I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 14 December 2021

9.30am

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams

videoconference. Either a recording or written

summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website

 

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

6 December 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - The MADE Group                                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Auckland Council Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022                                                                                                                        7

12        Te Kete Rukuruku programme - adoption of te reo Māori names, receipt of associated narratives and installation of bilingual signs at Sandspit Reserve   17

13        Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)                     35

14        Auckland Unlimited - Culinary Workshops Accelerator                                         41

15        Māori Outcomes Annual Report - Te Pūrongo a te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021                                                                                     49

16        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update:  Quarter One, 2021-22       51

17        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents          59

18        Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan:
Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach - Waiau Pa                                                                   
69

19        Parks Service Assessment Outcomes for the Development of 6 Angiangi Crescent, Beachlands (Neighbourhood Park).                                                                          73

20        Reserve revocation of 8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku and 72R Karaka Road, Beachlands                                                                                                                                       79

21        Approval for the 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) development - extensions to four existing public roads, one Jointly Owned Access Lot, one new public road name and three new JOAL names.                                                       85

22        Approval for a new private road name at 14 Belgium Road, Pukekohe                97

23        Approval for five new public road names and the extension of an existing road name at 67 Clarks Beach Road, Pukekohe                                                             103

24        Approval to name a new public road at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands.  113

25        Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board input into Auckland Council's submission to the National Emissions Reduction Plan                                                                 121

26        Governance Forward Work Calendar December 2021                                          131

27        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                137

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 30 November 2021, including the confidential section, as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.


 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - The MADE Group

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Charles Ma of MADE Group Limited will attend the meeting to address the board on matters pertaining to the Auranga development.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         Charles Ma will present an update on Auranga, including views on the siting of the Drury West rail station.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

(a)     thank Charles Ma of MADE Group Limited for his attendance and presentation on Auranga, including views on the siting of the Drury West rail station.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Council Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/16251

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an integrated performance report for Quarter One, 1 July – 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·    Community led Placemaking and Safety: staff have finalised funding agreement with Pukekohe Business Association for their placemaking activities 2021/22. Staff are working with Waiuku Business and Development Association on a funding agreement to deliver placemaking activations in 2022. Staff continue to liaise with internal and external stakeholders to deliver a community-led programme to reduce anti-social behaviour at both east and west coast beaches. Support was provided to the Clarks Beach Yacht Club to assist their community clean up and working bee

·    Papakura Stream Landowner Engagement Programme – Franklin: On the 26 May a planting event was held at the Brookby Wildlife Habitat and volunteers planted 2000 native trees and wetland grasses in a 100-year-old Kahikatea stand wetland. A second planting day was held on 23 June at the Papakura Esplanade Reserve and this planting was planned to be contractor implemented; however, due to the high level of volunteer interest involved in the event, it became a volunteer only day.

·    Waiuku Trails - Implement plan (Year 2/3): This project was completed September 2021 as year 2 was 1.4km of aggregate path being built along the esplanade reserve from Rangiwhea Road to McCall drive. The overall goal is to provide 16 kilometers of trail connections, forming a network of local paths around the Waiuku township.

·    Implementation of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan: Consultation has taken place with key stakeholders and a small number of community groups. Bringing forward the review of the plan to this financial year was supported and the scope of the review will be workshopped with the board in Quarter 2

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·    Community Facilities Big Bay Reserve - renew coastal assets: A new design is required for the seawall, with next steps to engage a new designer for the seawall and confirm project manager changes.

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2021/2022 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·    Net financial operating performance for Franklin Local Board is less than three percent below budget for the first quarter ended 30 September 2021 

·    Operating expenditure is three percent below budget mostly in Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) still to be delivered, as there continues to be disruptions around events and gatherings under COVID-19 restrictions 

·    Operating revenue has a five per cent decrease in facility hire and library services revenue

·    Capital expenditure is behind budget having achieved only six percent year to date of the total revised budget as this has been severely disrupted by COVID-19

·    Associated cost escalations and supply chain risks will possibly further impact future delivery.

6.       The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for Quarter One ending 30 September 2021.

b)      note that the Customer and Community Services Capex work programme been updated to reflect financial deferrals (Attachment C).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Franklin Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services (C&CS)

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services (I&ES)

·        Plans and Places

·        Auckland Unlimited.

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.


 

 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

COVID-19 restrictions

9.       Auckland has faced COVID-19 restrictions (Level 3 and 4) from 17 August 2021 - six weeks of Quarter One (just under half the period this report covers).

10.     Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were closed.

11.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update (attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.


 

 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates

14.     The following include activities identified as initiatives in the Local Board Plan and the Local Board Agreement:

·    ID 1467 Auckland Unlimited Franklin Economic Broker. The Economic Broker continues to deliver the work programme in line with expectation. An evaluation of the value of the role is nearing completion and will be shared with the local board in the New Year to assist decision making about the 2022/23 work programme.

·    ID 128 CC&S Operational expenditure for Franklin Arts Centre. During Q1, Franklin Art Centre delivered 20 programmes with 20 sessions to a combined total of 1,150 participants and attendees. Highlights included the Franklin Arts Centre Whānau Day that was run by mana whenua and included performances by Kōtahu Dance Company and featured local enterprise stalls and poi making in the foyer. The community gallery exhibition titled ‘Reflections’ by local youth leader Tracey Aramoana with students from Pukekohe Intermediate School that reflected on the first COVID19 lockdown, and the exhibition and artist talk by local master carver Ted Ngātaki and young carver and artist Māka Pōtini.

·    ID 134 CC&S Capacity and resilience building. Staff have finalised funding to Diabetes Aotearoa (Gardens 4 Health) to continue to support local garden groups. Staff met with residents at Birdwood East community garden to discuss needs for this community and access to water has been improved. Staff are working with key stakeholders to support a working bee at the garden where improvements will be made to garden bed locations, soil and mulch levels and seedlings will be sourced. The Kayes Road garden umbrella organisation is completing a lease application to enable the delivery of the container for the bike hub project.

·    ID 130 CC&S Youth: Franklin youth participation. FYAB have been busy working on a wide range of projects. They participated in a planting day at Waitawa which has inspired them to work on future clean-up projects in collaboration with other environmental groups. They also held their strategic retreat in August which reflected on the past six months and planned for future events, and played amazing games like the race around Waiuku then bowling in Pukekohe. During lockdown they focused on social media engagement with members doing daily sharing, what it looks like inside their bubbles. FYAB were invited to the OECD youth week forum to speak on youth and democracy in times of crisis, specifically political responses to mental health and education through COVID19. FYAB initiated a Q&A with Chloe Swarbrick on leadership and youth voice which was facilitated by Auckland Youth Voice Network and around 50 young people participated from across the various youth councils.

·    ID 143 CC&S Community grants Franklin. The Franklin Local Board has approved a total of $32,080 for Quick Response Round One and a total of $2,500 for Multi board Round One. This leaves a total of $29,109 for one quick response rounds. A total of $24,000 was approved for the Franklin Swimming Pool grant round, with $1,000 remaining.

·    ID 720 I&ES. Waiuku Zero Waste Business and Community Education Programme: A waste education facilitator has been appointed to deliver and coordinate workshops and events. Five in-person workshops / learning events were held, with others postponed due to COVID-19 Alert Level 4 and 3. Several Repair Café events were planned and scheduled, along with a local ‘zero-waste’ market but have been rescheduled due to COVID-19 Alert Level 4 and 3. Community and business outreach and education has been ongoing throughout lockdown. Waiuku Zero Waste have met with local businesses and church groups throughout Pukekohe, Pokeno and Waiuku areas to share zero waste messages and ideas.

Activities with significant issues

15.     The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·    ID 20415 Community Facilities Big Bay Reserve - renew coastal assets: A new design is required for the seawall with next steps to engage a new designer for the seawall, and confirm project manager changes.

Activities on hold

16.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·    ID 25981 Community Facilities Bledisloe Park - upgrade sports lighting and field:  Award tender with next steps to start physical works. The sport fields have been fully booked during the upgrade

·    ID 29066 Community Facilities Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve - install connector footpaths: Tree resource consent application has been approved and a designer has been engaged to work on preliminary design and final detailed designs. Resource consent application in progress, as more time is required by regulatory department due to COVID-19 Level 4, seeking further information. The next steps include a local board workshop and business meeting to socialise the final concept plan for acceptance and approval. Due to some potential delays in timeline of processing the consents, Iwi consultation and final detailed design, the physical works may be delayed until financial year 2022

·    ID 27688 Community Facilities Kawakawa Bay boat club - investigate and renew boat ramp pontoon piles: Preliminary cost estimates the pontoon replacements will be more expensive than thought and will require replacement under a more detailed form of contract and tender. A coastal designer has been engaged to produce a requirement statement to assist accurate tender submissions. The next steps include completing the required statement, issue the tender, appoint a contractor for construction and order the new pontoons

·    ID 20570 Community Facilities Maraetai Park - upgrade junior play space: Currently a designer is being engaged with next steps to review plans with local iwi group. Physical works will start in financial year 2023

·    ID 23773 Community Facilities. Pukekohe Stadium (Growers Stadium) - upgrade sports field 2: currently reviewing tender submissions with next steps to award tender and start physical works. The fields have been fully booked during upgrade

·    ID 19966 Community Facilities. Puriri Road Reserve - replace access: project on hold awaiting local board direction in relation to alternative sources of funding from Panuku

·    ID 25946 Community Facilities Te Puru Park - develop concept plan: Cultural Values Assessment to be completed first from Iwi group before we progress. Iwi do not support project at this stage as remains (koiwi) were uncovered during earthworks in 2004. Next steps - to work with Park Sport & Recreation who are reviewing the skatepark upgrade and identifying another site, as the iwi group do not support any digging onsite

·    ID 20699 Community Facilities Te Puru Park - renew skate park: next steps - to award tender and start physical works. The sport fields have been fully booked for upgrade

·    ID 15559 Community Facilities Umupuia Coastal Reserve-upgrade Park assets: Engage with a designer with physical works to begin in financial year 2023

·    ID 20759 Community Facilities Whitford Point Reserve - renew play space and car park: project near completion, however site works was shut down due to Level four lockdown and only minimal works are now needed. Once COVID19 restrictions change to level three, we will then complete physical works.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

18.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This report informs the Franklin Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     This report informs the Franklin Local Board of the activities that has a direct Māori outcome focus and explain its progress:

·    ID 131 CC&S Community Empowerment. Local Māori responsiveness – Franklin: RIMU (research and evaluation department) undertook a review of the improving Māori input project which has been presented to both the governance and delivery groups. Acting on the recommendations in the review, the group has been renamed Ara Kōtui and has a single level structure with delivery staff representation attending governance hui. Staff liaised with Local Board Services and have finalised the funding with the support organisation. The Tuia programme continues through to the end of the calendar year. The candidate community project has been impacted by the August/September Covid-19 lockdown. When restrictions allow, staff will support the community project delivery if appropriate

·    ID 1399 CC&S libraries: Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language Celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori: The theme for term 2 school holidays in July included Matariki. Activities promoting Te Reo were held at Pukekohe Library and Waiuku Library during this time and the activities were well attended. During lockdown, activity prompts and ako videos were shared digitally throughout Mahuru Māori (challenge to encourage the continued use of Te Reo through various way including waiata).

·    ID 1566 CC&S The Southern Initiative: Funding of $50,000 to be provided to Te Ara Rangatahi to support Mahia te Mahi - Rangatahi Opportunities, Employment and Education programme which will support 25 rangatahi to start end of November 2021.

·    ID 1214 CC&S PSR Wai-o-Manu Reserve development: Wai-o-Manu (Wai-o-Maru) draft operational management plan has received a positive response from the Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki management board. Feasibility work and concepts for a proposed Kaitiaki Centre have been completed along with detail related to the wetland restoration within the reserve. These documents will be combined into a final draft that will be presented to the Co-management Committee meeting in October for evaluation and approval. Once approved by the Co-management Committee the final draft will be workshopped with the board for feedback and direction. It is anticipated that the final operational management plan will be presented to the board for adoption in Q4

·    ID 3122 CC&S CARRY FORWARD: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places): Tranche one names received from iwi and hui tuku ingoa arranged with Mana whenua in November.

·    ID 654 I&ES Te Korowai o Papatuānuku: A new planting site has been agreed upon between Ngāti Te Ata and Auckland Council for restoration. Approximately 5,000 trees will be planted at Tāhuna Pa and is planned for June 2022. The current lockdown is not anticipated to interfere with this event, however it has delayed the time required for site preparation which contractors will begin in October or November 2021, when lockdowns have eased. The two cultural planting sites from July 2021 will receive pest plant maintenance by contractors to protect the establishing native plants.

·    ID661 I&ES Finding Franklin Bats: Te rapu nga pekapeka o Franklin: Staff met with Eco Quest to discuss project planning. Access was arranged for Eco Quest to Biodiversity Focus Areas and bat habitat layers in Auckland Council’s Geo-Maps system to pinpoint possible sites. Eco Quest have written a plan for the next three years (pending local board funding) on the landowner engagement approach for bat surveys and have applied to the Regional Environmental and Natural Heritage grant for further funding for automatic bat detectors to assist in the project. In quarter two Eco Quest will meet with members of Te Ara Hīkoi (Predator Free Franklin) to outline work on long-tailed bats to date, and to share the vision for collaborating with Te Ara Hīkoi, landowners, and local iwi Ngāti Pāoa and Ngāti Whanaunga. The aim is to begin establishing relationships with landowners who are interested in assessing bat activity on their properties

·    ID 15559 Community Facilities Umupuia Coastal Reserve-upgrade Park assets: Currently working with both mana whenua and the designer to assist concept design with next steps of physical works to begin in the 2023 financial year.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.       This report is provided to enable the [name] Local Board to monitor the organisation’s      progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are no      financial implications associated with this report.

           

Financial Performance

30.     Operating expenditure of $3.54 million is $126,000 below budget for the first quarter, being net overall overspend in Asset Based Services (ABS) of $5,000, and net underspend in Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) of $131,000 year to date for programmes not yet delivered within the current work programmes.  Many programmes and community initiatives, and restrictions on attendance at events have been disrupted under COVID-19 constraints.

31.     Operating revenue of $324,000 is $14,000 below budget in facility hire and library services revenue.

32.     Capital expenditure of $519,000 is behind budget by $392,000 in this quarter due to significant COVID-19 disruptions to the local renewal programme.

33.     The financial report for the first quarter ended 30 September 2021 for Franklin local board area is in Appendix B attached.

Revised Capex Budget

34.     Capex budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

35.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2021 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

36.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2021 to reflect early completion.

37.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

38.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

39.     The Customer and Community Services Capex work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards (refer attachment C).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

41.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Q1 Work Programme update (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Q1 Franklin Financial report (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

C_CCS Capex work programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Orrin Kapua - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Te Kete Rukuruku programme - adoption of te reo Māori names, receipt of associated narratives and installation of bilingual signs at Sandspit Reserve

File No.: CP2021/18002

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To adopt 61 te reo Māori park names and their associated narratives.

2.      To approve the installation of bilingual park signage in Sandspit Reserve.

3.      To invite iwi to name an additional three sites in the next tranche of the naming programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.         In September 2019 the Franklin Local Board resolved to invite mana whenua to name 149 parks in the Franklin area as part of Te Kete Rukuruku, the Māori naming of parks and community places programme (FR/2019/138).

5.         The Māori name will be added to the existing park name resulting in a dual name for the site. Nothing will be taken away.

6.         A hui tuku ingoa was held on 4 November 2021 where mana whenua presented 61 names to the local board.

7.       This report recommends the Franklin Local Board’s adoption of these 61 park names, receipt of narratives and approval to install bilingual signage in Sandspit Reserve.

8.       Communications to inform the stakeholders and communities around these parks will commence upon formal adoption of the names.

9.         Where reserves are classified under the Reserves Act 1977, gazettal of the dual park names will occur once the names are adopted.

10.       Sandspit Reserve is the preferred location for the installation of bilingual signage. We recommend a small community event (whakarewatanga) be organised to acknowledge and celebrate the adoption of these names and unveil the new signage at Sandspit Reserve.

11.       Iwi have started working on naming the remaining 88 sites that will be progressed as Tranche Two of the Te Kete Rukuruku programme for Franklin Local Board.

12.       Three additional sites have been identified for naming and these could be added into Tranche Two subject to mana whenua agreement. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      adopt the 61 te reo Māori names for parks as dual names, as outlined in Attachment A

b)      receive the narratives that tell the story behind each of the names, as outlined in Attachment A

c)      acknowledge that Auckland Council has agreed to enter into a mātauranga agreement that commits to upholding the correct use of the name and to use it only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use)

d)        authorise the gazettal of park names listed in Attachment A, for parks classified under the Reserves Act 1977, in accordance with section 16 (10) of the Reserves Act

e)      approve Sandspit Reserve as the preferred location for the installation of bilingual signage

f)       request that a small community event be organised to acknowledge and celebrate the adoption of these names and unveil the new signage at Sandspit Reserve

g)      invite iwi to name the following three sites as part of Tranche Two:

·    Clarks Beach Recreation Reserve, Stevenson Rd as a dual name

·    77 Tahuna Minhinnick Drive, Glenbrook Beach as a sole Māori name

·    6 Angiangi Cres, Beachlands as a sole Māori name.

 

Horopaki

Context

13.       Te Kete Rukuruku (TKR) is a culture and identity programme that collects and tells the unique Māori stories of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. It is a partnership between Auckland Council and all 19 mana whenua groups that have interests across the region, led by mana whenua.

14.       The objectives of the programme are to:

·     build and strengthen relationships with mana whenua

·     celebrate the Māori identity which is Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland’s unique identity in the world

·     enable te reo Māori to be seen, heard, spoken and learned in our daily lives.

15.       A key component of the programme is the reintroduction of ancestral and contemporary Māori names to the city’s parks and places.

16.       The adoption of dual or sole Māori names supports and delivers on multiple council policies and plans including:

a)    the Auckland Plan outlining council’s commitment to support te Reo to flourish

b)    council’s Long-term Plan 2021-2031 strategic priority of the promotion of te reo Māori

c)    the Māori Language Policy whose actions include increasing bilingual signage and dual naming.

17.       Mana whenua have the mātauranga and the mana for deciding on appropriate Māori names for the whenua and these names should not be subject to public debate. TKR process, as previously agreed with mana whenua and local boards, is that te reo Māori names are researched and provided by mana whenua and public feedback is not sought. In some cases the Māori names have been attached to the park or area for hundreds of years, well prior to the English name being adopted.

18.       Once the names are adopted by the local board communication and public notification will commence.

19.       Māori names may be adopted as either dual names, where the existing English name is retained and nothing is taken away, or sole names where the existing English name is removed and replaced with a sole Māori name.

20.       As part of the process one bilingual exemplar park is identified within each tranche. Signage in this park will be reviewed and either upgraded or replaced to include both Māori and English text. Upon project completion, all signage within the selected park will be bilingual.

21.       Once the names are adopted signage will be replaced only when it is due for renewal, except for the bilingual exemplar park selected. Should the local board wish to upgrade signage sooner to reflect the new names funding would be required from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget.

Gazettal

22.       The council as landowner can name parks and places by resolution through the exercise of its power of general competence under section 12 of the Local Government Act.

23.       Where the land is vested in council and held as reserve under the Reserves Act the council may name or change the name of a reserve by notice in the Gazette (s16(10) Reserves Act)

24.       As part of the TKR process any sites subject to the Reserves Act will be gazetted following adoption by the local board

Background

25.     The rationale and benefits of the programme, as well as the process for identifying and adopting names and narratives, were agreed by Franklin Local Board at its business meeting in September 2019. (FR/2019/138)

26.     At this meeting the Franklin Local Board also resolved to invite mana whenua to provide Māori names and narratives for 149 parks (FR/2019/138). This was then included in the local board’s FY2019/2020 work programme as Tranche One.

27.      At a workshop held on 5 May 2020 the Franklin Local Board agreed with the 149 sites being split into two tranches. Another workshop was held on 6 April 2021 where the local board supported the TKR programme team’s recommendation to develop bilingual signage for Sandspit Reserve in Tranche One and Kennelly Reserve in Tranche Two.

28.      Sixty-one park names were presented to the local board by mana whenua at a hui tuku ingoa on the 4 November 2021 and are now ready for adoption, as detailed in Attachment A.

29.      The remaining 88 sites make up Tranche Two and are currently being researched by mana whenua. Refer Attachment B. The names are expected this financial year.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Name adoption

30.     At its September 2019 meeting the Franklin Local Board resolved that the names and narratives will be adopted and used to enrich the stories of parks and support the Māori language to be visible, heard, spoken and learnt.

31.     It is recommended that the board adopt the names as dual names, no parks have been identified for sole naming at this time.

32.     The local board may subsequently choose to remove the English name from the park and have a sole Māori name. Consultation with stakeholders and those with an interest in the park is at the local boards’ discretion but would be recommended should the board wish to pursue this as an option.

33.     Some sites being named already had a Māori name. In some cases iwi have chosen to retain this as the name for the site. If spelling differs, the name adopted will be using the correct spelling as submitted and confirmed by mana whenua.


 

 

Addition of three sites for naming in the next tranche

34.     Parks, Sport and Recreation staff have advised TKR that after discussions with the local board three additional sites have been identified for Māori naming. They suggested they could be included in the next tranche of sites.

The three sites are:

·    Clarks Beach Recreation Reserve, Stevenson Rd – dual name

·    77 Tahuna Minhinnick Drive, Glenbrook Beach – new development with no existing English name so a sole Māori name is preferred

·    6 Angiangi Cres, Beachlands – new development with no existing English name so a sole Māori name is preferred.

35.     TKR staff recommend that the local board formally invite iwi to name these sites and if iwi have capacity the sites will be added into Tranche Two for naming.

36.     Should iwi advise they have no additional capacity for adding further sites into Tranche Two then the sites will be put forward into Tranche Three.

Bilingual signage in Sandspit Reserve

37.     In Tranche One the board was offered the opportunity to select one park where all signage will be upgraded to be fully bilingual. This signage is fully funded from Long-term Plan regional funding for Māori outcomes.

38.     At a workshop on 6 April 2021 the board confirmed their support for Sandspit Reserve to be their first park to receive this fully bilingual signage.

39.     The new signage will include:

·      dual language entrance signage stating the te reo Māori and English names

·      bilingual wayfinding, information and bylaw signage

·      a bilingual interpretative sign to tell the story behind the te reo Māori name.

40.     With a view to spending Aucklanders’ money wisely, existing signs will be reskinned, unless the signage is damaged or worn and needs to be replaced.

41.     A signage audit is underway and visuals of the park signage will be drafted and provided to the board prior to the signs being installed.

42.     Bilingual signage will visibly raise the profile of te reo Māori in the public domain. It will provide the opportunity to learn the story behind the name as well as making it easy for the public to familiarise themselves with and use te Reo.

43.     If the local board does not approve the installation of bilingual signage at Sandspit Reserve, all signage will remain in its present condition. Signage will then only be replaced either via the renewals programme or, if funded separately by the local board, as a stand-alone project from the Locally Driven Initiatives budget.

44.     For the reasons outlined above it is recommended that the local board approve the installation of bilingual signage in Sandspit Reserve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

45.       There are no substantive climate change impacts relating to this matter.

46.       The inclusion on signage of Māori names for parks adopted through the TKR programme is planned to align with signage renewal projects, or by re-skinning when necessary. This minimises environmental impacts and unnecessary wastage of resource.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.      The Te Kete Rukuruku project is a regional programme that delivers on Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy and Kia Ora Te Reo, which is a priority within Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, the organisation’s Māori Outcome Performance Management Framework.  It also delivers on Kia Ora Te Ahurea (the Māori culture and identity outcomes) as the programme helps to reclaim our Māori identity and unique point of difference in the world.

48.      The programme aligns with the aspirations of the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) as articulated in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2017, Māori Plan.

49.      This programme is a partnership programme with the naming and narratives being led by mana whenua. It seeks to bring rigour to the process of naming across the council group over time. 

50.      The programme has also triggered the development of new bilingual signage templates that may be used across the organisation in the future.

51.     Community Facilities staff are responsible for renewal of existing signage and will incorporate the new dual name as and when signage is renewed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.      Through partnering with mana whenua on this project, it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and local boards will be strengthened.

53.      The programme’s recommendation of dual naming adds an additional name and narrative to each park, as opposed to taking anything away from the community.

54.      Dual language naming signage and bilingual signage help to enrich park user experience.

55.      Māori naming and bilingual signage in parks is aligned to the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome five: Cultural heritage and Māori identity is expressed in our communities 

·    Key Initiative: Work with mana whenua … to tell the stories of our places including parks, community centres and libraries.

56.    When the 61 names have been adopted and their narratives received Auckland Council is permitted to use them for community outreach and educational purposes (non-commercial).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.      Te Kete Rukuruku continues to establish a best practice approach to Māori naming and the collection and sharing of stories.

58.   This project helps to increase Māori identity and belonging and is aligned with outcomes in the Auckland Plan.

59.   The project contributes towards outcomes from the Te Reo Māori Action Plan 2020-2023. The action plan brings to life the Māori Language Policy (2016) and describes actions to champion a bilingual city where te reo Māori is seen, heard, spoken and learned.

60.      Adopting the Māori name and narrative for 61 parks will increase the visibility of te reo Māori in the local board area, will safeguard the stories of mana whenua and help ensure their survival.

61.    Mātauranga agreements are being developed to ensure that names and stories are protected by the council. It is important that the council upholds their correct use and uses them only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use).

62.    As a partnership programme, all aspects of providing names and narratives have been led by the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau. This is appropriate as mana whenua are those with the mana in this area to carry the responsibility for Māori naming.

63.    There are a large number of resident mataawaka (Māori who live in Auckland but are not in a mana whenua group) who will have a great interest in these new names and narratives. This provides an opportunity to engage with mataawaka Māori organisations and invite them to embrace and help champion the names and narratives once the names are adopted.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.       Franklin Local Board has carried forward $23,000 of its Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) funding for this programme into the current financial year. Tranche One includes 61 parks that will receive dual names within this financial year. No additional funding is required.

65.     This funding provides a partial contribution to mana whenua for their time in supporting the process including research and ratification.

66.     The local board may choose to hold a small community event to unveil the bilingual signage in Sandspit Reserve and celebrate the adoption of the names. The board should advise the TKR team if they wish to hold such an event so this can be organised in liaison with the civic events team.

67.     Sufficient funding remains to allow for a small community event.

68.     The local board allocated $21,500 for Tranche Two and iwi are already working on identifying names for these 88 sites. No additional funding is required.

69.       Updated dual name signage for these parks will be delivered over time by Community Facilities within existing renewals programmes.

70.       Bilingual signage for Sandspit Reserve, and also for Kennelly Reserve in Tranche Two, is fully funded by Long-term Plan regional funding for Māori outcomes. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71.       Several risks and issues were highlighted at the outset of this programme or added as the programme has progressed. These risks are carefully managed throughout the process and mitigated in a variety of ways as outlined in the table below:


 

Potential Risks

Mitigation

Multiple mana whenua having an interest in the parks, with differing views on naming.

Timeframes are extended when required to allow robust discussion amongst iwi. The approach of the programme has been to focus on a quality agreed outcome.

Extended delays in the adoption of Māori names, continuing the predominance of English only names and missing renewal opportunities.

Splitting the tranche to allow for adoption of names as they are finalised rather than waiting for completion of the entire tranche.

Potential negative public reaction to Māori names.

The existing English name can be retained with the Māori name being added. Communications once the Māori names are adopted to ensure a full understanding of the names and their meanings.

High costs of replacement signage.

Signage will be replaced as it comes up for renewal with the only exception being the bilingual signage at Sandspit Reserve. Signage here will be reskinned if replacement is not warranted.

 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

72.       Where land is vested in the council and held as a reserve under the Reserves Act the council may name or change the name of a reserve by notice in the Gazette. Where reserves are classified under the Reserves Act 1977, gazettal of the dual park names will occur once the names are adopted.

73.     The names will be entered into the council’s website, GIS and SAP systems as soon as possible after adoption.

74.     Upon Franklin Local Board’s formal approval, the process for installation of bilingual signs at Sandspit Reserve will commence, with anticipated delivery in February 2022.

75.     Community Facilities teams will be advised of all names adopted so any signage being renewed will include the Māori name.

76.     The TKR team will discuss with iwi a timeline for receipt of the 88 names and update the local board accordingly.

77.     If resolved by the local board a small community event (whakarewatanga) can be organised in Sandspit Reserve to unveil the new signage and celebrate the adoption of the names. This will be organised by the civic events team in liaison with TKR and Local Board Services.

Communications approach

78.       The communications team will work with the local board and mana whenua, with support from the programme team, to implement the communication plan and develop outputs specific to the Franklin Local Board.

79.       Local board communication channels will be used to get messages out, including Facebook pages and e-newsletters. The local communication team will also work with local boards to develop media opportunities with board members to share the messages with their networks.

80.       The launch of the communications outputs will be triggered by the local board’s adoption of the names.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Franklin Park Names for Adoption Tranche One

25

b

Attachment B Franklin Tranche Two Parks

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dawn Bardsley - Naming Lead

Authorisers

Anahera Higgins - Te Kete Rukuruku Programme Manager

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)

File No.: CP2021/17754

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formalise local board feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Through Vision Zero, Auckland Transport (AT) has adopted the goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050. One of the faster and most cost-effective ways to prevent DSI is to set safe and appropriate speed limits for the function, safety, design and layout of roads.

3.       As part of Tranche 1 of Auckland Transports Safe Speeds Programme safe speed limits were set on many high risk urban and rural roads and within town centres across Auckland between June 2020 and June 2021.

4.       Roads where safe speed limits were set on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 percent reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries[1]. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced on these roads by seven per cent, compared to an upward trend in road trauma seen on the rest of the road network.

5.       Further changes to speed limits are now being proposed for a number of roads across Auckland where current speed limits are not deemed safe and appropriate. This is referred to as Tranche 2A of the Safe Speeds Programme.

6.       Details of the changes proposed in each local board area are provided as Attachment A

7.       Public consultation on Tranche 2A closed on 14 November 2021. A summary of the consultation feedback will be provided as Attachment B (to be tabled at the business meeting and to be workshopped with the local board on 7 December 2021).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       AT is the road controlling authority for all roads within the Auckland transport system. Generally, this is the local road network which includes public roads and beaches but excludes State Highways for which Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency has responsibility.

9.       Reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at speeds that are appropriate for road function, safety, design and use, is one of the key measures that AT is undertaking to improve safety on Auckland’s roads. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits will contribute to a reduction in deaths and serious injuries on our roads and ensure speed limit consistency on the network.

10.     Setting safe and appropriate speed limits also supports AT’s Vision Zero approach (adopted by the AT Board in September 2019), which provides that no deaths or serious injuries are acceptable while travelling on our transport network.

11.     AT controls more than 7,300 kilometres of roads and, through the Safe Speeds Programme, is working through a multi-year programme to review all speed limits across its network.

12.     Speed limits must be reviewed and set (by bylaw) in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017. In line with government strategy and legislation, AT is prioritising high risk roads for review.

13.     Previously AT made the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) which set new speed limits for the highest risk roads following AT’s first tranche of speed limit reviews. Within this first tranche, speed limits were reviewed on around 10 per cent of the local road network. Where new safe and appropriate speed limits were required to be set, these came into effect from mid-2020 to mid-2021.

All road performance

14.     Roads where speed limits were changed on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced by seven per cent.

15.     This equals four lives saved and 48 less injury crashes on roads treated with safe and appropriate speeds.

Rural road performance

16.     Rural roads where speeds were changed on 30 June 2020 have seen a 78 per cent reduction in fatalities and a small reduction in serious injuries.

17.     This equates to a DSI reduction of 16 per cent on the rural network where speed limit changes have been made. The overall number of crashes is similar to pre-implementation, but the crash severity rates have reduced, this is what would be expected on higher speed roads.

18.     While it will take additional time to confirm that these trends are sustained, initial indications are promising.

19.     AT is now proposing further speed limit changes for a number of roads across Auckland after reviewing and finding that their current speed limits are not safe and appropriate. This is part of the second tranche of reviews under the Safe Speeds Programme (Tranche 2A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     AT is proposing to amend the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 and set new safe and appropriate speed limits for 823 roads across Auckland with a total length of 614km (approximately eight per cent of the road network), with these new limits proposed to come into force mid-2022.

21.     AT has reviewed the existing speed limits for each of the roads identified and found they are not safe and appropriate for the function, design and use of the roads. This means there is now a legal obligation to improve the safety of the roads. Making no change is not an option. This means AT is required to either:

·    set a new safe and appropriate speed limit, or

·    install engineering measures to improve the safety of the road, like road widening, resurfacing, barriers, road markings, speed humps etc.


 

22.     Physical constraints and the corresponding costs involved mean that it isn’t viable to ‘engineer up’ these roads to support their existing speed limits. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits is one of the fastest and most cost-effective ways of reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

Community Engagement

23.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Tranche 2A took place from 27 September – 14 November 2021, including:

·      a flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes on/near the roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

·      advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist/ethnic media:

Central Leader, East & Bays Courier, Eastern Courier, Manukau Courier, North Harbour News, North Shore Times, Nor-West News, Papakura Courier, Rodney Times, Franklin County News, Western Leader, Hibiscus Matters, Pohutukawa Times, Chinese Herald, Mandarin Pages, Ponsonby News

·      radio advertising on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·      radio interviews and adlibs on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·      media release and on-going media management

·      published an article in Our Auckland

·      translated consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Tongan, Samoan, Simplified Chinese, Korean and NZ Sign Language

·      sent flyers, posters and hardcopy Freepost feedback forms, in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

·      put posters on trains, buses and ferries that could reach 280,000 commuters each day

·      15 online webinars.

24.     Feedback has been provided through a number of channels:

·      online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

·      via a survey

·      via a mapping tool

·      at public hearings held on 25 November.

25.     Local boards have also had the opportunity to present at public hearings.

26.     A summary of feedback from the local community has been provided as Attachment B. This includes feedback on specific streets in your area, as well as broad feedback about the Safe Speeds Programme more generally.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

28.     For town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced under the first tranche of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of respondents advising they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The Safe Speeds Programme has been endorsed by the AT Board, the Auckland Council Planning Committee and conforms with direction from the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2018/19 – 2027/28 and the Auckland Transport Alignment Project.

30.     In March 2021, Auckland Transport staff held a workshop with Auckland Council’s Planning Committee to provide an update to Councillors on Vision Zero, road safety performance over the past three years and sought feedback on the direction and priorities for Tranche 2 of the programme. The Committee expressed informal strong support for the direction of the Safe Speeds Programme, with a number of members supportive of the programme moving faster into their community areas.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Public submissions and feedback will be provided as Attachment B (to be tabled at the business meeting and to be workshopped with the local board on 7 December 2021).

32.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide feedback on changes proposed in Tranche 2A.

33.     Feedback provided in relation to Tranche 1 has also been considered by Auckland Transport in the development of the current proposals.

34.     For the residential areas where speed limits have been reduced under the first tranche of the Safe Speeds Programme, there has been strong positive feedback on the safety improvements, with 79 per cent of respondents commenting that the area feels safer overall. As noted above, 19 per cent of respondents advised they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Engagement on Tranche 2 has been undertaken with kaitiaki at northern, central and southern transport hui during 2021 alongside detailed engagement on the rural marae workstream, which is part of the second stage of Tranche 2.

36.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of the second phase of Tranche 2.

37.     Further engagement will be undertaken following the public engagement period to determine feedback on and support for the final proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines.

40.     When Auckland moved into Alert Level Four, a temporary pause was put on all new consultations to allow time to adapt our consultation strategy and increase our digital engagement. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·      the consultation start date was delayed by three weeks from 6 September to 27 September

·      the consultation length was extended from 5 to 7 weeks

·      the number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased

·      digital advertising spend was increased, and digital engagement plans were put in place with Auckland Council’s Engagement Partners who helped reach our diverse communities.

41.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline, and local boards will be kept up to date with any changes to the dates that the new speed limits will take effect.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Early in 2022 Auckland Transport will finalise an analysis and feedback report, including feedback from both the public and local boards.

43.     On 31 March 2022 staff will present this report and recommendations to the AT Board.

44.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force on 31 May 2022 for the majority of roads, and 13 June 2022 for roads associated with schools, allowing for school speed changes to be made at the start of a school week.

45.     These dates may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept updated if any changes are made.

46.     More speed limit changes (Tranche 2B) are planned to be publicly consulted in 2022. AT has engaged with all local boards affected by Tranche 2B and will continue to keep local boards updated as the speed reviews are finalised.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board - proposed Auckland Transport speed limit changes Tranche 2A (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Oliver Roberts – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Unlimited - Culinary Workshops Accelerator

File No.: CP2021/18762

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks allocation of funds from the Franklin Local Board’s 2021/2022 Locally Driven Initiatives Operational budget towards hosting of two Food & Beverage tourism capability building workshops and a public lecture by international Culinary Tourism expert, Eric Pateman.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board have a long-standing interest in leveraging the area’s reputation as a leading horticultural region in order to attract visitors to the area as an integral part of the visitor experience and an expression of the area’s identity.

3.       ‘From the Ground Up’ project which is currently in delivery by Auckland Unlimited has a focus on developing high value, long-term activations in the Food & Beverage sector relating to innovation, research, and destination with key stakeholder partners. 

4.       An opportunity has arisen from the delivery of Phase One of the ‘From the Ground Up’ (FGU) project.  International Culinary Tourism expert, Eric Pateman who is leading the FGU project is visiting Auckland from Canada in the first quarter of 2022.  This provides scope to add value to the Franklin Food & Beverage sector by taking advantage of the visit to deliver a capability building workshop that will benefit producers and other operators in what is a key sector for the Franklin area.

5.       It is considered that holding these workshops has the potential to add value to the Franklin Food & Beverage sector and contribute to the delivery of outcomes in the current Franklin Local Board Plan.

6.       A total of $16,000 is required for delivery of the capability building workshops, $15,000 for development of the content and delivery of the workshops and a $1,000 contingency should a venue need to be hired.

7.       The workshops are not in the current AUL work programme, however funds required for this initiative could be reallocated from existing and appropriate allocations. Auckland Unlimited holds $35,000 unspent funds in the 2021/22 Franklin Local Board LDI Opex work programme (Clevedon Area Tourism Promotion allocation - SharePoint # 3137) and Eke Panuku Development Auckland also has a small project fund as a part of the Unlock Pukekohe programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      agree to reallocate $8,000 from the Clevedon Area Tourism Promotion budget (work progamme # 3137) to support the delivery of two business capability development culinary workshops and a public lecture by internationally renowned culinary tourism expert, Eric Pateman.

b)      acknowledge Eke Panuku Development Auckland’s funding support to enable the workshop to benefit Pukekohe based food businesses to strengthen the Unlock Pukekohe project’s revitalisation of Pukekohe Town Centre

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Franklin Local Board have identified the development of its visitor economy as an opportunity to leverage the area’s strengths to generate local opportunity and prosperity. The local board plan 2020 includes a key initiative to support the development and promotion of rural south Auckland as the nation’s food bowl. 

9.       Culinary / food tourism, a growing part of the tourism sector, supports the two objectives above.  Franklin is well placed to leverage the growth of culinary tourism, given the area’s well established food production sector.

10.     There is work underway in the south of Auckland in the Ministry of Primary Industries funded ‘From the Ground Up’ initiative being delivered by Auckland Unlimited’s Business Innovation team. ‘From the Ground Up’ focuses on developing high value, long-term activations in the Food & Beverage sector relating to innovation, research, and destination. This is being led by global culinary tourism expert Eric Pateman.

11.     Eric is scheduled to visit Auckland early in 2022 as part of his role leading Phase 1 ‘From the Ground Up’ providing an opportunity to utilise his expertise to help develop the agri-tourism and food tourism potential that exists within Franklin.  It is proposed funding be arranged to support an initiative to enable food producers and food based hospitality businesses to have the opportunity to work with Eric in a workshop format with content developed specifically to meet the needs of the businesses participating.

12.     Eric has experience of delivering workshops and strategies for food tourism around the world in order to build the capability within the food & beverage production and hospitality sectors.  Further details of Eric’s background and credentials to add value by working with businesses in Franklin are provided in attachment A. 

13.     Funding is sought from the local board to deliver a Food & Beverage Capability workshop run by Eric Pateman in the first quarter of 2022. The content of the workshop will be developed in conjunction with key stakeholders in the Franklin Local Board area.

14.     Delivered as an accelerator, the workshop will be co-designed with the sector to support local food & beverage producers, growers and key sector businesses with a focus on supporting development and growth that will enable prosperity in a post-covid environment. This will be delivered as a master-class style workshop and will include two 1 ½ hour sessions with identified businesses. 

15.     The workshop will bring a global perspective on unique selling point of Franklin’s food production sector.

16.     An example of how they day will be structured is provided below:

Workshop #1 Entrepreneurs in the Culinary Supply Market – Agri-tourism and Farmers Markets

Time:    10am- 11.30am (1.5 hours)            

Target Market: Agri-preneurs, Agritourism, Chefs and Local Markets

 

Workshop #2 - Selling and Delivering a Great Culinary Experience

Time: 1pm – 3.30pm (1.5 hours)              

Targeting: Pukekohe Eateries - Finished Food, Food Service, Grocery and Restaurants (including wineries with food service)

 

Lecture:  Trends and Opportunities -Taking your Brand to the World Through Culinary Tourism

Time: 5pm – 5.45pm (45 min)           

Targeting: General interested public (incl. businesses)

 

Location: to be confirmed

 

 

17.     Phase Two of ‘From the Ground Up’ is looking to add a work stream facilitating the development of the Pukekohe and Clevedon area into a high-value food & beverage hub and centre of innovation and culinary destination.

18.     The workshops also provide an opportunity to bring Pukekohe and Clevedon in to Phase Two of ‘From the Ground Up’, offering an opportunity to hear from food businesses what this could look like, and deliverables and activations could be included in further work.

19.     A reallocation of existing funding is sought from the local board to deliver a Food & Beverage Capability workshop run by Eric Pateman in the first quarter of 2022. The content of the workshop will be developed in conjunction with key stakeholders in the Franklin Local Board area.

20.     While the initiatives unspent funds in the current LDI work programme are tied to are compatible with the proposed workshop, confirmation from Franklin Local Board that the funds allocated to Clevedon Tourism Development can be reallocated to fund delivery of the workshop is required, and is sought in this report.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The visit to the Auckland region of global food tourism expert Eric Pateman from Canada as part of the ‘From the Ground Up’ project provides an opportunity for local food producers and food businesses to benefit from an opportunity to work with a global food tourism expert.

22.     This approach is considered to align well with the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 key initiative to support the development and promotion of rural south Auckland as the nation’s food bowl.  It also sits alongside work already underway in both Pukekohe, through Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Clevedon by the Clevedon Community and Business Association (CCBA) through their branding work and strategy.  Both Eke Panuku and CCBA have indicated support for the workshops on the basis that they align with their current work programmes in Pukekohe and Clevedon.  Eke Panuku have provided confirmation they will jointly fund this initiative.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     The proposed allocation of funds does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The proposed workshops align with Eke Panuku Development Auckland’s ‘Unlock Pukekohe’ programme to revitalise Pukekohe Town Centre which will be strengthened by the development of the profile and capability of the Pukekohe area’s food production and related retail and hospitality businesses as identified in the ‘eat and trade’ theme identified in the draft masterplan for Pukekohe.  The workshop could also be a catalyst for the longer-term question around Pukekohe business adaptability and capability building in the face of a range of pressures being felt by town centre operators and also work to support the identity of Franklin \ Pukekohe and its unique selling points.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The Franklin Local Board have identified development of its visitor economy as an opportunity to leverage the area’s strengths to generate local opportunity and prosperity and the local board plan 2020 includes a key initiative to support the development and promotion of rural south Auckland as the nation’s food bowl.

26.     The workshop firmly supports the goal of lifting the profile of Franklin’s food production sector by working with the sector to articulate its unique selling point and deliver and enhanced experience for visitors to the area. This was discussed by the AUL Innovation Specialist – Food and Beverage, at a workshop with the local board on 26 October 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Māori food businesses will be actively sought to participate in the workshop.  The workshop is to be delivered by someone with extensive experience working with Indigenous groups around the world (including Māori as well as various peoples in Canada).  This is viewed as critically important to the enhanced success of this project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     A total of $15,000 is required for the workshops and a contingency of $1,000 is required in case there are venue and modest catering costs.  At this stage the hope is that a suitable host within the food and beverage sector can be found who would provide a venue free of charge.

29.     This project is not currently funded within the current financial year’s work programme and funds will have to be reallocated from elsewhere.

30.     In considering existing funds that have been allocated for activities that the workshops align with there are two funds identified that could support this project.

31.     One is funding for small projects that support the revitalisation of Pukekohe Town Centre under the Unlock Pukekohe initiative delivered by Eke Panuku Development Auckland.  Eke Panuku have confirmed support for the workshops are able to provide half of the total costs ($8,000).

32.     The other source is funding allocated to Clevedon Tourism Development.  This allocation has in part been allocated to the Clevedon Community and Business Association (CCBA) for development of a Clevedon Brand. The balance ($35,000) remains available to support Clevedon develop as a destination.  There is likely follow-on work once the branding project is completed.  However, the CCBA have indicated support for part of the balance ($8,000) to be used for the workshop as development of the Clevedon food offer is consistent with work they have undertaken to date and likely direction of travel of further work planned under their strategic plan.

33.     The reallocation recommendation has no financial impact on the overall LDI Opex budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The new COVID-19 pandemic protection framework and international border announcement from government provides greater certainty that this workshop can go ahead unaffected.

35.     The main risk is securing attendance of the right types of business that wish to work towards lifting the profile of the food and beverage sector in Franklin.  With an extensive track record in working with business in the sector, the ‘From the Ground Up’ project team are well networked across food sector businesses in the Franklin area and will be able to secure attendance by appropriate businesses with the support of other key stakeholders.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Subject to local board approval Auckland Unlimited draw up a service agreement specifying deliverables and expected outcomes.

37.     Ongoing conversations with representatives from the Franklin Food & Beverage sector will then begin to develop workshop content tailored to the needs of those attending the workshop.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Eric Pateman bio

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jonathan Sudworth – Local Economic Development Advisor

Wendy Voegelin - Growth Programme Specialist – Food & Beverage

Authorisers

John Norman – Strategic Planning Manager, Local Economic Growth

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Māori Outcomes Annual Report - Te Pūrongo a te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021

File No.: CP2021/18915

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongoPurpose of the report

1.       To present the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report 2020-2021 shows how the council group is contributing to the 10 mana outcomes of Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, and the LTP 10-year budget priorities.

3.       The council group published its first Māori Outcomes Report in 2019. This third edition flows on from earlier reports and provides information on performance, including how the council group has been supporting a Māori response and recovery from COVID-19. Each report aims to provide a comprehensive picture of annual progress to decision makers across the council group, Māori partners, elected members, leaders in governance, and whānau Māori.

4.       Highlights for the 2020-2021 year include:

·    approval by Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee of ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori outcomes performance measurement framework’

·    support for Māori led COVID-19 response and recovery initiatives through the Manaaki Fund 2020 which saw a total of $2.9m granted

·    the Māori Outcomes Fund achieving its highest ever annual spend of $17.6 million

·    Toi o Tāmaki / Auckland Art Gallery hosting the Toi Tū Toi Ora exhibition which was the largest exhibition in the 132-year history of the Gallery. Toi Tū Toi Ora received a record number of Māori visitors and showcased several up-and-coming and established Māori artists.

5.       A key learning for the year is the need to move towards a Māori-led funding approach by partnering with Māori organisations with similar aspirations and outcomes. Work is underway on this through a Māori-led initiatives fund.

6.       Separate to the annual Māori outcomes report is the 6-monthly measures report for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. The inaugural measures report for the July 2021 – Dec 2021 period will be presented to the PACE committee in the new year.

7.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021 will be publicly published with copies distributed to key partners including mana whenua iwi and mataawaka entities.

8.       Some initiatives supported by the Māori Outcomes Fund related to local boards’ governance and projects in the south include:

·    Te Paataka Koorero o Takaanini – bilingual library and community hub

·    Te Kete Rukuruku – Māori naming of parks and places

·    Kaumātua units at Papakura Marae in partnership with local board

·    Te Whakaoranga o te Puhinui – Puhinui stream regeneration programme

·    Te Korowai o Papatūānuku – partnership with Ngāti Te Ata on One Billion Trees project

·    Cultural heritage and protecting sites of Māori significance

·    Engagement: local boards with mana whenua and mātāwaka

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021: Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report. (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ashley Walker - Advisor - Maori Outcomes

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update:  Quarter One, 2021-22

File No.: CP2021/17965

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with proposed changes to the Franklin Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A number of general changes are proposed for the Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plans, as part of ongoing work to improve and refine the approach to engagement with Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs).

3.       The four substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare – may also propose specific changes.

4.       General changes are shown in Attachment A. Attachments B and C are work programme updates from Auckland Unlimited and Watercare.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter One 2021-22

b)      adopt the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

6.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

7.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans.

8.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·      Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·      Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·      Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

9.       In addition, as part of implementing the Joint CCO Engagement Plan, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

10.     We are introducing these new reports gradually, so for Quarter One your report may not include updates from all four CCOs.

11.     For Quarter Two reporting, we expect to have updates from all four CCOs for all local board areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes proposed by Local Board Services

12.     The original discussions with local boards used the five levels of engagement outlined by the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2): inform, consult, involve, collaborate and empower. Feedback from local boards indicated that using all five levels was unwieldy, and in particular that there was confusion and disagreement about when ‘empower’ might be used.

13.     We are proposing that we reduce the engagement levels down to a simplified three step model of inform, consult and collaborate. This helps to better distinguish between projects and to clarify the kinds of engagement that are expected at each step.

14.     We have also moved the CCO work programme tables from being embedded within the engagement plan, to being a series of four attachments. This makes it easier to use the work programmes as the basis for quarterly reporting.

15.     Minor changes may have also been made to names of Local Board Services and/or CCO contacts.

16.     These changes are all shown as tracked changes in Attachment A – Franklin Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

17.     Auckland Transport has not provided updates for this quarter’s report. Auckland Transport will be joining the combined reporting framework for Quarter Two.

18.     Auckland Transport has proposed the following changes to the engagement plan work programme:

·         Remove the “Woodhouse Road Pedestrian Crossing” line as it has been cancelled

·         Remove the “Additional weekday Pine Harbour ferry services” line as it has been completed.

Auckland Unlimited

19.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment B.

Changes to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

20.     Auckland Unlimited had previously responded to local board requests to include more information on major events by adding a line item for each event.

21.     As part of ongoing work to improve and refine this process, we are proposing to replace all the individual major event lines with the three following lines:

·      Delivered Events (Diwali, Lantern Festival, Pasifika, Tāmaki Herenga Waka)

·      Sponsored Events (i.e., Elemental)

·      Supported Events (i.e., FIFA World Cup, World Choir Games)

22.     This change reduces the number of amendments and additions required to the engagement plan each quarter as events are completed and provides a more consistent update pattern going forward. 

23.     These proposed changes are reflected in Attachment A.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

24.     Eke Panuku has not provided updates for this quarter’s report. Eke Panuku will be joining the combined reporting framework for Quarter Two.

25.     Eke Panuku has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme

Watercare

26.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment C.

27.     Watercare has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

29.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Adopting the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

31.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

33.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

35.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

37.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

39.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Two in March 2022

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Auckland Unlimited 2021-22 Q1 Report - Franklin Local Board

55

c

Watercare work programme 2021-2022 Q1 Report - Franklin Local Board

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator



Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18324

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname. 

 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the other of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology. 

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e. the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e. the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data show that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/local-impacts-local-board-views-reports.aspx

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order. Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias.  If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ballot order effects and Auckland Council elections_November 2021

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan:
Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach - Waiau Pa

File No.: CP2021/17989

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Paths Plan was initiated in 2016 and the Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa section was initiated in 2020.

3.       Mana whenua provided written feedback to the draft plan highlighting their whakapapa to this area specifically identifying the cultural significance of Waitete Pā and the need to ensure that the Pā site is protected through future path development processes. Cultural significance and the protection of Waitete Pā has been strengthened within the plan.

4.       The broader community engagement process involved a survey through Auckland Council’s ‘Have Your Say’. A written submission from the Clarks Beach and Waiau Pa Residents Association was also received. Minor changes were made to the draft plan in response to this feedback.

5.       A workshop was held with the board in August 2021 to review the revised draft document. Further feedback from the board required several additional minor amendments to be made to the draft document.

6.       The Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa (Attachment A) is now presented to the board for approval and formal adoption

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      adopts the Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa for inclusion into the Franklin Paths Plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Franklin Local Board initiated the development of the Franklin Trails Plan in 2016 and the decision was made to develop the plan in sections as follows:

·         Pohutukawa Coast Trails Plan 2017

·         Te Aro Hikoi – Waiuku Trails Plan 2017

Pukekohe Subdivision:

·         Pukekohe- Paerata Paths Plan 2018

·         Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach and Waiau Pa Plan 2021.

8.       The paths plan has been developed with reference to the Auckland Unitary Plan reflecting the patterns of land use, transport, and service network within the defined area. Plan outcomes include improving the potential effects of urbanisation and development by identifying aspirational shared walking/cycling connections.

9.       The draft document has been developed in three phases:

·         Draft the network

·         Analysis

·         Refine the network and establish priority routes and present the plan for adoption.

10.     The Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa is an aspirational long-term plan to be used by the Franklin Local Board and its stakeholders to deliver their agreed priority connection projects for Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa.

11.     The board aims to collaborate with key stakeholders such as Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters, developers, and the community to deliver path connections and identified priority routes. This potentially will share the direct cost of implementation of specific connections.

12.     Following the Franklin Local Board workshop in February 2020, where the draft Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa was discussed, staff were directed to engage with mana whenua and the community and seek feedback on the draft plan. Covid19 lockdown issues and delayed mana whenua engagement slowed the delivery of the final document for review and approval by the board.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

13.     The engagement process on the Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach and Waiau Pa plan has involved workshops with the local board, mana whenua, plus internal and external stakeholders whose input and feedback has contributed to this final plan.

14.     The plan has been sectioned into four distinct areas with identified potential routes. Four priority connection projects have been identified by the board for consideration in future work programmes.

15.     The recommended priority connections will provide active transport and recreational connections to be made throughout Clarks Beach and to Waiau Beach and Waiau Pa. The community through the resident’s association have a strong desire and enthusiasm to work closely with the board on path delivery by providing voluntary assistance.

16.     The board have successfully developed a community led delivery model in Waiuku and the community of Clarks Beach believe a similar model could be developed within their area for the delivery of key connections.

17.     Priority route 1 the connection between Clarks Beach and Waiau Pa is a key focus for the community and is seen by the board as a connection that they wish to focus on as outlined in their Local Board Plan of 2020.

-     Work with the community and Auckland Transport to enable paths or trails that support active transport and connect local destinations e.g., Waiau Pa School to Clarks Beach

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The Franklin Local Board focuses on the following key initiative in their Local Board Plan 2020:

-     Enable communities to reduce carbon emissions by enabling active transport around and between towns and villages.

19.     Within this paths plan are identified priority routes and connections that once completed will increase walking and cycling activity and decrease car dependency across the board area.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The approval and adoption of the Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa Plan by the board will enable it to be used as a guiding document for both internal and external stakeholders. The document will guide these stakeholders to provide paths where connections have been identified and note that there is a focus on the delivery of the four priority connections outlined within the plan. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The Franklin Local Board initiated the development of the Franklin Paths Plan in 2017 and remain committed to the development of the plan as part of Local Board Plan 2020 objectives:

-     Local Board Plan 2020

Outcome 2 - Outcome two: Improved transport options and fit for purpose roads

Key initiative: Work with the community and Auckland Transport to enable paths or trails that support active transport and connect local destinations.

22.     The board at the November workshop indicated support for the recommended priority paths and indicated that a key focus for the board is the priority one connection between Clarks Beach and Waiau Pa. The final approved paths plan will be a guiding document to achieve this future connection working with both Auckland Transport and developers to achieve this connection.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Engagement with Ngāti Te Ata and Ngāti Tamaoho, who have whakapapa (genealogy) to this area was completed in mid-2021 with several changes being incorporated within the draft plan.

24.     Mana whenua have continued to support the process the Franklin Local Board has embarked on to complete a Franklin Paths Plan and will continue to be engaged through all aspects of delivery of the paths plan.

25.     Waitete Pā is significant cultural site that both Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngāti Te Ata wish to ensure is not impacted by path development, location, and use. Path location within the neighbouring recreation reserve will be designed and located within the reserve to ensure path users are drawn away from the Pā site.

26.     Mana whenua will continue to focus on five key cultural values considered issues of significance when working in partnership with the board:

·         Whanaungatanga – Develop vibrant communities

·         Rangatiratanga – Enhance leadership and participation

·         Manaakitanga – Improve quality of life

·         Wairuatanga – Promote distinctive identity

·         Kaitiakitanga – Ensure a sustainable future.

27.     The Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach and Waiau Pa will be forwarded to mana whenua following formal approval.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Delivery of the path plan aspirations is a collaborative effort involving the board, Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters, developers, and the community which will focus at first on priority routes identified. The board has identified that the Waiau Pa School to Clarks Beach connection is a board priority. Future work programme funding could be provided through LDI capex.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The board advocates that delivery of the outcomes within their aspirational paths plan will involve collaboration with key stakeholders such as Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters, developers, and the community. This potentially will share the direct cost of implementation of specific path connections focussed initially on the priority routes identified and approved within the plan. A dependence on partnerships could slow down delivery of the plan outcomes. This will be mitigated by clear cross department communication and consistent messaging to external parties including developers

30.     A dependence on partnerships could slow down delivery of the plan outcomes. This will be mitigated by clear cross department communication and consistent messaging to external parties including developers.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach – Waiau Pa will be used by the board as a guiding document to support future development within the defined area by both internal infrastructure departments and external development organisations.

32.     The final plan will also assist in supporting community led groups wishing to be directly involved in the delivery of priority connection outcomes within this plan.

33.     This final plan is an aspirational document which is to be implemented over the next ten to twenty years. Successful implementation will rely on a co-ordinated approach between the board and its stakeholders.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pukekohe Subdivision Paths Plan: Clarks Beach, Waiau Beach and Waiau Pa (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Greg Lowe - Parks and Places Specialist (Parks Services)

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Parks Service Assessment Outcomes for the Development of 6 Angiangi Crescent, Beachlands (Neighbourhood Park).

File No.: CP2021/17613

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To confirm the parks service outcomes to be achieved through the development of the new neighbourhood park acquired by Auckland Council at 6 Angiangi Crescent, Beachlands.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council acquired 6 Angiangi Crescent, within the Jack Lachlan Drive development area of Beachlands, for the purpose of developing the site as a neighbourhood park.

3.       In October 2021 a parks service assessment of 6 Angiangi Crescent was undertaken by staff and the recommended parks service outcomes were workshopped with the Franklin Local Board on 2 November 2021.

4.       The board direction from this workshop recommended a scaling down of the park service outcomes to be delivered in the development of this neighbourhood park based on:

·    site location

·    proximity to Kahawairahi Park

·    active transport connections

·    shape of the park limiting the scope for development

·    the budgeted funding for development of this park exceeds the board’s anticipated expenditure estimate

·    the board wish to use part of the allocated funding to complete amenity improvements at Kahawairahi Park.

5.       The service outcomes have therefore been tempered and will focus on providing rest and respite, learn to ride activities and exercise equipment. These types of experiences are not well catered for within the Beachlands area and will complement activities provided in the wider network. The park will also be landscaped to provide variety and shade.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the following park service outcomes and design direction for the neighbourhood park at 6 Angiangi Crescent:

i)        A safe environment where residents and their families can enjoy a range of accessible park amenities that support the walking/cycling/commuter experience and provide for exercise and passive recreational outcomes

ii)       Park amenities including accessible seating, tables, bins and planting for shade with landscape enhancement taking into consideration the prominent elevated location of the park and maintaining rural view shafts to the west.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Beachlands has become one of Auckland’s fastest growing suburbs over recent years with the residential population more than doubling since 2006.

7.       A major area of growth within Beachlands is known as the Jack Lachlan Drive development area and Auckland Council acquired two sections of parkland within this area to be developed for neighbourhood park purposes. Kahawairahi Park has already undergone some development (2021/22) while development of 6 Angiangi Crescent, a 3000 square metre neighbourhood park, has yet to be started.

8.       The funding for the development of 6 Angiangi Crescent has been provided by the Regional Growth Fund and split over two years as follows:

·    Concept plan development 2022/2023 - $25,000

·    Project delivery 2023/2024 - $575,000

9.       In the 2021/2022 the Franklin Local Board work programme approved a parks service assessment to be undertaken for 6 Angiangi Crescent. The outcome of this work will guide the scope of development for this neighbourhood park.

10.     The parks service assessment reviewed the informal recreation and play need for the park guided by agreed considerations such as recreation services delivered by the surrounding parks network, provision gaps, supporting Māori outcomes, landscape opportunities, play, accessibility, inclusivity, connectivity, social and gathering spaces along with community aspiration. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The site is essentially an elongated triangular shape that has a shared active transport pathway running through the middle of it. One of the key design features within this new development area of Beachlands is the shared path network that assists and encourages active recreation within this community. The park is located along a key active transport route that links Kahawairahi Drive to the Pine Harbour transport hub.

A picture containing road, way, highway, spaghetti junction

Description automatically generated

Fig 1. 6 Angiangi Crescent (3D perspective 2021 aerial)

12.     Within 650 metres of this site to the south is the recently developed Kahawairahi Park with a suburb sized playspace that caters for age groups from early childhood through to youth. Kahawairahi Park is adjacent to the shared path network that runs through this development area contributing to a very activated and accessible neighbourhood park used by the adjoining community and visitors to Beachlands.

13.     6 Angiangi Crescent is located approximately half-way between the Beachlands commercial area and the ferry terminus at Pine Harbour. An active transport shared path links the commercial area to Kahawairahi Park and then onto Ninth View Avenue through 6 Angiangi Crescent. This shared path will be fully extended to Pine Harbour late 2022.

14.     A typical neighbourhood playspace development at this park is somewhat complex and restricted by the narrowness of the land area and the proximity to Angiangi Crescent, a key feeder road within this residential area.

15.     Consideration could however be given to creating play elements that actively reflect the shared nature of the path network that runs through this new development area. Typically, the path is used to carry walkers/joggers and cyclists who come individually and in social or family groups.

16.     It was recommended to the board that park development could focus on providing rest and respite, learn to ride activities for the younger cyclist/scooter rider and some other recreational activities such as exercise zones. The park will be landscaped to provide variety and shade. These types of experiences are not well catered for within the Beachlands area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The development of the park including landscaping and revegetation with trees and native shrubs will help absorb emissions. The development of this park adjacent to a key active transport route within Beachlands is also likely to encourage more walking and cycling and less vehicle use.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The Community Facilities team has within their Franklin work programme the development of a concept plan for 6 Angiangi Crescent in FY 2022/23. The finalising of the parks service outcomes will provide the guiding scope for the development of concept plan in FY23.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     6 Angiangi Crescent is one of two areas of public open space acquired within Beachlands to ensure public open space provision requirements are met for this community. The location, the shape of the park and the finished shared path formation provide several development challenges.

20.     The board at the 2 November workshop to discuss parks service outcome provisions agreed that development should support the active transport nature of the location in its provision of park amenities.

21.     The board broadly felt that the park did not lend itself to major development given that Kahawairahi Park is a short distance away and provides play for a varied age group and other informal recreation opportunities. The recommended park service outcomes supported by the board for 6 Angiangi Crescent include the following:

·    A safe environment where residents and their families can enjoy a range of accessible park amenities that support the walking/cycling/commuter experience and provide for exercise and passive recreational outcomes.

·    Park amenities will include accessible seating, tables, bins and planting for shade with landscape enhancement taking into consideration the prominent elevated location of the park and maintaining rural view shafts to the west.

·    Park amenity activities should complement, rather than duplicate, those at Kahawairahi Park.

22.     The board has indicated that they feel that the present budget provided for park development of 6 Angiangi Crescent allocated by the Regional Growth Fund is excessive and that the scale of development envisaged for this park should be reduced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     Mana whenua with a strong focus on Kaitiakitanga to ensure a sustainable future for all have provided significant input into the growth and development within Beachlands through Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki.  Māori engagement in the development of new open space areas, environmental infrastructure and the roading network has been ongoing.

24.     Māori have a critical role in ensuring Aucklanders are more active and connected with nature and celebrating our Māori identity. They will be engaged specifically in relation to ongoing park development.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

 

25.     The funding for development of 6 Angiangi Crescent comes from the Regional Growth Fund and is spread over the following two financial years:

·    FY 2022/23 Development of a concept plan - $25,000

·    FY2023/24 Project delivery - $525,000

26.     This budget is reflected in the approved board work programme however the board intend to advocate for the re-allocation of some of this budget to further develop Kahawairahi Park.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The board has agreed on the parks service outcomes to be achieved in developing 6 Angiangi Crescent, recognising the development constraints linked to the park’s location and shape.

28.     The board wish to see the estimated development budget of $525,000 reduced to better reflect the parks service outcomes agreed and any savings achieved to be invested in further development of Kahawairahi Park

29.     The approved funding to develop 6 Angiangi Crescent has been provided by the Regional Growth Fund and it is possible that any savings related to a reduction in delivery cost for this park development will be returned to that fund for allocation elsewhere within the region.

30.     To ensure that there is a balanced discussion related to cost and possible savings related to the approved budget for development of this park, it is recommended that the concept plan be completed in FY2022/23. This will enable a more accurate estimate of cost to be provided.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The board continues with their 2022/23 work programme to develop a concept plan for the development of 6 Angiangi Crescent.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Greg Lowe - Parks and Places Specialist (Parks Services)

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Reserve revocation of 8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku and 72R Karaka Road, Beachlands

File No.: CP2021/10279

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks the views of the Franklin Local Board on the proposal to revoke the reserve status of two reserves in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Finance and Performance Committee approved in principle the disposal of 72R Karaka Road, Beachlands and 8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku as part of the Emergency Budget asset recycling programme in 2020. The two sites are reserves subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       The committee’s approval of the disposals is conditional upon the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes. Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) is undertaking the required statutory processes on behalf of the council, including the reserve revocation process.

4.       Eke Panuku publicly advertised the proposed reserve revocations and invited public submissions. The public submissions process for the proposal to revoke the reserve status of the two sites commenced in February 2021. Independent Commissioners have been appointed to consider the public submissions. Hearings are scheduled to be held in October 2021 to allow for submitters to speak directly to the Independent Commissioners.

5.       Council departments have assessed 72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive against the provisions for recreation reserves in s17 and road reserves in s111 Reserves Act 1977 and against council’s Open Space policies. The assessments confirm that the sites are no longer required by council as recreation reserves or for open space network purposes. Auckland Transport (AT) has assessed 72R Karaka Road as not required for its transport infrastructure purposes.

6.       Eke Panuku has provided the board with relevant property information and open space assessments for the two sites and now seeks the board’s formal views regarding the proposed reserve revocations.

7.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee will consider the board’s views regarding the two sites, in addition to any recommendations made by the Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions. The PACE Committee will decide if the proposal to revoke the reserve status for the two sites should be forwarded to the Department of Conservation (DOC).


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      endorse the proposed reserve revocation of the following sites as they are no longer required by Auckland Council as reserves:

i)        72R Karaka Road, Beachlands; and

ii)       8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku.

b)      note the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider the board’s views and any recommendations made by Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       In 2020 the Finance and Performance Committee approved in principle the disposal of 72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive as part of the Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. This approval is subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes. Eke Panuku, on behalf of the council, has subsequently commenced work on completing the required statutory processes.

9.       As the sites are classified as reserves under the Reserves Act 1977, a process for the revocation of reserve status, including public and iwi notification, is necessary before they may be sold.

10.     Public notices for the proposal to revoke the reserve status of the subject reserves were published in newspapers in February 2021. Letters were also sent to adjoining landowners and the proposal listed on the Auckland Council website. Public notices were also placed on the reserves. The public notice that was published and placed on reserves, letters and information on the council website advised of council’s proposal to revoke the reserve status, explaining the reason for the proposal and seeking public submissions.

11.     Council appointed Independent Commissioners to consider the public submissions received for the proposed revocation of 72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive and hearings are scheduled to be held in October 2021.

12.     The PACE Committee will consider the board’s views regarding the proposed reserve revocation of the two sites and any recommendations made by the Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions. The PACE Committee will decide if the proposal to revoke the reserve status should be forwarded to the DOC.

13.     The local board has been consulted by council’s Plans and Places team on the separate plan change process to change the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) - Open Space zoning of the two reserves before a disposal can proceed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property information - 72R Karaka Road, Beachlands

14.     72R Karaka Road comprises 1012m2 of vacant land. It was vested upon subdivision with the Crown in 1928 for road reserve purposes. In 1977 the property was vested with the former Manukau City Council for the purpose of road reserve. Council records indicate it was part of a planned road network that allowed for vehicle connections into adjacent large development lots. 72R Karaka Road is a road reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

15.     Auckland Transport confirmed that the site is no longer required for roading purposes, and it is not included in the precinct plan as a road.

16.     Council’s Community Investment team (formerly the Parks and Recreation Policy team) assessed the site in 2018 against council’s Open Space Provision and Open Space Acquisition policies. The assessment also considered the provisions for a road reserve in s111 Reserves Act 1977. This assessment confirmed 72R Karaka Road is not required by council as a reserve or for open space network purposes. This is on the basis that the potential for the site to provide a walking connection is not feasible. The site does not connect any other open spaces and does not meet criteria as a neighbourhood park.

Property information - 8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku

17.     8 Magnolia Drive is a 312m2 area of undeveloped open space that was vested upon subdivision as a reserve with the former Franklin District Council in 1999. The site is a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

18.     Council’s Community Investment team assessed the site in 2019 against council’s Open Space provision and Open Space Acquisition policies. The assessment also considered the provisions for a recreation reserve outlined in s17 Reserves Act 1977. This assessment confirmed 8 Magnolia Drive is not required by council as a recreation reserve or for open space network purposes.

19.     This is on the basis that the site is not required to meet open space provision targets. The nearby Massey Park provides adequate open space for the local community. 8 Magnolia Drive does not form any connections to other open space and is not required for future connections. While there is a notable tree identified in the AUP Schedule (ID 2160 Magnolia Tree) located near the northern boundary of the site, public ownership is not required to protect the tree.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive are not in  flood prone areas. The two sites are not coastal properties and are not likely to be impacted in the future by rising sea levels.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Council’s Community Investment team, with input from council’s Parks operational staff, assessed 72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive against council’s Open Space policies and the provisions for recreation reserves in s17 and for road reserves in s111 Reserves Act 1977. AT has assessed 72R Karaka Road for future roading purposes.

22.     Additional consultation with council’s Heritage team has been undertaken regarding historic or archaeological values associated with the sites. It was confirmed that council’s heritage records and Geomaps overlays hold no known heritage values associated with the sites.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Eke Panuku and council’s Value for Money team has provided the board with an information memorandum regarding the proposed reserve revocations of 72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive.

24.     This report provides the board with an opportunity to formalise its views regarding the proposed reserve revocations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Nineteen mana whenua iwi authorities were consulted in 2020 regarding any issues of cultural significance associated with 72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive. No issues of cultural significance were received by Eke Panuku or council in response. 

26.     Site specific mana whenua engagement was also undertaken regarding the proposed reserve revocations. A submission was received from Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua that opposed the revocation of the reserve at 8 Magnolia Drive. The rationale was that the site should be land banked for future Treaty settlements. A submission from Ngāti Paoa was also received that objected to all the proposed reserve revocations across Auckland, with no rationale attached. The objections have been referred to the Independent Commissioners for consideration and will be included in the report to the PACE Committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     No financial implications are associated with the recommendations contained in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There is a risk that the Minister of Conservation may not approve the proposed reserve revocations. In such a circumstance 72R Karaka Road and 8 Magnolia Drive would remain as reserves subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     The board’s feedback and the Independent Commissioner’s recommendations on the proposal to revoke the reserve status will be reported to the PACE Committee. The report to the committee will also seek approval to submit a request to the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status for the two sites.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor, Portfolio Review, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Matt Casey - Team Leader Portfolio Review, Eke Panuku Development

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Ross Chirnside – General Manager, Value for Money

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Attachment A – images

Figure 1: Geomaps aerial of 72R Karaka Road, Beachlands; subject area is outlined in light blue


 

Figure 2: Geomaps aerial of 8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku; subject area is outlined in light blue

 

Figure 3: Google street view of 8 Magnolia Drive, Waiuku


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Approval for the 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) development - extensions to four existing public roads, one Jointly Owned Access Lot, one new public road name and three new JOAL names.

File No.: CP2021/17274

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name the extensions to four existing public roads and one Jointly Owned Access Lot (JOAL).

2.       To also seek approval for the naming of one new public road and three new JOAL’s, created by way of a subdivision development at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the Local Board’s approval.

4.       The developer, Classic Developments, has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

5.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

6.       The proposed names for the new public and private roads at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) are:

Public Roads

Proposed Name

Public Road 1
(Continuation of existing road name)

Roslyn Farm Street

Public Road 2
(Continuation of existing road name)

Sierra Way

 

Public Road 3
(New road name)

Hillock Rise

(Applicant preferred)

Hummock Rise

(Alternative 1)

Shale Way

(Alternative 2)

Public Road 4
(Continuation of existing road name)

Steppe Drive

 

Public Road 5
(Continuation of existing road name)

John Main Drive

 

 

 

 

 

Private Roads

Proposed Name

JOAL 32
(Continuation of existing private road name)

Continuation of Waharua Lane

JOAL 33
(New private road name)

Pekepeke Lane

(Applicant preferred)

Piwaiwaka Lane

(Alternative 1)

Pekeketua Lane

(Alternative 2)

JOAL 41
(New private road name)

Piwaiwaka Lane

(Applicant preferred)

Taiko Lane

(Alternative 1)

Pekepeke Lane

(Alternative 2)

JOAL 42
(New private road name)

Pekeketua Lane

(Applicant preferred)

Tanika Lane

(Alternative 1)

Piwaiwaka Lane

(Alternative 2)

JOAL 43
(No name required – Servicing three dwellings only)

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the name Roslyn Farm Street for Public Road 1 being an extension of the existing Roslyn Farm Street and created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

b)      approve the name Sierra Way for Public Road 2 being an extension of the existing Sierra Way and created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

c)      approve the name Hillock Rise for Public Road 3 being a new public road created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653).

d)      approve the name Steppe Drive for Public Road 4, being an extension of the existing Steppe Drive and created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

e)      approve the name John Main Drive for Public Road 5 being an extension of the existing John Main Drive and created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

f)       approve the name Waharua Lane for JOAL 32 being an extension of the existing Waharua Lane and created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

g)      approve the name Pekepeke Lane for JOAL 33 being a new private road created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

h)      approve the name Piwaiwaka Lane for JOAL 41 being a new private road created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

i)        approve the name Pekeketua Lane for JOAL 42 being a new private road created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South (Stage 3 and 4) (resource consent references BUN60350651 and SUB60350653), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Resource consent reference BUN60350651 (subdivision reference number SUB60350653) was issued in June 2020 for the construction of 89 new residential freehold units and included one new road, four extensions to existing roads, one extension to an existing private road (JOAL) and four new private roads (JOAL’s).

8.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B.

9.       In accordance with the Standards, any road, including private ways, JOAL’s, and rights of way, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

10.     For these reasons, the new public roads and private JOAL’s identified in this report require road names.

11.     The public roads (Roads 1, 2, 4 and 5) from this stage of the development are continuations of Roslyn Farm Street, Sierra Way, Steppe Drive and John Main Drive approved during preceding stages 1 and 2 of this development.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the Local Board’s approval

13.    The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

14.     The proposed names for the new public roads follow the geologic theme considered appropriate at Stage 1 of the development. The proposed names for the private roads have been chosen from suggested names arising from previous consultation with Ngaati Whanaunga:

Road Reference

Proposed names

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Public Road 1 (Continuation)

Rosalyn Farm Street

The existing name to be continued into the new road is Rosalyn Farm Street and this was approved at Stages 1 & 2.

Public Road 2 (Continuation)

Sierra Way

The existing name to be continued into the new road is Sierra Way and this was approved at Stage 1.

Public Road 3

(New road)

Hillock Rise

(Applicant preferred)

This name continues the Geological theme used in stages 1 & 2. A hillock is a Geographical feature characterized by a small rise in the land or a hill of no great elevation. It is noted that this proposed road gently rises from Road 5 to the elevated cul-de-sac at the end of Road 3.

Hummock Rise

(Alternative 1)

This name continues the Geological theme previously used in Stages 1 & 2. A hummock is a Geographical feature characterized by an elevated track of land rising above the general of a marshy region. It is noted that this proposed road rises from Road 5 to the elevated cul de sac at the end of Road 3.

Shale Way

(Alternative 2)

The name continues the Geological theme previously used in Stages 1 & 2. Shale is a soft sedimentary rock formation that is known to be found in the nearby Hunua Ranges.

Public Road 4: (Continuation)

Steppe Drive

The existing name to be continued into the new road is Steppe Drive and this was approved at stage 2.

Public Road 5: (Continuation)

John Main Drive

The existing name to be continued into the new road is John Main Drive and this was approved at stages 1 & 2.

JOAL 32: (Continuation)

Waharua Lane

The existing name to be continued into the new road is Waharua Lane and this was approved at stage 1.

JOAL 33
(New road)

 

Pekepeke Lane 

(Applicant preferred)

From Ngaati Whanaunga Report & Suggestions – A native bat that dwells in the Hunua Ranges

Piwaiwaka Lane

(Alternative 1)

From Ngaati Whanaunga Report & Suggestions – A native bird that dwells in the Hunua Ranges

Pekeketua Lane

(Alternative 2)

From Ngaati Whanaunga Report & Suggestions – A native frog that dwells in the Hunua Ranges

JOAL 41
(New road)

 

Piwaiwaka Lane

(Applicant preferred)

From Ngaati Whanaunga Report & Suggestions – A native bird that dwells in the Hunua Ranges

Taiko Lane

(Alternative 1)

Coprosma “Taiko” is a low groundcover that is to be planted within the front yards/ entranceways of the Lots within stages 3 & 4 as per approved landscaping plan. Th road name reference the species of plants fits in with the sense of identity within the natural landscape theme.

Pekepeke Lane

(Alternative 2)

From Ngaati Whanaunga Report & Suggestions – A native bat that dwells in the Hunua Ranges

JOAL 42
(New road)

 

Pekeketua Lane

(Applicant preferred)

From Ngaati Whanaunga Report & Suggestions – A native frog that dwells in the Hunua Ranges

Tanika Lane

(Alternative 1)

Lomandra “Tanika” is a low growing shrub that is to be planted within the front yards / entranceways of the Lots withing Stages 3&4 as per approved landscaping plan. The road name reference to the species of plant fits in with the sense of identity within the natural landscape theme.

Piwaiwaka Lane

(Alternative 2)

From Ngaati Whanaunga Report & Suggestions – A native bird that dwells in the Hunua Ranges

15.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

16.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

17.     Road Type: ‘Rise’ is an acceptable road type for the new public roads and ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private roads, suiting the form and layout of those roads.

18.     Consultation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) and mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

23.     The applicant has formally consulted all mana whenua groups in July 2021. Ngaati Whanaunga registered their interest in the development and the applicant has been in direct consultation on the road names with Ngaati Whanaunga only.

24.     Ngaati Whanaunga had suggested names for an earlier stage of the subdivision (Stage 1 & 2) in a letter dated 31st Oct 2019. Some road names that were not used at that time have been adopted for this stage of the subdivision and with the awareness of mana whenua.

25.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

27.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan

93

b

Location map

95

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 14 Belgium Road, Pukekohe

File No.: CP2021/18341

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 14 Belgium Road, Pukekohe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. The Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, CFC Foundation Trust, agent Tingran Duan of The Surveying Company has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 14 Belgium Road are:

·    Whakaora Place (applicant’s preference and endorsed by Ngāti Tamaoho)

·    Pakipaki Place (alternative)

·    Taharori Place (alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name ‘Whakaora Place’ for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 14 Belgium Road, Pukekohe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60339680 and SUB60339681, and road naming reference RDN90096947).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60339680 (subdivision reference number SUB60339681) was issued in March 2020 for the construction of 14 new residential freehold units, two public reserves, a balance lot for future development and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any public road or any private way, commonly owned access lots (COAL), and right of way, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

9.       In this instance the COAL requires a name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL is highlighted in yellow. 

10.     It is to be noted that there is no access from East Street, and a 4m wide planting covenant along East Street has been approved, therefore all residential lots will require access of the COAL.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

12.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

13.     Theme: The applicant’s proposed names and their meanings are as follows:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant and Ngāti Tamaoho)

Whakaora Place (applicant’s preference and endorsed by Ngāti Tamaoho)

Whakaora is the Te Reo Māori word for Revival. When the church was opened in Pukekohe in 1922 it was called Christian Revival Church. Next year the Church celebrates 100 years of being part of the Pukekohe community. Therefore, the applicant considers ‘Whakaora’ as a way of acknowledging the 100 years of being part of and serving the community.

Pakipaki Place

(alternative)

A food derived out of the hard times.

Taharori Place

(alternative)

A site where our people were commonly seen and lived.

 

14.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     Road Type: Place’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

17.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of Council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     The applicant has met onsite with Ngāti Tamoho and discussed the proposed names. Ngāti Tamoho supported the proposed names but preferred ‘Whakaora Place’.

23.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and three Te Reo Māori names are proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site & Location Plans

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrea Muhme - Subdivison Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Approval for five new public road names and the extension of an existing road name at 67 Clarks Beach Road, Pukekohe

File No.: CP2021/18334

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name five new public roads, created by way of a subdivision development at 67 Clarks Beach Road, Pukekohe.

2.       Approval is also sought to name a new section of public road as ‘Kaitiaki Drive’, being an extension of the existing road with the same name.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. The Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

4.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Knights Investments Limited, agent Doyle Smith of Nakhle Group has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

5.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

6.       Approval from the local board is required to use the existing name of ‘Kaitiaki Drive’ for the extension of that same road. ‘Kaitiaki Drive’ was previously approved under resolution FR/2018/77.

7.       The proposed names for the new public roads at 67 Clarks Beach Road are:

 

Road Reference

Applicant’s Preferred Name

Road 1 (extension)

Kaitiaki Drive

Road 5

Korowhiti Road

Road 6 and 7

Uatoto Road

Road 8

Gertrude Cole Road

Road 9

Whata Street

 

Road 10

Ritetai Street

Pool of Alternative Names

These alternative names can be used for any the public roads listed above.

Paratehoe Road

Grace Cole Street

Ungatetaka Road

Botica Road

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the following names for five new public roads within Stages 2 & 3 of the subdivision at 67 Clarks Beach Road, Pukekohe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent reference SUB60378610, and road naming reference RDN90096800):

i)             Korowhiti Road (Road 5)

ii)            Uatoto Road (Road 6 and 7)

iii)           Gertrude Cole Road (Road 8)

iv)           Whata Street (Road 9)

v)           Ritetai Street (Road 10)

b)      approve the name ‘Kaitiaki Drive’ for the new section of public road that connects to the existing section of Kaitiaki Drive, providing access to the new subdivision at the end of this road, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60378610).

Horopaki

Context

8.       Resource consent reference SUB60378610 and land use consent LUC60379593 was issued in June 2021 to combine Stages 2B and 3 previously approved under BUN60303722 and BUN60349019. The combination of Stages 2B and 3 results in the construction of 62 new residential freehold units, two balance lots to be developed at a later stage and six public roads to vest.

9.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

10.     In accordance with the Standards, any public road or any private way, commonly owned access lots (COAL), and right of way, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

11.     The public roads to be named can be seen in Attachment A, where they are highlighted.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

13.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

14.     Theme: The applicant’s proposed names and their meanings are as follows;

Road number

Proposed Name

Meaning (as described by applicant and Ngāati Tamaoho)

Road 5

Korowhiti Road 

This name has been recommended by Ngāti Tamaoho. It means hoop like net that was used by tuupuna for fishing.

Road 6 & 7

Uatoto Road

This name has been recommended by Ngāti Tamaoho. ‘Uatoto’ - the veins, acknowledging the freshwater tributaries large & small whose journeys began at the head waters and finally reached their destinations of Te Manukanuka o Hoturoa.

Road 8

Gertrude Cole Road

This name was provided by the previous property owner, whose family have resided in the Clarks Beach area for over 30 years. The name is of the previous owner’s great grandmother. This name is to acknowledge settlers of the Clarks Beach area.

Road 9

Whata Street

This name has been recommended by the Ngāti Tamaoho representative. ‘Whata’ means a place to store food, elevated platform, storage area.

Road 10

Ritetai Street

 

This name has been recommended by the Ngāti Tamaoho representative. ‘Ritetai’ – ‘ri’ short for ‘pari’ or high, ‘tai’ or tide, acknowledging the flow of te Manukanuka o Hoturoa.

 

 

Pool of alternatives

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Paratehoe Road

This name has been recommended by Ngāti Tamaoho. ‘Paratehoe’ - a metaphoric acknowledgement to olden times, the ‘hoe’ being a waka paddle & ‘Para’ meaning not being used, standing for a long time & gathering dust & all the elements of time.

Grace Cole Street

This name was provided by the previous property owner. The family has resided in the area for over 30 years, and this is the name of the former owner’s sister. This name is to acknowledge historic settlers of the Clarks Beach area.

Ungatetaka Road

This name has been recommended by Ngāti Tamaoho. ‘Ungatetaka’ - unga short for urunga - pillow, taka is to drop, in this phrase acknowledging the loved one's who have passed on or laying our loved ones to rest.

Botica Road

This name has been put forward by Anton Walynetz. Botica is the surname of his grandparents (Kate Trisa Botica and Paul Vladimir Botica). They grew up and lived on the original dairy farms that operated where Clarks Beach is now situated (run by Mick Vela and George Torkar). This name is to acknowledge settlers of the Clarks Beach area.

 

15.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

16.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

17.     Road Type: ‘Road‘ and ‘Street’ are acceptable road types for the new public roads, suiting the form and layout of the roads.

18.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of Council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

23.     In 2018, as part of the original road naming application for Stage 1, mana whenua were contacted by the applicant, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho (Ngāti Tamaoho Trust)

24.     The names proposed were alternative names that were not approved as part of the original road naming application. Therefore, further consultation has not been undertaken, as the names remain the same.

25.     A response was originally received from Ngāti Tamaoho, who suggested several Te Reo Māori names, which have subsequently been adopted by the applicant. Some of these names were approved under Stage 1 in 2018.

26.     Waikato-Tainui also responded and indicated support for any recommendations from Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngāti Te Ata.

27.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and six te reo Māori names are proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

29.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site & Location Plans

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Andrea Muhme - Subdivison Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Approval to name a new public road at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands.

File No.: CP2021/19043

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name a new public road, created by way of a subdivision development at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, David Heald, agent Ian Gibson of Airey Consultants Ltd has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new road at 44 Eighth View Avenue are:

·    Kōwaitau Avenue (Applicant Preferred)

·    Sunder Avenue (Alternative 1)

·    Porbandar Lane (Alternative 2)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name Kōwaitau Avenue (applicant’s preferred name) for the new road created by way of subdivision at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90096946; and resource consent references BUN60362291 and SUB60362293).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60362291 (subdivision reference number SUB60362293) was issued in July 2021 for the construction of 48 new residential freehold allotments and a new public road.

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new public road (“ROAD 1”) requires a road name. This can be seen in Attachment B, where the length of road that requires a new name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Maori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The subdivision is part of a multistage development, so the road names have been a continuation of previous stages. The subdivision will continue the existing names of Eighth View Avenue and Seventh View Avenue in an east-west direction. The developer has had ongoing consultation with Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki through previous stages, and has asked them to propose a name for the new public road:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Kōwaitau Avenue

(Applicant preferred)

The name suggested by Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki meaning “young Kahawai” and is a play on the original name of the area – Kahawairahi.

Sunder Avenue

(Alternative 1)

As matriarch of the Keshvara family this name would help memorialise Sunder Keshvara's role and importance to the family and her ongoing contribution to the Beachlands community. Sunder has performed volunteer roles in the local community and she has had a strong role in shaping the Keshvara family's values. She has been a stabilising force for the family and continues to be held in high regard within the local community. She has been a resident in the local area for over 30 years.

Porbandar Lane

(Alternative 2)

The city of Porbander is near the ancestral home of the Keshvara family and is notably famous for being the birthplace of Mahatma Gandhi. The family would love to honour the ancestral link to their Indian Heritage and this name would memorialise some of the long-term roots of the family. The Keshvara family also believe that from 2021 and beyond, the New Zealand public and more aware than ever that celebrating diversity and the heritage of all Kiwi's ancestral roots is appropriate and to be encouraged.

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has yet to confirm that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Avenue’ is an acceptable road type for the new public road, suiting the form and layout of ROAD 1.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations (CCO) were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 26 July 2021 the applicant’s agent made contact with Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki to propose new names for the ROAD 1. The applicant has consulted with all other iwi groups in the past, who previously deferred to Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, so no other groups have been approached on this occasion.

22.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and the proposed Te Reo Māori names was suggested by Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location Map

117

b

Site Plan

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board input into Auckland Council's submission to the National Emissions Reduction Plan

 

File No.: CP2021/17764

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To report on the Urgent Decision made by Franklin Local Board to provide input into Auckland Council’s submission to the National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP).

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 26 November 2019 the Franklin Local Board resolved (FR/2019/168) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)           adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and hold a meeting with requirements of a quorum.

b)           delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)           agree that the relationship manager (or any person/s acting in this role) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d)           note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary business meeting of the local board.

3.       The Ministry for the Environment (MfE) has released for public consultation a discussion document seeking to inform the development of the first National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP).

4.        This describes existing actions the Government has committed to and sets out new proposed actions it may include in the ERP to further reduce emissions and meet climate targets.

5.        The document proposes a range of new strategies and policies for consideration which span every sector of the economy and include changes to our funding and finance system, the way we organise our urban areas, and a shift to a circular economy.

6.        The Government is required to publish the ERP by the end of May 2022.

7.        The discussion document containing these proposals is set out here:

            https://environment.govt.nz/assets/publications/Emissions-reduction-plan-discussion-document.pdf

8.        Auckland Council already has existing strategic direction in emissions reduction through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and has agreed positions that have recently been provided through previous submissions on climate change and transport emissions.

9.        As such, the council will not, in the main, be developing new positions through this submission, but will base it on relevant strategies and these existing agreed positions.

10.      Local board input into that submission is sought, closing on 10 November, for feedback to be considered in the council’s submission or 19 November 2021 for feedback to be appended. Therefore, the opportunity for the local board to formalise its feedback by resolution falls outside of the scheduled business meeting times.

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Franklin Local Board:

notes the Urgent Decision finalised on 19 November 2021, as follows, in that the local board:

A)     support overall Auckland Council’s feedback to the Governments Emissions Reduction Plan submission

B)        provide the following feedback to the Governing Body on the Government’s Emissions:

 

Reduction Plan submission:

Meeting the net-zero challenge: Transition pathway

i)          recommend including an additional principle about engaging and educating the public, as engaged communities and societies play a significant role in helping or hindering massive societal shifts on complex issues, and a flexible and pragmatic approach is required to bring communities, in particular rural areas, along on the journey as opposed to forcing them which could create outcomes that are not practical or able to be reasonably achieved

ii)         agree that Local Government has an important role to play in reducing emissions at a local level, as its scope of influence extends beyond urban and transport planning, to many services that engage communities. The local board supports having a strong national direction for local government and support the call for all Government agencies and cross-parliament parties to have an open, combined approach to climate change policies.

 

Aligning systems and tools: Funding and finance

iii)         support policy interventions to be prioritised to deliver systemic change and in particular support the focus of behavioural and societal shifts to delivering the net zero emissions target. There are opportunities where shifts in behaviour could deliver deep emissions reductions and policies could help deliver this, and suggest that central government should establish policy outcomes and funding mechanisms for behaviour change programmes to educate and embed a cultural transition to low carbon.

 

Aligning systems and tools: Moving to a circular economy

iv)        support the circular economic principles being critical to achieving these goals, envisaging a future which reflects environment-centric principles of designing out waste and pollution, keeping products and materials in use, and regenerating natural systems

v)         advocate to work with local business, industry and resident groups to deliver a circular economy and low carbon living education programme to enable our community to respond to climate change issues.  For example, the local board supports industries that turn domestic and commercial plastic into premium products such as fence posts, like Future Post based in Waiuku, that work with Auckland Council to collect soft plastics that are not currently being collected

vi)        encourage support for research and design for local companies to look into products that support the circular economy like unwanted and unusable food turned into starch bags.

 

Transitioning key sectors: Transport

vii)       welcomes the commitment made by government to substantially increase investment in public and active transport, including Auckland’s rail and bus networks. This requires sustained improvements in network coverage and in interpeak, evening and weekend services, to provide better access to jobs, education and amenities at all times, especially for our rural communities where there is limited public transport.

viii)        rural towns and settlements have to rely on private transport because of their remote proximity to urban Auckland, and therefore it is not uncommon for a single-family household to have up to five cars. With smaller section sizes and narrow streets for on-street parking being implemented in rural settlements and towns, there are impacts with large vehicles using the roads to connect between rural and urban based industries

ix)        raise concerns about the focus on urban development (with readily available services/infrastructure) and a reduction on parking requirements and road width. This will create more of the developments we are currently encountering with minimal residential parking and reduced road width without any public transport options. The need for private vehicles in certain circumstances must be recognised.

 

Travel demand management

x)        support in principle the introduction of congestion pricing in Auckland, subject to revenue generated by the scheme being used to mitigate equity impacts to accelerate delivery of the Auckland Transport Alignment Project (including climate change mitigations identified within), be allocated to deliver a mix of roading, public transport and active transport.

xi)       note that a congestion charge will create equity issues both in terms of those who cannot afford the implications of congestion charging (financial deprivation), but also those who don’t have existing PT services/alternative solutions available to them (the transport choice deprived and physically isolated communities of Auckland).

 

xii)      believe that organisations representing heavy vehicle interests are best placed to comment on an equitable approach to heavy vehicle charging

 

Transitioning key sectors: Building and construction

xiii)     agree that built environment is responsible for a significant proportion of Auckland’s emissions, with stationary energy use in residential, commercial and industrial buildings (including process heat). The construction sector is also a major driver in the demand for emissions intensive materials, such as steel and concrete and has a large carbon footprint in the Auckland region.

xiv)     recognise that material such as steel will continue to be a vital part of building and construction, and that with the Glenbrook Steel Mill as an important part of the regional and national economy and local community, there must be a collaborative and supportive approach towards these industries to assist them to transition to a reduced carbon footprint.

xv)      support a flexible approach is required to transitioning in the building and construction sector, as it would benefit from a broader focus on the built environment rather than the construction of buildings and practices in the construction sector; particularly with regards to approaches to manage or reduce embodied carbon of construction materials, which is a significant issue.

xvi)     support transitioning in the building and construction sector to be focussed on new buildings however, there needs to be a plan to address existing buildings to improve health and wellbeing outcomes. We need to address the low operational efficiency and poor thermal performance of our current buildings which can be improved by adding water tanks that capture water that can be used for maintenance and cleaning the building as well as new technology to provide heat to swimming pools as well as hot water for our offices. The board understands that a gradual approach is required to the implementation because of cost implications.

 

Transitioning key sectors: Waste

xvii)      supports a local transition to circular economy approach to waste management and enable local climate action through funding locally accessible landfill diversion facilities such as the Waiuku Community Recycling Centre and support community-led initiatives that enable locals to divert waste from landfill

xviii)   emphasis should be placed on the creation and support of smaller localised community recycling centres (eg Waiuku) as opposed to larger sub regional type ventures that would require people to travel further, thus creating more carbon emissions

xix)   support seeking additional funding for ongoing operational support for Community Recycling Centres beyond their current five-year contracts to enable continued service provision which has been instrumental in the success seen with the ongoing operation of the Raglan Resource Recovery Centre

xx)    advocates the need for one Resource Recovery Park to be established in the Franklin Local Board area to future proof services for forecasted large population growth in Drury, Pukekohe, Whitford, Beachlands, Clevedon and North Waikato areas.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board input into Auckland Council's submission to the National Emissions Reduction Plan

125

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar December 2021

File No.: CP2021/18876

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated December 2021 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Governance forward work calendar Decenber 2021

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2021/17778

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 2, 9, 16, and 23 November.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight of projects in their work programme or on matters that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops. Workshops are not open to the public, but a record of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

4.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 2, 9, 16, and 23 November 2021

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 2, 9, 16, and 23 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2 November 2021 Franklin Local Board workshop record

139

b

9 November 2021 Franklin Local Board workshop record

141

c

16 November 2021 Franklin Local Board workshop record

145

d

23 November 2021 Franklin Local Board workshop record

147

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin, Manurewa, Papakura

 


Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

14 December 2021

 

 

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[1] For the 12-month period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021, compared to an average of the prior five years.