encourage and support Aucklanders to adopt environmentally sustainable lifestyles.

3.      The programme focuses on supporting strategic regional initiatives that deliver on any of four outcome categories: sustainable living, conservation, healthy waters and kaitiakitanga (see Attachment A for the grant framework).

4.      The total budget available for the 2021/2022 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme funding round is $1,026,434. This includes $341,165 allocated from the 2021/2022 natural environment targeted rate budget, which is ringfenced to support projects that contribute towards conservation outcomes and $200,000 from the 2021/2022 community climate action budget which is ringfenced to support projects that contribute towards emissions reduction. This is a 22 per cent increase on available budget compared with 2019/2020. This increase is due to reduced multi-year commitments from the 2021/2022 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme budget and the addition of community climate action budget.

5.      The programme received 99 applications for the 2021/2022 funding round which requested a total of $4,767,097. These included 39 multi-year applications requesting funding for up to three years. One application was withdrawn during the assessment process and one application was deemed ineligible.

6.      The applications were assessed against key criteria such as the expected impact of the project on regional outcomes, applicant capacity and contribution to Māori outcomes.

7.      Based on this assessment, staff recommend that 48 applications are supported with a total of $1,257,434 in grants including multi-year allocations (see rationale for funding specific projects in Attachment B). This total includes $1,026,434 from the 2021/2022 grants budget. Eleven multi-year projects are also recommended for funding, with $141,000 allocated in 2022/2023 and $90,000 in 2023/2024.

8.      Of the 48 applications recommended for funding, 28 (58 per cent) will deliver on conservation outcomes and 14 (29 per cent) will deliver on sustainable living outcomes. The focus of grant allocation towards conservation and sustainable living projects reflects the mix of applications received in this funding round and the additional funding available from the natural environment targeted rate and community climate action grants budget.

9.      Four applications recommended for funding will deliver on the kaitiakitanga outcome and a total of 23 applications recommended for funding were identified as making a contribution towards achieving Māori outcomes. Allocation to kaitiakitanga projects from the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage budget has increased from five per cent in 2019/2020 to 14 per cent in 2021/2022.

10.    Recommended grants range from $5,000 to $90,000, with an average value of $26,196.

11.    Due to the high number of applications not all are able to receive funding. Staff recommend that 49 applications be declined. This is for a variety of reasons, but in most instances because other projects were assessed as contributing more directly to regionally significant outcomes. A number of high-quality applications are also recommended to be partially funded, taking into account budget limitations (see funding rationale in Attachment B).

12.    Once approved, applicants will be notified of funding decisions as soon as practicable. Successful grant recipients will have one to three years to complete their projects, depending on the grant term.

13.    At the end of the grant term recipients will be required to complete an accountability report detailing what has been achieved with this funding and through their projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      whakaae/approve the grant allocations for the 2021/2022 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme funding round, as listed below and detailed in Attachment B of the agenda report:

Applicant

Project title

Amount recommended

Projects funded through Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants budget and Natural Environment Targeted Rate

Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

Pest Free Ihumātao

Total: $60,000

RENH: 2021/22 $20,000, 2022/23 $20,000

NETR: 2021/22 $20,000

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Investigations of kākahi in Kaipātiki and Upper Waitematā streams

Total: $40,000

RENH: 2021/22 $15,000, 2022/23 $10,000, 2023/24 $10,000

NETR: 2021/22 $5,000

EcoQuest Education Foundation

Te rapu nga pekapeka o Franklin: Finding Franklin Bats

Total: $9,000

RENH: 2021/22 $5,000

NETR: $4,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society NZ Incorporated

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast: Tikanga Aotūroa Māori / Community Hubs

Total: $79,284

RENH: 2021/22 $20,000 2022/23 $20,000 2023/24 $20,000

NETR: 2021/22: $19,284

Community Waitakere Charitable Trust

Pekapeka in the North West - Where are the bats?

Total: $28,645

RENH: 2021/22 $10,000, 2022/23 $5,000

NETR: 2021/22 $13,645

Takatu Landcare Group Incorporated

Ecological Restoration Plan and Pilot Project

Total: $49,000

RENH 2021/22 $20,000, 2022/23 $5,000, 2023/24 $5,000

NETR 2021/22 $19,000

Matuku Reserve Trust Board

A wetland for all - restoration and education

Total: $52,500

RENH 2021/22 $15,000, 2022/23 $15,000, 2023/24 $15,000

NETR 2021/22 $7,500

Manaia Properties Limited

Remote Trap Sensoring

Total: $7,133

RENH 2021/22 $5,000

NETR 2021/22 $2,133

Recreation Solutions Limited

Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan Restoration Plan

Total: $34,500

RENH 2021/22 $7,500, 2022/23 $10,000 2023/24 $10,000

NETR 2021/22 $7,000

Friends of Te Wairoa Catchment Incorporated

Te Wairoa Native Plant Education Program

Total: $25,694

RENH 2021/22 $8,000 2022/23 $10,000

NETR 2021/22 $7,694

EcoQuest Education Foundation

Fish community assessment following fish-passage enhancement in the Hūnua Ranges

Total: $23,500

RENH 2021/22 $10,000 2022/23 $6,000

NETR 2021/22 $7,500

The Waiheke Resources Trust

Love Our Wetlands

Total: $33,000

RENH 2021/22 $18,000
NETR
2021/22 $15,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society, Hauraki Islands Branch

Forest & Bird Hauraki Branch - Te Ngahere Project

Total: $40,000

RENH 2021/22 $15,000 2022/23 $15,000 2023/24 $5,000

NETR 2021/22 $5,000

The Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Tiaki Taiao Tamaoho

Total: $36,000

RENH 2021/22 $15,000

NETR 2021/22 $21,000

Pou Tāngata Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Community Development Trust

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Motu Kaitiakitanga

Total: $90,000

RENH 2021/22 $25,000; 2022/23 $25,000, 2023/24 $25,000

NETR 2021/22 $15,000

Shorebirds Trust

Te Arai/Pakiri North Predator Control Buffer Zone Stage 2.

Total: $31,500

RENH 2021/22 $17,000
NETR
2021/22 $14,500

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Investigations of discrete Titiwai colonies in the Eskdale Reserve Network.

Total: $14,000

RENH 2021/22 $9,000

NETR 2021/22 $5,000

Restore Hibiscus and Bays Incorporated

Catchment-scale stream restoration, pest plant control and predator eradication programme

Total: $22,000

RENH 2021/22 $15,000
NETR
2021/22 $7,000

The Windy Hill - Rosalie Bay Catchment Trust

Windy Hill Sanctuary Weed and Track Team

Total: $32,760

RENH 2021/22 $15,000
NETR 2021/22 $17,760

Conservation Volunteers New Zealand

Ecological Enhancement of the Awaawaroa Wetland Reserve

Total: $22,500

RENH 2021/22 $15,000
NETR 2021/22 $7,500

Karekare Ratepayers and Residents Trust

Karekare Landcare - 2020/2021 equipment & bait

Total: $15,686

RENH 2021/22 $5,000
NETR
2021/22 $10,686

South Titirangi Neighbourhood Network under the umbrella of Gecko Limited

Neighbourhood Restoration and Urban Sanctuary Project

Total: $22,500

RENH 2021/22 $7,500

NETR 2021/22 $15,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society NZ Incorporated

South-East Wildlink

Total: $12,000

RENH 2021/22 $2,000

NETR 2021/22 $10,000

Kauri Rescue Trust

Kauri Rescue in the Auckland Region

Total: $37,500

RENH 2021/22 $7,500

NETR 2021/22 $30,000

Projects funded through the Natural Environment Targeted Rate

Waiheke Collective under the umbrella of the Waiheke Resources Trust

Waiheke Collective coordinator role

Total: $10,500

NETR 2021/22 $10,500

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand - Warkworth Area Branch

Forest & Bird Warkworth Area Little Blue Penguin Kororā Project

Total: $5,000

NETR 2021/22 $5,000

Mahu West Pest under the umbrella of Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society of New Zealand Incorporated

Region-wide Endangered Long-tailed Bat Biodiversity Research Project

Total: $5,000

NETR 2021/22 $5,000

Pest Free Coatesville

Pest Free Coatesville

Total: $7,500

NETR 2021/22 $7,500

The Windy Hill Rosalie Bay Catchment Trust

Aotea Community Native Plant Nursery - facility improvements

Total: $6,144

NETR 2021/22 $6,144

Motu Kaikoura Trust

Motu Kaikoura Biodiversity Surveys

Total: $5,000

NETR 2021/22 $5,000

Leigh Community Club Incorporated

Pest Free Leigh - Rural Expansion project

Total: $10,000

NETR 2021/22 $10,000

Scow Incorporated

Project Weta

Total: $5,819

NETR 2021/22 $5,819

Projects funded through Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants budget and community climate action grant budget

Whakaupoko West Franklin Land Care Group

Green Trails - Connecting Communities - Creating biodiversity corridors

Total: $38,000

RENH: 2021/22 $25,000

Climate action: 2021/22 $13,000

Tāmaki WRAP Charitable Trust

Tāmaki Urban Market Garden

Total: $20,000

RENH: 2021/22 $13,000

Climate action: 2021/22 $7,000

The Auckland King Tides Initiative under the umbrella of the Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Incorporated

Auckland King Tides Initiative Live Lightly School/Community Workshop Delivery

Total: $36,000

RENH: 2021/22 $20,000
Climate action:
2021/22 $16,000

Whenua Warrior Charitable Trust

#projectSouth

Side600

Total: $36,000

RENH: 2021/22 $10,000
Climate action: 2021/22 $26,000

EcoMatters Environment Trust

Community Bike Hub expansion

Total: $26,000

RENH: 2021/22 $15,000

Climate action: 2021/22 $11,000

Sport Waitakere Trust

West Auckland Urban Farming Feasibility Study

Total: $32,000

RENH 2021/22 $20,000

Climate action 2021/22 $12,000

Tread Lightly Charitable Trust

Tread Lightly Caravan 2022

Total: $32,000

RENH 2021/22 $15,000

Climate action 2021/22 $17,000

Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Upcycled Gardening for Communities

Total: $20,000

RENH 2021/22 $10,000

Climate action 2021/22 $10,000

Kelmarna Community Garden Trust

Regenerative market garden, growing local food through Community Supported Agriculture

Total: $25,000

RENH 2021/22 $15,000

Climate action 2021/22 $10,000

Bike Avondale under the umbrella of Avondale Community Action Charitable Trust

'"GO Bike Avondale GO"

Total: $25,000

RENH 2021/22 $15,000

Climate action 2021/22 $10,000

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Sustainable Living Community Education & Engagement

Total: $24,769

RENH 2021/22 $8,769

Climate action 2021/22 $16,000

The Community Builders NZ Trust

Wheels and Wellbeing

Total: $31,000

RENH 2021/22 $12,000
Climate action
2021/22 $19,000

Projects funded through the community climate action grant budget

Community Collective Limited

Sustainable Living Festival: Community Power and Climate Action

Total: $20,000

Climate action 2021/22 $20,000

Otahuhu College Board of Trustees

Otahuhu College Community Garden Project

Total: $8,000

Climate action 2021/22 $8,000

Sustainable Papakura

Papakura Foraging Tours

Total: $5,000

Climate action 2021/22 $5,000

Projects funded through Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants budget

Sustainable Coastlines Charitable Trust

Restoring the mauri of the Whau

Total: $5,000

RENH 2021/22 $5,000

 

Horopaki

Context

The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme supports environmental and sustainability outcomes

14.    The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme supports the implementation of the Auckland Plan, Auckland Council’s Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy, the Regional Pest Management Plan, and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. Outcomes from these plans supported by this grant programme are:

·        the mauri of the natural environment is in optimum health

·        our natural heritage is valued by all Aucklanders

·        our natural resources are sustainably managed

·        our waterways, coastline, harbours, islands and marine areas are treasured

·        a high number and diverse range of Auckland’s indigenous species and ecosystems are conserved; there are no regional extinctions of indigenous species and a reduction in the number of threatened or ‘at risk’ species

·        mana whenua are empowered, enabled, respected and recognised in their customary kaitiaki role, and participate in the co-management of natural resources

·        Aucklanders adopt sustainable lifestyles, including reducing use of non-renewable resources and minimising waste

·        Auckland communities are involved in the stewardship of our biodiversity and other natural resources

·        Aucklanders help to address climate change through carbon sequestration, adaptive land management and better soil management.

Outcome areas and grant programme criteria for 2021/2022

15.    Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant projects need to meet at least one of the grant programme framework outcomes. These are grouped under four categories:

·        sustainable living

·        conservation

·        healthy waters

·        kaitiakitanga.

16.    The grant programme framework and the specifics of the fund criteria are attached to this report as Attachment A.

Funding available for the 2021/2022 financial year

17.    Auckland Council invests an annual budget of $522,269 into the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants programme. The budget available for allocation in the 2021/2022 funding round is $485,269. This is because a portion of this budget ($37,000) has already been committed to multi-year applications through the 2019/2020 funding rounds. Table 1 provides details on these multi-year commitments.

Table 1: 2021/2022 existing multi-year grant commitments

Applicant

Project Title

2021/2022

Waiheke Collective under the umbrella of The Waiheke Resources Trust

Coordinator role for the Waiheke Collective

$15,000

Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Society Incorporated

Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Assistant

$10,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society New Zealand Incorporated

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

$10,000

Roseline Klein

Maungawhau Ecological Restoration – Weeding and Planting Below Clive Road

$2,000

Total

$37,000

 

18.    Additional funding of $341,165 was allocated from the natural environment targeted rate budget to provide supplementary funding for conservation projects in 2021/2022. The additional funding is targeted towards conservation projects which aim to achieve biodiversity outcomes across the Auckland region.

19.    Additional funding of $200,000 was allocated from the community climate action grants budget to provide supplementary funding for climate action projects in 2021/2022. The additional funding is targeted towards sustainable living projects which aim to achieve emissions reduction outcomes across the Auckland region.

Timing and promotion of the grant programme

20.    The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme has one annual funding round. In 2021/2022, the fund opened on 12 July 2021 and was scheduled to closed on 27 August 2021. Due to the impact of COVID-19 Alert Level 4 restrictions on applicants’ ability to source quotes or supporting information the closing date was extended to 3 September 2021. Applications were assessed by subject matter experts during September and October 2021.

21.    The grant was promoted through several existing processes and networks including Auckland Council’s website and social media sites, hui, pest liaison and biodiversity groups, networks and emails to environmental stakeholders and partners.

22.    Three community workshop presentations were held during the funding round, one was face to face in central Auckland and two were online. These workshops provide a forum for applicants to seek support with the application process and request advice from council staff.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Applications were assessed using a three-stage process

23.    Applications were assessed through a three-stage process as follows:

i.          Applications were assessed against grant programme eligibility criteria and allocated for merit assessment according to the outcomes of the fund.

ii.         Subject matter experts for each of the categories were allocated applications for assessment against the criteria shown below in Table 2. Māori outcomes for all applications were assessed by an internal subject matter expert in Te Ao Māori. The assessment evaluated to what extent the project empowered mana whenua as kaitiaki and the integration of Te Ao Māori within the project methodology and goals. As application assessment was completed during COVID-19 Alert Level 4 restrictions, the assessment is based on material provided in the application, additional information provided by the applicant through email and phone conversations, and the assessors prior knowledge of project sites.

Table 2: Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grant assessment criteria

Criteria

Weighting

Project impact

40

Project connectivity

20

Applicant capacity

20

Contribution towards Māori outcomes

10

Value for money

10

Total

100

iii.         A panel of subject matter experts considered all applications against the outcome areas and recommended grant allocations based on application assessment and alignment with grant programme outcomes. Applications which are more closely aligned with programme outcomes were more likely to be funded, although other key criteria were also considered such as geographical distribution, replicability of the project and ability for it to be scaled up across the region.

24.    The panel developed funding recommendations for the Committee’s consideration as described in Attachment B and summarised in the report recommendations.

Recommendations for allocating funding

25.    It is recommended that 48 applications are supported with grants from the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme budget. These recommendations include 11 multi-year projects.

26.    If approved, the grant allocation will be:

·        $1,026,434 from the 2021/2022 grant budget (including $341,165 from the natural environment targeted rate budget and $200,000 from the climate action grants budget)

·        $141,000 from the 2022/2023 grant budget

·        $90,000 from the 2023/2024 grant budget.

27.    Table 3 shows the number and total value of applications received, declined and recommended for funding in 2018/2018, 2019/2020 and 2021/2022. There was no Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grant allocation in 2020/2021 as budget was unavailable under the Emergency Budget.

Table 3: Summary of funding available and committed from 2018/2019 to 2021/2022

 

2018/2019

2019/2020

2021/2022

Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant Budget

$358,855

$396,443

$485,269

Natural environment targeted rate budget

$200,000

$440,000

$341,165

Climate action grants budget

-

-

$200,000

Number of applications received

70

69

99

Total value of grants requested

(including multi-year requests)

$2,786,199

$2,299,755

$4,767,097

Number of applications recommended for funding

47 applications recommended for funding, 8 of them multi-year

22 declined

1 withdrawn

49 applications recommended for funding, 6 of them multi-year

19 declined

1 withdrawn

48 applications recommended for funding, 11 of them multi-year

49 declined

1 ineligible and 1 withdrawn

Value of grant allocation including multi-year allocations

Range: $1,850 to $55,000

Average grant: $14,369

Range: $2,000 to $70,000

Average grant: $13,782

Range: $5,000 to $90,000

Average grant: $26,196

Rationale for funding decisions

28.    While the grant framework provides for grants between $5,000 and $40,000 per annum, there is provision to award smaller grants for projects that meet the criteria for regional significance, but only require moderate support.

29.    Most of the successful applications were recommended for partial funding, taking into account value for money, project budgets, ability to scale projects and access to other resources.

30.    No grants of less than $5,000 are recommended. Recommended grants including multi-year allocations range in value from $5,000 to $90,000, with an average grant value of $26,196.

31.    It is also recommended that a further 49 applications be declined. Projects are recommended to be declined for a variety of reasons, in most instances because other projects were assessed as contributing more directly to regionally significant outcomes (see further details in Attachment B).

Recommended projects are split across the grant outcomes

32.    Projects recommended for funding are split across achieving the conservation, sustainable living and kaitiakitanga outcomes. Allocation to sustainable living projects from the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme budget has increased from 29 per cent in 2019/2020 to 35 per cent in 2021/2022. Allocation to kaitiakitanga projects has increased from five per cent in 2019/2020 to 14 per cent in 2021/2022. The increased allocation for both the sustainable living and kaitiakitanga outcome is due to an increase in both number of applications received and application quality.

 

33.    Allocation to healthy waters projects from the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme budget has reduced from 11 per cent in 2019/2020 to four per cent in 2021/2022. The reduced allocation for the healthy waters outcome is due to projects applying to the 2021/2022 round having a relatively lower contribution towards regionally significant outcomes. Figure 1 provides a comparison of 2019/2020 allocations with 2021/2022 allocation recommendations.

Figure 1: Regional Environment and Natural Heritage budget allocations by outcome

34.    The additional ring-fenced natural environment targeted rate fund dedicated for projects with conservation outcomes has contributed positively to both the number and average grant value of recommended conservation projects. The number of conservation projects recommended for funding has increased from 20 to 28 projects and the average grant value per project has increased from $19,375 to $23,773.

35.    The additional ring-fenced community climate action budget dedicated for projects with emissions reduction outcomes has contributed positively to both the number and average grant value of recommended sustainable living projects. The number of sustainable living projects recommended for funding has increased from 11 to 14 projects and the average grant value per project has increased from $15,342 to $24,483.

36.    Table 4 below outlines the Regional and Natural Heritage Grant allocations by outcome area.

Table 4: Summary of Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant allocations by outcome area

Outcome area

Number of applications recommended for support

Amount recommended from Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant budget 2021/2022

Amount allocated from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) budget 2021/2022 *

Amount allocated from the Community climate action grant budget 2021/2022 ^

Total 2021/2022

Sustainable living

14

$168,769

-

$174,000

$342,769

Conservation**

28

$226,500

$278,165

 

$504,665

Healthy waters

2

$20,000

$7,000

 

$27,000

Kaitiakitanga *^

4

$70,000

$56,000

$26,000

$152,000

Total

48

$485,269

$341,165

$200,000

$1,026,434

* Only applications with conservation outcomes (conservation, healthy waters and kaitiakitanga projects) are funded from NETR and Tools and Resources budget.

^ Only applications with emissions reduction outcomes (sustainable living and kaitiakitanga projects) are funded from the community climate action budget

^^ 11 projects funded from both the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant and Climate action budgets, three projects funded from climate action budget only.

** 20 projects funded from both the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant and NETR budgets, eight projects funded from the NETR budget only.

*^ One kaitiakitanga project received additional funding from NETR budget as it also contributes directly towards conservation outcomes and one kaitiakitanga application received additional funding through the community climate action budgets as it contributes directly towards emissions reduction.

Projects recommended for multi-year funding

37.    Eleven applications are recommended for multi-year funding. These recommendations are based on high project ranking, representing a strong alignment with the grant objectives, high applicant capacity and best practice project design. These are listed in Table 5 below.

38.    Of the 11 applications recommended for multi-year funding two applications support the kaitiakitanga outcome and nine applications support the conservation outcome. Multi-year funding was not recommended for any applications supporting the sustainable living outcome as a funding approach for future delivery of community climate action grants is currently being developed.

Table 5: Recommendations for multi-year funding allocation

Applicant

Project Title

2021/2022

2022/2023

2023/2024

Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

Pest Free Ihumātao

$20,000

$20,000

 

Pou Tāngata Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Community Development Trust

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Motu Kaitiakitanga

$25,000

$25,000

$25,000

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Investigations of kākahi in Kaipātiki and Upper Waitematā streams

$15,000

$10,000

$10,000

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society NZ Incorporated

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast: Tikanga Aotūroa Māori / Community Hubs

$20,000

$20,000

$20,000

Community Waitakere Charitable Trust

Pekapeka in the North West - Where are the bats?

$10,000

$5,000

 

Takatu Landcare Group Incorporated

Ecological Restoration Plan and Pilot Project

 

$20,000

$5,000

$5,000

Matuku Reserve Trust Board

A wetland for all - restoration and education

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

Recreation Solutions Limited

Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan Restoration Plan

$7,500

$10,000

$10,000

Friends of Te Wairoa Catchment Incorporated

Te Wairoa Native Plant Education Program

$8,000

$10,000

 

EcoQuest Education Foundation

Fish community assessment following fish-passage enhancement in the Hūnua Ranges

$10,000

$6,000

 

Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society, Hauraki Islands Branch

Forest & Bird Hauraki Branch - Te Ngahere Project

$15,000

$15,000

$5,000

Total

 

$165,500

$141,000

$90,000

Applicants’ contribution to projects is far higher than council investment

39.    A 50 per cent applicant contribution is encouraged for the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant to ensure that the council grants continue to leverage private investment and funding from other providers.

40.    The applicant contribution can be volunteer time, in-kind contributions or financial. The total applicant contribution across applications recommended for funding is $11,455,440.

41.    Following the assessment of project budgets and potential environmental outcomes, one application is recommended to receive greater than 50 per cent funding towards project costs. This application from Ngāti Tamaoho Charitable Trust for Tiaki Taiao Tamaoho is recommended for funding due to the potential environmental outcomes and focus of targeted rates funding on providing mana whenua support.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.    The Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant provides grants to individuals and groups for projects that support community climate change action to reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

43.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan sets out a path for the region to achieve its climate goals and respond to our changing climate. The 2021/2022 Regional Environment and Natural Heritage funding round has provided an umbrella grant programme for the allocation of the 2021/2022 community climate action grants budget which contributes to action area C4: Remove barriers and support community initiatives that reduce emissions and build resilience in a fair way. The addition of targeted climate action grants budget has increased the number of projects recommended for funding from 11 to 14 and increased the average grant value per project from $15,342 to $24,483.


 

 

44.    Projects funded through the fund will contribute to the actions detailed in the table below.

Table 6: Project contribution towards Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Actions

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan Action

Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grant recommendation contribution.

Action area T3: Increase access to bicycles, micro-mobility devices and the safe, connected and dedicated infrastructure that supports their use.

Four projects that focus on increased access to bicycles or cycle trail networks are recommended for funding in this grant round. Three projects recommended for funding support the creation or expansion of community bicycle hubs improving communal and personal access to bicycles, increasing knowledge on bicycle repair and maintenance, and encouraging cycling as a mode of transport.

Action area C1: Work together to strengthen the resilience of our communities, people and places.

Four projects that focus on engaging and educating communities to be aware of current and future climate risks and consequences of hazards are recommended for funding in this grant round.

Action area F4: Increase supply and demand for local, seasonal and low carbon food

Seven projects that focus on supporting people to grow their own

food are recommended for funding in this grant round.

 

Action N1: Build the resilience of Auckland’s indigenous biodiversity, habitats and ecosystems to the impacts of climate change

Projects were recommended for funding under the conservation and healthy waters outcomes support climate change adaptation through measures such as community planting days, landscape restoration and reforestation

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.    The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views on applications were not sought.

46.    Input on applications was sought from experts from the relevant departments across the council, for example, Healthy Waters or Education and Community Climate Action departments.

47.    Applications were also reviewed by an historic heritage subject matter expert and an archaeological assessment completed where necessary.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impact

48.    Geographical distribution of grant allocations across different local board areas was considered among other factors by the moderation panel.

Local board views

49.    The Community Grants Policy provides for local boards to operate their own local grants programmes. Local boards may choose to fund local environmental projects and activities, some of which may complement the grants provided at regional level, or vice versa.

50.    Information on funding allocation and successful applicants will be provided to all relevant local boards, following the approval of grant recommendations by the Environment and Climate Change Committee

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.    All grant programmes aim to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Input from the Independent Māori Statutory Board has been sought into the development of the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grants programme.

Applications under the kaitiakitanga category

52.    The Kaitiakitanga category of this grant programme supports projects or activities that align with, enable and empower mana whenua or mataawaka in the exercise of kaitiakitanga in Tāmaki Makaurau. Four applications were received in this category.

53.    Of the applications recommended for support, the projects with greatest contributions towards Māori outcomes is identified in the applications listed in Table 7.

Table 7: Projects with significant contributions to Māori outcomes

Applicant

Project title

Contribution to Māori outcomes

Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

Pest Free Ihumātao

This project is mana whenua-led, and gives expression to taonga tuku iho, kaitiakitanga and rangatiratanga. The iwi has built relationships with others in the conservation space to share knowledge and build their own capability, which has helped contribute to their 'by iwi, for iwi' approach. The iwi is rightly proud of the progress they have made towards their aspirations, which are to protect indigenous taonga, enhance the mauri and connections to their ancestral landscape, and enable succession through tuakana-teina relationships. This application is an exemplar and positioned to bring economic, social, spiritual, cultural and environmental wellbeing dimensions to the people while also aligning with the objectives of broader regional and national strategies.

The Ngāti Tamaoho Trust

Tiaki Taiao Tamaoho

This is a mana whenua-led project in which iwi take the lead on a collaborative approach with community groups in the rohe. Employment of their rangatahi is a very important part of the project. This will involve iwi delivering cultural inductions, cultural presentations and mātauranga health and safety packages to the community and council, while significantly growing iwi capacity for further work. This is a long term, generational project for the people and rohe as kaitiaki of biodiversity and cultural heritage.

Pou Tāngata Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Community Development Trust

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Motu Kaitiakitanga

This project is mana whenua led, with the purpose to focus on the ecological and mauri restoration of the Waikopua ki Uta, Waikopua ki Tai and Motukaraka islands connected to mana whenua Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki. The applicant has provided an excellent restoration plan to protect and restore taonga species while protecting wahi tapu sites. Mana whenua have a goal to train rangatahi on animal pest control to counteract the invasion of pests from the mainland. The project will use mātauranga Māori, customary practices and Te Ao Māori values and concepts to restore the mana of the whenua for future generations. The applicant has developed strong relationships with local groups and stakeholders and other conservation organisations, including Department of Conservation.

 

Assessment of Māori outcomes

54.    Māori outcomes for all applications were assessed by an internal subject matter expert in Te Ao Māori. The assessment evaluated the extent to which the project empowered mana whenua as kaitiaki and the integration of Te Ao Māori within the project.

55.    A total of 23 applications recommended for funding were identified during the assessment process as contributing positively towards Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.    The budget allocation for this grant was confirmed through the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. The annual budget for this grant is $522,269. The funding recommendations presented in this report recommend full allocation of the 2021/2022 fund. Multi-year funding recommendations partially commit budget from 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

57.    In May 2021, the Governing Body approved an extension to the natural environment targeted rate to support environmental initiatives for the duration of the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 (resolution GB/2021/38).

58.    For the 2021/2022 financial year $341,165 from the natural environment targeted rate budget will be used to provide supplementary funding for conservation projects applied for through the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant programme.

59.    In May 2021 the Governing Body approved additional $152 million budget on a package of initiatives to address the long-term challenges of climate change. As part of this package budget will be used to provide community climate action grants supporting community-initiated projects that deliver emissions reduction. For the 2021/2022 financial year $200,000 from the community climate action grants budget will be used to provide supplementary funding to sustainable living projects applied for through the Regional Environment and Natural Heritage grant programme. A funding approach for future delivery of community climate action grants is currently being developed.

60.    Attachment B details the amounts recommended for funding from both the grant programme budget and the additional targeted funding.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.    A risk assessment has only identified three low risks associated with the grant allocation process. These are listed below along with the mitigations:

·    Low reputational risk – Applicants may query the grant allocation process and feel it has been inconsistent or unfair. This risk is mitigated through the thorough and transparent evaluation and assessment process, carried out in accordance with the grant framework.

·    Low financial risk – Grant recipients are unable to deliver their projects as planned due to impacts of COVID-19. This risk is mitigated through the application assessment which has included consideration of alternative delivery options where required. In the event of project disruption, council staff will work with grant recipients to agree alternative delivery plans or extended project timeframes.

·    Low financial risk – Grant applicants do not use grant funds appropriately to fulfil the conditions of their grant or deliver the outcomes desired by the council. This risk is mitigated through the initial assessment, which included evaluation of the capacity of applicants and their track record, and requirements for detailed reporting on outcomes of all applications. Grant recipients are required to account for use of allocated funds and the council can request the return of any funds not used in line with the approved grant purpose.

62.    Staff will maintain regular contact with grant recipients during project implementation to follow up on progress and make sure any risks of individual projects are properly addressed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.    Once approved, applicants will be notified of funding decisions as soon as practicable. Successful applicants will have one to three years to complete the proposed project work.

64.    At the end of the grant term recipients will be required to complete an accountability report on what has been achieved through their projects. Accountability reports provide detailed information about different aspects of the project, including receipts to show expenditure, photos and videos and are reviewed by subject matter experts against prespecified metrics.

65.    Unsuccessful applicants will be issued with a decline letter as soon as practicable. These applicants will also be offered the opportunity to work with council staff on applications for future funding rounds or other opportunities for funding.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grants Programme Framework 2021-2022

131

b

Attachment B Regional Environment and Natural Heritage Grant recommendations and rationale

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Fran Hayton - Principal Grants Advsr & Incentives TL

Authorisers

Rachel Kelleher – General Manager Environmental Services

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator



Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

Allocation of the 2021/2022 Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund

File No.: CP2021/09780

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an update regarding grant recommendations for the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021/2022 funding round.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund is a contestable grants scheme established as a key initiative of Auckland Council’s Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018 (the Waste Plan 2018).

3.      The fund supports initiatives that will help achieve the vision, targets and strategic objectives of the Waste Plan 2018, including waste minimisation and the diversion of waste from landfill in Auckland.

4.      The fund focuses on seed-funding new waste minimisation activities. Funding is allocated across four key outcome areas:

·        resource recovery initiatives and facilities

·        commercial waste

·        organic waste

·        community action and behaviour change.

5.      In the 2021/2022 funding round a total of $551,770 is available to distribute, of which:

·        $50,160 is available to distribute to small grants ($5,000 and under), with decision-making delegated to the General Manager Waste Solutions

·        $501,610 is available to distribute to medium and large grants (over $5,000), with decision-making delegated to the Governing Body.

6.      The grant programme received 80 applications, requesting over $1.8 million in total. Approximately 12 applications were for small grants, and 68 applications requested medium and large grants. Two applications from the medium and large grant category and one application from the small grant category were ineligible due to misalignment with the fund criteria and objectives. One application from the small grant category was withdrawn by the applicant.

7.      All applications were checked for eligibility, before being assessed and scored by a panel of council staff with expertise in waste minimisation. Assessments were undertaken in line with the funding criteria, including strategic alignment, Māori outcomes, potential for waste minimisation, community participation, value for money, and quality of the proposal (see fund guidelines in Attachment A).

8.      To improve Māori outcomes achieved by the fund, there is now a separate Māori outcomes assessment criterion with 10 per cent weighting and a target of 15 per cent of the fund to ensure more of the fund is awarded to projects which deliver specific Māori outcomes by Māori for Māori and help ensure effective participation and encourage applications from mana whenua and mataawaka organisations.

 

9.      Staff recommend that 21 of the medium and large grant applications are supported with funds from the 2021/2022 Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund budget for a total value of $491,190, of which $67,980 is recommended for applications submitted by Māori organisations. The recommended projects will deliver on all four key outcome areas of the fund.

10.    If the recommendations are approved, applicants will be notified of funding decisions in December 2021. All projects are to be undertaken within calendar year 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      tuhi/note the information contained in this report on allocation of funds to medium and large (over $5,000) grant applications for the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021/2022 funding round.

b)      tuhi/note that allocations for the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021/2022 funding round will be presented for decision-making in the confidential section of this meeting.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.    The Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund was established to support waste minimisation initiatives using a portion of the funds allocated to Auckland Council from the national waste levy. The fund is primarily intended to provide seed-funding to encourage and enable creative reuse and recovery as well as generate economic opportunities.

12.    Half of the total revenue generated from the national waste levy (currently set at $20 per tonne for Class 1 landfills and $10 per tonne for the other classes) is allocated to territorial authorities on a population basis. This money must be spent on promoting or achieving waste minimisation as set out in local authorities’ waste management and minimisation plans.

13.    The Auckland Council Waste Plan 2018 sets out the purpose of the fund, which is summarised as follows:

·        promote or achieve waste management and minimisation

·        reduce waste to landfill in accordance with the objectives of the plan

·        foster new ideas and encourage community participation in reducing waste to landfill.

14.    The fund aims to target priority waste streams, reduce harm to the environment and improve efficiency of resource use by supporting new initiatives which complement and enhance existing programmes or address gaps. Funding is allocated through four outcome areas as shown in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Outcome areas targeted through the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund

Outcome area

Background

Resource recovery initiatives and facilities

         Development of a regional resource recovery network is a priority for Auckland’s long-term aim to achieve zero waste by 2040. The network will provide infrastructure that supports maximum resource recovery, as well as providing local business and employment opportunities. A specific focus is the development of community and business operated resource recovery facilities.

Commercial waste

Supporting business waste minimisation is a key initiative of the Waste Plan 2018. The long-term target of this plan is to reduce total waste to landfill by 30 per cent by 2027. As commercial waste (waste not controlled by the council) makes up 83 per cent of all waste sent to landfill in Auckland, supporting business waste minimisation is a priority. The council is seeking ways to encourage development of innovative solutions for commercial waste, particularly construction and demolition waste (such as concrete, timber, plasterboard, and insulation materials).

Organic waste

Organic waste (food waste and green waste) makes up about 50 per cent (by weight) of domestic waste sent to landfill. As such, reducing organic waste is a priority for achieving Auckland’s zero waste goal. Auckland Council will introduce a kerbside collection of food scraps for households in urban areas over the next few months. Initiatives that complement this service or enable local composting are eligible for funding. Projects could look at reducing domestic and commercial green waste to landfill like community gardens, through composting or mulching, or innovative ways to process organic waste.

Community action and behaviour change

Fostering new ideas and encouraging community participation in reducing waste to landfill is a key direction of the waste plan and a priority in the lead up to introducing user pays charging for refuse across the region once the food scraps collection has been introduced. Building community capacity for waste minimisation will be important in ensuring all Aucklanders have access to the information, education and support they need to reduce the amount of waste they send to landfill. The aim is to create enduring change in community behaviour and attitudes towards waste.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grant programme budget and funding available for 2021/2022

15.    The fund has an annual budget of $500,000, with $450,000 allocated to medium and large projects and $50,000 allocated to small grants in a single funding round. This is summarised in Table 2 below.

Table 2: Sub-categories for allocating grant funding

Category

Grant range

Application period each financial year

Small projects

From $1,000 - $5,000

August

Medium projects

From $5001 - $25,000

August

Large projects

From $25,001 - $50,000

August

 

16.    If funds are not fully allocated in one year, they are carried forward into the next funding round. Unspent allocations can also be returned to the budget if no longer required by the grant recipient.

17.    In the 2021/2022 funding round, unallocated or returned funding from previous financial years totalling $51,770 was carried forward and added to the budget for this funding round. Of this, $160 is available for small grants, and the remaining $51,610 is available for medium and large grants.

18.    The total amount of funding available for distribution for the 2021/2022 funding round is $50,160 for small grants and $501,610 for medium and large grants.

19.    The fund has a minimum threshold of $1,000, and a maximum threshold of $50,000. Applications requesting funding of more than $50,000 in a single year period are considered on merit at the discretion of subject matter experts and council staff.

20.    Decision-making for recommendations of up to $5,000 is delegated to the General Manager Waste Solutions, with decision making for recommendations of over $5,000 delegated to the Governing Body.

Applicants are required to match 50 per cent of the funding

21.    A minimum 50 per cent contribution towards the projects is required from applicants. This can be achieved through additional funding from their own or other resources, or time-in-kind.

22.    Private investment and funding from other providers are encouraged and considered favourably by the assessment team.

Timing and promotion of the grant programme

23.    The 2021/2022 funding round was promoted via several avenues, including:

·        local boards

·        internal council networks including the Waste Solutions, Sustainability Initiatives, Community Empowerment Unit and Grants teams

·        Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund contact database

·        media releases to newspapers, including articles in Our Auckland

·        Facebook ads

·        digital screens in Auckland Council service centres, libraries and buildings.

24.    In addition to the standard promotion listed above, in July 2021 two online and one in person workshop presentations were held across Auckland where applicants could be supported through the application process and request advice from council staff.

25.    Applicants were given an extra week to submit their applications due to the government mandated alert level changes in response to COVID-19 that came into force during the application period. The deadline was shifted from 31 August 2021 to 7 September 2021 and all applicants were notified of this change.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Grant applications were assessed using a three-stage process

26.    Applications were assessed through a three-stage process as follows:

i.        All funding applications were assessed for eligibility against the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund guidelines, as outlined in Attachment A. 

ii.       Feedback was requested from subject matter experts and council staff on all eligible funding applications, as outlined in Table 3. The Māori outcomes specialist assessed and scored the relevant applications against the Māori outcomes criteria. Their assessments and scores were taken through to the panel meetings but were not further modified by the panel. The Māori outcomes scores were given a 10 per cent weighting and contributed directly to the overall weighted score of each application.

iii.      Applications were then assessed by a panel comprised of council subject matter experts, who scored each application against the assessment criteria, focusing on the:

·        project’s strategic alignment with the waste plan

·        potential for waste minimisation

·        community participation and/or benefit

·        value for investment

·        quality of proposal.

Table 3: An overview of feedback requested on Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund applications

Feedback requested from

Feedback requested on

Intention

Subject matter experts

·    Any applications that require subject matter input regarding the waste being targeted, processes being used, or organisation applying

·    To receive technical and expert input on subject matter, including the applicant, targeted waste streams, community, processes and legislative requirements

Māori outcomes specialist

·    Any applications where Māori outcomes are identified by the applicant

·    To receive a specialist assessment of the extent of the project’s engagement with Mana Whenua as kaitiaki, the achievement of Māori outcomes, and Te Ao Māori as integral to the project’s methods and aims

Resource Consents Department

·    All applications

·    To identify whether any resource consents may be triggered by the proposed project

Sustainable Schools Team

·    Any applications relating to educational institutions or child-based learning

·    To identify whether the applicant has been liaising with the Sustainable Schools Advisor allocated to their area

·    To help determine whether the project is using best practice methods, and those appropriate for the size, capacity and type of organisation

 

27.    The initial scores were moderated by panel members before the panel agreed upon final funding recommendations for the Environment and Climate Change Committee’s consideration.

The grant programme received 80 applications across all four priority outcome areas

28.    The grant programme received 80 applications, requesting over $1.8 million in total. Approximately 12 were for small grants, and 68 for medium and large grants. Two applications from the medium and large grant category and one application from the small grant category were ineligible due to misalignment with the fund criteria and objectives. One application from the small grant category was withdrawn by the applicant.

29.    Applications were received from a range of organisation types with the majority received from businesses, charitable organisations, schools or educational institutions and social enterprises, as shown in Figure 1 below. 

 

 

            Chart, histogram

Description automatically generated

 

         Figure 1. Applications received by organisation type

 

30.    Applications were spread across all four priority outcome areas (resource recovery initiatives and facilities, commercial waste, organic waste, and community action and behaviour change). Applications generally aim to deliver on more than one of the four outcome areas. Refer to Figure 2 below for applications received by outcome areas.

31.    There was a strong focus on projects that influenced community action and behaviour change and reduced commercial waste.

 

         Figure 2. Applications received by outcome areas

 

32.    Grant requests ranged from $970 to $50,000 in value, with an average of $23,090 being requested.

Recommendations and rationale for allocating funding

33.    The funding recommendations included in this report have been developed in line with the fund guidelines, priorities and agreed funding principles.

34.    Staff recommend that 21 applications from the medium and large grant category, totalling $491,190, are supported from the fund’s medium and large grants category budget for the 2021/2022 funding round.

35.    A total of $67,980 is recommended for applications submitted by Māori organisations. This equates to 13.6 per cent of the funds available for medium and large projects or 12.3 per cent of the total available funds for the 2021/2022 funding round.

36.    Applications which are recommended for funding scored highly against the assessment criteria, as well as showing:

·        capability of the applicant to deliver the project outcomes

·        budget feasibility, including applicant investment and funding requested

·        demonstration of financial and operational project sustainability

·        ability to scale or replicate the project

·        use of best practice methods

·        project continuance and benefit should partial funding be granted.

37.    Of all medium and large applications received, 39 applications are recommended to be declined for reasons such as:

·        low contribution towards funding outcomes

·        not significantly meeting funding criteria

·        budget limitations.

38.    Two applications from the medium and large grant category were ineligible from this grant round due to misalignment with the fund criteria and objectives. The unallocated funding of $10,420 will be carried forward from the medium and large grants category budget to the 2022/2023 funding round.

39.    A total of 11 applications from the small grant category requesting up to $5,000 were recommended for funding for a total of $37,590, out of which three applications were moved from the medium grant category to the small grant category due to change in funding allocation. The decision-making on these is delegated to the General Manager Waste Solutions.

40.    Five applications for the small grant category were recommended to be declined, one application was ineligible due to misalignment with the fund criteria and objectives and one application was withdrawn by the applicant. The unallocated funding of $12,570 will be carried forward from the small grant category budget to the 2022/2023 funding round.

41.    Table 4 below shows the number and total value of applications received, declined and recommended for funding since 2019/2020.

Table 4: Summary of funding available and allocations from 2019/2020 to 2021/2022

 

2019/2020

2020/2021

2021/2022

Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund Budget

$484,130

$649,770

$551,770

Number of applications received

84

115

80

Total value of grants requested

(including multi-year requests)

$2,347,380

 

$3,163,920

 

$1,847,280

Number of medium and large applications recommended for funding

20 applications recommended for funding, no multi-year

41 declined

 

24 applications recommended for funding, no multi-year

59 declined

2 withdrawn

21 applications recommended for funding.

39 declined

2 ineligible

Number of small applications recommended for funding

13 applications recommended for funding

7 declined

3 withdrawn

27 applications recommended for funding

3 declined

 

11 applications recommended for funding

5 declined

1 ineligible

1 withdrawn

Value of grant allocation for medium and large applications

Range: $5,190 to $50,000

Average grant: $22,500

Range: $7,350 to $50,000

Average grant: $23,990

Range: $8,710 to $50,000

Average grant: $23,390

42.    More detail on the allocation of grant funding will be discussed in the confidential section of the December 2021 Environment and Climate Change Committee meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.    One of the key criteria for allocation of funding under the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund is the potential for a project to divert waste from landfill. The diversion of waste from landfill contributes to a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions through reducing the largest source category for the waste sector – solid waste disposal.

44.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan sets out a path for the region to achieve its climate goals and respond to our changing climate. Projects funded through the fund will contribute to the following actions:

·        Action B7: Develop and support initiatives to minimise construction and demolition waste:

o   six projects that focus on minimising construction and demolition waste are recommended for funding in this grant round. The projects mainly focus on reuse and repurposing of material as well as creating a better understanding of barriers and opportunities for waste minimisation in order to develop tools and guidelines for the wider construction industry. Further to this, construction and demolition projects help drive demand for recovered materials by diverting them from landfill or cleanfill, helping to create a circular economy.

·        Action E6. Manage our resources to deliver a zero waste, circular economy:

o   24 projects which contribute to a circular economy by encouraging re-use and restoration of products and materials are recommended for funding. By reusing materials, these projects will reduce emissions from waste in landfill and preserve embedded carbon by extending the lifecycle of such materials.

·        Action F3. Prevent and reduce waste and maximise the value of surplus food:

o   14 projects that rescue food and divert food scraps from landfill are recommended for funding in this grant round. Food scraps and organic materials release methane when they degrade in the anaerobic environment of a landfill. The diversion of these specific materials will further reduce methane emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.    All applications have had input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department, according to the project outcome areas and scoring guidelines. All applications were also reviewed by a resource consent expert and recommendations were provided to ensure the proposed projects do not require any consents.

46.    The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views on applications were not sought.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.    Local boards have a strong interest in waste minimisation and play a key role in promoting the fund to their networks and communities.

48.    Local boards will be informed of the results of the funding round and successful applications from their areas, following approval of funding recommendations by the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.    A guiding principle of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund is to support waste minimisation projects which enable Māori to participate in co-management of resources and support sustainable development of Māori outcomes, leadership, community and partnerships.

50.    To improve Māori outcomes achieved by the fund, following a review of the fund in 2021 there is now a separate Māori outcomes assessment criterion with 10 per cent weighting to prioritise waste minimisation projects that enable mana whenua in their role as kaitiaki and mataawaka businesses and organisations with waste minimisation capability.

51.    There is also now a target of 15 per cent of the fund to ensure that more of the fund is awarded to projects which deliver specific Māori outcomes by Māori for Māori and help ensure effective participation and encourage applications from mana whenua and mataawaka organisations. For the 2021/2022 funding round 13.6 per cent of the funds available for medium and large projects or 12.3 per cent of the total available funds are recommended for applications submitted by Māori organisations.

52.    To further enable Māori participation in the fund the Waste Solutions department has a key performance indicator to hold four capacity-building workshops for Māori organisations prior to the next round of funding.

53.    The grant programme received three applications from Māori organisations in the 2021/2022 funding round. Funding is recommended for two of these applications under the medium and large grant category and the other application has been declined.

54.    Approximately 41 other applicants identified as either:

·        working with Māori

·        having Māori involvement in the design or concept

·        having a Māori focus through tikanga (practices), mātauranga (knowledge) or reo (language), or

·        Māori participation through a Māori priority group, target group or high representation of Māori staff delivering the project.

55.    Funding is recommended for eight of these applications under the medium and large grant category.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.    The grant allocation of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund can be managed through existing budgets provided by the national waste levy. The 2021/2022 budget for medium and large grants is $501,610.

57.    Staff recommend $491,190 of this budget be allocated in the 2021/2022 funding round.

58.    The unallocated funding of $10,420 will be carried forward to the 2022/2023 budget for medium and large grants.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.    To reduce risks, allocation of grants follows the guidelines and criteria of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund and Community Grants Policy. A thorough assessment process, including fair and transparent decision making, ensures fair allocation of grants.

60.    The Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund further mitigates potential risk by using a reimbursement process when awarding large amounts of funding. Recipients receive funding once project works have been undertaken and invoices or receipts have been provided to the council.

61.    Upfront funding can be provided, however an official and detailed request must be made by the grant recipient and is assessed on a case-by-case basis. There is also a requirement for applicants to provide a project accountability report at the end of their term.

62.    Staff will maintain regular contact with applicants during the project implementation phase to follow up on progress and make sure any risks are properly addressed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.    Once recommendations are approved, applicants will be notified of funding decisions in December 2021.

64.    Successful applicants will be notified in writing. At the end of the grant term, recipients will be required to meet project accountability requirements, detailing how funding has been used and what their project has achieved.

65.    Unsuccessful applicants will be informed of the decision in writing. These applicants will also be offered a written evaluation on request, and the opportunity to work with council staff for advice on applications for future funding rounds.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Applicant guide to Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund

193

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Driver, Waste Planning Advisor

Authorisers

Parul Sood, General Manager Waste Solutions

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings (including forward work programme) - 2 December 2021

File No.: CP2021/18100

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the progress on the forward work programme included as Attachment A.

2.      To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to the Environment and Climate Change Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.      The following memos were circulated to members of the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

Date

Memo

27/10/21

Update on Clean Hull Plan shift to national plan

24/11/21

Update Manukau Harbour

29/11/21

Update on Kaipara Moana Remediation Programme

29/11/21

Jobs for Nature programme update

 

5.      The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/Briefing

3/11/21

Water Strategy - International and Mana Whenua-led Benchmarking for water – confidential

3/11/21

Water Strategy – Treaty Partnership and Working with Aucklanders strategic shifts – confidential

10/11/21

Water Strategy - Integrated land use and water planning; and Regenerative water infrastructure strategic shifts – confidential

10/11/21

Transport Emissions Reduction Plan – progress update – confidential

17/11/21

Water Strategy - Water Security & Diverse Sources, Restoring & enhancing

Water Ecosystems, and Pooling Knowledge – confidential

24/11/21

Water Strategy - Implementation & Wrap Up – confidential

 


 

 

6.      These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/ Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te TaiaoEnvironment and Climate Change” from the drop-down tab and click “View”.

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

7.      Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      tuhi / note the progress on the forward work programme included as Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      riro / receive the Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information items and briefings – 2 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

207

b

Update on Clean Hull Plan shift to national plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Update Manukau Harbour (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Update on Kaipara Moana Remediation Programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Jobs for Nature programme update (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change] Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021/2022

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities. The full terms of reference can be found here:[i Terms of reference].

This committee will meet bi-monthly commencing February 2021

 

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected decision timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee

2 Dec 21

10 Mar 22

12 May 22

07 Jul 22

08 Sep 22

Workshops / Memo

Strategic approach to Climate Change: - Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Chief Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019] Link to decision

 

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to develop a plan to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

 

Consultation on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to government

 

 

Progress to date:

C40 Update 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Consultation on the Climate Commission draft advice to Government 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 – June 2021
Link to decision

C40 Divest/Invest Declaration – August 2021
Link to decision

Sustainability Asset Standards/Corporate Emissions October 2021

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transport Emissions

Transport Emissions Reduction Plan for Auckland

To approve

Progress to date:

Approach - August 2021
Link to decision

Progress update – December 2021

Decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural hazards coastal renewals, slips and remediation

Coastal Management Framework and delivery of Shoreline Adaptation Plans

Resilient Land and Coast

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019)

Shorelines adaptation plans apply a long term, sustainable approach to management of our coast over the next 100 years. Adaptive management plans will be developed in collaboration with mana whenua and communities. Plans will consider the experiences and values we place on the coast and how these may change over time due to coastal hazards and climate change.

ECC to approve the Whangaparaoa Pilot and the process in 2021. ECC then to approve completed plans following endorsement via the respective the Local Boards. 

 

Progress to date:

Adoption of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan – June 2021
Link to decision

 

Decision report Whangaparaoa pilot.

 

 

Decision report approve

Beachlands and East and Regional Risk Assessment

 

Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan (NHRMAP)

NHRMAP is reporting tool that collates all of the work programmes across Auckland Council that mitigate long term natural hazard risk, outside of emergency management. As natural hazard events are expected to escalate in size and frequency due to climate change, this work is an important step to ensure that the council is appropriately managing risk.

Receive 6 monthly reporting updates.

 

Progress to date:

Adoption of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan – June 2021
Link to decision

 

Memo

 

 

Decision

 

December 2021 memo on reporting framework

 

July 2022 – workshop on NHRMAP year one including any recommended changes to the plan

Waste Minimisation

Waste Political Advisory Group

Waste Solutions

To provide feedback and guidance on implementation of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018

Waste Political Advisory Group meetings

 

 

 

 

 

Ongoing – quarterly meetings

Consultation on key national waste proposals

 e.g. container return scheme design

Waste Solutions

Ministry for the Environment consultation on design for national container return scheme design – Auckland Council submission

To approve the Auckland Council submission on Ministry for the Environment consultation on container return scheme design

Council submission to be confirmed pending central government consultation dates TBC

 

 

 

Decision TBC

 

 

 

 

Kerbside refuse policy charging review

Review of PAYT model to assess whether PAYT is still the best solution for achieving the objectives of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

Finance and Performance and Governing Body to consider and determine to deviate, or not, from current Waste Management and Minimisation Plan policy.

Any deviation will require a special consultative procedure likely as part of the Annual Plan 2022/2023 process.

ECC Committee will receive a close out report in mid 2022.

 

 

 

 

Decision

 

 

Water

Auckland Water Strategy

Chief Planning Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

*ENV/2019/75

The health of Auckland’s waters is a critical issue. Both freshwater and marine environments in Auckland are under pressure from historic under-investment, climate change and rapid growth. The draft Auckland Plan 2050 identifies the need to proactively adapt to a changing water future and develop long-term solutions.

Series of workshops scheduled for 2021

Workshops to be held to seek feedback and guidance on strategic direction of proposed Water Strategy ahead of decision making in December 2021 and final decision making in March 2022.

Progress to date:

Water Consumption targets report 15 April 2021
Link to decision

Decision

Decision

 

 

 

Series of workshops held in October and November 2021

National Environment Standards for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy, Infrastructure Strategy)

 

Further detailed opportunity to provide Auckland Council input on specific regulatory proposals, probably through Planning Committee, awaiting advice from MFE, likely in 2021.  Not linked to release of Water Services Bill in mid-2020.

Dates for the release of these NES are anticipated to be in the second half of 2021 at earliest.

Note: Overlap with Planning Committee

For information: Decision to provide feedback on the Water Services Bill and other reforms noted at Planning Committee in early 2020. The Natural Environment Strategy Unit (APRSR) provided proposed council submission on the Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill to Environment and Climate Change Committee in March 2020. Status of proposed NES for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows will be provided to relevant committees when more is known about central government process

Progress to date:

Waters Strategy and Long-term Plan update 10 September 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM)

Plans and Places

Healthy Waters

Natural Environment Strategy

 

The NPSFM being implemented, with periodic reporting to council committees on progress, and responding to ongoing central government refinement of the framework for achieving water outcomes. Decision making for this area of work will be split between the Planning Committee (for planning decisions such as Plan Changes) and Environment and Climate Change for non-statutory functions

To provide guidance on the council’s implementation of non-statutory functions under the National Policy Statement.

For Information: Planning Committee agenda report scheduled for March 2021 setting out proposed Auckland Council approach to implement the NPSFM 2020, as driven from a planning approach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Quality Targeted Rate Programme

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Healthy waters and streams projects supported by the water quality targeted rate for projects that will ensure cleaner beaches, streams and harbours across the region

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the Finance and Performance Committee. End of year report will be provided in October.

Progress to date:

End of year report 10 September 2020
Link to decision

End of year report October 2021

Link to decision 

 

 

 

 

Annual report

 

Too Much Water Policy

To develop an adaptive approach to protecting Aucklanders from harms as a result of a future with’ too much’ water.

For decision: Position Statements to guide future responses while policy is further developed and update on programme approach to be provided in March 2022.

 

 

 

 

Update

 

 

 

 

Harbours

Manukau Harbour

Natural Environment Strategy

 

To achieve better outcomes for the Manukau Harbour including:

·    increased visibility of Auckland Council initiatives through updates on work programmes to the committee

·    greater E&CC oversight, and

work to strengthening relationships with mana whenua and other parties

Annual update provided through 30 June 2021 closed workshop which included overview of synthesis report of findings from the council’s 2020 State of the Environment report, current and future operational programmes, and strategic direction

Memo

 

 

 

 

 

Hauraki Gulf

Natural Environment Strategy

 

Work to ensure that the outcomes that Auckland Council intends to achieve in the Hauraki Gulf under its statutory responsibilities are clearly articulated. 

To ensure that the central government work programme is complementary to council’s aspirations for the Hauraki Gul

i)          matters that need greater internal synergies within council’s statutory responsibilities to give effect to improved Hauraki Gulf outcomes (i.e., resource management)

ii)         matters that Auckland Council wishes to contribute to the central government work programme encompassed by ‘Revitalising Our Gulf: Government Action on the Sea Change plan’, as it relates to complementary activities within Auckland Council’s mandate

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kaipara Harbour

Governance

Provides a report back function for the Auckland Council interest in the Kaipara Moana Remediation Programme

To receive the annual report and other progress updates as required

Memo

 

 

 

 

 

Grants

Allocation of the Regional Natural Heritage Grant

Environmental Services

 

Decision-making over regional environment fund as per the grants funding policy and fund guidelines. Funds to contribute to the council’s goals related to protecting our natural environment.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021

Decision

 

 

 

 

 

Establishment of a Climate Action Fund

Environmental Services

To approve establishment of a contestable fund to support community climate action.

To approve establishment of a new climate action fund. Decision report in July 2022

 

 

 

Decision

 

 

Review of the Regional Environment & Natural Heritage Fund

Environmental Services

To review the fund to better align community environmental funding. 

To approve any significant changes to the RENH grant framework arising from the review.

Decision report in July 2022

 

 

 

Decision

 

 

Allocation of Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021

Waste Solutions

Decision making over medium and large funds from the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund in line with the fund’s adopted policy. Funds to contribute towards the council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021.

Progress to date:

Update on guidelines - Report to June 2021
Link to decision

Decision

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Heritage

National / Inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan

Environmental Services

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

A Pathway Management Plan is a statutory plan under the Biosecurity Act.  Council is working with MPI, DOC and neighbouring councils (a group known as Top of the North) to develop one to manage the spread of marine pests to avoid or minimise their negative impacts on the environment. Initially proposed as aligned regional plans, this is now proposed to be a national plan, with the Minister of Biosecurity as the decision maker.

 

To approve formal council feedback on the proposed national plan and consider council’s budget implications if any.

Progress to date:

Memorandum regarding shift to national plan sent in November 2021.

 

 

 

 

Decision (timing uncertain as relies on CG  consultation is TBC)

 

 

Natural Environment Targeted Rate Programme

 

Environmental Services

Natural environment projects supported by the natural environment targeted rate will help protect the environment and tackle the pests, weeds and diseases that are threatening the native species

 

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the F&P Committee. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in October.

Progress to date:

End of year report 10 September 2020
Link to decision

End of year report October 2021

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

Decision

 

Annual report on the council’s operational plan for implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030

Environmental Services

Under section 100B of the Biosecurity Act, the council is required to report annually on its operational plan for implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan.

For information:. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in September 2022.

Progress to date:

Report October 2021 as part of the annual report on the water and environment targeted rates

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

Decision

 

 

Kauri dieback work programme update

Environmental Services

 

The natural environment targeted rate included a $100m package to improve the protection of kauri in Auckland.  The work programme includes a significant track upgrade package to reduce the spread of kauri dieback, as well as funding for education, enforcement, monitoring, treatment and research.

To update the committee on ongoing regional kauri dieback management work programme.

Progress to date:

Memo sent November 2020, link found here

Memo: annual update for 2021/2022 will be sent December 2021 or January 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

Update and oversight role

National Biodiversity Strategy and National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

Natural Environment Strategy and Environmental Services

Government is launching these two programmes and they will guide council activity

To endorse council’s approach to responding to the strategy and policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weed Management Political Advisory Group

 

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/13. Implementing this resolution will include engagement with local boards from September – November

Oversee the implementation and delivery of the Weed Management Policy, taking into account both community and technical considerations.

This year will have a focus on providing oversight over the implementation Resolution number ECC/2020/55 relating to the standardisation of funding for weed management within the urban road corridor.

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

Next WMPAG meeting to be scheduled for May 2022

Project Streetscapes – Regional Review of Weed Management in the Road Corridor

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/55 f)

Consideration of engagement of with mana whenua, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and the IMSB

 

 

 

 

 

Memo, December 2021

Memo, July 2022

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Council Controlled Organisation’s Climate Change Update

Climate Change

To give elected member’s visibility of the work undertaken by CCOs to adapt & mitigate the impacts of climate change

Auckland Transport Update 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Auckland Unlimited Update 15 April 2021
Link to decision

Eke Panuku Update 15 April 2021

Link to decision

Auckland Unlimited – Zoo – 10 June 2021
Link to decision

Watercare – 12 August 2021
Link to decision

 

 

Review of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation fund

Waste Solutions

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Review the Fund, in line with the recommendations of the S17A Value for Money review.

To approve any significant changes to the grant framework arising from the review.

 

Update on guidelines - Report to June 2021
Link to decision

Review of Auckland Council’s Regional Pest Management Plan

Environmental Services

Council has statutory obligations under the Biosecurity Act to control weeds and animal pests. The purpose of work in 2020 will be to resolve any remaining appeals against the plan and complete final steps required for it to become operative.

To update the committee when the plan becomes operative.

Memorandum regarding operative in part as part of items for information in February 2021.

No further decisions for the rest of term

Decision can be found here

Proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy)

Auckland Council made submission on Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill in March 2020. Subsequent Bill extends regulatory regime to all drinking water suppliers (other than domestic self-supply) and increased requirements to manage risks to drinking water sources. Implications for council roles in being a drinking water supplier, and planning and regulatory functions.

To approve substance of proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill, with final approval delegated to Chair and other members of ECC Committee prior to 2 March 2021 central government deadline.

 

 

Decision can be found here

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

02 December 2021

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Allocation of the 2021/2022 Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains sensitive information about some commercial applications that should not be released to competitors.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Three waters refers to drinking water, wastewater, and storm water.

[2] Three waters refers to drinking water, wastewater, and storm water.

[3] National Policy Statement – Freshwater Management policy 3.5

[4] The Water-Sensitive Cities index can be applied to a region despite its title. Auckland Council applied the framework with a focus on urban and peri-urban areas.   

[5] Local Government Act, 2002 and Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

[6] Auckland Unitary Plan Objective E1.2: The mauri of freshwater is maintained or progressively improved overtime…’

[7] http://www.knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=1747&DocumentType=1&

[8] http://knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=2807

[9] Streams, springs, rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater, estuaries, harbours.

[10] These include Section 33 and 36 of the Resource Management Act and provisions for Te Mana Whakahono a Rohe agreements.