I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 8 December 2021

5.00pm

MS Teams
This meeting will proceed via MS Teams.

As required under the COVID-19 Response (Urgent Management

Measures) Act 2020, either a recording of the meeting or a written

summary will be published on the Auckland Council website.

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Members

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Papaliitele Peo

 

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Janette McKain

Democracy Advisor

 

1 December 2021

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: janette.mckain@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Deputation - Auckland Kindergarten Association                                                  5

8.2     Deputation - Te Ararata Stream Team      6

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       6

11        Governing Body Member Update                       9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                                              11

13        Chairpersons Report and Announcements     13

14        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations                               17

15        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Youth Grants 2021-2022                                                             79

16        Approval for a new private road name at 1C, 1D and 1E Bukem Place, Favona                      85

17        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Accessibility Findings: Hau Maranga report                          91

18        Draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi                                                                            127

19        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                                    177

20        Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)                                      233

21        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                                                    311

22        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board Work Programme for July to September 2021        347

23        2021-22 Q1 Quarterly Report CCO Engagement Plan - Mangere-Otahuhu                                  411

24        Summer Events update and seeking direction report                                                                  435

25        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents                           441

26        Governance Forward Work Calendar             447

27        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                                  453

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 November 2021,  as a true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

·             Farewell to Susan Jordan - PA/Office Manager, a big thank you for your service to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board and a staff member/team member of the Local Board Services team, all the best in your retirement.

·             Welcome back to Auckland Council Liz Muliaga!

·             Auckland Faith Network and Auckland Prayer Breakfast Team for the recent Prayer Breakfast event held 18 November 2021.

·             Well done to all the compulsory schools in the MO area for completing this challenging school year.

·             Kāīnga Ora’s Bader McKenzie development has won an Excellence Award in the “Kāinga Ora – Homes and Communities Community and Affordable Housing Property Awardcategory at the New Zealand Property Council Awards 2021. Also the Best in Category award for that same category went  a project involving Te Ākitai Waiohua.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

 

8.1       Deputation - Auckland Kindergarten Association

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Toni Nealie, GM Strategic Engagement and Pauline Winter CEO of the Auckland Kindergarten Association (AKA) would like to discuss the opportunities and challenges faced by AKA and how they might be able to work with the board to provide the best early childhood education in the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Toni Nealie and Pauline Winter for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Te Ararata Stream Team

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Julia Tu’ineau, Pragna Patel and Carolyn Robinson from the Te Ararata Stream  would like to update the board on their upcoming project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Julia Tu’ineau, Pragna Patel and Carolyn Robinson for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

File No.: CP2021/16248

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 Minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2021/16255

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allow the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead roles, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

2.       To make any appointments to vacant positions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Members have an opportunity to update the board on their activities as topic area leads.

4.       The table below outlines the current leads and alternates for topic areas of local board business meetings and organisations on which the board is represented through a formal appointment.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

1st Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Christine O’Brien

2nd Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled   

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

2nd Christine O’Brien

Landowner Consents (excluding filming)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Landowner Consents Filming

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Events (receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Liquor Licences Hearings

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Resource Consent (proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Resource Consents (notified hearings)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Area Plan Working Group

MOLB

All board members

OPLB

Apulu Reece Autagavaia,

Dawn Trenberth

 

LGNZ (Local Government New Zealand

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

 

 

 

 


Organisation / Initiative

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere Bridge BID

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Mangere Town Centre BID

Makalita Kolo

 

Mangere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Otahuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

 

South Harbour Business Association BID

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Auckland Airport Community Trust for

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Ambury Park Centre

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Mangere Mountain Education Trust             

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Maori input into local board decision-making political steering group

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Otahuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated Society

Makalita Kolo

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

File No.: CP2021/16257

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To give the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update and written reports from the local board Chair.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairpersons December 2021 report

15

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/16400

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick-Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A. The programme sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

3.       This report presents applications received in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment B.

4.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $165,000.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       $56,112.68 was spent on Local Board Grant Round One and $10,107.78 on Multi-Board Round Two; leaving a total of $98,779.54 remaining to be spent.

6.       Ten applications were received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Round Two, requesting $16,720.00 in total.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022, listed in the following table:

Table One: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

QR2209-201

Assembly of God Church of Samoa Auckland

Towards refreshments for a six-week weight loss challenge starting at the Assembly of God Church of Samoa Auckland in Mangere between November 2021 to December 2021

$1,500.00

QR2209-202

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Towards costs of fuel for the epilepsy educator traveling in Counties Manukau District Health Board region from January 2022 to December 2022

$500.00

QR2209-203

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards annual cost of counselling in Mangere-Otahuhu from January 2022 to September 2022

$2,000.00

QR2209-204

Te Ararata Stream Team

under the umbrella of Mangere East Family Service Centre Inc.

Towards storage container and tools for the community event in Te Ararata Stream between December 2021 to March 2022

$2,000.00

QR2209-210

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Towards the costs of producing and printing 520 Street Smart Handbooks

$1,820.00

QR2209-211

Mangere Hawks Netball Club

Towards water-blasting costs and masks for building maintenance of the Mangere Hawks Netball Club between January 2022 to March 2022

$2,000.00

QR2209-212

Mangere Otahuhu Netball Centre

Towards cleaning and building wash of Mangere Otahuhu Netball Centre between January 2021 and February 2022

$2,000.00

QR2209-213

Road Safety Education Limited

Towards the cost of catering, venue hire and facilitator for "Road Safety and Youth Development for Young Mangere Otahuhu Drivers"

$1,900.00

QR2209-214

Saletaulua Keresoma

Towards venue hire of Metro Theatre and Mangere Memorial Hall for their fitness training and prizegiving between January 2022 to March 2022

$1,000.00

QR2209-217

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Towards Life Education workbooks to be delivered in the grounds of St. Joseph's Otahuhu, Otahuhu Primary School, Otahuhu Intermediate, and Al-Madinah School between February 2022 and June 2022

$2,000.00

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

$16,720.00

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board adopted the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A. The programme sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the board.

10.     The community grant programmes has been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

13.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

14.     Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction, increasing access to single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation, local tree planting and streamside revegetation, and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.

19.     A summary of each application received through Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick-Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 is provided in the attachments.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $165,000.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year. $56,112.68 was spent on Local Board Grant Round One and $10,107.78 on Multi-Board Round Two; leaving a total of $98,779.54 remaining to be spent.

22.     Ten applications were received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Round Two, requesting $16,720.00 in total.

23.     Funding for the grants is within approved budgets. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board allocating funding for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Round Two, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

21

b

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Quick Response Grant, Round Two 2021/2022 Application Summary

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rikka Barbosa - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Youth Grants 2021-2022

File No.: CP2021/18889

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline, applications received for Māngere-Ōtāhuhu youth grants 2021/2022 work programme #277.

2.       To seek approval of up to $3,500 from the local board’s community grants budget #297 to further support the 2021/2022 work programme line 277 Youth: Capacity building and participation Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Staff recommend that fourteen applicants are approved for funding totalling $13,500 and that two applicants are not recommended for funding.

4.       The 2021/2022 work programme line 277 Youth: Capacity building and participation Māngere-Ōtāhuhu includes an allocated budget of $10,000 for youth grants.

5.       Therefore, staff recommend that the local board approve the allocation of up to an additional $3,500 from the community grants budget to support all the recommended grant applications to be approved.

6.       The applicants that are approved for funding will receive a certificate acknowledging their grant in early 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the allocation of up to $3,500 from the community grants budget to 2021/2022 work programme line 277 Youth: Capacity building and participation Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

b)      to fund, part-fund or decline the following 2021/2022 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Youth Grants applications listed in the following table:

Application ID

Purpose of Funding

Recommended funding amount

MOYG2122-04

Leleo Toomata

Pay course fees (Bachelor of Nursing Pasifika)

 

$1,000

MOYG2122-05

Ali Habibi

Pay course related costs (AUT) – Purchase of Laptop, Textbooks and travel costs

$1,000

MOYG2122-09

Jaksyn Hepi-Nga rongo

Pay fees to participate in Sports and Leadership Programmes – Secondary Schools Waka Ama Sprint Championships

$1,000

MOYG2122-28

Sage Peni

Pay course fees (Commerce / Law Degree / University of Auckland)

$1,000

MOYG2122-29

Caerwyn Tomuli Liu liu-Afoa

Purchase of Apprenticeship Tools (Electrician - AUT Automotive)

$1,000

MOYG2122-30

Joshua Vaka

Hire Instruments to support the formation of an ‘Otahuhu Local Brass Band’

$1,000

MOYG2122-33

Sharday Wong

Pay course fees and purchase tools (Level 4 professional fashion, film, media and makeup artistry)

$1,000

MOYG2122-39

Liam Costley

Pay course fees in Sports (Trampolining training & Competition)

$1,000

MOYG2122-48

Hser Thger Chri

Purchase laptop, stationary and pay travel costs (furthering education in Biology and Chemistry)

$750

MOYG2122-49

Fathima Faiza Mohamed Faiz

Purchase laptop, books and stationery for university course (Journalism)

$750

MOYG2122-50

Lucas Vaaga

Purchase laptop and printer for Youth Work (‘Youth to Youth’)

$1,000

MOYG2122-51

Tewrin Tali

Cover startup costs – Art & Culture (Cook Islands dance and Ukelele lessons)

$1,000

MOYG2122-53

Blake Costley

Pay sports training, affiliation fees (Icon Trampoline Club) and travel costs for National Champs.

$1,000

MOYG2122-54

Fathima Jazeela Mohamed Faiz

Pay course fees and travel costs

$1,000

Total

$13,500

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The 2020/2021 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Work Programme includes a budget of $10,000 for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Youth Grants 2021/2022.

8.       The local board assess the applications to ensure that they align with their priorities, to develop and grow young people as leaders, foster Māori Pasifika arts and culture, help young people contribute, prosper and thrive, enable people to participate, celebrate and contribute to their local community and improve the overall wellbeing of Māngere-Ōtāhuhu.

9.       The scholarships opened on 13 September 2021 and closed on 29 October 2021.

10.     The youth grants were advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

11.     A total of 16 applications were received for the grants. 38 applications were commenced but unsubmitted.

12.     The criteria for applicants are as follows:

·        Be aged between 13 and 24 years old.

·        Be a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident.

·        Live or attend school and/or have a meaningful connection to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

·        Include a letter from school principal, teacher, tutor, community leader or employer in support of application.

·        Undertake study at a tertiary or training institution in 2022 or have participated in a conference or event in New Zealand that is significantly based on youth leadership and development.

13.     The grants are available for applicants to apply for funding up to $1,000 for any one of the following:

·        Learning and development opportunities to build on your own leadership and experience within your community.

·        Supporting the development of your own social enterprise project.

·        Support to attend conferences, programmes or training for personal development, such as climate change, leadership, social innovation, wellness, arts and culture, trade, sports, and media.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Funding these scholarships is intended to enable the young people to move into further education and training that will develop their leadership potential. This will help to achieve educational aspirations identified in the local board plan with the hopes of growing young leaders in the community.

15.     The number of applications received decreased by five from the previous year. The age group that submitted the most applications was 17-year-olds followed closely by those aged 18 and 16 years, one each for ages 13, 19, 20, 21 and 28. There were one applicant who identified as Māori, two Māori and New Zealand European and two Māori/Pacific while five identified as Pasifika. The remaining applicants identified as Tongan/Chinese, Southeast Asian (1), Sri Lankan (2).

16.     The majority of applicants were asking for support to fund their course related costs, such as course fees, travel costs and equipment such as laptops, which may be a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and an increased focus on digital and online learning.

17.     Thirty-eight applications were unsubmitted. Staff followed up to provide support and advice. Reasons for not submitting the applications are unclear.

18.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful scholarship applicants so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

19.     Staff recommend that the local board approve the allocation of $13,500 to 16 recipients. However, there is currently only $10,000 available budget in the associated work programme activity.

20.     Therefore, staff recommend that the local board approve the allocation of an additional $3,500, from the community grants budget, to support all the recommended grant applications to be approved.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Staff note that due to COVID-19, there is an increased uptake in online and virtual education and activity. This has a positive impact on the environment through reduced carbon emissions resulting from travel. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.  The Youth Grants are managed and delivered by the Youth Empowerment Team with administrative support and expertise from council’s Grants Team.

23.  The local board Communications Advisor will assist with the marketing and promotion of the scholarships.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The scholarships contribute to the local board achieving the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes: Our communities are inclusive, vibrant, healthy and connected and our prosperous local economy supports local people.

25.     Applicants must live or attend school and/or have a meaningful connection to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

26.     The applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 24 November 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     According to the 2018 census 16.4% identified as Māori (compared to 11.5% Auckland). 12,861 Māori usually live in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

28.     There were 6.25 per cent of the applications received identified as Māori, 6.25 percent identified as a mix of Māori and NZ European and 12.5 per cent of applications were a mix of Māori and Pacific.

29.     Promotion of the youth grants was targeted to ensure the correct audience is captured and are inclusive of the diversity within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, increasing applicants from our diverse backgrounds (25%).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The 2021/2022 work programme line 277 Youth: Capacity building and participation Māngere-Ōtāhuhu has an allocated budget of $60,000, which includes $10,000 for youth grants.

31.     Staff recommend that the local board approve the allocation of an additional $3,500 from the community grants budget to 2021/2022 work programme line 277 Youth: Capacity building and participation Māngere-Ōtāhuhu to support the recommended grant applications.

32.     A total of 16 applications were received, requesting a total of $44,022.31.

33.     Staff recommend that 14 applicants are approved for a total funding amount of $13,500.

34.     Staff recommend that two applicants are not approved for a total amount of $6,000.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.       There is a heightened risk of students not completing studies if there is another COVID-19 lockdown. Funds will need to be returned to the local board if activities do not go ahead and staff will advise successful applicants of this.

36.       If the local board does not approve the additional budget allocation, then there is a risk that four of the applicants will not receive funding.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.       Staff will notify applicants of the local board’s decision, process grants payments and will support the allocation of additional budget to administer the funding.

38.       Youth Grant recipients are required to acknowledge the local board on any publicity or promotional material and be available to work with council staff on media coverage.

39.       Youth Grant recipients will be invited to provide an accountability report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Raquel Barbiellini - Specialist Advisor Youth Specialist

Authorisers

Rachel Turner - Community and Social Innovation

Tania Pouwhare - TSI Social Intrapreneur

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 1C, 1D and 1E Bukem Place, Favona

File No.: CP2021/17500

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 1C, 1D and 1E Bukem Place, Favona.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. The Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       The developer and applicant, Mitchell Jefferson of Seed Property Limited, has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 1C, 1D and 1E Bukem Place are:

·    Tīmata Lane (applicant’s preference and endorsed by Te Akitai Waiohua)

·    Tāmata Place (alternative also endorsed by Te Atkitai Waiohua).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approves the name ‘Tīmata Lane’ for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 1C, 1D and 1E Bukem Place, Favona, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60380110 and SUB60380111, and road naming reference RDN90096070).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60380110 (subdivision reference number SUB60380111) was issued in October 2021 for the construction of 20 new residential freehold units and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any public road or any private way, commonly owned access lots (COAL), and right of way, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

9.       In this instance the COAL requires a name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL is highlighted in yellow. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across Auckland. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     The Guidelines also state that road names should not be commercially based. The applicant had expressed a desire for the name ‘Seed Lane’, however, as ‘Seed’ is the applicants company name this would be contrary to the guidelines.

13.     The applicant’s proposed names are detailed in the table below:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Tīmata Lane (applicant’s preference)

Te Reo Māori word meaning: (noun) start, beginning, commencement.

The applicant’s interpretation for this meaning is that for a vast majority of the purchasers who are going to be moving into these new homes, it will be their first home and the beginning of home ownership for them. Home ownership for many, has huge benefits to health, well-being, stability etc and can mean that people have a fresh start in life. For others they can commence with other life plans such as having children and integrating into a new community etc. It really is very significant to their residents, so the applicant wanted the street name to signify this.

Tāmata Place (alternative)

Te Reo Māori word meaning: (verb) refresh, revitalise, restore. The applicant’s interpretation of this meaning is to refresh/revitalise the local area by putting new life into the site and creating a new community to flourish here. It also refers to ‘cultivation’ which the applicant relates to by to building new homes for first home buyers, it is similar to planting the seed for new life and prosperity.

 

14.     Both the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     ‘Lane’ and ‘Place’ are acceptable road types for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

17.     Mana whenua were consulted. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

18.     The new private road has previously been and will continue to be utilized by the occupants of 1A and 1B Bukem Place. The Guidelines state that for the renaming or alteration of an existing road name, evidence is required to show that 100% of the owners of all properties that take their current address from that road have been consulted and that most of them agree to the change. The registered owner of both 1A and 1B Bukem Place provided their written support in favour of both ‘Tīmata Lane’ and ‘Tāmata Place’. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of Council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This report seeks the decision of the local board and the decision is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications.  

23.     On 8th November the applicant contacted Te Akitai Waiohua and received confirmation that the proposed names are accepted.

24.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and two Te Reo Māori names are proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

26.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site & Location Plans

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Andrea Muhme - Subdivison Advisor

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Accessibility Findings: Hau Maranga report

File No.: CP2021/16597

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Accessibility Hau Maranga Report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Māngere-Ōtahuhu Local Board has committed to support Whānau Hauā (people with disabilities) in their community. The board allocated funding for consultation with Whānau Hauā as part of the 2019/2020 work programme.

3.       Connected Communities staff appointed a non-government organisation, Te Roopu Waiora, to do a qualitative study, consult with local Whānau Hauā and conduct a literacy review.  

4.       The purpose of the study is to help inform future local board work programmes and other local activity where Whānau Hauā could feel included and connected.

5.       Te Roopu Waiora completed the mahi and presented their findings in the Hau Maranga report to the local board in a workshop on 22 September 2021.  The report made recommendations as to where the local board could prioritise initiatives in future work programmes.

6.       Recommendations to the local board were mainly in supporting and advocating for Whānau Hauā.  While there are opportunities for further engagement with the Whānau Hauā community in the current work 2021-2022 programme, the COVID-19 environment needs to be considered.

7.       An analysis of the Hau Maranga report recommendations sets out the benefits and considerations of each recommendation.  Staff advice is provided on recommended actions for the local board.

8.       This report presents the final Hau Maranga report in Attachment A for adoption by the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      adopt the Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board Hau Maranga Report provided in Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board supported the idea of an Accessibility Plan which was undertaken in 2016.  Be Accessible, a non-government organisation, received funding from the local board to complete the Plan. 

10.     The Accessibility Plan was adopted in 2017. The Plan’s focus is mainly on assessing local infrastructure for accessibility.

11.     However, at that time no consultation with local disabled communities, Whānau Hauā, took place.   

12.     Staff then saw the need to have a corollary to the Accessibility Plan so that Whānau Hauā could give their perspective and help shape recommendations for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to assist in future planning for initiatives to meet Whānau Hauā needs. 

13.     There is an opportunity to look at how Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board could engage better with the Whānau Hauā community. 

14.     Te Roopu Waiora, non-government organisation, was chosen to do this mahi as they have extensive networks with Whānau Hauā providers and a positive reputation with the Whānau Hauā community.  Their approach has a strong Te Ao Māori practice, and they are reputable in academic research.  

15.     A qualitative study and a literature review were to be undertaken to provide recommendations to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to consider for future activities.

16.     Te Roopu Waiora had 16 participants in their interviews and heard their perspectives on accessibility matters in the local board area. The mahi also includes a literature review.  The completed study is presented in the Hau Maranga report in Attachment A. 

17.     At a workshop on 22 September 2021, Te Roopu Waiora presented the Hau Maranga Report that outlined the four recommendations and invited feedback from the local board. The local board was supportive and expressed the importance of Whānau Hauā voice as well as that of Te Ao Māori.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

18.     Auckland Council currently has no disability strategy.  However, there is a strong drive to have a disability strategy from a Whānau Hauā perspective. The Diversity and Inclusion unit is currently working on a disability strategy for Auckland Council. 

19.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Hau Maranga report is a unique document that is community-led and is a significant study for Whānau Hauā that could be replicated across all local boards.   

20.     The report states that disability from a Māori cultural perspective does not feature in the literature that was reviewed. This needs to be included for future Whānau Hauā strategies and approaches.

21.     The report highlights that there are no statistics that relate to Whānau Hauā residents specifically in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.  However, it is understood that Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Whānau Hauā residents face the same issues as other Whānau Hauā across Auckland.  

22.     The report compares Whānau Hauā to able-bodied people.  Whānau Hauā have disadvantages in

·    housing,

·    education

·    employment

·    internet Wi-Fi availability and

·    social support services.

23.     Whānau Hauā face more levels of discrimination and social isolation than able-bodied people.  They also have a high mistrust of public institutions. 

24.     There are additional inter-sectional factors in the local board area which heighten the need for locally specific recommendations.  These include high Māori and Pasifika populations and a growing number of aged residents that are more likely to face debilitating illnesses leading to disability issues as they get older. 

25.     The report also touches on matters that were outside the scope of the local board reach, for example housing, transport, and street planning.  However, the local board can have an advocacy role in this area.

26.     The report gave four recommendations to the local board to consider for future planning. Each recommendation has been analysed with a recommended action from council staff.   

 

HAU MARANGA

RECOMMENDATIONS

BENEFITS

CONSIDERATIONS

Recommended Action

1. Investigate appropriate ways and accessible platforms to engage Whānau Hauā

 

 

Greatly enhances communication with Whānau Hauā community; more inclusive; increase local board engagement

 

Whānau Hauā technology with the council would need to be investigated and costs are largely dependent on technology upgrade budgets; decision is made at a wider Auckland Council level

 

 

Local board can advocate with Auckland Council whanau for Whānau Hauā communication platforms

 

 

2. Improve and implement inclusive local board practices

 

a) Facility Emergency procedures and Safety Review

 

 

 

 

 

 

More inclusive of Whānau Hauā safety assessments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dependent on Community Facilities accessibility assessments and council decision making

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local board can advocate particularly with facilities in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area

 

b) Improved engagement by local board members with residents

 

Increased connection and inclusivity of Whānau Hauā.  Increased visibility and collaboration between local board & Whānau Hauā. 

 

COVID-19 restrictions and the need to pivot online

 

Local board can start through 2021/2022 work programme –workshops or organised visits for engagement; can include Māori Whānau Hauā community, Pasifika Whānau Hauā and wider community

 

 

c)  Secure support from iwi and Governing Body

 

Wider connection for Whānau Hauā and awareness of their needs

 

Dependent on iwi and the Governing Body embracing this

 

Local board can advocate & champion Whānau Hauā needs to Iwi & Auckland Council

 

d) Civic education and workforce training opportunities

 

Empowers whānau hauā community to know their rights and responsibilities; council staff learn about the difficulties Whānau Hauā face

COVID-9 restrictions. Lockdown delays and the need to pivot online

 

 

Local board can start with 2021/2022 work programme through workshops on civic education for Whānau Hauā

 

 

 

 

3. Strengthen advocacy and facilitation among stakeholders with interests in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu to ensure marginalised communities are included

 

a) Champion inclusive practices for local communities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whānau Hauā are included in local activities and their needs are considered for events, parks etc

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Largely dependent on organisers such as Auckland Transport, Kainga Ora as well as various Auckland Council units

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Local board can advocate for Whānau Hauā needs with key stakeholders such as Kainga Ora, Auckland Transport and wider council family

 

b) Inclusion criteria in funding applications and stakeholder ventures

 

Whānau Hauā are included and have access to funding for Whānau Hauā initiatives

Considerations regarding Whānau Hauā technology

Local board can start in the 2021/2022 work programme -workshops on funding.

Utilising Community Grants staff for workshops

 

c) Encourage disability/cultural expertise via social procurement for events and services

 

Inclusivity of Whānau Hauā in any events, consultation and services provided by local board & wider council family

 

 Largely dependent on procurement for Auckland Council-wide units

Local board can advocate for this within wider Auckland Council.

 

 

 

d) Promote local board roles and priorities to all communities

 

Whānau Hauā are included and well informed of their civic duties.  Know how they can contribute to priorities for the community

COVID-19 restrictions, lockdown delays and the need to explore how this can be done online for Whānau Hauā

Local board can start planning in its current work Programme and identify initiatives in its 2022/2023 work programme.  A series of workshops for Whānau Hauā.

4. Encourage integrated planning for housing, transport, and business developments

 

a) Strengthen working relationships and communication with stakeholders

 

 

 

 

 

 

Increase visibility of Whānau Hauā to have their needs met; local board has relationship with housing, transport, and business development providers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Largely dependent on stakeholders’ and providers’ decisions and processes

 

 

 

 

 

Local board to advocate to key stakeholders such as Auckland Transport, Kainga Ora and Business networks for Whānau Hauā to be considered in any planning

 

b) Checklist of local priorities for stakeholders/researchers/planners

 

Enhance inclusion of Whānau Hauā.  Local board has an engagement plan and Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan outcomes already are a list of local priorities 

 

None cited

Local board Work Programme 2021/2022 includes possible civic workshop engagements to promote Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Outcomes as priorities

 

 

 

c) Identify whānau referral processes

Greatly enhance access for Whānau Hauā to local board funding and Auckland Council services

Beyond scope of local board to speak on Central government whanau referral processes, foraying into social services

 

 Local board can start with referral processes internally such as promoting the different local board funding and Auckland Council services

d) Inter-sectoral planning and review

 

Increase visibility of Whānau Hauā across local government & central government. Enhance local board visibility in Whānau Hauā space.

Would need to concentrate on Auckland Council first before advocating to Central Government

Local board Accessibility initiatives in 21/22 Work Programme connected further to wider Council Whānau Hauā priorities

 

Connect with Disability Advisory Panel. 

 

Promote local board Whānau Hauā mahi with other local boards

 

Local board advocacy role with Central Government

 

 

 

 

27.     The analysis of recommended actions shows the local board as having an advocacy role but that engagement and planning with Whānau Hauā community can start through the 2021/2022 work programme. However, the COVID-19 environment will need to be considered.

28.     COVID-19 has also greatly impacted on work towards Whānau Hauā activity, with several key considerations:

·    2021/2022 work programme mahi may experience delay as lockdowns continue and the Whānau Hauā public are reticent in meeting in groups.

·    The Hau Maranga report cites the lack of appropriate technology and Wi-Fi accessibility.

·    Increased vulnerability during emergencies for Whānau Hauā, for example, how to access food parcels, how to be vaccinated.

·    Importance of local groups and connections for Whānau Hauā to increase their sense of belonging.

 

29.     Staff note that the report is an internal guiding document for the local board to reference when planning and developing local activity, including annual work programme development.  

30.     Staff recommend committing to a three-year review of this report, to ensure the report remains relevant, responsive to emerging local needs, and that it continues to align with the local board plan. Therefore, it would make sense to complete the next review in 2023 at the same time as the next local board plan is adopted.

31.     Staff also recommend a slight name change for the work programme line item #281 from Accessibility to Whānau Hauā Accessibility for the 2022-2023 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     Increasing community resilience and connection is an important way to counter the effects of future climate impacts including adverse weather events and emergencies.  The report speaks of increasing connection to Whānau Hauā.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Auckland Council adopted disability operation action plan in 2016 as part of the Auckland Inclusive Framework. 

34.     However, the Diversity and Inclusion unit are currently working on a disability strategy.  The report will aid this mahi especially in giving a Māori cultural perspective once this report is adopted. 

35.     The report will be circulated to relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations once adopted. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     The report is a guiding document to direct local board activity, including development of the 2022/2023 work programme which could prioritise activity recommended to work towards a local accessibility approach.

37.     The report was presented in a workshop with the local board and there was general support for the recommendations

38.     The Hau Maranga report will assist in greater visibility of Whānau Hauā needs as it goes to relevant internal and external parties when adopted.

39.  Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     In the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area, 16.4 per cent of the population identify as Māori (compared to 11.5 per cent across Auckland). Currently, 12,861 Māori usually live in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu. This is an increase of 2,526 people, or 24.4 per cent, since the 2013 Census.  

41.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020 incorporates this mahi through outcome four – celebrating our unique tangata whenua and Pasifika identities. The local board strive to elevate and apply Te Ao Māori in community building, advocacy, and investment.  The Hau Maranga report is an example of this.   

42.     The Auckland Council Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – The current Māori strategy includes the Māori responsiveness action plan.  This Hau Maranga report adds to their mission of Māori outcomes and priorities to meet Māori needs. The report will be sent to Nga Mātārae unit who oversee Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau. 

43.     Connected Communities has recently formed the new Māori outcomes delivery unit to advance a practice and programme of work that will improve Māori outcomes as well as accelerate whanau and tamariki wellbeing.  The Hau Maranga report adds to their work and the report will be sent to this team. 

44.     The recommendations aim to increase engagement with Māori Whānau Hauā community and other cultural groups to help build their capability and capacity across the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Area. The recommendations also speak to the relevancy of a Māori cultural perspective for Whānau Hauā to be included in future local board mahi. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The 2021/2022 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Work Programme line includes $10,000 budget towards Whānau Hauā initiatives.

46.     The local board can consider the recommendations in the report when developing the 2022/2023 work programme and allocating its local discretionary budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     One identified risk of adopting the Hau Maranga Report is in the evolving and changing needs of the community which has been exaggerated by the effects of COVID-19. Staff are seeking to counter this risk by suggesting a commitment to a review of the Whānau Hauā activities in 2023/2024 to coincide with the development of the next Local Board Plan. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Hau Maranga report will be sent to internal Auckland Council staff working on establishing the Auckland Council Disability Strategy. It will also be sent to the Disability Advisory panel and other relevant internal and external stakeholders. 

49.     Ngā Mātārae and Connected Communities Māori Outcomes delivery unit will be sent the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Hau Maranga report.

50.     Staff will look at 2021/2022 Whānau Hauā initiatives as part of the local board work programme accessibility line #281 and will support the local board in 2022/2023 work programme development in response to the recommendations of the report. 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hau Maranga report

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gillianne Ray – Specialist Advisor

Authorisers

Kim Taunga - Head of Community Delivery

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi

File No.: CP2021/15778

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the draft Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The BID Team has implemented a review of the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi and supporting documents, as advised in the memo to local board members dated 23 April 2021. The memo can be found on the Auckland Council website, InfoCouncil.

3.       The review sought informal and formal feedback from local boards, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, council-controlled organisations (CCOs), council departments and other external stakeholders.

4.       The review has focused on strengthening those parts of the policy relating to issue resolution and, following local board feedback, the financial sustainability of BID programmes.

5.       The review also focused on elected member needs and identifying any political risks and mitigations.

6.       The draft BID Policy (2021) has been discussed with the Finance and Performance committee at a workshop on 18 August 2021. Feedback received has been incorporated into this version of the BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

7.       Staff are now seeking formal feedback from local boards on the draft BID Policy (2021) provided as Attachment A.

8.       As advised in a second memo to local board members dated 13 October 2021, the formal feedback period has been extended to 28 February 2022 to accommodate the difficulties and strains resulting from the current lockdown and to allow the BID-operating business associations more time to send in feedback.

9.       Following formal feedback received from local boards, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, CCOs, council departments and other external stakeholders, the final version of the BID Policy (2021) and support documents will be presented to the Finance and Performance Committee for adoption on 19 May 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide formal feedback on the draft Business Improvement District Policy (2021) and supporting documents by 28 February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

Overview of the Auckland BID programme

10.     BID-operating business associations are membership-based organisations independent of Auckland Council. The draft BID Policy (2021) supports the independent nature of the BID-operating business associations. They are responsible for the BID programme delivery, its success, and are accountable to BID members/BID affiliates.

11.     Local boards have the primary relationship with BID-operating business associations in their area:

·        Local boards and business associations have a vested interest in a particular place and share similar goals. Working collaboratively achieves greater outcomes.

·        Local boards have significant allocated decision-making responsibility for BID programme establishments, amending existing BID programmes, BID boundary changes, continuation/discontinuation and issue resolution.

12.     Auckland Council requires BID-operating business associations to fully comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (Kaupapa Hereā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) (refer Attachment A).

13.     The BID policy sets out the process for:

·        establishing, continuing/discontinuing BID programmes

·        changes to the BID programme boundary area/map

·        changes to the BID targeted rating mechanism

·        issue resolution

·        key stakeholder roles and responsibilities.

14.     The BID policy includes the engagement and reporting requirements for BID-operating business associations to ensure all BID members/BID affiliates have access to the relevant BID programme information. BID-operating business associations must use their Annual General Meeting (AGM) process to obtain formal member approval for the BID programme delivery, budget, and to confirm their BID targeted rate grant amount for the following financial year.

15.     The BID policy describes the balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability role council has for monies collected as a public sector organisation. This balance is necessary to sustain public trust and confidence with the Auckland Council BID programme. 

The review

16.     Commencing April 2021, the review of the current policy began with communicating with local boards and all stakeholders involved in the management and operation of BID programmes across Tāmaki Makaurau. This included both BID-operating and non-BID business associations, council departments and interested parties. The process to date has included informal feedback and comments on the current policy.

17.     The review process focused on strengthening parts of the policy (and updating supporting documents) relating to issue resolution and, following local board feedback, financial sustainability of BID programmes.

18.     The review has also provided the opportunity to clarify the documentation between Auckland Council (collecting the BID targeted rate and the funder) and the BID-operating business association relating to the BID Programme Agreement (2016) document.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Rationale for the review

19.     The primary objective for reviewing the current 2016 policy is a focus on the issue resolution sections. Experience over the last five years has illustrated gaps in the usefulness of the current policy to address and resolve issues in a timely manner.

20.     The review provided an opportunity to update parts of the policy relating to Auckland Council changes in operation, current business practices and where the advancement of technology has contributed to how business is done, for example, online meetings.

21.     There was also an early opportunity to capture informal feedback from local boards and BID-operating business associations.

22.     The information and informal feedback collected in May, June and July of this year has been incorporated into the draft BID Policy 2021 and supporting documents provided in Attachments A, B and C. A summary of the BID Policy (2021) requirements is provided with this report in Attachment D.

23.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Participants in the review

24.     In addition to local boards, there are a range of stakeholders involved in BID programmes, both internal and external to Auckland Council. The BID team set a programme of informal engagement, outlined in Table 1 below:

Table 1 – Key engagement activity

Stakeholder

Engagement

Dates

BID-operating business associations

Business associations without BID programmes

BID communication including newsletters and emails:

Sent to 50+ BID-operating business associations and other interested parties

March, April, May, June and July 2021

Three network meetings

May, June and July 2021

An average attendance exceeded 20+ BID-operating business associations

Four special workshops - topics included: issue resolution, conflict of interest and developing a board charter

June and July 2021

An average of 23+ BID programmes were represented at each workshop.

Local boards

18 local board workshop presentations

June and July 2021

Introduction memo and BID policy review information

Three special topic workshops - topics included: issue resolution, conflict of interest and developing a board charter

June and July 2021

An average of 16 local board elected members attended each workshop

Local Board Services Department Lead team

Presentation and information feedback received

Presentation on 18 June 2021

Finance and Performance Committee

Memo on BID policy review project

April 2021

Council departments including:

·    Legal Services

·    Connected Communities

·    Ngā Mātārae

·    Risk and Assurance

·    Finance and Policy

·    Local Board Services

Regular meetings, engagement and feedback

May, June, and July 2021

Independent polling agent

 

Engagement and feedback regarding the ballot/polling process

June 2021

Finance and Performance Committee workshop

The draft BID Policy (2021) V1 and support documents were presented and feedback received

18 August 2021

25.     The process to undertake the review of the current policy (2016) takes place from February 2021 to June 2022. Progress to date is set out in Table 2 below:

Table 2 - Progress to date

Date

Progress

2021

Feb/March

·    Project planning, stakeholder communications

April to July

·    Directed consultation with local boards and stakeholders on the current BID policy and identified themes

  issue resolution

  conflicts of interest

  board charter development

May/June

·    Cross council, external engagement and feedback

June/July

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents created

August 18

·    Finance and Performance Committee workshop

August/September

·    Distribution of draft BID Policy (2021) for formal feedback

Informal local board feedback

26.     Discussions with local boards during workshops centred around:

·        issue resolution – how to do this fairly and in a timely manner

·        operational issues – relating to management and governance of BID-operating business associations

·        opportunities for collaboration and cost savings between BIDs

·        elected members involvement with BID-operating business associations

·        growth opportunities for BID-operating business associations

·        continued dependence on local board funding.

Seeking local board formal feedback on the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

27.     Local boards are now being asked to provide formal feedback on a revised draft policy (2021) and support documents provided in Attachments A, B and C. Local boards are encouraged to engage with BID-operating business associations in their local board area (where relevant/possible) to help to inform this feedback process. 

28.     The formal feedback period has been extended to 28 February 2022 to accommodate the current lockdown restrictions and allow the BID-operating business associations more time to send in feedback.

29.     Any feedback from local boards will help the further development of BID Policy (2021). It would be, however, particularly useful to get local board views on proposed changes set out in Tables 3 and 4 below.

30.     Feedback from local boards, external stakeholders and any further feedback from BID-operating business associations will be reviewed by staff and this will help inform the final version of the policy. Formal feedback can be sent to bids@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz.

Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

31.     Once the BID Policy 2021 is approved, other support material will be made available on the BID Auckland Council website www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz and include:

·        BID-operating business association constitution (template 2021)

·        BID-operating executive committee board charter (template 2021)

·        individual BID programme area maps

·        BID affiliate/BID business association membership qualification diagram

·        local board BID representative position description

·        template documents, including:

o   AGM agenda

o   AGM minutes

o   BID programme income and expenditure budget (for BID grant of $120,000).

Summary of changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

32.     The key proposed changes incorporated into the draft BID Policy (2021) are set out in Table 3:

Table 3 - Key changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

Key change from current policy

Description

Note

2021 section, page

Issue resolution

 

Improving the ability to resolve issues with a clear process in a timely manner

An issue is identified as non- compliance with the BID policy

3.5, Requirement 24

BID Programme Funding Agreement (2021) Attachment B

Replaced BID Programme Agreement (2016)

Clarifies the relationship between the parties

3.1, Requirement 18

Size and scale of BID programmes

Minimum BID targeted rate grant $120,000

No change from 2016

Minimum BID targeted rate grant $120,000 remains

A new requirement for legacy BID programmes (11 in total) that currently receive less than $120,000pa to increase their targeted rate up to that amount over the next five years

A variety of options are suggested to achieve this

This requirement is a result of local board feedback on concerns to continually fund non-financially sustainable BID programmes

 

1.4, Requirement 3 and 4

Exceptional or unexpected circumstances

Council may, at its discretion, depart from the requirement set out in section 2.4 (25% of total voting forms must be returned for the ballot to be valid

Council will consider evidence of support to date, what is fair and any impact from amending the voting threshold mandate

 

3.4.2

BID operating business association constitution (template 2016)

This supporting document was included as part of the current policy and now removed from the BID Policy (2021)

This allows the business association to amend their constitution to suit their local needs, on the basis it’s not inconsistent with the BID policy

A template document is provided on the www.bid.auckland.govt.nz website

1.1, 2.3.2 Requirement 12

BID operating executive committee board charter (template 2016)

This supporting document was included as part of the current policy and now removed from the BID Policy (2021)

This allows the business association to amend their board charter to suit their local needs, on the basis it’s not inconsistent with the BID policy

A template document is provided on the www.bid.auckland.govt.nz website

1.1, 2.3.2 Requirement 12

33.     Minor changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) are set out in Table 4 below:

Table 4 - Minor changes made to the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents

Minor changes to current policy

Description

Note

2021 section, page

Other council funding

 

Organisational view on risk regarding BID-operating business association receiving other council funding

The draft BID policy acknowledges other council funding grants allocated to BID-operating business associations

2.3.4, Requirement 16

Local boards – other roles

 

Updated

Refer to elected member conflicts of interest policy

A link to these documents can be found here

2.5.3

BID Annual Accountability Report (2021) Attachment C

Name change from BID Annual Accountability Agreement (2016)

To include BID targeted rate grant amount and copy of AGM resolution

3.2, Requirement 22, Table 2, item 9

Audit – provision for a review audit or full audit

Recognition of increased risk and increased reporting requirement based on the amount of targeted rate received

Set as a sliding scale

BID targeted rate grants less than $200,000pa must commission a review audit

BID targeted rate grants more than $200,000pa must commission a full audit

3.2, Requirement 23, Table 2, item 4

Rating mechanism - flat rate

Lifted the maximum flat rate amount from $500 to $900 per rateable property

To provide more flexibility for BID-operating business associations when considering BID programme budgets and the impact of BID targeted rates on ratepayers

3.1.2

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     The BID Policy (2021) focuses on the governance and accountability for BID-operating business associations. Individually the BID programme, through targeted rate-funding, can focus on advocacy and activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     Formal feedback will be sought from other council teams including CCOs and those who work and have an interested in the BID programme and business community space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Local boards have engaged with the review of the BID Policy (2016) and their informal feedback has been incorporated into the draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents. Table 1 outlines local board engagement to date.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Officers are working with Auckland Council’s Ngā Mātārae Unit to ensure that the BID Policy (2021) aligns with the Auckland Council Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications for local boards under the draft BID Policy (2021).

39.     Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from the draft BID Policy (2021) and supporting documents.

41.     The policy describes the balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

42.     The draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents set out the requirements and obligations for BID-operating business associations and are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members, and to undertake and meet all requirements set out in the policy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     Following formal feedback received from local boards, CCOs, BID-operating business associations, non-BID business associations, council departments, other external stakeholders and those with an interest in BID programmes, the final BID Policy (2021) and support documents will be updated and the steps outlined in Table 5 below will be completed by the BID team:

Table 5 - Progress to completion

Date

Progress

2021

August

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents updated to post Finance and Performance Committee workshop feedback

Mid-August to 1 October

·    Draft BID Policy (2021) and support documents distributed to local boards, BID-operating business associations, council departments, CCOs and other stakeholders for formal feedback

·    Update www.bid.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz website with feedback link

·    Feedback open 24 August to 20 October

October to 28 February 2022

·    Formal feedback extended from 20 October to 28 February 2022

19 May 2022

·    Presentation of final version of BID Policy (2021) and support documents to Finance and Performance Committee meeting

2022

19 May 2022

·    Presentation of final version of BID Policy (2021) and support documents to Finance and Performance Committee meeting

44.     The BID Policy (2021), if approved by the Finance and Performance Committee in December 2021, would become operational on 1 July 2022. 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2021 BID Policy

137

b

Draft 2021 BID Programme Funding Agreement

159

c

Draft BID Policy Annual Accountability Report

171

d

Summary of 2021 BID Policy requirements

173

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Glenn Boyd – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022

File No.: CP2021/17779

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (the draft policy).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Significance and Engagement Policy, adopted in 2014, is undergoing a policy refresh to make it more contemporary and user-friendly.

3.       The goal of the policy refresh is to provide for a simplified decision-making process through a high-level guiding document that allows for case-by-case assessments.

4.       Minor updates are needed in both the significance and engagement components of the policy.

5.       Updates around the significance component of the draft policy include:

·    the assessment of significance in terms of a continuum

·    taking a cumulative approach to a package of proposals or decisions

·    adjusting the list of strategic assets to include only assets critical for the delivery of services and clarifying that most strategic assets are identified as groups or networks of assets to reflect the way in which they deliver services

·    adding guidance for assessing the significance of decisions for assets that do not meet the criteria for being strategic.

6.       Updates around the engagement component of the draft policy include:

·    simplifying existing text to make the policy more user-friendly

·    ensuring the engagement principles capture a more diverse Tāmaki Makaurau

·    capturing the need to safeguard staff, elected members and the community during consultation and engagement

·    giving more visibility to the connection between the policy and the forthcoming and separate refresh of the Engagement Guidelines, which will support staff to operationalise the policy.

7.       The draft policy was adopted for public consultation by Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 meeting, resolution number GB/2021/111.

8.       Public consultation ran from 27 September to 18 October 2021.

9.       Adoption of the final policy is projected for February 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy as part of the overall consideration for final adoption in February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Significance and Engagement Policy (the 2014 policy) was created and adopted in 2014 to fulfill the legislative requirements outlined in section 76AA of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).

11.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is a key document for decision-making and the consultation process. It is comprised of two interrelated sections on significance and engagement.

12.     The significance section sets out how and when communities can expect the council to engage before making decisions, describes the council’s approach to determining the significance of proposals and decisions, and lists the council’s strategic assets.

13.     The engagement section provides high-level principles on how to engage inclusively with the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau. These high-level principles ensure that engagement is fit-for-purpose according to the level of significance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have undertaken a policy refresh as the 2014 policy has not undergone changes since its initial adoption.

15.     An internal assessment of the 2014 policy found that that it was largely easy to use, but minor improvements would allow for more efficient decision-making and more fit-for-purpose engagement processes.

16.     General high-level updates and clarifications are being proposed for the draft policy to create a more contemporary policy.

17.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to be a prescriptive policy document, and any accepted changes to the draft policy will not change the purpose for which it is used.

18.     The proposed changes to the Significance and Engagement Policy 2021 were reported to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September – see Attachment A Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation, also found online with associated documents.

Consultation

19.     Formal public consultation was held from 27 September to 18 October 2021. The consultation document is part of Attachment A, or online here.

20.     Given COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the region, consultation was conducted entirely virtually and consisted of:

·    consultation materials and online feedback forms made available on the council’s engagement website (AK Have Your Say)

·    virtual workshops with community partners with demographic advisory panels

·    working with community partners to reach diverse groups.

21.     All feedback has been captured and will be reported through to the Governing Body meeting in February 2022 to inform decision-making on the final policy.

22.     A summary of the regional feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B and local board specific feedback in Attachment C.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Accepting the proposed changes to the draft policy allows for a fit-for-purpose and contemporary significance and engagement policy that will encourage a richer engagement process during future consultations around climate change issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Any strategic asset under the draft policy that is held or managed by a substantive Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) will be identified in the CCO Accountability Policy. CCO’s must comply with that policy when making decisions on strategic assets under their control.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local boards play a key role in engaging with their local communities. The change to enable more fit-for-purpose consultation and engagement for some asset-based decisions may provide local boards with greater flexibility to customise some engagement processes to better meet the needs of their community.

26.     Local board chairs were invited to a workshop held on 4 August 2021 that also included the Parks, Arts, Community and Events, and Finance and Performance committees for a high-level overview on proposed amendments to the draft policy.

27.     Formalised local board views from this workshop and report will be incorporated into the February 2022 Governing Body report for the policy adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The refresh of the Significance and Engagement Policy will strengthen the council’s capacity and capability to engage with and meet the needs of the Māori community. This will be achieved through the delivery of bespoke training initiatives and resources which align to best practice engagement that responds to the needs and is supported by Māori. Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides a foundation to build council’s engagement approach and supports initiatives already underway such as Te Matapuna 2 as a pilot for spatial-based engagement. Work on relationship agreements is progressing, and there is good support for capacity contracts. Further work is required to streamline engagement forums to ensure they are fit for purpose and respond to priorities from Māori.

29.     Ongoing collaboration on the development of the Māori engagement practice and approach will inform the Engagement Guidelines and will ensure council’s size and engagement reach is leveraged effectively. This collaboration will ensure that the operational execution of the Engagement Guidelines is well-informed and aligned with best practice in te ao Māori.

30.     This focus on practice, capacity and capability will guide operational performance so that the aspirations for Māori engagement in Tāmaki Makaurau are progressed, aligned and achievable. Further work on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau performance measures will be aligned with the engagement approach as it continues to be developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed changes to the significance section of the policy assists in the assessment of significance and may reduce the financial costs of engagement approaches that are not fit-for-purpose.

32.     Reclassifying some assets as non-strategic will also remove the burden of audit costs if the council seeks to make any future decisions around changing ownership or control of those assets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present any risk. The risks associated with refreshing the draft policy are set out in the report to the 23 September Governing Body meeting in Attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Feedback from the consultation along with local board views will be reported to the 24 February 2022 Governing Body meeting as part of the materials for the finalised draft policy approval.

35.     The final Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 is proposed to be implemented following approval at the same Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation

181

b

Summary of regional feedback

221

c

Local Board specific feedback

229

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Yu - Senior Advisor - Fin Policy

Eddie Tuiavii - Principal Advisor - Democracy and Engage

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Kenneth Aiolupotea - General Manager Democracy and Engagement

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)

File No.: CP2021/17786

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formalise local board feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Through Vision Zero, Auckland Transport (AT) has adopted the goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050. One of the faster and most cost-effective ways to prevent DSI is to set safe and appropriate speed limits for the function, safety, design and layout of roads.

3.       As part of Tranche 1 of Auckland Transports Safe Speeds Programme safe speed limits were set on many high risk urban and rural roads and within town centres across Auckland between June 2020 and June 2021.

4.       Roads where safe speed limits were set on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent  reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries[1]. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced on these roads by seven per cent, compared to an upward trend in road trauma seen on the rest of the road network.

5.       Further changes to speed limits are now being proposed for a number of roads across Auckland where current speed limits are not deemed safe and appropriate. This is referred to as Tranche 2A of the Safe Speeds Programme.

6.       Details of the changes proposed in each local board area are provided as Attachment A

7.       Public Consultation on Tranche 2A closed on 14 November 2021. A summary of  the consultation feedback is provided as Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       AT is the road controlling authority for all roads within the Auckland transport system. Generally, this is the local road network which includes public roads and beaches but excludes State Highways for which Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency has responsibility.

9.       Reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at speeds that are appropriate for road function, safety, design and use, is one of the key measures that AT is undertaking to improve safety on Auckland’s roads. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits will contribute to a reduction in deaths and serious injuries on our roads and ensure speed limit consistency on the network.

10.     Setting safe and appropriate speed limits also supports AT’s Vision Zero approach (adopted by the AT Board in September 2019), which provides that no deaths or serious injuries are acceptable while travelling on our transport network.

11.     AT controls more than 7,300 kilometres of roads and - through the Safe Speeds Programme -  is working through a multi-year programme to review all speed limits across its network.

12.     Speed limits must be reviewed and set (by bylaw) in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017. In line with government strategy and legislation, AT is prioritising high risk roads for review.

13.     Previously AT made the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) which set new speed limits for the highest risk roads following AT’s first tranche of speed limit reviews. Within this first tranche, speed limits were reviewed on around 10 per cent of the local road network. Where new safe and appropriate speed limits were required to be set, these came into effect from mid-2020 to mid-2021.

All road performance

14.     Roads where speed limits were changed on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced by seven per cent.

15.     This equals four lives saved and 48 less injury crashes on roads treated with safe and appropriate speeds.

Rural road performance

16.     Rural roads where speeds were changed on 30 June 2020 have seen a 78 per cent reduction in fatalities and a small reduction in serious injuries.

17.     This equates to a DSI reduction of 16 per cent on the rural network where speed limit changes have been made. The overall number of crashes is similar to pre-implementation, but the crash severity rates have reduced, this is what would be expected on higher speed roads.

18.     While it will take additional time to confirm that these trends are sustained, initial indications are promising.

19.     AT is now proposing further speed limit changes for a number of roads across Auckland after reviewing and finding that their current speed limits are not safe and appropriate. This is part of the second tranche of reviews under the Safe Speeds Programme (Tranche 2A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     AT is proposing to amend the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 and set new safe and appropriate speed limits for 823 roads across Auckland with a total length of 614km (approximately eight per cent of the road network), with these new limits proposed to come into force mid-2022.

21.     AT has reviewed the existing speed limits for each of the roads identified and found they are not safe and appropriate for the function, design and use of the roads. This means there is now a legal obligation to improve the safety of the roads. Making no change is not an option. This means AT is required to either:

·    set a new safe and appropriate speed limit, or

·    install engineering measures to improve the safety of the road, like road widening, resurfacing, barriers, road markings, speed humps etc.

22.     Physical constraints and the corresponding costs involved mean that it isn’t viable to ‘engineer up’ these roads to support their existing speed limits. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits is one of the fastest and most cost-effective ways of reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

Community Engagement

23.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Tranche 2A took place from 27 September – 14 November 2021, including:

·    a flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes on/near the roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

·    advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist/ethnic media:

Central Leader, East & Bays Courier, Eastern Courier, Manukau Courier, North Harbour News, North Shore Times, Nor-West News, Papakura Courier, Rodney Times, Franklin County News, Western Leader, Hibiscus Matters, Pohutukawa Times, Chinese Herald, Mandarin Pages, Ponsonby News

·    radio advertising on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    radio interviews and adlibs on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    media release and on-going media management

·    published an article in Our Auckland

·    translated consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Tongan, Samoan, Simplified Chinese, Korean and NZ Sign Language

·    sent flyers, posters and hardcopy Freepost feedback forms, in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

·    put posters on trains, buses and ferries that could reach 280,000 commuters each day

·    15 online webinars.

24.     Feedback has been provided through a number of channels:

·    online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

·    via a survey

·    via a mapping tool

·    at public hearings held on 25 November.

25.     Local boards have also had the opportunity to present at public hearings.

26.     A summary of feedback from the local community has been provided as Attachment B. This includes feedback on specific streets in your area, as well as broad feedback about the Safe Speeds Programme more generally.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

28.     For town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced under the first tranche of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of respondents advising they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The Safe Speeds Programme has been endorsed by the AT Board, the Auckland Council Planning Committee and conforms with direction from the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2018/19 – 2027/28 and the Auckland Transport Alignment Project.

30.     In March 2021, Auckland Transport staff held a workshop with Auckland Council’s Planning Committee to provide an update to Councillors on Vision Zero, road safety performance over the past three years and sought feedback on the direction and priorities for Tranche 2 of the programme. The Committee expressed informal strong support for the direction of the Safe Speeds Programme, with a number of members supportive of the programme moving faster into their community areas.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Public submissions and feedback are provided as Attachment B.

32.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide feedback on changes proposed in Tranche 2A.

33.     Feedback provided in relation to Tranche 1 has also been considered by Auckland Transport in the development of the current proposals.

34.     For the residential areas where speed limits have been reduced under the first tranche of the Safe Speeds Programme, there has been strong positive feedback on the safety improvements, with 79 per cent of respondents commenting that the area feels safer overall. As noted above, 19 per cent of respondents advised they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Engagement on Tranche 2 has been undertaken with kaitiaki at northern, central and southern transport hui during 2021 alongside detailed engagement on the rural marae workstream, which is part of the second stage of Tranche 2.

36.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of the second phase of Tranche 2.

37.     Further engagement will be undertaken following the public engagement period to determine feedback on and support for the final proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines.

40.     When Auckland moved into Alert Level Four, a temporary pause was put on all new consultations to allow time to adapt our consultation strategy and increase our digital engagement. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    the consultation start date was delayed by three weeks from 6 September to 27 September

·    the consultation length was extended from 5 to 7 weeks

·    the number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased

·    digital advertising spend was increased, and digital engagement plans were put in place with Auckland Council’s Engagement Partners who helped reach our diverse communities.

41.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline, and local boards will be kept up to date with any changes to the dates that the new speed limits will take effect.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Early in 2022 Auckland Transport will finalise an analysis and feedback report, including feedback from both the public and local boards.

43.     On 31 March 2022 staff will present this report and recommendations to the AT Board.

44.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force on 31 May 2022 for the majority of roads, and 13 June 2022 for roads associated with schools, allowing for school speed changes to be made at the start of a school week.

45.     These dates may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept updated if any changes are made.

46.     More speed limit changes (Tranche 2B) are planned to be publicly consulted in 2022. AT has engaged with all local boards affected by Tranche 2B and will continue to keep local boards updated as the speed reviews are finalised.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

List of changes proposed for local board area

239

b

Summary report of consultation feedback on speed limit changes

241

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Oliver Roberts - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/17788

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive. 

4.       Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy. 

5.       The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important. 

6.       The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving: 

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life: 

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection: 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:  

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:  

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

7.       The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from “one-size fits all” to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, and shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.       Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.       A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10.     Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.  

11.     The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.  

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’ 

13.     Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive. 

14.     In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.  

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15.     The refreshed draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy (Attachment A) has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the strategy and how it will be used.  

16.     During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.  

17.     Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021.  

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18.     At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[2].

19.     Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.  

20.     Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.  

21.     Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them. 

22.     Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.  

23.     Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[3].

24.     Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[4]. 

25.     Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.   

Challenge 1 

Challenge 2 

Challenge 3 

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive. 

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection. 

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling. 

 

26.     More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:  

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Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27.     In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:  

 

 

 

 

 

From

To

Ad hoc and siloed

Working in integrated ways

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning. 

 

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and economic).

One size fits all

Targeting our responses

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.  

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities. 

Council as expert

Enabling community leadership

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy 

28.     To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.  

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving 

29.     The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities. 

·    Manaakitanga |Quality of life 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

 

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection 
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong 

 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action 
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures 
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

Objectives: Where should we focus our action 

30.     To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes. 

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31.     While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focused on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.  

32.     These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.  

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

33.     The draft strategy proposes we invest in our resource to make the biggest impact, and this will be guided by four key principles:

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34.     Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.  

35.     Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.  

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36.     As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.  

37.     The high-level outcomes and objective in the strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action.   

38.     The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.  

39.     This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.  

40.     It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.  

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41.     Nga Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges. 

42.     A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for. 

43.     Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44.     A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the strategy’s new objectives.  

45.     New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes. 

46.     There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY22-25). 

47.     The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

49.     The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     This is a strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.  

51.     Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.  

52.     Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54.     Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.  

55.     The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page. 

56.     Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include: 

·    concern for isolated communities

·    a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·    concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa[5].

58.     The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population. 

59.     Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tamaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000[6]. 

60.     By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whanau and hapori.  

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities 

61.     To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.  

62.     Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes 

63.     The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.  

64.     The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tamaki Makaurau. 

65.     Mana whenua and Mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     There is currently no additional budget attached to the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

If <event>: 

Then <impact>: 

Possible mitigations: 

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources.   

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy. 

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.  

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.  

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction.

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.  

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.  

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.  

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact. 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68.     This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.  

69.     The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

319

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Māngere Ōtāhuhu Local Board Work Programme for July to September 2021

File No.: CP2021/18108

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        A review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan and Ōtara-Papatoetoe area plan #1517.

·        Pest Free Urban South - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu #778.

·        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Schools Waste Minimisation programme #734.

·        Māngere Bike Hub (EcoMatters) #739

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged).

5.       The net operational financial performance of the board is tracking below revised budget for the first quarter of 2021/2022 (92 percent). Revenue is below budget for the year, predominantly due to loss in revenue from the closure of council facilities resulting from COVID-19 alert level 4 and 3 restrictions. From the local board’s Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) opex funding, a significant portion of programmes were put on hold due to the lockdowns but are expected to resume as restrictions lift.

6.       Capital spend of $517,000 is below budget by $315,000, which is mainly due to central government lockdown restrictions limiting the capital works delivered during level 4 lockdown, but once again, these are expected to resume as restrictions lift.

7.       Capital projects in the pipeline for 2021/2022 include the local renewals programme, the Mangere Centre Park upgrade, Ōtāhuhu Town Centre revitalisation and the David Lange destination playground.

8.        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2021

b)      note that the Customer and Community Services Capex work programme been updated to reflect financial deferrals as presented in Attachment C.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

i.          Customer and Community Services

ii.         Infrastructure and Environmental Services

iii.         Plans and Places

iv.        Auckland Unlimited.

10.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

COVID-19 restrictions

11.     Auckland has faced COVID-19 restrictions (Level 3 and 4) from 17 August 2021 for 6 weeks of quarter one, which is just under half the period this report covers.

12.     Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were closed.

13.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update provided in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

14.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

 

15.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates

16.     Local Small Business Mentors Programme (MO) #1642: The programme launched for business registrations on 4 October.  A third of the MOLB funded places were accessed within the first two weeks.  Further efforts to promote the initiative to eligible MOLB businesses will continue in the next few months.

17.     Operational expenditure for Māngere Arts Centre - Ngā Tohu o Uenuku (Council facility) #272: During the first quarter of the financial year, the Māngere Arts Centre delivered 16 programmes, five of which had Māori outcomes, with 36 sessions to a combined total of 10,565 participants and attendees.

18.     Build Capacity: Community-led response to alcohol licensing and advertising #279: Joint Service Agreement between the two OP/MO local boards is completed. Clarity on the capacity building element for advocacy against alcohol harm built into the agreement. The Strategic Broker is managing this contract.

19.     Māori Responsiveness Māngere-Ōtāhuhu #280: Staff support delivery of Ara Kōtui (Improving Māori Input into Local Board decision making project) outcomes ratified by the project reference group and are exploring opportunities for collaboration with mana whenua to deliver programmes that support meaningful engagement with Māori communities and build capacity.

20.     Activation of community places Māngere-Ōtāhuhu #286: At Nga Tapuwae, Q1 saw a continuation of the Parenting, Budgeting and Learner Drivers' Licence programmes. Upwards of 60 youth attended. The programmes are a success, and a high number of students successfully pass and obtain a licence.

21.     Whai Pūmanawa Literacy - we support communities to thrive (Children and Youth) - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu #1372: In July tamariki and rangitahi enjoyed the Harry Potter inspired "Hogwart's School of Witchcraft and wizardry" event at the Māngere Bridge Library.  South Auckland STEM delivered a school holiday programme in July for 120 local children at Māngere Town Library.

22.     Sport and active recreation facilities grants #702: The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Sport and Active Recreation Facility Plan was adopted on 15 September 2021. The plan identifies and prioritises a number of projects suitable for a Sport & Active Recreation Facilities Grant.

23.     Ecological and enviromental volunteers programme FY22 #754: 188 volunteer hours and 1,000 plants planted this quarter. School planting took place at Peninsula Point, and Corporate group planting at Naylor reserve. Contractors planted 800 plants at Sturges Park during Level 3 to get plants in the ground before the end of season.

24.     A review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan and Ōtara-Papatoetoe area plan #1517: One collective hui and three working group meetings were held during this quarter. These included the review of draft maps by mana whenua and the working group. Following this, the Māori Heritage Unit was requested to undertake cultural landscape mapping for the area. Draft area plan material including updated text was presented to the working group for review for each of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe area plans. It is envisaged the draft area plans will be approved for engagement by the end of 2021 and for engagement to start in February 2022.

Activities on hold

25.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

i.          Cyclamen Park - Playground Renewal #2317: Project has been deferred to financial year 2024 - resolution - MO/2021/12. This project has been identified in the work programme as “risk adjusted programme (RAP)” project and can be delivered early in the event that projects approved for delivery in 2021/2022 are delayed for any unforeseen reason.

ii.         Otahuhu Community Centre (former Library) - renew community centre # 2347: Project on hold due to Panuku and Community Services are developing options on the future use of the facility.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

26.     These activities are deferred from the 2021/2022 work programme:

i.          Mangere Centre Park Depot - renew boxing facility #2330: Due to budget constraints the project is deferred to financial year 2023/2024

ii.         Mangere East Hall [Ex Metro Theatre] - refurbish hall #2331: Due to budget constraints the project is deferred to financial year 2023/2024

iii.         Mangere-Otahuhu - renew park roading and car parks #2338: The investigation and design of this project are on hold during financial year 2020/2021 due to the funding restraints, however funding is set to resume in financial year 2024/2025.

iv.        Mangere-Otahuhu -Auckland Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy #2341: The project will be scoped for works to commence in future years.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

28.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     This report informs the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     A number of projects outlined below involve engagement with Maori and delivering Maori outcomes.

32.     David Lange Park - develop concept plan #3157: All community assets contribute significantly to Maori well-being, values, culture, and traditions. There is existing engagement with mana whenua on the larger David Lange development project. Mana whenua have been engaged throughout the design and consent process.

33.     Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Pop-Up Activations #296: Opportunities will be provided for Māori to deliver arts activity that express Māori cultural values and identity, and to realise rangatahi potential.

34.     Local civic events Māngere-Ōtāhuhu #291: Direct engagement with mana whenua for the delivery of the events.

35.     Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche two #839: Return te reo Māori names and narratives to parks and places.

36.     Pūkaki Crater restoration #725: the board continue to attend Pūkaki Crater Co-Management Committee meetings (held with members from Te Ākitai Waiohua, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board, Auckland Council Environmental Services, and Auckland Council Park Services). All work is co-delivered with the kaitiaki manager of Pūkaki Marae. The meetings allow all proposed works to be discussed openly and with agreement before they commence. This ensures alignment with Māori outcomes identified. We will also work with Makaurau Marae Nursery for the supply of half of the plants to support local Māori business.

37.     Pest Free Ihumātao #778: This project is led and mostly delivered by Makaurau Marae environmental division to support economic opportunities for Māori, boosting the nursery’s capabilities in becoming self-sufficient and more resilient.

38.     This project facilitates mana whenua to exercise their responsibilities of tino rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga and Māori to exercise tiakitanga.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     This report is provided to enable the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

40.     Operating expenditure relating to Asset Based Services (ABS) is below budget by $218,000 for the first quarter of 2021/2022, while the LDI operational projects are $264,000 below budget. The ABS underspend is mainly due to lower facility operating costs, primarily the Moana-Nui-a-Kiwa and Mangere Arts Centre, due to the closure of council facilities under COVID-19 alert level restrictions. The LDI underspend is due to a variety of projects yet to draw down on financial allocations.

41.     Capital spend of $517,000 is below budget by $315,000 and represents investment in the local renewals programme and the Mangere Centre Park upgrade and the Ōtāhuhu Town Centre revitalisation.

42.     The complete Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Financial Performance report can be found in Appendix C.

Revised Capex Budget

43.     Capex budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

44.     Projects that were still in progress on 30 June 2021 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

45.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2021 to reflect early completion.

46.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

47.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

48.     The Customer and Community Services Capex work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards and presented in Attachment C.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

50.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Work Programme Quarter 1 update

355

b

MO Quarterly Operating Performance Q1 2021 Financial Appendix

391

c

Customer and Community Services Capex Local Board Programme

397

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Noha Zaki - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 



Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

2021-22 Q1 Quarterly Report CCO Engagement Plan - Mangere-Otahuhu

File No.: CP2021/18557

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with proposed changes to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A number of general changes are proposed for the Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plans, as part of ongoing work to improve and refine the approach to engagement with Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs).

3.       The four substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare – may also propose specific changes.

4.       General changes are shown in Attachment A. Attachments B, C and D include work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, and Watercare.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter One 2021-22

b)      adopt the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

6.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

7.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans.

8.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

9.       In addition, as part of implementing the Joint CCO Engagement Plan, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

10.     We are introducing these new reports gradually, so for Quarter One your report may not include updates from all four CCOs.

11.     For Quarter Two reporting, we expect to have updates from all four CCOs for all local board areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes proposed by Local Board Services

12.     The original discussions with local boards used the five levels of engagement outlined by the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2): inform, consult, involve, collaborate and empower. Feedback from local boards indicated that using all five levels was unwieldy, and in particular that there was confusion and disagreement about when ‘empower’ might be used.

13.     We are proposing that we reduce the engagement levels down to a simplified three step model of inform, consult and collaborate. This helps to better distinguish between projects and to clarify the kinds of engagement that are expected at each step.

14.     We have also moved the CCO work programme tables from being embedded within the engagement plan, to being a series of four attachments. This makes it easier to use the work programmes as the basis for quarterly reporting.

15.     Minor changes may have also been made to names of Local Board Services and/or CCO contacts.

16.     These changes are all shown as tracked changes in Attachment A – Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

17.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment B.

18.     Auckland Transport has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme. 

Auckland Unlimited

19.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment C.

Changes to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

20.     Auckland Unlimited had previously responded to local board requests to include more information on major events by adding a line item for each event.

21.     As part of ongoing work to improve and refine this process, we are proposing to replace all the individual major event lines with the three following lines:

·    Delivered Events (Diwali, Lantern Festival, Pasifika, Tāmaki Herenga Waka)

·    Sponsored Events (i.e., Elemental)

·    Supported Events (i.e., FIFA World Cup, World Choir Games)

22.     This change reduces the number of amendments and additions required to the engagement plan each quarter as events are completed and provides a more consistent update pattern going forward. 

23.     These proposed changes are reflected in Attachment A.

24.     No other changes are proposed to the Auckland Unlimited Work Programme.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

25.     Eke Panuku has not provided updates for this quarter’s report. Eke Panuku will be joining the combined reporting framework for Quarter Two.

26.     Eke Panuku has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme.   

Watercare

27.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment D.

28.     Watercare has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

30.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Adopting the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

32.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

34.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

36.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

38.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Two in March 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu - signed CCO engagement plan with 4 attachments

415

b

Auckland Transport from July to November 2021 performance report

429

c

Auckland Unlimited from July to November 2021 performance report

431

d

Watercare from July to November 2021 performance report

433

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Noha Zaki - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Summer Events update and seeking direction report

File No.: CP2021/18735

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek direction on planning for the delivery of summer events within the COVID-19 Protection Framework.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Event Production Team is planning for a great summer in Auckland, full of free community events. These are likely to be delivered within the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

3.       The proposed COVID-19 Protection Framework intends to ease restrictions of access for fully vaccinated people, including attending events.

4.       To implement the framework at events, there will be planning and cost implications for which the Event Production team seeks local board direction on by 29 November 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      consider the various options stated in this report and provide a direction to the Events staff on how to proceed.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Event Production Team is planning for a great summer in Auckland, full of free community events. These are likely to be delivered within the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

6.       The general purpose of free local board events is to celebrate people and communities by bringing people together and helping create pride of place. Traditionally summer in Auckland is a busy and exciting time with hundreds of local events.

7.       Since August 2021 COVID-19 alert restrictions have resulted in the cancellation of local board events in Auckland, the most recent of these being the Christmas events. The Event Production Team investigated alternative Christmas activations but unfortunately this has proven to be too difficult and high risk given the uncertainty of the step-down timings in alert levels.

8.       Movies in Parks is a regionally promoted series and the ‘go live’ planning programme, which includes publication of the website, social media, event listings and publicity, is scheduled for 10 December 2021.  The Music in Parks series, which includes some local board events will also go live on this date.

9.       Direction is needed from the board to enable event staff to prioritise where to invest time, which is important for events that require high levels of community participation, as well as enable us to carry-out supplier negotiations on bulk hireage across all events.

 

COVID-19 Protection Framework and Events

10.     Government advice is that Auckland will be moved to the new COVID-19 Protection Framework once the population reaches 90% double-vaccination. This has been confirmed to occur on 3 December.

11.     The COVID-19 Protection Framework shifts focus to easing restrictions for fully vaccinated people using a Vaccination Certificate (also referred to as Vaccination Pass).  The information available currently indicates the following for events:

Level

If Vaccination Passes are used.

Events to have systems for managing vaccination pass validation, record-keeping, increased hygiene and face coverings.

If Vaccination Passes are not used.

Events to follow advice on record-keeping, increased hygiene and face coverings.

Green

Events can proceed with no limits

Restricted to a maximum of 100 people at the event.  They must be seated and maintain 1 metre physical distancing.

Orange

Events can proceed with no limits

No events

Red

Events can proceed with a maximum of 100 people and only if they can maintain 1 metre physical distancing.

No events

 

12.     With the use of the Vaccination Pass at any level, event organisers will need to establish a way to validate these prior to allowing people access to the event.

13.     For outdoor events this will mean creating a secure boundary of the site with managed entry / exit points, as well as implementing systems for validation.  It is not yet clear what these systems will be.

14.     At all times, Auckland Council will follow the guidance provided by the Ministry of Health.

15.     Auckland Council is creating specific vaccination guidelines/policies for elected members, staff, volunteers, suppliers and customers.  The Events team will be required to follow council guidelines/policies once implemented.

16.     Staff acknowledge the short timeframe for providing direction. This timeline is to ensure we do not launch the promotion of events which local boards may wish to cancel if unable to fund the additional requirements.

17.     The scope of this report is for event production work programme items. The implications for civic events will be addressed with boards on a case-by-case basis when the Civic Eventst team works with boards on event briefs and scheduling.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Event production staff are looking into the operational requirements and costs for implementing the vaccination checks and additional health measures, such as

a)   securing the event site (security, fencing, barriers)

b)   creating multiple, controlled entrance/exit points

c)   increased security personnel and possibly wristbands or identifiers

d)   introduction of technology for certificate/pass validation

e)   provision of face-coverings

f)    provision of more hand-washing facilities or hand-sanitiser.

14.     These measures will incur costs which were not considered in the original event budget when it was approved in the 2021/2022 work programme.

15.     Estimates are that costs could be up to $6000 extra for some events.

16.     Each event will have a tailored approach and costs will vary depending on the expected audience size and park/location used.  It will take time for staff to work through every event on the summer schedule. Therefore, we are requesting that boards consider allocating up to a further $6000 per event to cover these additional measures.

17.     Options for delivery of summer events

Option

Pros

Cons

Recommendation

Option 1:

 

Events budgets increased to cover the new safety management costs

 

Compliance with government advice on delivering the event safely.

 

The event can be successfully delivered as intended with no reduction in event offering.

 

Community sees local board taking safety seriously but not at the cost of reducing community participation and enjoyment.

 

By supporting these events, the board will provide their communities with some sense of a return to normality, and an opportunity to safely gather.

Potential reputational risk if attendance is low due to COVID uncertainty or other factors and people are against the increased spend on events when funding could be placed elsewhere.

 

Events could be a target for protests against the vaccination mandates, or those without a Vaccination Pass may try to access the site and be declined causing upset.

Mangere-Otahuhu Movies in Parks at David Lange Park and Murphy Park proceed as planned, with additional safety requirements and associated costs of up to $6,000 each.

Option 2:

 

Event budget remains the same with new safety costs funded by reducing other elements within the event.

 

Compliance with government advice on delivering event safely.

 

No additional funding required.

 

To afford safety measures programming is reduced which could cause disappointment for those who engage and participate in the event. 

 

Reduction in offering will minimise delivery on local board outcomes.

 

Events could be a target for protests against the vaccination mandates, or those without a Vaccination Pass may try to access the site and be declined causing upset.

Not recommended for movies. 

Movies in Parks budgets are not large enough to accommodate the anticipated extra costs even with the removal of all pre-entertainment.

 

 

Option

 

 

Pros

 

 

Cons

 

 

Recommendation

Option 3:

 

Event is cancelled prior to the promotion of summer season commencing

With early cancellation no costs will be incurred, the budget can be reallocated or put forward as savings.

 

This option avoids confusion with community (event simply left off promotions rather than cancelled later).

Not delivering agreed work programme.

 

Potential risk of losing momentum when events miss a year. Attendance and profile need to be rebuilt in subsequent years.

 

Disappointment by local community that the event is not proceeding (another thing cancelled due to COVID).

 

Potential reputational risk for cancelling when other local boards may choose to proceed.

Not recommended.

 

18.     Mangere-Otahuhu Local Board has confirmed in its 2021/2022 work programme the delivery of two events to take place during the summer season (January to March). They are:

·    Movies in Parks, Saturday 26 March, Murphy Park, approved budget $14,000

·    Movies in Parks, Saturday 5 February, David Lange Park, approved budget $14,000.

         Please note that Ambury Park Movies in Parks on Friday 21 January is a regional event.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Events are an important part of community cohesiveness and wellbeing. The direction sought in this report does not incur any additional climate impacts. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     At all times, Auckland Council will follow the guidance provided by the Ministry of Health.

21.     Event permitting and organisation will require the involvement of other council departments and council controlled organisations such as Auckland Transport as a matter of course. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Local Board views are being sought to enable event staff to prioritise where to invest time, which is important for events that require high levels of community participation, as well as enable us to carry-out supplier negotiations on bulk hireage across all events.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The Customer and Community Services work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, or location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation is undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

24.     Progress updates on delivery of Māori outcomes is provided to the local board through quarterly performance reports.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     Additional measures outlined in the report is expected to cost up to $6,000 per event. The Mangere-Otahuhu local board is funding two Movies in Parks events in 2021/2022 (David Lange Park, Murphy Park), and total funding of up to $12,000 is being requested from the local board. The financial implications of each of the proposed options is outlined below.

 

26.     Option 1

LDI opex budget for the year has been fully allocated through the local board’s operational work programme. If the board wishes to allocate additional funding of up to $12,000 to the two Movies in Parks events, then the budget will need to come from existing work programme items.

27.     Option 2

If the board does not wish to allocate additional funding, then there is no financial implication as the event delivery and cost of additional measures will be managed within the existing budget.

28.     Option 3

Current LDI opex budget is $14,000 for each Movies in Parks event. If the board wishes to cancel the events, LDI opex budget of up to $28,000 will be returned to the board for reallocation to other work programme items.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The Event Production Team does not have capacity to carry out surveys of local board areas to determine how local communities feel about the COVID-19 Protection Framework and if this will increase or decrease the likelihood of them attending events.  We cannot guarantee attendance.

30.     We look to the local boards for guidance on how communities may respond to physical barriers stopping Aucklanders who do not have a valid Vaccination Pass attending local events and any potential political or reputational risks associated with this.

31.     There are a number of uncertainties in relation to the ongoing effects of the pandemic such as the applicable public health measures in place at the time of the event, how vaccination passes will work in practice, whether special measures are needed for people exempt from vaccinations, and the impact of any council policies being developed to manage the health and safety of staff and customers. All measures will be taken to comply with the available public health advice and directives, and the views of the local board will be sought where unanticipated issues arise.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Staff will continue to follow Ministry of Health requirements and cancel or plan the events as directed by the local board. Staff will keep the local board informed if Ministry of Health requirements, or council vaccination polices change and impact further on the events.

33.     Publicity for Movies in Parks and Music in Parks (including local board events) will go live on 10 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Noha Zaki - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18422

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname. 

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology. 

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e. the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e. the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data show that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/local-impacts-local-board-views-reports.aspx

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order. Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias.  If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/16259

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Calendar December to February

449

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2021/16261

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 3, 10 and 24 November 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 3, 10 and 24 November 2021.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

3 November workshop notes

455

b

10 November workshop notes

457

c

24 November workshop notes

459

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Janette McKain - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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[1] For the 12-month period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021, compared to an average of the prior five years.

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[3] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[4] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[5] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[6] ibid