I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Howick Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 2 December 2021

4.00pm

Howick Local Board Meeting Room
Online via Skype for business

 

Howick Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Adele White

 

Deputy Chairperson

John Spiller

 

Members

Katrina Bungard

 

 

Bo Burns

 

 

David Collings

 

 

Bruce Kendall

 

 

Mike Turinsky

 

 

Bob Wichman

 

 

Peter Young, JP

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Blair Morrow

Democracy Advisor

 

29 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 027 278 6975

Email: vanessa.phillips@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     John East of Pakuranga United Rugby Club                                                               5

9          Public Forum                                                                            5

10        Extraordinary Business                                       6

11        Governing Body Member update                        7

12        Chairperson's Report                                           9

13        Expression of Interest outcome for community management of 91 Picton Street, Howick        11

14        Approval for existing road name extensions - Kilcadden Drive and Ballinabreen Road, Flat Bush                                                                     35

15        New community licence and lease BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated at Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga       41

16        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                                                      59

17        Howick Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations                                                 95

18        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                                    205

19        Council-contolled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter One, 2021-22                         261

20        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Howick Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022                                                                            287

21        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents                           347

22        Auckland Transport - Howick Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report December 2021                                                                            353

23        Howick Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                            371

24        Workshop records                                            373

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

26        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                         383

C1       Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation         383


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Howick Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 15 November 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Howick Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       John East of Pakuranga United Rugby Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mr John East  of Pakuranga United Rugby Club will present to the board on the Club’s plans to rename their site and expand their gymnasium.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      thank John East of Pakuranga United Rugby Club for his deputation and attendance.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member update

File No.: CP2021/18564

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Howick Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Howick Ward Councillors with an opportunity to update the local board on regional matters they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Paul Young and Cr Sharon Stewart QSM.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2021/18570

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This item gives the local board chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and note the chairperson’s written report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the local board chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s verbal update and written report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Blair Morrow – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Expression of Interest outcome for community management of 91 Picton Street, Howick

File No.: CP2021/17713

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a recommendation to the Howick Local Board on the preferred organisation to manage and operate the Howick War Memorial Community Facility at 91 Picton Street, Howick.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In May 2021 the Howick Local Board requested staff commence an Expression of Interest (EOI) process to find a new operator for the Howick War Memorial Community Facility, in response to a 2017 needs assessment.

3.       Organisations were invited to propose either:

i)          Managing access to the venue through a contract for service

Or

ii)         Delivering services through a community lease, as suited to the venue and location

4.       The EOI opened for applications on 15 September and closed on 5 October. Nine applications were received.

5.       The project team has assessed each submission against the agreed criteria to identify the stronger applications and a recommended applicant to take forward.

6.       Staff identified the four strongest applications as:

·    Howick Village Association Incorporated

·    Manukau East Council of Social Services (MECOSS)

·    OneAfrica Incorporated

·    The Uxbridge Community Projects Incorporated

7.       Staff recommend the local board approve Howick Village Association (HVA) as the preferred applicant to manage and operate the facility because:

a.   HVA is a well-established organisation with strong organisational and financial capability to manage a community facility.

b.   HVA has strong local connections that will assist them to deliver activations for the community.

c.   HVA proposes a range of community activations for the facility, which would turn it into a community hub. 

8.       The next steps will be for staff to enter into discussion / negotiation with Howick Village Association Incorporated to develop a service approach that includes broad community access and that will be recommended to the Local Board for approval in February.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)   Note the strength of response to the EOI process and thank all applicants for their interest and commitment to Howick.

b)   Approve Howick Village Association (HVA) as the preferred applicant at this stage, for the following reasons: 

a.   HVA is a well-established organisation with strong organisational and financial capability to manage a community facility

b.   HVA has strong local connections that will assist them to deliver activations for the community.

c.   HVA proposes a range of community activations for the facility, which would turn it into a community hub. 

c)   Request staff to enter into discussion / negotiation with Howick Village Association Incorporated to develop a service approach that includes broad community access and can be recommended to the Local Board for approval in February.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

10. In 2017, the local board commissioned a needs assessment for the Howick Information Service which found that the service was underutilised and not strongly aligned to Auckland Council or Howick Local Board outcomes.  It also found that the need for an information service had changed significantly since its establishment in 1975. Most of the information available at the Howick Information Service is available from other sources, including online, libraries and other organisations.

11. In 2018, the board indicated a preference for a reduced focus on visitor information services and an increased focus on the venue becoming a community hub with more active programming.

12. During the 2020/2021 financial year the facility at 91 Picton Street has been operating as a venue for hire to enable Emergency Budget saving requirements.

13. In May 2021 the Howick Local Board requested staff to commence an EOI process to transfer management of the facility from council to community, taking into account current utilisation, findings from the 2017 needs assessment, and strategic alignment with Howick Local Board Plan.

14. The board approved an EOI process to gather community interest in managing the facility, either by “managing access to the venue through a contract for service” (Community Centre Management Agreement) (CCMA) or “delivering services through a community lease, as suited to the venue and location”.  The EOI application is included in Attachment A.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15. As requested by the board, a small project team developed the EOI documentation and invited community groups to make applications to manage the facility. On 15 September the EOI opened, and it closed on 5 October. Nine applications were received, these were from:

·    Howick Tourism Inc. Trading as East Auckland Tourism

·    Pakuranga Chinese Association

·    Joint application of MECOSS, East Auckland Tourism and Citizens Advice Bureau

·    Joint application of Pregnancy Barre / Birth Balance Connect & Drift away Massage

·    The Uxbridge Community Projects Incorporated 

·    Howick Village Association Incorporated

·    OneAfrica Charity

·    Manukau East Council of Social Services (MECOSS), individual application

·    Matthew Brajkovich – (The Hub or similar name)

 

The applications were assessed by staff against the following criteria:

·    Strategic alignment

·    Wider community benefit

·    Financial capability

·    Collaboration

·    Organisational capability and capacity

·    Service model (opening hours, hireage costs)

·    Benefit for Māori.

A summary of all nine applications is in Attachment B.

16. Below is a summary of the top four organisations against the assessment criteria.

Table 1: Summary of top four applicants from the Expression of Interest for use of 91 Picton Street, Howick

= Adequate

= Good

✓✓ = Strong

Howick Village Association

Manukau East Council of Social Services (MECOSS)

OneAfrica Charity

The Uxbridge Community Projects Inc

Strategic alignment

✓✓

✓✓

Wider community benefit

✓✓

Financial capability

✓✓

Collaboration

 

Organisational capability

✓✓

Service model

 

✓✓

✓✓

Benefit to Māori

 

Key:

✓✓ = Strong: Strong or excellent evidence of alignment with the criteria

= Good: Good evidence of alignment with the criteria

= Adequate: Some evidence of alignment with the criteria

. = Inadequate: Little or no evidence of alignment with the criteria

 

            A summary of the assessment of all nine applications is in Attachment C.

 

17. Of the top four scoring applicants, staff recommend that Howick Village Association be approved as the preferred applicant for the management of the Howick War Memorial Community Facility.

18. HVA did not specify which type of management they preferred. A Community Centre Management Agreement (CCMA) would achieve greater community access and activation than a lease.

19. During discussion / negotiation, staff will work with the preferred applicant to establish a sustainable and effective approach that can be recommended for adoption.

 

Enabling broad community access to the facility

20. The EOI process was expected to attract applications from individual groups. However, both individual and combined applications from community groups were received.

21. At the workshop on 28 October 2021, the local board considered the nine applications. Through the discussion, the local board reaffirmed the importance of enabling broad community access to the facility, including all the groups who have expressed interest in the facility through the EOI process. 

22. Staff have considered different ways to manage the facility at 91 Picton Street, taking into account interest from both individual groups and coalition groups. The pros and cons of the different management options are included in Table 2.

Table 2: Summary of the pros and cons of three potential management options

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

One group has exclusive occupancy

Multiple groups working in collaboration

One group working under the principle of access and activation

 

Pros:

·    One group holding the relationship with council ensures greater accountability for meeting the agreed requirements

·    A Community Outcomes Plan can be implemented to ensure some outcomes are met and to review the group’s performance against the plan over time. 

Cons:

·    In general, exclusive occupancy involves the delivery of a narrow service, rather than enabling access and activation for the community.

·    If the group is not delivering, it can take a considerable amount of time to terminate the agreement.

Pros:

·     A wider range of services can be delivered.

·     If one group is not performing, the other groups can ensure delivery continues.

Cons:

·     In general, the organisations deliver their own services rather than enabling access and activation for the community.

·     Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines require agreements with one group. This would not be possible with multiple organisations unless they agreed to set up a joint legal entity.

 

 

Pros:

·     There are clear expectations on the group to ensure broad community access and activation, and their performance is regularly monitored.

·     One group holding the relationship with council ensures greater accountability for meeting the agreed requirements

Cons:

·     These types of agreements do not provide long term occupancy rights for organisations.

 

23. Considering the pros and cons of each option, staff recommend option three as the preferred management option. This is because it has clarity of accountability and a contractual requirement to enable broad community access and activation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24. Local community services and venues create a stronger sense of place and foster localism and place-based approaches. This has a positive impact on our resilience to climate change.

25. There will be no increased greenhouse gas emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26. The Connected Communities department is responsible for the ongoing management and oversight of services from this venue.

27. If a community lease is found to be the best outcome, management of this relationship will transfer to the Community Facilities Department.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28. The transferring of the Howick War Memorial Community Facility from council management to community management has been led by the Howick Local Board and is in line with the Howick Local Board Plan Outcome 1, “People in our communities feel safe, engaged and connected” and the objective of “People actively contribute to their community”

29. The opportunities the Howick Local Board sees are:

·    Building the capacity of community groups to effectively serve their members

·    Bringing people together through involvement in community activities

·    Working with communities to deliver on their aspirations and priorities.

 

30. Some of the key initiatives under the specific Local Board outcomes are:

·    Identify and support a network of representative community groups, building their capacity to successfully serve their communities

·    Empower community groups to co-deliver projects with Auckland Council, and to take action to protect and maintain community assets,

·    Fund activities that bring diverse communities together and support volunteering.

 

31. Staff workshopped the nine applications with board members on 28 October 2021. This reaffirmed the importance of ensuring the facility remains broadly accessible to the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32. While the venue at 91 Picton St, Howick does not specifically target Māori populations, the venue enables locally responsive activities, promoting participation, inclusion, and connection for all Aucklanders, including Māori.

33. A Community Centre Management Agreement includes key performance indicators (KPIs), these would have a requirement that the successful applicant engage with Māori, and where appropriate support the delivery of programmes that local iwi may wish to run in the facility.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34. There is $25,552 allocated to support managing access to the venue through a contract for service and with the reinstatement of ABS opex that was taken for savings in the Emergency Budget in the 2020/2021 financial year, $54,000 per annum will be available to the local board from 2021/2022 onwards.

35. None of the options discussed in this report require additional investment beyond what is available in the asset-based services budget in the Long-Term Plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36. A potential outcome of the negotiations is no workable option being agreed upon. In this case, staff will return to the local board to recommend another applicant.

37. Other applicants may be dissatisfied with the outcome of the EOI. Staff have kept in touch with applicants throughout the EOI process and maintained objectivity throughout.  This local facility will remain available for many organisations to enjoy in the future.

38. Taking on the management of a community facility during a pandemic could have risks in relation to vaccination mandates for the operator. Early in the discussion, staff will inform the preferred applicant of the proposed vaccination policy and other COVID-19 approaches.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Table 2: Timeline for next steps

When

Action

December 2021

-     Feedback to unsuccessful applicants

-     Engage in discussion / negotiation to develop the approach

 

January 2022

 

-     Update the local board on progress

February 2022

-     Business report to recommend future approach for local board approval

-     Develop a transition plan that will see the new provider commence the operation of the facility from March 2022

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Expression of Interest Application Form

17

b

Attachment B: Summary of applicants

29

c

Attachment C: Assessments of Applicants

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Julia Craig - Place & Partner Specialist

Authorisers

Kevin Marriott - Manager Community Facilities

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Morgan Borthwick - Manager Advisory

 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Approval for existing road name extensions - Kilcadden Drive and Ballinabreen Road, Flat Bush

File No.: CP2021/16786

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Howick Local Board to:

a)   Correct Kilcadden Road approved under resolution HW/2016/276 to Kilcadden Drive, due to an error in the 2016 report and resulting minutes. Kilcadden Drive was the applicant’s actual preferred name and road type, and is the address being used by residents along this road and on signage that has been in use since 2016.

b)   Formally extend two existing road names, being Kilcadden Drive and Ballinabreen Road, Flat Bush, as a result of new development along these roads

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines), the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for road naming.

3.       The Guidelines and Standards state that a single length of road shall have only one name (AS NZS 4819:2011 section 4.4.2). Therefore, when an existing road is extended as a result of new development, the existing road name should be extended along the new stretch of road.

4.       Applicants Fletcher Living are extending the existing roads Kilcadden Drive and Ballinabreen Road in Flat Bush and request that these road names be extended onto the new stretches of the roads.

5.       This report also seeks to rectify the issue of Kilcadden Drive being originally approved as Kilcadden Road under resolution HW/2016/276. Due to a typing error, the 2016 report stated that the applicant’s preferred name and road type was Kilcadden Road whereas it was actually Kilcadden Drive as shown in the Figure 1 plans included in the 2016 report.

6.       Kilcadden Drive has been installed on road signage and has been used in the addresses of properties along the road, which are now all inhabited. Changing these addresses and signage from Drive to Road would cause significant impacts on residents, whereas changing resolution HW/2016/276 from Road to Drive would be a simple paperwork exercise.

7.       The road types ‘Road’ and ‘Drive’ are equally as suitable for the road in question under the Guidelines, therefore there are no issues with this correction and it would be the most logical and sensible resolution for the error identified.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)    rescinds resolution HW/2016/276 insofar as it relates to Kilcadden Road only, in order to correct the road type to Kilcadden Drive as per the road signage installed and the rating addresses in use along this existing stretch of road.

b)    approves Kilcadden Drive as a correction of Kilcadden Road.

c)    approves the extension of the existing road names Kilcadden Drive and Ballinabreen Road, Flat Bush, onto the newly developed and extended portions of those roads in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974. Resource consent references BUN60353082 and SUB60353083 for Kilcadden extension, and BUN60369947 and SUB60369949 for Ballinabreen extension.

Horopaki

Context

8.       There is extensive residential development being undertaken in the Flat Bush area between Flat Bush School Road and Murphys Park Drive. The subject road extensions have been approved under the following resource consents, which are separate stages of the wider masterplan development area:

a)         The extension of Kilcadden Drive was approved under resource consent reference BUN60353082, subdivision reference number SUB60353083, issued in December 2020 involving the construction of 46 new residential units (8 detached, 10 duplex and 28 terraced dwellings) and associated freehold subdivision of Superlot 4.

b)         The extension of Ballinabreen Road was approved under resource consent reference BUN60369947, subdivision reference number SUB60369949, issued in August 2021 involving the creation of 113 new residential dwellings and lots, 4 vacant lots, associated roads to vest (Lots 200-201) and services, being a subdivision of Superlot 5.

9.    Site and location plans of the developments can be found in Attachment A.

10.     In accordance with the Standards, all public roads require names in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering. A single length of road, including extended sections of existing roads, shall have only one name (AS NZS 4819:2011 section 4.4.2).

11.     In these developments two existing public roads are being extended therefore the existing road names should be extended along the new stretches of those roads.

12.     Kilcadden Drive was originally approved as Kilcadden Road under resolution HW/2016/276, however, this was due to a typing error in the 2016 report that stated that the applicant’s preferred name and road type was Kilcadden Road whereas it was actually Kilcadden Drive as shown in the Figure 1 plans included in the 2016 report itself. The applicant proceeded on the basis of the plans that showed Kilcadden Drive not Road.

13.     Resolution HW/2016/276 thus needs to be corrected to Kilcadden Drive to reflect the situation on the ground, as the road signage has shown Kilcadden Drive since 2016 and residents are using the address Kilcadden Drive.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for road naming. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

15.     In this development two existing public roads are being extended therefore, in accordance with the Guidelines and Standards, the existing road names should be extended along the new stretches of those roads and no further analysis is required.

16.     The existing road names to be extended (Kilcadden and Ballinabreen) have already been approved by the local board and prior to that approval they had already been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards were considered to have been met and duplicate names were not located in any close proximity. Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) also confirmed that the names were acceptable for use in this location.

17.     As part of the original approval for the existing road names mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines.

18.     The correction of Kilcadden Road to Kilcadden Drive will pose no issues or risks because the Guidelines state that road types such as ‘Road’ and ‘Drive’ are determined by the layout of the road in question and, in this case, both are acceptable road types for the road in question.

19.     Kilcadden Drive has been installed on road signage and has been used in the addresses of properties along the road, which are now all inhabited. Changing these addresses and signage from Drive to Road would cause significant impacts on residents, whereas changing resolution HW/2016/276 from Road to Drive would be a simple paperwork exercise.

20.     The correction of Kilcadden Road to Kilcadden Drive would therefore be the most logical and sensible resolution for the error identified and will ensure that the local board decision records match what is on the ground with minimal impacts on existing residents.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The naming of roads and the correction of road type from Road to Drive has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

25.     As part of the original approval for the existing road names mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines and this proposal merely seeks to extend existing road names across the development as anticipated by the staging of the underlying subdivision resource consents, and to correct a road type from Road to Drive, being considered technical matters only.

26.     As mana whenua have been previously engaged, and the names being sought are extensions of existing roads, it is considered that further engagement with mana whenua is not necessary in this instance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

28.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the road name extensions.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Approved road names and extensions are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database.  LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Kilcadden & Ballinabreen Extensions

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Emerald James - Senior Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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PDF Creator


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

New community licence and lease BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated at Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga

File No.: CP2021/18094

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a licence and lease to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated (the club) and to seek landowner approval for a container building to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2016 the board considered a business report and approved a licence and lease to the club for an area at Lloyd Elsmore Park.

 

3.       Because there were discussions about a multisport building at the park, execution of the deeds for the license and lease were not progressed.

 

4.       The club has been operating at the location since 2012 and now wish to complete the development envisaged in 2016 with the addition of a clubroom/amenity building.

 

5.       The building that was intended to be located on the site in 2016 is now no longer available and the club is proposing to locate a container style building close to the original siting of the earlier building. The new building will provide amenities for the club and the public attending events.

 

6.       The club continues to be involved in the group discussions for the multisport facility project at the park and potentially will use spaces at the facility once it is completed. The completion of this project was anticipated to be 2021 but with constrained funding for projects, the completion date for the project is unknown.

 

7.       The club wish to finalise the development of the BMX site and to regularise their occupation of the license and lease areas They have also made an application for landowner approval to site a container styled building on a portion of the reserve. This container building will include a toilet block, tuck shop, storage facilities and deck.

 

8.       The resolution passed by the board in 2016 was comprehensive and the majority of the decisions are still applicable to the license and lease proposal. Because of the passage of time, staff recommend revisiting the terms of the resolution and updating these accordingly to suit changes to the proposed development.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

A)   Rescind resolution HW/2016/231 passed 14 March 2016 and replace that as shown below:

   Resolution number HW/2016/231(To Be rescinded)

That the Howick Local Board:

Licence

a)         Approve public notification, in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, of the intention to grant a licence to occupy approximately 6115m2 of Lloyd Elsmore Park (2R Bells Road) to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated to operate BMX activities (as illustrated in Attachment B – Site Plan).

b)         Nominate Members Collings, Udy, Boles and Spiller to be on a hearings panel to consider any submissions received following the public notification process and make a decision; should a hearing be necessary.

c)         Grant a licence to occupy, if there are no objections received through public consultation, to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated for the area occupied by the BMX track (as outlined in red in Attachment B – Site Plan) at Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga.

i.   Term – 5 years, commencing 15 March 2016, with one 5 year right of renewal.

Lease

d)         Approve public notification in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977, of the intention to lease approximately 210m² of on Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga, to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated for clubrooms, deck and steps as illustrated in Attachment B (Reference No.1, 2 and 4).

e)         Grant an agreement to lease, if there are no objections received through public consultation, to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated for the area to be occupied for clubrooms, deck and stairs as illustrated in Attachment B (Reference No. 1, 2 and 4) at Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga for two years commencing 15 March 2016, with a one year right of renewal, if required.

f)          Require that the agreement to lease be subject to the following:

i.   the final location, detailed design of the facility and vehicle access and parking is agreed with council parks staff.

ii.  the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated obtains all regulatory consents required for the planning and development of the building and parking.

iii. the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated enters into a funding agreement with the council for the maintenance and cleaning of the facility.

iv. the toilets within the building to be of a durable standard that can cope with high Club and public use and to be open to the public when the Club is present on the site.

v.  the tuck shop to be operated by the Club for member use only.

vi. construction works and reinstatement of the reserve are subject to conditions to be supplied by the Parks Manager (South).

g)         Grant a land lease for the areas illustrated in Attachment B (No. 1, 2 and 4) at Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga, to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated subject to the following:

i.     Term – 10 years, commencing from the date of issue of a building certificate of compliance, with one 10 year right of renewal.

ii.    Rent - $1.00 (+ GST) per annum, if requested.

iii.    A Community Outcomes Plan, to be approved by the local board portfolio holder, and attached to the lease document.

iv.  All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

h)      Grant approval for the Mountain Raiders BMX Club to relocate a building (20m x 8m) to Lloyd Elsmore Park, pending the outcome of the public consultation process on the proposed licence agreement and lease.

i)        Floodlights

i)       Grant landowner approval for the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated to install floodlights at the track, subject to the lights meeting council standards and ownership subsequently being transferred to the council to ensure ongoing public safety.

To be replaced with

That the Howick Local Board:

Licence

a)   Grant a licence to occupy, to the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated for the area occupied by the BMX track (as outlined in red in Attachment A– Site Plan) at Lloyd Elsmore Park, 2R Bells Road, Pakuranga.

i.   Term – Five years, commencing 21 February 2022, with one five-year right of renewal.

Lease

Grant a community lease, for the area to be occupied for container styled clubroom and amenity building and decking as illustrated in Attachment A on the following terms and conditions;

a)      Term – five years, commencing 21 February 2022 with one five-year right of renewal.

j)        rent - $1.00 (+ GST) per annum, if requested.

k)       that conditions be included in the lease agreement to allow, at the lease renewal, for the local board to consider and approve one of the following options:

1)      require the BMX club to remove the temporary container buildings and replace them with a more permanent structure from the site prior to renewing the lease on the existing terms and conditions.

l)        a Community Outcomes Plan, to be approved by the local board portfolio holder, and attached to the lease document.

m)     the final location, detailed design of the facility and vehicle access and parking is agreed with council parks staff.

n)      the BMX Mountain Raiders Club Incorporated enters into a funding agreement with the council for the maintenance and cleaning of the facility.

o)      the toilets will be open to the public when the club is present on the site.

p)      the tuck shop is to be operated by the club for member use only support landowner approval for the placement of a container building on a portion of Lloyd Elsmore Park (Attachment B)

q)      construction works and reinstatement of the reserve are subject to conditions to be set out in the landowner approval letter.

r)       All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.<Enter text>

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In 2016, the Howick Local Board (the board) resolved to grant a license and lease to the club for an area at Lloyd Elsmore Park.

10.     For several reasons, the deeds to approve the license and lease were not executed. At the time there were also ongoing discussions about a multisport building on the park that the club were party to. The club has use of the established track and is pursuing the development of its clubroom and amenity building and is still participating in discussions as a potential user of the multisport building.

11.     The club now wishes to complete the development of the BMX track area with the installation of a container style club room and amenity building.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The Land

12.     The land is described as Lot 8 DP 27711. The land is held in fee simple by the Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve under the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is part of Lloyd Elsmore Park.

The Club

13.     The club is affiliated to BMX New Zealand and was incorporated on 17 February 1983. In 2012, The club moved from their previous location at Pigeon Mountain Road, Pakuranga to Lloyd Elsmore Park.

14.     The objectives of the club are to encourage and further BMX racing in Auckland through establishing, maintaining and developing a BMX track in the Howick or Pakuranga areas of Auckland.

15.     The club is run by committee members and coaches.

16.     The BMX track is open to the public to use at all times and is asked not to damage the track during that public use. Club activities include training throughout the week. They have classes in age groups from two years up to classes for adults.

17.     The financial accounts indicate that the club has accumulated funds and no known liabilities.

18.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place.

History

19.     In March 2016, the Board passed a resolution granting a licence, an agreement to lease and subsequently a lease to the club.

20.     The agreements were not formalised in 2016 because the club was involved in the multisport facility project led by Parks, Sport and Recreation staff. The club is one of the clubs that may use the use multisport facility once completed.

21.     Following discussions with Parks, Sport and Recreation staff, the board, and the Club, a report was proposed in 2018 to rescind the boards 2016 resolution to allow for a review of the lease terms to fit with the anticipated completion of the multisport facility. The board also sought more information from Community Leasing staff about the maintenance of the BMX track. That report was not progressed.

22.     The club is still part of the multisport building discussion group and may use spaces once the building is completed. With the uncertainty of funding sources, there is no timeline for completion of this multisport building or final occupation details.

Container Building

23.     The lease and license proposal from 2016 included relocating a building from elsewhere to be used as a clubroom. That building is no longer available and the club's plans have changed. They now wish to place a container style building adjacent to the site originally envisaged as the clubroom site. The club has also applied for landowner approval for this.

24.     In 2016 an agreement to lease and lease for the clubrooms was envisaged. The agreement to lease was to allow the club to fund and undertake the works relating to the clubrooms. As noted, the clubs plans have changed and they are now ready to install the container building once they have the required approvals. The club is also in occupation of the area so an agreement to lease is not required. 

25.     The container building is approximately 150 square metres with a timber deck to the front and western side of the building and includes a toilet, tuck shop and storage facilities. The toilet block will include shower amenities. The toilet will be made available to the public while the club is onsite.

26.     The club will also store equipment and materials in the building required for ongoing track maintenance and event activities.

27.     As part of the building works, the club will undertake treatment of the exterior of the container to ensure it is visually sympathetic with the surrounding area.

28.     The club will lodge resource and building consent applications prior to the commencement of any works.

29.     No reserve trees are impacted by the works.

30.     Funding for the amenity building is provided through a grant from the boards Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) allocation, which the club obtained approval for in 2015 and will be released once Council’s Parks Active Recreation Lead is satisfied that all the pre-conditions for release of the funds are fulfilled.

31.     The recommended lease term is five years initial plus a five years right of renewal to match the terms of the licence- for the track. The Club would need both the lease area and the licence area to carry out their activities. The terms for the lease is still in accordance with the suggestions of the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Public Notification and Iwi Engagement

32.     Both public notification and iwi consultation are required as the BMX proposal is not included in the Lloyd Elsmore Park Management Plan.

33.     Iwi engagement was undertaken in April and May 2018.  No submissions opposing the lease were received from iwi.

34.     Public notification was undertaken in May and June 2018. No submissions were received.

35.     As this new proposal is not materially different from that approved by the Board previously, and the public was notified and iwi were engaged, no further public notification and iwi engagement is required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     The site contains a flood plain and flood prone areas as shown in photo 1 below. This means that during a flood event stormwater water could accumulate in these areas. The Council’s Senior Asset Assessor- Community Facilities advises that when the track was built, council will have ensured that drainage installed would dispose of accumulated stormwater to mitigate any flooding issues.BMX trackMap

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Photo 1

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The proposed lease has no identified impacts on council or other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

38.     Land Advisory staff have engaged with specialist staff within council in progressing the landowner approval for the container building. All specialists are supportive of the container building proposal as the proposal fits within the license area envisaged in 2016 and does not use additional parkland.

39.     The Parks Sports and Recreation Specialists are supportive of the proposal as it promotes activation of the reserve and maximises participation in recreational activity and organised sport. The benefits of activation in the reserve were considered to outweigh any visual effects of the development in the location.

40.     There is shared ownership of the track facility. Council owns the track asset and the floodlights. Maintenance of the track is also shared, with council supplying lime once a year, compacting this on the track and the club then maintains the track to their requirements. Council’s Sports Facility Manager is happy for this arrangement to continue. These arrangements will be recorded as specific conditions in the lease.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     The recommendations within this report fall within the board’s allocated authority relating to granting of leases, and licences for local community facilities (in line with the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012) and align with the Howick Local Board Plan.

42.     Further to the board workshops and business meetings, when this report was discussed, the proposed new community lease was discussed again at the Howick Local Board workshop on 14 October 2021.

Board members asked for confirmation that the board’s previous allocation of $125,000 approved in 2015 for a toilet for the Club was still available and whether the board is being asked to allocate further funds. The Active Recreation Lead has confirmed that the $125,000 is still available for the clubroom and toilet development. Funds will be released to the club when a lease is formalised and the club’s Landowner Approval Application is approved.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader statutory obligations to Māori. Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

44.     Iwi engagement has been undertaken with a submission period from 26 April 2018 to 18 May 2018. No submissions opposing the lease were received from iwi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 recommends a rental of one dollar ($1) plus GST per annum.

46.     There is an allocation of $125,000 from the boards Locally Driven Initiatives Fund approved in 2015 that is still available to the Club. As noted earlier in the report this will be disbursed when the lease and the landowner approval application are approved and any preconditions are satisfied.

47.     Ongoing maintenance responsibilities of lighting and annual lime top-up and compaction continued to be borne by Council. It is worth noting that the Club also use their time and resources to maintain the track in partnership with Council.

Internal note to be deleted: The board’s Lead Financial Advisor has reviewed and agreed to this  ‘Financial implications’ section.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     There are no other anticipated risks to the local board in amending and rescinding the Board’s 2016 resolution to provide a lease and landowner approval to the club.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     Subject to local board approval, staff will prepare the Lease and the Community Outcomes Plan with the club.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan

49

b

BMX Club 2021 LOA

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tsz Ning Chung - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16884

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive. 

4.       Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy. 

5.       The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important. 

6.       The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving: 

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life: 

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection: 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:  

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:  

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

7.       The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from “one-size fits all” to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, and shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.       Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.       A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10.     Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.  

11.     The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.  

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’ 

13.     Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive. 

14.     In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.  

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15.     The refreshed draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy (Attachment A) has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the strategy and how it will be used.  

16.     During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.  

17.     Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18.     At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[1].

19.     Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.  

20.     Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.  

21.     Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them. 

22.     Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.  

23.     Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[2].

24.     Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[3]. 

25.     Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.   

Challenge 1 

Challenge 2 

Challenge 3 

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive. 

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection. 

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling. 

 

26.     More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:  

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Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27.     In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From

To

Ad hoc and siloed

Working in integrated ways

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning. 

 

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and economic).

One size fits all

Targeting our responses

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.  

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities. 

Council as expert

Enabling community leadership

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy 

28.     To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.  

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving 

29.     The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities. 

·    Manaakitanga |Quality of life 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

 

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection 
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong 

 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action 
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures 
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

Objectives: Where should we focus our action 

30.     To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes. 

Application, logo, company name

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31.     While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focused on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.  

32.     These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.  

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

33.     The draft strategy proposes we invest in our resource to make the biggest impact, and this will be guided by four key principles:

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34.     Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.  

35.     Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.  

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36.     As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.  

37.     The high-level outcomes and objective in the strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action.   

38.     The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.  

39.     This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.  

40.     It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.  

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41.     Nga Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges. 

42.     A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for. 

43.     Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44.     A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the strategy’s new objectives.  

45.     New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes. 

46.     There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY22-25). 

47.     The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

49.     The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     This is a strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.  

51.     Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.  

52.     Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54.     Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.  

55.     The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page. 

56.     Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include: 

·    concern for isolated communities

·    a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·    concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa[4].

58.     The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population. 

59.     Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tamaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000[5]. 

60.     By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whanau and hapori.  

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities 

61.     To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.  

62.     Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes 

63.     The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.  

64.     The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tamaki Makaurau. 

65.     Mana whenua and Mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     There is currently no additional budget attached to the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

If <event>: 

Then <impact>: 

Possible mitigations: 

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources.   

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy. 

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.  

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.  

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction. 

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.  

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.  

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.  

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact. 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68.     This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.  

69.     The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Howick Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/17037

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Howick Local Board with information on applications in the Howick Quick Response Round One 2021/2022; to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 17 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received in the Howick Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $589,334.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       For the 2021/2022 financial year, there are a total of three Local Grant rounds, two Multi-board and two Quick Response rounds.

6.       Twenty-seven applications were received for the 2021/2022 Howick Quick Response Round One, requesting a total of $69,903.03.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Howick Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Howick Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 listed in the following table:

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2207-110

Asian Library Trust

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire of the Uxbridge Centre including the cleaning fee, building management and sound and lighting, marketing material and performance costs

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-104

Auckland Seniors Support and Caring Group Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of the 2021 Christmas Party and Chinese Spring Festival celebration

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-103

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of producing and printing 680 Street Smart Handbooks

$2,380.00

Eligible

QR2207-132

Bucklands Beach Yacht Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of a trailer, registration and warrant as well as three Shearwater 340 rigid inflatable boats

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-101

Burn Support Charitable Trust

Events

Towards the cost of Camp Awhi t-shirts

$1,012.00

Eligible

QR2207-135

Cession Community Trust Account

Community

Towards facilitator fees at Pakuranga College from 18 January 2022 to 14 April 2022

$4,480.00

Eligible

QR2207-124

Ceylon German Technical Training Institute Alumni Association of New Zealand

Community

Towards the total budget of the "Sri Lankan New Year Celebration Sport events"

$7,211.00

Eligible

QR2207-112

Eastern Districts Country Music Club Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of music equipment, insurance, and venue hire

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-129

Harlequin Music Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of a new boiling unit including the plumbing and electrical work at the Harlequin Music Theatre

$2,329.47

Eligible

QR2207-111

Highland Park Community Creche Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of the outdoor playground upgrade including two play cubes, clatter bridge and a cargo net

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-116

Howick East Combined Probus Club

Community

Towards a 25% contribution of the hire of a bus

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-126

Howick Tourism Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of six months ongoing maintenance of search engine optimisation and Google Ads activity and updated East Auckland Tourism Website

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-131

Howick Tourism Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of the design of a new brochure, in a print ready format the Howick Tourism

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-125

Inner Wheel Club of Howick

Community

Towards venue hire

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-128

JK Productions Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of a curator and artists frees

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-134

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards workbooks at Anchorage Park School, Point View School, Botany Downs School and Howick Primary School from 28 February 2022 to 10 June 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-108

Mellons Bay School Board of Trustees

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of pool maintenance costs including, chemicals, testing, Watercare water bill, and Nova electricity bill, and salary for a pool support person

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-127

Pakuranga and Howick Budgeting Services Incorporated

Community

Towards petrol vouchers, gifts, and training for volunteers

$800.00

Eligible

QR2207-130

Pakuranga Athletics Club Juniors

Sport and recreation

Towards Pakuranga Athletic Club Junior Open Day at Lloyd Elsmore Park from 6 February 2022 to 6 February 2022

$2,990.00

Eligible

QR2207-114

Pakuranga Inter-Church Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of 32 counselling sessions at the Pakuranga Counselling Centre

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-123

Pakuranga Tennis Club

Sport and recreation

Towards tennis net replacement at Pakuranga Tennis Club from 17 January 2022 to 28 January 2022

$800.56

Eligible

QR2207-113

Ranjita Sahota

Community

Towards venue hire, advertisement, gratuity, and catering

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-119

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the cost of catering, venue hire and a faciliatory for "Road Safety and Youth Development for Young Howick Drivers"

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-106

Shelly Park School

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of four Forza football goals for Shelly Park School

$2,900.00

Eligible

QR2207-133

The Gallery

Arts and culture

Towards facilitation costs at Ormiston Town Centre from 21 February 2022 to 2 March 2022

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-107

The Uxbridge Community Projects Incorporated

Community

Towards funding for the installation of blinds including scaffolding

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2207-105

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards counsellor helpline training, management, and support

$3,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$69,903.03

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/Context.aspx

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme. The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   higher priorities for funding

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 17 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio and community networks

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the Howick Local Board Plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     As outlined in the Howick Grants Programme 2021/2022, staff have also assessed each application according to which applications to the needs of the community in support of the recovery from COVID-19.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/Climate-impact-statement.aspx

13.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

14.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/CouncilGroupImpactsAndViews.aspx

15.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Howick Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

19.     A summary of each application received through the Howick Quick Response Round One, is provided (refer Attachment B)

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

21.     Ten applicants applying to the Howick Quick Response Round One have indicated that their project targets Māori or contribute to Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

23.     The Howick Local Board adopted the Howick Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 17 May 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

24.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $589,334.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

25.     There will be a total of three Local Grants, two Multi-board and two Quick Response rounds in the 2021/2022 financial year.

26.     Fifty-five applications were received for the 2021/2022 Howick Local Grants Round One, requesting a total of $644,647.92, and twelve applications for the 2021/2022 Multi-board Grants Round One requesting a total of $516,841.44.

27.     Forty-three applications for the 2021/2022 Howick Local Grant Round One, was granted a total of $293,560.86.

28.     Five 2021/2022 Howick Multi-board Grant Round One applications was granted a total of $12,600.00. A total of $306,160.86 allocated.

29.     Twenty-eight applications were received for the 2021/2022 Howick Local Grant Round Two and a total of $115,404.39 was granted.

30.     The balance available of the 2021/2022 Howick grants budget is $167,768.75.

31.     Twenty-seven applications have been received for the 2021/2022 Howick Quick Response Round One, requesting a total of $69,903.03.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/Risks.aspx

32.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

33.     Staff recommend that due to current COVID19 crisis, if an applicant is unable to carry out the project in this financial year, then a clause is added to the recommendation, that the applicant can retain the funds to carry out the event in the next financial year or postpone the event date, to when alert levels have reduced, and the event can be conducted safely.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Following the Howick Local Board allocation of funding for the Quick Response Round One 2021/2022, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Howick Local Grant Programme 2021/2022

103

b

Howick Quick Response Round One - application summary

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 


Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Howick Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

 

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-110

Asian Library Trust

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Chinese Traditional Performing Art Project

Location:

Uxbridge Centre Howick

Summary:

We will hold Xiangsheng Show,as traditional performing art in Chinese comedy, and one of the most popular elements in Chinese culture.
We will hold Chinese traditional Folk Music Concert including 10 different music instruments performing during the event.

Dates:

30/07/2022 - 03/09/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

300

% of participants from Local Board

100%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Provide opportunity for local community to experience Chinese Traditional Culture Activities
Provide opportunity to improve local community mental health through comedy show and traditional music

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

Support local arts, culture, music and heritage activities and experiences

 

We provide traditional Chinese art & culture activities to local communities through different performing art projects

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - venue accessible

Target ethnic groups:

Specific ethnic group Chinese

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

We will inform everyone Smoke-Fee message during the full event
Zero Waste required after event
We promote healthy drink and food
Active lifestyles including fingers/hand/arm movement while playing instruments

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

5%

5%

50%

%

40%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$3000.00

Requesting grant for:

Venue Cost, Cleaning Cost, Building management, Light & sound, poster design & printing

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

I will seek sponsors

Cost of participation:

$2

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$3500.00

$500.00

$0.00

$500.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

venue cost for two shows

$2127.00

$2127.00

poster design & print cost

$373.00

$373.00

performing cost for two shows

$1000.00

$1000.00

 

Income description

Amount

250 tickets@ $2

$500.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

30

100

$2115.00

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2207-110

Chinese Traditional Performing Art Project

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

 

 

 

No previous application

Applications prior to the 2018/2019 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

           

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-104

Auckland Seniors Support and Caring Group Incorporated

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: 2021 Christmas Party and Chinese Spring Festival celebration

Location:

China Town in Te Rakou Drive of Botany Downs

Summary:

1) to show and share our traditional performance;
2) to show and share our tradional food;
3) to show and share our tradional paintings and etc.

Dates:

01/02/2022 - 01/02/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

200

% of participants from Local Board

95%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

People esp. old people meet together to celebrate traditional festival by watching perforamces and sharing food . Some of them come from the rest homes; some from other ethnic groups; most of them from our group  members and volenteers. They can be able to feel happy and gay through the community event. They are like brothers and sisters in a big family. In the meanwhile the local families are welcom to join us. We will enjoy a happy time together.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

People actively contribute to their community

 

Chinese spring festival is the most important celebration in tradition. Chinese people like to get together to share their happiness and best wishes on the festival. It is a special day for Chinese,esp. for the Chinese seniors who enjoy the traditional culture so much.

 

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

No Māori outcomes identified

Accessible to people with disabilities

No -

Target ethnic groups:

N/A

Healthy environment approach:

N/A

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$3000.00

Requesting grant for:

Performance fees $1000
Hall Hire & Cleaning $1000
Food and other fees $1000

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We may reduce the cost of performance fees.

Cost of participation:

no

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$4500.00

$0.00

$0.00

$1500.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Performance fees

$1500.00

$1000.00

Hall hire and cleaning fees

$1000.00

$1000.00

Food and other fees

$2000.00

$1000.00

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2207-104

2021 Christmas Party and Chinese Spring Festival celebration

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2207-164

We play and we help

2021/2022 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  SAP approved

Approved

$1,000.00

LG2220-132

Volunteer training for seniors' support/service

2021/2022 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Awaiting funding agreement

Approved

$4,500.00

LG2210-104

We play and we help

2021/2022 Manurewa Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,200.00

LG2213-107

We play and we help

2021/2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round One -  GA Assessment completed

Approved

$0.00

QR2107-207

2021 Chinese Moon Festival Celebration

2020/2021 Howick Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,000.00

QR2120-208

2021 Chinese Dragon Boat Festival Celebration

2020/2021 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2114-201

We play and we help

2020/2021 Papakura Local Grant, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2113-207

We play and we help

2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2110-317

We play and we help

2020/2021 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2107-307

We play and we help

2020/2021 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,000.00

QR2107-114

Celebration of Chinese tradional festivals

2020/2021 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

LG2107-120

We play and we help

2020/2021 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

LG2020-126

We play and we help

2019/2020 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

LG2014-105

We play and we help.

2019/2020 Papakura Local Grant, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,600.00

LG2010-134

We play and we help.

2019/2020 Manurewa Local Grants, Round One -  Grants refunded

Approved

$3,125.00

LG2007-107

We play and we help.

2019/2020 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

QR1920-309

Celebration of Chinese Moon Festival

2018/2019 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

QR1910-308

Celebration of Chinese Moon Festival

2018/2019 Manurewa Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,500.00

QR1913-312

Celebration of Chinese Moon Festival

2018/2019 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round Three -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

QR1907-204

Celebration of Chinese Moon Festival

2018/2019 Howick Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

LG1911-308

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three -  Accountability not satisfactory

Approved

$3,600.00

LG1914-201

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Papakura Local Grant, Round Two -  Accountability not satisfactory

Approved

$1,000.00

LG1908-305

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Three -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

LG1920-203

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Waitematā Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG1907-302

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1910-201

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG1913-210

We Play We Help - Possible Internal Journal

2018/2019 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,500.00

QR1907-123

Chinese Dragon Boat Festival Celebration

2018/2019 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1913-229

Chinese Dragon Boat Festival Celebration

2018/2019 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,670.00

QR1910-211

Chinese Dragon Boat Festival Celebration

2018/2019 Manurewa Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$600.00

LG1907-212

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

QR1910-107

2018 Christmas Party and Chinese Spring Festival celebration

2018/2019 Manurewa Quick Response, Round One -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

LG1914-122

2018 Christmas Party and Chinese Spring Festival celebration

2018/2019 Papakura Local Grant, Round One  -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,100.00

QR1913-3-1008

2018 Christmas Party and Chinese Spring Festival celebration

2018/2019 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

QR1910-106

2018 Christmas Party and Chinese Spring Festival celebration

2018/2019 Manurewa Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

LG1910-128

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Manurewa Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG1907-132

We Play We Help

2018/2019 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

Applications prior to the 2018/2019 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

           

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-124

Ceylon German Technical Training Institute Alumni Association of New Zealand

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Sri Lankan New Year Celebration Sport events

Location:

Barry Curtis park-cultural lawn

Summary:

Sri Lankan traditional sport events, traditional food, cultural activities and an inter team soft ball cricket tournament.

Dates:

02/04/2022 - 02/04/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

450

% of participants from Local Board

40%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Enhancing the spirit of the members and get to know the wider community in the local area.
Sharing the culture with fellow Aucklanders and celebrating diversity.
Promote the Multiculturalism and value the identification in the community.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

Sports and recreational opportunities respond to the needs of our communities

 

By having traditional sport events in view to celebrate the Sri Lankan New Year and promote the culture to local board communities, promoting arts by introducing a competition to young kids, traditional music and music chairs, promoting cricket by means of a inter team tournament.

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

No -

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

Place NO SMOKING signs in the area. Use bio degradable containers and utensils for food distribution. 
All refuse collection bins are named and graded in the location itself.
No deep frying or fatty food in the menu, water is the main choice for dehydration.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

5%

20%

40%

30%

%

5%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$7211.00

Requesting grant for:

As per the budget, whole project excluding the volunteers hours.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

Requesting the community for donations, if donations do not meet the required fund  the event will be subsidized to a lesser capacity.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$7211.00

$0.00

$0.00

$3000.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

File attached

$7211.00

$3000.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

25

325

$6873.75

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2207-124

Sri Lankan New Year Celebration Sport events

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

 

 

 

No previous application

Applications prior to the 2018/2019 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

           

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-129

Harlequin Music Theatre Incorporated

Legal status:

Incorporated Society, Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: FOH boiler unit

Location:

Harlequin Musical Theatre

Summary:

The instant hot water boiling unit in our front-of-house (FOH) kitchen needs replacing. Like many other community theatres, Covid-19 put our 2020 and 2021 seasons into disarray and despite three fairly successful productions of Annie, Grease and Into The Woods, our club funds are still recovering. Our November show Mamma Mia!, which would have been a crowd pleaser, had to be postponed and we likely won't have any hireage income for the rest of the year either.

Dates:

10/01/2022 - 31/01/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

5000 plus per year

% of participants from Local Board

80%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

For each of our three annual shows we usually have 1,500-1,800 people coming through our doors as audiences. The FOH kitchen is also used for 20-35 actors, 10-15 musicians, 10-15 backstage and support crew per show during rehearsals. A similar amount of people would be expected for our outside hires. The boiler unit broke down earlier in the year and we currently used hot water jugs.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

Support local arts, culture, music and heritage activities and experiences

 

The Harlequin Musical Theatre is recognised as the Hub of musical theatre in our community.
Our theatre seats 140 patrons and we staged over 90 shows in the last 60 years.
In a "normal" year we would produce three (3) shows, reaching up to 5,000 people in our community across all ethnic groups, including audiences, cast, crew, bands etc.
Our objectives are to provide quality performing arts for the education, entertainment and cultural enlightenment for the wider Howick and Pakuranga community. And to provide a successful training and experience base for a diverse range of members in the areas of
music, song, dance, drama, orchestra, lighting, sound, design, construction and theatre administration.
We also hire the theatre to a number of local youth theatre and dance groups for their performances.

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Harlequin Musical Theatre has a wheel chair access, special seating and washrooms

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

We are committed of recycling and avoiding waste wherever we can, including the re-use of props and sets.
Cast members almost always have dance movements during the show. We also rent the theatre to regional Youth theatres and dance schools.
Our licensed bar has free tap water and non-alcoholic drinks as cheapest options. Food is always provided.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$2329.47

Requesting grant for:

Plumbing, electrical work, boiling unit as per our preferred quote from LA Plumbing

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would make up the difference.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$2329.47

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Plumbing, electrical, boiler

$2329.47

$2329.47

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

5

10

$211.50

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2207-129

FOH boiler unit

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2207-237

Harlequin Projector and Screen

2021/2022 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  GA Assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2207-117

Backstage Theatre Comms System

2021/2022 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  SAP approved

Approved

$15,000.00

QR2107-130

Harlequin Mic Headsets

2020/2021 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,730.35

LG2107-156

Building and roof clean

2020/2021 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,007.00

CCS21_1_111

ANNIE - Harlequin's November show

Creative Communities Scheme 21_1 -  Acquitted

Approved

$5,300.00

QR2007-154

Green Room kitchenette upgrade

2019/2020 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

LG2007-337

Baby Grand Resoration

2019/2020 Howick Local Grants, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2007-246

Theatre rebrand and facelift

2019/2020 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  Grants refunded

Approved

$5,000.00

LG2007-136

Container replacement

2019/2020 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,900.00

QR1907-220

Company

2018/2019 Howick Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

CCS19_2_226

Company - Harlequin's July show

Creative Communities Scheme 19_2 -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,100.00

LG1907-232

Upgrade and replacement of theatrical sound equipment

2018/2019 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$10,000.00

No previous application

           

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-128

JK Productions Ltd

Legal status:

Limited Liability Company

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Wildest Dreams and Game Changers

Location:

Q theatre, 305 Queen Street, Auckland CBD, Auckland 1010

Summary:

Wildest Dreams and Game Changers is a black orientated visual arts exhibition that features Black creatives responding to the notion of playing the game: a multi-faceted performance that involves code-switching, hustling, remaining unapologetically black; as well as manifesting our ancestors' wildest dreams. The idea of the game is prolific in popular culture (Squid Game, Hunger Games) but the exploration of how Black Kiwis respond to this in Aotearoa is a brand new endeavour. Our 2022 exhibition will feature works from five Afro-Kiwis artists that whakapapa to the African diaspora and whose work will be brought together by upcoming curator from Howick, Lindsey de Roos with support from mentor and BCA Founder, Dione Joseph.

Dates:

01/01/2022 - 20/03/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

100

% of participants from Local Board

90%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

This projects targets the African/Afro-Caribbean, the LGBTQIA+, migrant and general audiences. It is an opportunity for locals from Howick to connect with other black creatives across the region to access and participate in arts and culture. Community benefits include:
 
1) Working opportunities for black and queer creatives in their specialised fields, including the artists and crew involved. It is important to us to be creating projects with and for our community and to ensure that we build capability and capacity within the black community. 
 
2) Representing the complex experiences of the black community to create an empowering experience for the artists while also calling people into the conversation. Our community outreach, online presence and marketing and promotions across all our social and documentation on our website will ensure that our community and other connected communities will have access to this free events.  
 
3) BCA aims to sustain a range of talented Black artists at various levels of their careers (including new and emerging, mid-career and experienced) by professionally remunerating our team and encouraging and facilitating the growth of our new and emerging Black theatre practitioners including our Howick based and local Curator Lindsey de Roos and our emerging visual artists.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

Support local arts, culture, music and heritage activities and experiences

 

Firstly, this project will engage the Black community from the Howick region and those with connections to Howick by creating opportunities to connect, create and collaborate on a new and original exhibition. This includes drawing upon the skills and creativity of our artists, team (artistic director, producer, curator) and designers (photographer, graphic and web design) as well as three emerging black artists to immerse audiences in the everyday life of Black New Zealanders. 
 
Secondly, present culturally specific content featuring both the black and LGBTQI+ community. Many Black New Zealanders are consistently told that there is no history of a black community, yet, for example, the Caribbean Society was founded in 1961 and at the time had over 1000 members recorded. The BCA currently stands at over 500 members across Aotearoa, and thus this exhibition aims to represent our varied experiences, and specifically the black queer experience.
 
Thirdly, increase the capacity and capability of Black artists across the region through our tuakana teina mentorship model that ensures emerging creatives are given the support needed to explore, expand and grow their skills through secondments to industry professionals and mentoring support.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Same Same But Black

community connections; marketing; promotion

The Basment theatre

Community arts space for makers, dancers, visual artists, poets, musicians and comedians,

Howick Little Theatre

currently conversations in progress; potential exhibition space

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

No Māori outcomes identified

 

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Q Theatre has disability access to all its levels including a lift and ramp.

Target ethnic groups:

Specific ethnic group African, Other: African Diaspora, Caribbean, Migrants

Healthy environment approach:

Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages

The exhibition out will promote artists to use green materials that are compostable or sourced naturally. This will follow through as a required question to be answered in their proposals. This message will also be maintained in the curators mentorship with the artists as they make for the show. They will be encouraged to use ecological thinking in their making, such as using non-toxic materials, and they will be motivated to think about the sustainable futures of their artwork so that it does not become waste.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

%

%

%

%

100%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$3000.00

Requesting grant for:

We are requesting funding for the artists and curators. Our aim is to create the necessary infrastructure for Black Kiwi artists to have a sustainable practice in Aotearoa while learning, growing and expanding their artistic practice.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would organise a boosted campaign and ensure that we did match our target. It's very important to us to adequately remunerate our creative professionals for their time.

Cost of participation:

no

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$3000.00

$0.00

$0.00

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Curator

$1500.00

$1500.00

Artist Fee @ $500 each x 3

$1500.00

$1500.00

 

Income description

Amount

This will be a free event

$$

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

4

10

$211.50

 

Additional information to support the application:

Artist call out and Letter of support see below

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2207-128

Wildest Dreams and Game Changers

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

CCS22_1_044

'When We Marched’

Creative Communities Scheme CCS22_1 -  South East 22_1

Approved

$5,800.00

LG2220-139

Swift Divides: Visualising a Future for Black Queer Kiwis

2021/2022 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,000.00

LG2219-101

Dimensions in Black (a play about African New Zealanders)

2021/2022 Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

RegPr_22_1080_

Po' Boys n Oysters Theatre Production by BCA (Black Creatives Aotearoa)

Regional Arts and Culture 2021/22 Project Grants Round 1 -  Awaiting funding agreement

Approved

$15,000.00

CCS21_3_215

Black Creatives Aotearoa Screenwriters Lab

Creative Communities Scheme CCS21_3 -  South East 21_3

Approved

$6,800.00

No previous application

           

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-133

The Gallery

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Arts and culture

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: The Gallery | Ormiston Town Centre

Location:

Ormiston Mall

Summary:

The Gallery is requesting funding to cover setup, material and Facilitator costs for daily art participation in Ormiston, which will be setup in a large unit inside the mall, very close to one of the main entrances.

Dates:

21/02/2022 - 02/03/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

375

% of participants from Local Board

95%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

The Gallery serves a hugely varied audience, including those who otherwise wouldn’t have access to the arts. It also provides a safe space for the community.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

Support local arts, culture, music and heritage activities and experiences

 

+ allows the community to feel seen and heard through the curation and display of their art (helping to positively shape their identity)
+ elevates locals' ideas by helping them bring their concepts to life
+ is open 7 days a week, allowing participants to drop-in whenever is most convenient for them

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Ormiston Mall

Large Unit (includes sink and storage space)

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

Māori involvement in the design/concept

Our current participants (who are predominantly of Māori descent) will consult re our design and concept for our Ormiston setup (they already share mātauranga and reo through their artwork, which we would like to share with the Ormiston crowd).

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - The tables we use are easy for people with wheelchairs to sit at with no fuss.

Target ethnic groups:

 

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

+ art briefs and conversations
+ recycling as much a possible

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

50%

40%

%

10%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$3000.00

Requesting grant for:

Ten days of daily participation.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We would reach out to the likes of Arts Out East to see if they could help.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$3000.00

$0.00

$0.00

$1000.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

2x Facilitators ($25 p/h)

$3000.00

$3000.00

 

Donated materials

Amount

Art materials & sanitisation (from The Gallery)

$1000.00

Venue (value for approx 1x week)

$2500.00

 

Additional information to support the application:

+ attached is a deck with info about what we've been up to out West :) 
+ keen to bring the initiative East

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2213-219

The Gallery | Hunters Plaza

2021/2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant, Round Two -  SME assessment complete

Undecided

$0.00

QR2207-133

The Gallery | Ormiston Town Centre

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

REGCD21_026

Daily Participation

Regional Community Development grants 2021/2022 -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

LG2207-241

The Gallery | Ormiston Trial

2021/2022 Howick Local Grants, Round Two -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

QR2205-201

The Gallery | Daily Participation Facilitators

2021/2022 Henderson-Massey Quick Response Round Two -  GA assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

CCS22_1_253

The Gallery, WestCity | Summer Participation Facilitators

Creative Communities Scheme CCS22_1 -  North West 22_1

Approved

$4,000.00

CCS22_1_220

The Gallery, WestCity | Materials etc.

Creative Communities Scheme CCS22_1 -  North West 22_1

Approved

$6,884.00

QR2105-325

Henderson-Massey Window Installation

2020/2021 Henderson-Massey Quick Response Round Three -  Review accountability

Approved

$600.00

No previous application

           

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-103

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Legal status:

Incorporated Society

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: Street Smart supports 680 Year 13 Howick secondary students

Location:

Edgewater College - 32 Edgewater Drive Pakuranga, Pakuranga College - Pigeon Mountain Road, Half Moon Bay, Sancta Maria College - 319 Te Irirangi Drive, Flat Bush,.

Summary:

In support of the disadvantaged 680 year 13 secondary school students in lower decile schools across the Howick Local Board area, Blue Light wishes to produce and distribute its 2022 Street Smart Handbook.  This hard copy printed resource covers material designed to enable informed, positive choices by this group of students who are in a unique transitionary environment, with COVID lockdowns leaving them feeling unsafe, unconnected, and their learning disproportionately impacted.
Street Smart includes contact details for key government and service agencies in students’ communities and how to access essential COVID-19 resources with links to Maori and Pasifika support services.

Dates:

31/12/2021 - 31/03/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

680

% of participants from Local Board

100%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

The benefits of the hard copy Street Smart Handbook to these 680 students and their families/whanau are:
• Access to key accurate life skills information not contained in the NZ Curriculum, such as mental health illnesses, exposure to smoking, vaping, alcohol and drugs.
• A printed resource, which they, and members of their extended family can readily access, as opposed to information only accessible on the internet.
• Contacts and referral details for key government and service agencies to support them both now in this time of COVID and into the uncertain future.
• Accurate information on COVID and where to obtain COVID resources in their community.
• Career planning information at a time where their attendance at school may be intermittent and support that they may have gained from a teacher/school staff is not possible available to them.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

People are safe with access to services to support their wellbeing

 

Many Year 13 secondary school students, at a key transitional time, have had inequities exacerbated due to lockdowns - whether through lack of a suitable device for learning, poor or no connectivity, or a lack of a suitable space or person to support their learning. Blue Light, in this application wishes to apply for the production and printing of the Street Smart Handbook for 680 secondary school students from lower decile schools in the Howick Local Board area.
 
This hand book is specifically for Senior students studying for NCEA qualifications, Māori and Pacific learners, and students in low-decile schools, These students report their wellbeing and health and safety being most effected by each subsequent lockdown with nearly a third reported feeling less positive about their futures and anxiety around their health and safety increasing.
 
Street Smart is a unique hard copy resource covers material designed to support informed, positive choices by this group and the format and content is designed for use either in schools or at home allowing family and whanau to benefit also from the information contained within it.
 
Street Smart covers information not contained within the NZ Curriculum, and focuses on important life skills, tertiary training and upskilling opportunities, career services, and contact details for key government and service agencies in their community. COVID-19 resources are also featured, with links to Maori, and Pasifika support services.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Mainfreight - free distribution of SS to locations

Distribution of Street Smart

Edgewater College

Distribution of SS to students and discussion of content with SS students

Pakuranga College

Distribution of SS to students and discussion of content with SS students

Sancta Maria College

Distribution of SS to students and discussion of content with SS students

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

Māori participation - Māori priority group, target group, high representation or Māori staff delivering

Maori are one of the target audiences for the Street Smart Handbook due to the low percentage who have either internet connectivity or a device that is not a phone for learning and gaining information. This is evident where over 50% of Maori families experienced barriers to their youth accessing education, and gaining accurate information on the virus. Blue Light's Street Smart is a printed resource, removing the technology barriers and supplying information on a range of issues affecting both Maori youth and their whanau/families.

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - Blue Light through providing the Street Smart Handbook online, as well as in a printed format, enables youth experiencing disability choice and flexibility in how they prefer to access the information provided. Blue Light's online version will be formatted so that text to speech applications can be utilised by and for youth who prefer to have the material spoken to them.

Target ethnic groups:

 

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

Street Smart contains sections on Healthy bodies, including information on smoking, smoking cessation, and vaping. This section also contains information on the benefits of exercise, healthy eating and eating disorders. It has links and contacts to agencies who can help support youth, their families and community members if they need support or questions around healthy and sustainable lifestyle choices.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

%

100%

%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$2380.00

Requesting grant for:

Printing and production costs for Street Smart Handbooks distributed to 680 Year 13 Howick Local Board Secondary School students only

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

The Street Smart Handbook is funded on a school by school basis through different community funding groups. Should only some schools receive funding then fewer Street Smart copies will be printed and some students will not receive the handbook.

Cost of participation:

No

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$2380.00

$0.00

$0.00

$500.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Producing and printing 680 Street Smart Handbooks

$2380.00

$2380.00

 

Donated materials

Amount

Packaging and handling of Street Smart Handbook by Blue Light staff

$500.00

Distribution of Street Smart Handbook across NZ

$0.00

 

Total number of volunteers

Total number of volunteer hours

Amount

68

136

$2876.40

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2214-110

Street Smart supports 480 Year 13 Papakura secondary students

2021/2022 Papakura Small Grants Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QR2209-210

Street Smart supports 520 Year 13 Mangere-Otahuhu secondary students

2021/2022 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Grant, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QR2213-203

Street Smart supports 900 Year 13 Otara-Papatoetoe secondary students

2021/2022 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QR2207-103

Street Smart supports 680 Year 13 Howick secondary students

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2210-214

Street Smart supports 450 Year 13 Manurewa secondary students

2021/2022 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QRTP2212-106

Street Smart supports 440 Year 13 Orakei secondary students

2021/2022 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

QR2221-207

Street Smart supports 560 Year 13 Whau secondary students

2021/2022 Whau Quick Response Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QR2220-116

Street Smart supports 760 Year 13 Waitemata secondary students

2021/2022 Waitematā Quick Response Grant, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

QR2205-205

Street Smart supports 560 Year 13 Henderson-Massey secondary students

2021/2022 Henderson-Massey Quick Response Round Two -  GA assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

QR2201-210

Street Smart supports 800 Year 13 Albert-Eden secondary students

2021/2022 Albert-Eden Quick Response Grant, Round Two -  SME assessment completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2208-203

Street Smart supports 440 Year 13 Kaipatiki secondary students

2021/2022 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round Two -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

LG2211-210

Street Smart supports 350 Year 13 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki secondary students

2021/2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grant Round Two -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QR2215-105

Street Smart supports 400 Year 13 Puketapapa secondary students

2021/2022 Puketāpapa Quick Response Grant, Round One -  Submitted

Undecided

$0.00

QR2103-313

Rainbows End Fundays

2020/2021 Franklin Quick Response Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,967.00

QR2114-314

Blue Light Rainbows End Fundays

2020/2021 Papakura Small Grants Round Three -  Submitted

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2107-233

Rainbows End Fundays

2020/2021 Howick Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$2,774.20

QR2120-234

Blue Light Rainbows End Fundays

2020/2021 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QRTP2112-216

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2020/2021 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2113-329

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2121-317

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2020/2021 Whau Quick Response Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,000.00

QR2109-122

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2020/2021 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2105-322

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2020/2021 Henderson-Massey Quick Response Round Three -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,500.00

LG2110-432

Blue Light Rainbows End Fundays

2020/2021 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Four -  Project in progress

Approved

$5,044.00

QR2114-06

Street Smart supporting 408 Year 13 Papakura secondary school students

2020/2021 Papakura Small Grants Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2110-202

Street Smart supporting 570 Year 13 Manurewa secondary school students

2020/2021 Manurewa Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,995.00

QR2113-05

Street Smart supports 571 Year 13 Otara-Papaptoetoe secondary students

2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

QR2103-208

Street Smart supports 401 Franklin Year 13 Secondary School students

2020/2021 Franklin Quick Response Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,403.00

RegCD00054

Blue Light Reinvigorate Project

Regional Community Development grants programme 2020/2021 -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

QRTP2112-111

Street Smart Handbook supports 772 Orakei Year 13 Secondary Students

2020/2021 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,000.00

LG2108-216

Street Smart Handbook supports 383 Kaipatiki Year 13 Secondary students

2020/2021 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2120-127

Street Smart handbook supporting 777 Waitemata Year 13 students only

2020/2021 Waitematā Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

QR2117-213

Street Smart Handbook supports 855 Upper Harbour Year 13 students

2020/2021 Upper Harbour Quick Response Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2107-123

Street Smart supporting 853 Year 13 students in Howick schools

2020/2021 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,400.00

QR2105-220

Street Smart Handbook supporting 570 Henderson-Massey Year 13 students

2020/2021 Henderson -Massey Quick Response Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,500.00

QR2102-110

Street Smart Handbook supports 557 Year 13 Devonport Takapuna students

2020/2021 Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,250.00

QR2121-213

Street Smart Handbook supports 568 Year 13 Whau secondary students

2020/2021 Whau Quick Response Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,988.00

QR2101-208

Street Smart Handbook supporting Albert Eden youth to feel safe

2020/2021 Albert Eden Quick Response Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2121-110

Five Whau youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Whau Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,174.00

LG2108-108

Three Kaipatiki youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Kaipatiki Local Grant, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,304.00

LG2105-112

Five Henderson-Massey youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2101-110

Ten Albert-Eden youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Albert Eden Local Grant Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2107-110

Seven Howick youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Howick Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,520.00

LG2117-104

Five Upper Harbour youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Upper Harbour Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2106-110

Five Hibiscus & Bays youth attend Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants, Round One  -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,173.90

LG2109-106

Two Mangere-Otahuhu youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Māngere-Otāhuhu Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$869.56

LG2112-109

Two Orakei youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Ōrākei Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$870.00

LG2110-109

Two Manurewa youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Manurewa Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$869.56

LG2120-111

Two Waitemata youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Waitematā Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$800.00

QR2103-101

Two Franklin youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Franklin Quick Response Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$869.00

LG2119-107

Two Waitakere Ranges youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Waitākere Ranges Local Grants, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2115-106

Two Puketepapa youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Puketepapa Local Grant Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,304.34

LG2118-106

Two Waiheke youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Waiheke Local Grant Round One -  Withdrawn

Withdrawn

$0.00

LG2114-108

Two Papakura youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Papakura Local Grant, Round One -  Project in progress

Approved

$869.56

LG2113-111

Two Otara-Papatoetoe youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$869.56

LG2102-112

Two Devonport-Takapuna youth attend Blue Light's Life Skills programme

2020/2021 Devonport Takapuna Local Grant Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$869.56

QRTP2012-202

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2021-205

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Whau Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$800.00

QR2020-203

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Waitematā Quick Response, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2014-205

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Papakura Small Grants, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2013-203

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2009-206

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,967.16

QR2007-110

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR2003-204

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Franklin Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR2010-202

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Manurewa Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,514.00

QR2001-215

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Albert-Eden Quick Response, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,000.00

MTSG1920-110

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant Round 1 2019/2020 -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2005-224

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Henderson-Massey Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

LG2008-316

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Kaipātiki Local Grants, Round Three -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2006-241

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Hibiscus and Bays Local Grants, Round Two  -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2015-208

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2019/2020 Puketepapa Local Grants, Round Two -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

LG2004-203

2020 GBI Blue Light HUNTS course

2019/2020 Great Barrier Island Local Grants, Round Two -  Withdrawn

Undecided

$0.00

QR2013-126

Blue Light School Leavers Street Smart Handbook

2019/2020 Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,960.00

QR2010-126

Blue Light School Leavers Street Smart Handbook

2019/2020 Manurewa Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,960.00

REGCD2048

Blue Light Youth Driver Navigator Programme - Auckland

Regional Community Development 2019/2020 -  Submitted

Declined

$0.00

QR1919-315

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Waitākere Ranges Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,500.00

QR1914-314

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Papakura Small Grants, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1910-320

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Manurewa Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1909-348

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1905-333

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,890.00

QR1903-316

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Franklin Quick Response, Round Three -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,890.00

LG1904-203

GBI Kids HUNTS course

2018/2019 Great Barrier Island Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$3,151.41

QR1905-220

Bryan & Bobby Educational Activity Books

2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round Two -  Accountability overdue

Approved

$1,565.22

QR1905-117

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Henderson-Massey Quick Response, Round One -  Declined

Declined

$0.00

QR1903-102

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday 

2018/2019 Franklin Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1914-104

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Papakura Small Grants, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,000.00

QR1901-08

Blue Light Rainbows End Funday

2018/2019 Albert-Eden Quick Response, Round One -  Acquitted

Approved

$1,500.00

LG1804-214

GBI Kids HUNTS Course

2017/2018 Great Barrier Island Local Grants, Round Two -  Acquitted

Approved

$2,245.00

Applications prior to the 2018/2019 financial year have all been accounted for and omitted from this summary

           

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One

QR2207-135

Cession Community Trust

Legal status:

Charitable Trust

Activity focus:

Community

Conflicts of interest:

None identified

Project: E tu Tangata Stand together 10 week Youth well-being project

Location:

Pakuranga College

Summary:

Our project aims to mitigate and respond to the impact of the 2021 Covid-19 lockdown with an integrated youth well-being and resiliency strategy. The project involves direct youth mentoring for at-risk students, implementation of a risk factor survey and targeted programme for year 9’s. Delivering an orientation programme for new year 10-13 students. We will deliver three well-being sessions for all year 10’s in term one. We will implement student peer support leader empowerment through a two-day training seminar for senior students in January and provide ongoing supervision of the peer support groups (weekly mentoring during term one of the peer support leaders). Support students at the term one peer support camps.

Dates:

18/01/2022 - 14/04/2022

Rain dates:

 -

People reached:

1400

% of participants from Local Board

100%

 

Community benefits

Identified community outcomes:

 

Responding to the impacts of Covid-19 for young people helps to mitigate the negative impacts of in our community. By implementing a cohesive and preventative strategy, young people will be provided with the skills and access to help when the need arises. Young People are empowered to play an active part in their personal well being and that of their peers. Youth are empowered to improve positive coping skills, make positive choices, improve self-worth, develop inter-relational skills with peers/adults and establish support systems that avoid destructive coping strategies. 
Enable youth to be able to access mental health support, gain life skills, develop leadership skills, develop positive coping strategies. 
Contributing to positive youth development in the Howick Ward. Enable community-based support for teenagers in the Pakuranga catchment.

Alignment with local board priorities:

 

Rangatahi /Youth in Howick have a voice, are valued, and contribute

 

Youth in our community will have access to mental health support, stress management, developing positive coping skills. The project aims to address confidence building, empowering young people to build support systems, improve self-care, and provide accessible and on-going positive adult mentoring/life coaching. Given the negative effects of uncertainty for youth and the wider community, due to Covid-19, it is more important than ever for empowering support to be resourced. For over 9 years we have had a collaborative agreement with Pakuranga College and the Young Life Trust as a service provider of youth work services. That means our organisation is already positioned to contribute to the well-being of our rangatahi at Pakuranga College.

 

Collaborating organisation/individual

Role

Pakuranga College

administrative systems and oversight

Young Life Trust

Management of the ongoing youth worker programme, administrative systems, health and safety, insurance etc.

 

Demographics

Māori outcomes:

Māori involvement in the design/concept, Māori focus - tikanga (practices), mātauranga (knowledge), reo (language)

E tu Tangata follows the basic truths that we have value, we succeed together and others matter. E tu Tangata seeks to: 1) engage students in a practice of disciple and skill (Pukengatanga), 2) assist rangatahi in building confidence and making good life decisions (Mana Makuhake), 3) forming and strengthening group relationship dynamics (Whanau), and (4) through encouraging rangatahi to foster a sense of care for each other, their environment, and their community (Atawhai).

Accessible to people with disabilities

Yes - The school is accessible to those with disabilities and the programmes are delivered at Pakuranga College.

Target ethnic groups:

All/everyone

Healthy environment approach:

Promote smoke-free messages, Include waste minimisation (zero waste) messages, Healthy options for food and drink, including water as the first choice, Encouraging active lifestyles including movement or fitness programmes

Promote smoke free and vape free choices in line with the school policy. Promote use of reusable drink containers during the sessions and promote healthy food and drink choices as a matter of supporting personal health and well being. Fitness, breathing exercises and movement is already integrated into our programmes.

 

Percentage of males targeted

Percentage of females targeted

All - not targeted male/female

%

%

100%

 

0-5 years

< 15 years

15-24 years

25-44 years

45-64 years

>65 years

All ages

%

80%

20%

%

%

%

%

 

Financial information

Amount requested:

$4480.00

Requesting grant for:

Specialised facilitator time for the programme. The facilitator will be able to prepare, organise, deploy youth workers, manage and implement the programme.

If part funded, how would you make up the difference:

We will cut portions of the strategy. We would also attempt to fundraise, but given the time frame this would be difficult.

Cost of participation:

no

 

Total expenditure

Total income

Other grants approved

Applicant contribution

$18380.00

$4633.33

$9266.67

$0.00

 

Expenditure item

Amount

Amount requested from Local Board

Youth worker programme hours

$13900.00

$0.00

Specialised Facilitator fees

$4480.00

$4480.00

 

Income description

Amount

Provision of Service Pakuranga College

$4633.33

 

Other funding sources

Amount

Current Status

Young Life Trust

$9266.67

Approved

 

Additional information to support the application:

Youth work agreement with school and Young Life Trust attached.

 

Funding history

Application ID

Project title

Round - Stage

Decision

Allocation

QR2207-135

E tu Tangata Stand together 10 week Youth well-being project

2021/2022 Howick Quick Response, Round One -  GA Assessment Completed

Undecided

$0.00

CCS22_1_203

Stations of the Cross 2022 - "The Passion Dairies"

Creative Communities Scheme CCS22_1 -  South East 22_1

Approved

$3,600.00

QR2107-241

Two Family Recreational Events

2020/2021 Howick Quick Response, Round Two -  Project in progress

Approved

$3,000.00

CCS21_2_122

Stations of the Cross 2021 - "New(s)Cycle"

Creative Communities Scheme 21_2 -  South East 21_2

Approved

$4,200.00

LG2007-355