I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 7 December 2021

5.00pm

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dawn Trenberth

 

Members

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Dr Ofa Dewes

 

 

Lotu Fuli

 

 

Swanie Nelson

 

 

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor

 

30 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: +64 27 591 5024

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Papatoetoe Historical Society Incorporated                               5

8.2     Deputation - Access to Change                                                                          6

8.3     Deputation -Niue Community Trust                                                                   6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Board Members' Report                                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 13

14        Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations                                                                                                                                       15

15        Report for Change of Purpose for Community Grant LG2213-125                        29

16        Priority activities for Manukau Sports Bowl to inform the development of the master plan                                                                                                                                35

17        Community Garden Service Assessment                                                                 49

18        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents          59

19        Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy                                 69

20        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                   105

21        Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)                   161

22        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter One, 2021-22      169

23        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022                                                                                                             195

24        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  273

25        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      279

26        Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                 283

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 November 2021, as true and corect

b)         confirm the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 30 November 2021, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Papatoetoe Historical Society Incorporated

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Jenny Clark from the Papatoetoe Historical Society will be in attendance to present an update to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Jenny Clark from the Papatoetoe Historical Society for her attendance and presentation.

Attachments

a          Papatoetoe Historical Society Incorporated - presentation......................... 295

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Access to Change

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Marnish Nand and Nikki Singh from Access to Change recently won a competition run by the Faculty of Sport at Auckland University of Technology to create an idea that makes sport and exercise more accessible to the community. This competition was run in conjunction with the Decathlon Foundation who are funding a proportion of the idea.

2.         The winning idea is to create and place a free workout station in the heart of Papatoetoe. To make this a reality Access to Change has teamed up with Kolmar to have the workout station placed at the Papatoetoe Recreation Grounds. Attached is a document with more detail.

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Marnish Nand and Nikki Singh from Access to Change for their attendance and presentation.

Attachments

a          Access to Change infomation sheet............................................................. 307

b          Access to Change - Presentation................................................................. 309

 

 

8.3       Deputation -Niue Community Trust

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

Shaundell Rangihuna-Togiamua and members of the Niue Community Trust will be in attendance to to make a deputation for a land approval renewal at Aorere Park reserve.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Shaundell Rangihuna-Togiamua and members of the Niue Community Trust for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

 

File No.: CP2021/11132

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2021/11142

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board;

a)      receive the board members’ written and oral reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

 

File No.: CP2021/11161

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2021/17279

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022. as provided in Attachment B.

3.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 20 April 2021 (OP/2021/40) as provided in Attachment A. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $347,051 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       In July 2021 the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board granted $10,000 to the Mayoral Disaster Relief fund for the Papatoetoe Tornado.

6.       Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Grant and Multi-Board Grant Round One 2021/2022 received a total 49 applications and a total of $392,251.58 requested. A total of $125,496.03 was allocated leaving $211,554.97 remaining.

7.       Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round One 2021/2022 received a total of 14 applications and a total of $27,828.20 requested. $15,575.70 was allocated, leaving a total of $195,979.27 remaining for One local and multiboard grant round and two quick response rounds.

8.       15 applications were received for consideration by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe local board for the Quick response grant round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $34,596.65.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

a)      That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022, outlined in Table One:

 

Table One: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grant Round Two 2021/2022 applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2213-201

Epilepsy Association of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards fuel costs for two epilepsy educators in the Counties Manukau DHB region from 1 January 2022 to 31 December 2022

$500.00

Eligible

QR2213-202

S Double S Services Limited

Community

Towards bike helmets and bike parts at 41 Boundary Road from 30 November 2021 to 30 July 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-203

New Zealand Blue Light Ventures Inc

Community

Towards production of the Street Smarts handbook from 31 December 2021 to 31 March 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-205

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards Youthline helpline from 1 January 2022 to 30 June 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-206

Nora Swann Limited

Community

Towards workshops and gift bags for the Dress in Confidence project from 14 February 2022 to 18 February 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-207

Papatoetoe Adolescent Christian Trust

Community

Towards furniture for year 13 leaver programme from 1 January 2022 to 31 December 2022

$1,948.60

Eligible

QR2213-208

Nex Group Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire and coaching fees at Discipline Performance Gym from 11 January 2022 to 4 April 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-209

Inspire Charitable Trust under the Umbrella of 3rd Ave Productions

Community

Towards design costs, facilitation, catering, and administration from 14 February 2022 to 31 July 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-213

Independent Living Service Trust

Community

Towards venue hire, facilitation, catering, and administration costs at Te Puke ō Tara community hall from 1 February 2022 to 5 July 2022

$1,449.00

Eligible

QR2213-214

Environmental Education for Resource Sustainability Trust

Environment

Towards recycling bins and native plants from 1 January 2022 to 31 December 2022

$1,999.05

Eligible

QR2213-215

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Community

Towards workbooks at Ferguson Intermediate and Wymondley School from 14 March 2022 to 8 April 2022

$700.00

Eligible

QR2213-216

East Tamaki Rugby Football Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards marquee purchase 31 December 2021 to 25 February 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-218

Counties Manukau Touch Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards first aid kits and face masks from 11 January 2022 to 18 March 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-219

The Gallery

Arts and culture

Towards facilitation, materials, insurance, advertising, cleaning, volunteer expenses and set up costs at Hunters Plaza from 1 March 2022 to 31 March 2022

$10,000.00

Eligible

QR2213-220

XLR8 Sports Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards sound system purchase at East Tamaki Reserve between 31 December 2021 to 11 March 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible 

Total

 

 

 

$34,596.65

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

10.     The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

11.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·       local board priorities

·       lower priorities for funding

·       exclusions

·       grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·       any additional accountability requirements.

12.     The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2021/2022 on 20 April 2021 (OP/2021/40) and will operate three quick response and two local grant rounds for this financial year.  This includes the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Excellence Awards, which are open all year round (OP/2021/40).

13.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks and workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

16.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction, decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options, home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation, local tree planting and streamside revegetation, and education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

18.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

20.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applications so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time.

21.     A summary of each application received through the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 is provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Maori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Maori. Auckland Council’s Maori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     This report presents applications received in Ōtara-Papatoetoe Quick Response Grants Round Two 2021/2022 as provided in Attachment B.

24.       Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes including information in this report and have not identified any further financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board’s programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board allocation of funding for Quick Response Round Two, staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision and facilitate payment of the grant.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Otara-Papatoetoe Grants Programme

23

b

2021 2022 Otara Papatoetoe quick response round two application summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Boyd - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Report for Change of Purpose for Community Grant LG2213-125

File No.: CP2021/18158

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider a request by the Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society to change the purpose of a grant awarded on 21 September 2021 (Resolution OP/2021/139) in accordance with standing order 1.10.4 by revoking or altering all or part of a resolution passed at a previous meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A grant was awarded to the Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society (Resolution OP/2021/139) for $25,000 on 21 September 2021. The purpose of the grant was “Towards overall costs for the Santa Parade on Hunters Corner from on 8 December 2021”.

3.       The applicant has requested a change to the purpose due to uncertainty on what the COVID-19 regulations will be at the time of the event. The applicant has asked to repurpose this grant towards a different event being the Community Cultural Parade which will take place between February and April of 2022.

4.       The Community Cultural Parade has the stated goal “to explore multi-cultural ideals in the broader community”. All government guidelines for COVID-19 restrictions will be followed and a checkpoint will be established to ensure all staff and participants are fully vaccinated.

5.       The board was advised of this request via email in November and requested a report to formally approve or decline the change of purpose.

6.       Officers note that it will be difficult to track accountability for the alternate event proposed in the absence of any detail of the costs or any other factors that are normally sought in an application for local community grants of a larger value.

7.       The board is also advised that the next grant round closes on 25 March 2022 with a decision made on 17 May 2022.  This timing would not allow the applicant to put in an application for an event in March 2022.

8.       By approving the proposed change of scope, the board sets a precedent for approving events that did not contest other applications in the round.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      decline grant application LG2213-125 to Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society for $25,000 towards overall costs for the Community Cultural Parade to take place between February and April 2022

b)      If the board chooses to approve the request by the applicant and allow the grant to be applied towards the costs of the Community Cultural Parade, agree pursuant to standing order 1.10.4 to revoke or alter the following part resolution of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, adopted at its meeting held on 21 September 2021, OP/2021/139 shown below:

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Amount Approved

LG2213-125

Papatoetoe Central Main Street Society

Towards overall costs for the Santa Parade on Hunters Corner from on 8 December 2021

$30,000

$25,000

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

LG2213-125 Papatoetoe Santa Parade Application

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Boyd - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Rhonwen Heath - Head of Rates Valuations & Data Mgmt

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Priority activities for Manukau Sports Bowl to inform the development of the master plan

File No.: CP2021/17952

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the priority sport and recreation opportunities to be included in the Manukau Sports Bowl master plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2019 the Ōtara - Papatoetoe Local Board requested a master plan for Manukau Sports Bowl to guide the future development of the park (OP/2020/134).

3.       The local board and community identified a number of potential sport and recreation opportunities for Manukau Sports Bowl. There are more opportunities identified for the Sports Bowl than can be accommodated on the park.

4.       Staff engaged Visitor Solutions to prepare a needs analysis report to understand the priority sport and recreation needs for the local community. The needs analysis is presented in Attachment A.

5.       A panel of staff and mana whenua have evaluated and prioritised the sport and recreation opportunities using the vision and objectives for the park approved by the local board (OP/2021/87).

6.       The priority sport and recreation opportunities in order of priority are:

·    Tennis courts

·    Play and informal recreation

·    Indoor courts

·    Walking

·    Sportsfields

·    Splash pad

·    Bike facilities

·    Athletics

·    Greyhound racing.

7.       We are seeking the local board’s approval of the priority opportunities so a series of master plan scenarios can be developed for the draft master plan.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the following priority sport and recreation opportunities for inclusion in the Manukau Sports Bowl master plan:

i)        Tennis courts

ii)       Play and informal recreation

iii)      Indoor courts

iv)      Walking

v)      Sportsfields

vi)      Splash pad

vii)     Bike facilities

viii)    Athletics

ix)      Greyhound racing.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Manukau Sports Bowl is a 21-hectare park strategically located adjacent to State Highway One and near Manukau City Centre.

9.       The Sports Bowl is a local park under the local board’s governance, located within the Transform Manukau programme area. Transform Manukau is a programme led by Eke Panuku to develop Manukau to serve future generations and significant population growth. 

10.     The park currently provides for a mix of passive and active recreation activities. The main user groups are the Manukau Velodrome, Tennis Auckland, The Roots Collective and the Auckland Greyhound Racing Club.  There are a range of lease arrangements and terms, including the Auckland Greyhound Racing Club lease which has a conditional right of renewal in 2022 for a further term of 33 years.

11.     In September 2019, the local board approved a programme of work to support master planning for the medium and long-term future of the Sports Bowl (OP/2019/145).

12.     Subsequently, the local board approved the development of a masterplan including service property optimisation as a potential funding source for implementing the master plan (OP/2020/134).

13.     We are taking a two-phase approach to developing the master plan which consists of a research phase and a design phase. We are currently in the design phase of the master plan.

14.     At its June 2021 meeting, the local board approved the following vision and objectives for the master plan (OP/2021/87):

Vision

An accessible, inviting and inclusive destination park for everyone in our community

Objectives

                                       i)        foster stronger community ownership, and interactions with the park

                                      ii)        design the park to be safe, vibrant, provide easy connections, and reflect the community

                                     iii)        minimise the environmental impact of development and use of the park and enhance environmental outcomes

                                    iv)        provide opportunities which meet local community needs to learn, develop, participate, and have fun

                                     v)        maximise use of, and community benefits, arising from the park.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Visitor Solutions were engaged to prepare a needs analysis report for the Sports Bowl. The report was commissioned to investigate in detail a range of potential sport and recreation opportunities identified by the local board and community.

16.     There are more opportunities identified for the Sports Bowl than can be accommodated on the park or funded. Each of the opportunities is outlined in Attachment A, Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan Needs Analysis Report.

17.     Council staff and mana whenua have evaluated the opportunities against the vision and objectives for the park using a weighted attributes system. The weighted attributes system was designed in consultation with the local board at a workshop on the 29th of June 2021.

18.     The table below outlines the outcomes of the evaluation and summarises the key findings and recommendations. The opportunities are ranked in order of priority identified in the evaluation. A copy of the full evaluation is provided in Attachment B.

 

Opportunity

Key findings

Weighted score

Recommended action(s)

Tennis courts

 

 

The current facility is predominately used by local residents and has a high utilisation rate. This is expected to increase.

The covered courts provide opportunities for tennis as well as other sports and events.

 

82.7

Maintain the existing court provision.

The two public courts can be utilised as a flexible multi-marked court area.

Covered provision is essential to enable accessibility for South Auckland residents for tennis and non-tennis related activity.

Play spaces and informal recreation

 

 

A new and improved play space providing for a greater range of ages and skills would likely drive additional local participation above current use levels.

 

82.4

Provide for a play space to cater for a wide range of ages, and skills.

Provide flat grassed areas for informal and semi structured play for example volleyball, areas for large groups to gather and shade.

Support this informal recreation provision by providing for BBQ’s, toilets and changing facilities.

Indoor courts

Local demand will be strong for indoor courts in the local area, there is an identified gap in indoor court provision in South Auckland.

Indoor courts cater for popular sports within local community.

 

82.1

Provide for 2-3 indoor courts with the ability to expand to 4-5 in the future and the associated spectator seating. A fitness gymnasium should also be provided.

Walking

Opportunity to improve existing walking network both within the park and connections to the neighbourhood.

Good planning and integration with other assets will see park walkways used by a cross section of the community and all age groups (not just those interested in fitness).

 

80.5

Perimeter walking opportunity with strategic entry / exit points.

Multi-functional pathways that can be used for other activities in event mode.

Second tier walkways to link sites internally (reducing car trips).

Incorporate complementary assets such as lighting, toilets, wayfinding, artworks, and fitness equipment.

Sportsfields

There are two sportsfields on site. Only one is currently in use, the one in the middle of the greyhound track has been closed to the public for a number of years for safety reasons.

Lighting and improving the sports fields surfacing has the potential to grow participation for local community and meet the gap in shortage of week day training.

The location next to the motorway means the fields can be used intensively without disturbing residential neighbours.

 

78.6

Continue to provide the existing sportsfield. Improve the field surface and light the field to extend the use.

Identify how access to the infield of the greyhound track can occur safely to allow use of this field for sports again.

Splash pad

A small to medium sized splashpad is likely to be attractive to the local community.

Participation numbers are likely to increase over the summer months.

Vulnerable to water shortages

 

 

72.6

Include a splash pad in the master plan scenarios

Bike facilities

Currently the velodrome does not have much community use.

The opportunities identified in the needs analysis include: learn to ride, pump track and shared paths present an opportunity to grow local community use, building off bike activity which is happening locally.

Presents an opportunity for pathway from learning to ride through to build into performance/elite pathways.

To be effective, all aspects of the opportunity need to be included in the master plan.

 

67.7

Provide for learn to ride, pump track, shared paths, bike events and improve access to the velodrome.

Athletics

Conservative scoring reflects the need for more detailed analysis required.

Based on other information, it has the potential to be strong for both formal and informal use.

53.6

Include provision for athletics in medium to long term scenarios.

Undertake further analysis to determine the athletics needs that can be provided at the Sports Bowl.

In short to medium term scenarios provide for informal athletics provision including markings on sportsfields during the summer season.

Greyhound racing

The existing greyhound track has a low alignment with local catchment need (both now and in the future).

The inner track may meet some local needs however that doesn't influence the assessment of a greyhound track and facility.

 

25.6

Provide for greyhound track in the short to medium term master plan scenarios if the space is not immediately required or able to be utilised for another sport, game or recreational activity rated higher in the needs analysis.

50 metre swimming pool

Existing facilities are already meeting local participant needs. New development may have a negative effect on existing facilities.

20.2

Do not provide for a 50 metre swimming pool at Manukau Sports Bowl.

Advocate for improved aquatic facilities in the Manukau metro area

Review the need for aquatic facilities in the Manukau metro area in the Community Facilities Network Action Plan update

 

19.     The priority opportunities identified in the evaluation are very well aligned with the vision and outcomes for the park. They represent transformational shifts for the park, providing sport and recreation opportunities desired and needed by the local community. The Sports Bowl will provide the local community with greater opportunities to learn, develop, participate, and have fun.

20.     Greyhound racing scored second lowest in the evaluation. It will be included in the master plan scenarios as it is an existing facility on the park and the lease provides for the potential for the club to renew the lease, provided amongst other things, Auckland Council is satisfied that:

a)      there is sufficient need for greyhound racing at the Manukau Sports Bowl; and

b)      in the public interest some other sport, game or recreational activity should not have priority over greyhound racing.

21.     The master plan spatial planning will determine if greyhound racing can be accommodated alongside the higher priority sport and recreation opportunities identified.

22.     The next steps are to prepare a series of master plan scenarios based on the prioritised activities identified in the needs analysis.

23.     The master plan scenarios will include:

·    Small scale short term changes to the park to improve the access and use by the community.

·    Short to medium term investment in renewing and upgrading existing infrastructure and provision of new infrastructure.

·    Long term transformational shifts which will require businesses cases, long-term plan funding and external funders.

24.     The master plan will include an implementation plan that will consider staging development and estimated investment requirements.

25.     Eke Panuku has identified approximately $15m CAPEX for implementation of the master plan at the Sports Bowl using Transform Manukau reinvestment. This investment funding will be subject to Eke Panuku Board approval of an indicative business case on the completion of the master plan.

26.     Following the completion of the master plan Eke Panuku will investigate optimisation as a potential funding source.

27.     We recommend the local board approves the priority sport and recreation opportunities as ranked in the above table.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     The recommendations in this report have no climate impact. Climate impacts will be assessed in future work on the draft master plan and will be aligned with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

29.     The master plan implementation, design and development will include consideration of aspects such as water sensitive design, use of sustainable and ethical products, use of healthy products and construction waste. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Manukau Sports Bowl sits within the Transform Manukau programme area which is led by Eke Panuku. We are working closely with Eke Panuku on the development of the master plan to ensure that the master plan aligns with the other Transform Manukau programme activity. 

31.     The project has had input from various council departments including Parks Sport and Recreation, Community Facilities, Local Board Services and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships. Additional resource from other council departments such as Communication and Engagement, Legal and landscape architecture have provided input as required. The roles and responsibilities of teams in the wider council group are outlined in Table 1 of the June 2021 report (File No. CP2021/07418).

32.     The needs analysis has been reviewed by staff from Parks, Sport and Recreation and Eke Panuku. Legal Services have also provided advice for the report.

33.     The evaluation panel consisted of three staff members and two mana whenua representatives. The staff on the panel represented:

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

·    Priority Location Direction and Strategic Projects Team, Panuku

·    Parks, Sport and Recreation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Community engagement on the draft master plan is currently scheduled for April 2022. We will work with the local board to design a programme to seek feedback from the local community on the draft master plan.

35.     The local board has been involved in the development of the vision and objectives for Manukau Sports Bowl at workshops on 23rd March and 11th May 2021.

36.     The assessment criteria and their weightings were developed with the local board at a workshop on 29th June 2021.

37.     The draft findings of the needs analysis were shared with the local board at a workshop on the 14th September 2021.

38.     In the June 2021 report staff anticipated we would report the assessment criteria and weightings to the local board for their approval before undertaking the evaluation. To make up some time on meeting the deadline of completing the plan by the end of the 2021/22 financial year we are reporting both the evaluation criteria and evaluation results in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Thirteen mana whenua were invited to participate in the development of the master plan:

·    Te Kawerau a Maki

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Te Ahiwaru

·    Ngāti Paoa Trustboard

·    Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·    Ngaati Whanaunga

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamaterā

·    Waikato-Tainui

40.     Workshops have been attended by representatives of Te Ākitai Waiohua,  Ngaati Whanunga and Ngāti Maru.

41.     Staff and the local board have worked closely with mana whenua to develop the vision and principles for Manukau Sports Bowl. At the two hui the key issues identified were the need for the park to:

·   reflect the local community

·   provide activities for the whole family

·   be more welcoming to the local community.

42.     Representatives from Te Ākitai Waiohua and Ngaati Whanunga were on the  evaluation panel to identify the priority uses for the park. Their evaluation rankings were consistent with other panel members. Of particular concern to mana whenua was that the cycling offer was inclusive to all ages and skills, not focused on the velodrome.

43.     Mana whenua will continue to be involved in the development of the master plan reviewing scenarios and ensuring the design delivers on the vision and objectives.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     Council staff time required to develop the master plan is possible within existing staff resource in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years.

45.     Visitor Solutions have been engaged to work with staff to prepare the master plan. The costs are being covered by Eke Panuku. Eke Panuku has allocated approximately $80k opex to develop the master plan.

Financial viability assessed against Auckland Council’s sport and investment plan

46.     The financial viability and sustainability of the sport and recreation opportunities was considered as part of the needs analysis. This was guided by the investment principles outlined in Auckland Councils sport investment plan - Increasing Aucklander’s Participation In Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

47.     The purpose of the Sport Investment Plan is to guide Auckland Council’s sport investment over the next 20 years to respond to the changing needs of Aucklanders and deliver Auckland Plan outcomes.

Implementation funding

48.     Eke Panuku has identified approximately $15m CAPEX for implementation of the master plan at the Sports Bowl using Transform Manukau reinvestment. This investment funding will be subject to Eke Panuku Board approval of an indicative business case on the completion of the master plan.

49.     Following the completion of the master plan Eke Panuku will investigate optimisation as a potential funding source.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     A risk assessment has been undertaken and four key risks have been identified at this stage of the project.

51.     Community Facilities Network Plan review and the review of the aquatics network. These reviews could indicate a gap in aquatic facility provision in the Manukau area. This is considered to be a low risk as the team preparing the aquatic facility plan have reviewed the needs analysis and have advised it is consistent with their preliminary findings.

52.     Greyhound racing industry. The Government reviewed the greyhound racing industry earlier this year and has advised the industry that it needs to improve on a number of areas relating to animal welfare, data recording and transparency of all activities. In September the Minister for Racing requested the Racing Integrity Board undertake an assessment to determine whether the industry has materially improved on the areas identified work over the next 12 months with a final report presented before the end of 2022. This assessment may impact on the spatial planning for the park.

53.     Timeline The delivery of the master plan within the proposed timeframes is dependent on staff resourcing.  Staff have ensured resourcing is in place to make sure delivery is achievable within the timeframes. 

54.     Community and stakeholder expectations of opportunities. The development of a master plan has the potential to raise community and stakeholder expectations that the ideas in the master plan will be delivered. Any engagement on the master plan will need to clearly communicate the need for detailed needs assessment and feasibility studies, timeframes and budgets to deliver on the opportunities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     The timeline for developing the master plan has been revised. We have allowed more time to prepare a more through needs analysis. This means the political endorsement of the plan is now scheduled for June 2022, three months later than planned. The updated timeline is below:

56.     Following the local board’s approval of the priority opportunities, staff will begin developing master plan scenarios for the Sports Bowl.

57.     We will undertake targeted consultation with key stakeholders during the development of the draft scenarios.

58.     We will present draft master plan scenarios to the local board at a workshop in February 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Needs analysis (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Assessment of opportunities weighted scores

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shyrel Burt - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Community Garden Service Assessment

File No.: CP2021/15889

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Community Garden Service Assessment findings and next steps.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board requested a service assessment (FY 2021/2022 Community Services work programme) be prepared to guide community garden development within the local parks network.

3.       Community gardens require capital investment to develop and ongoing funding to maintain. However, appropriately located gardens can provide a range of beneficial outcomes that include education on food production and resilience, social gathering and connectedness and also contribute to improved park visitation and safety.

4.       The service assessment findings identified the following three parks for the potential development of a community garden:

·    Pearl Baker Reserve

·    Whitley Park

·    Swaffield Park.

5.       It is recommended that the board supports further investigations to determine the feasibility of community garden development at the above locations and to understand build and maintenance costs before conducting community consultation. Community Facilities will manage the feasibility investigation as part of their FY 2022/2023 work programme.

6.         The board should also explore with Healthy Families, opportunities for sustainable community garden models to provide food resilience in the community.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      support the recommendation for Community Facilities to conduct community garden development feasibility investigations at the following parks in FY 2022/2023:

              i)        Pearl Baker Reserve

             ii)        Whitley Park

           iii)        Swaffield Park.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The board supported the preparation of the service assessment as part of the FY 2021/2022 work programme to identify suitable locations within the local parks network for the development of community gardens.

 

 

8.       The service assessment will help the local board manage and respond to requests from the community to utilise parks and open space for food production purposes.

9.       Community gardens, located in the right space, can provide a range of beneficial outcomes that include:

·    education on food production and cooking

·    social gathering opportunities for a cross-section of ethnicities and age groups

·    park activation increasing park visitation and safety.

10.     However, community gardens require significant space and infrastructure to function, can be visually intrusive and effectively privatise parks and reserves for specific groups. They require capital investment to develop and ongoing funding to maintain. In addition, the community garden group must have the ability and capacity to interact with council to provide ongoing administration and management.

11.     The Auckland Teaching Gardens Trust (ATGT) provides food production and preparation education programmes and currently occupies four sites at Middlemore Park, Charntay Park, East Tamaki Reserve and Stadium Reserve.

12.     The board has previously raised concerns that ATGT education programmes were not adequately meeting the needs of the Ōtara Papatoetoe community. In response, ATGT has continued to develop and improve their services and programmes so that they are more accessible and relevant to local community needs. Additional programming includes providing support to deliver the pest-free programme with the gardens acting as education hubs to support the initiative across the local board area.

13.     ATGT’s Stadium Reserve garden will be redeveloped as part of Eke Panuku’s Unlock Old Papatoetoe regeneration programme which covers the town centre and park. The redevelopment will address population growth by providing intensified housing and improved recreational outcomes.  

14.     The development of a new community garden site, whether it be managed by ATGT or another entity, would help mitigate the loss of the Stadium Reserve garden.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The parks network as a whole is under significant strain to meet the current and future recreational needs of a rapidly growing population. In addition, the parks network is also under pressure to provide space for non-recreational outcomes and services to support housing intensification programmes and roading projects. Such outcomes include electrical substations, wastewater facilities and stormwater catchments which occupy park space and can prevent future recreational investment and improvement opportunities.

16.     The open space network is a finite resource that must be protected and retained. In particular, undeveloped open space provides for flexibility of use and supports a variety of passive and active recreation outcomes that exclusive use, which includes infrastructure developments and community gardens, displaces and prevents.

17.     While there is a recognised community need for locally grown produce and education around food production, community garden development can be detrimental to the local parks network on the following grounds:

·    privatises large areas of public space for the benefit of a few

·    prevents park access for passive recreation purposes

·    prevents other recreational improvement and investment opportunities

·    restricts the scope to deliver the Urban Ngahere Strategy as trees are largely incompatible with food production gardens.

18.     There is also an extensive list of criteria that must be considered to mitigate these risks, as well as to provide optimal outcomes, when selecting sites for community garden development, which include:

·    site capacity to locate gardens and storage facilities (sheds, etc.)

·    proximity to neighbouring properties

·    existing or established open space use patterns

·    proximity of services including water

·    toilet and parking provision

·    security

·    proximity of a willing and active group who will manage the garden.

19.     In addition, the existing community garden model is reliant on local board funding to develop and maintain garden sites. Healthy Families is investigating alternative sustainable garden models that can:

·    create local supply and demand for fresh produce

·    deliver a sustainable opex not dependent on funding

·    provide experiential learning programmes for the local community

·    create income/employment opportunities for the local community

·    provide a regenerative 'hub' for the community, a shared space where food can be a catalyst for social, cultural and environmental change.

20.     A sustainable community garden approach may provide the community with additional benefits that are currently realised through traditional garden operating models. Further exploration is required to determine the feasibility of the sustainable garden model.

Service Assessment

21.     The parks identified in the service assessment findings are located within walking and cycling distance of residential sub-divisions and can be connected to the town water supply which is vital for food production.

22.     Local parks identified for potential community garden development are:

·    Pearl Baker Reserve

·    Whitley Park

·    Swaffield Park.

Map

Description automatically generated

Figure 1: Red dots = ATGT gardens. Yellow dots = potential community garden locations.

 

 

I.    Pearl Baker Reserve

Map

Description automatically generated

Figure 2: Pearl Baker Park – Potential location for a small community garden.

 

Opportunities

Constraints

Recommendation

·      Space – there is sufficient space within the park for a small community garden.

·      Car park – a small car park provides eight spaces.

·      Education - a school and ECE are located nearby presenting education opportunities.

·      Nearby residential catchment – garden can provide for residents of the local neighbourhood

 

·      Space – to maximise passive recreation space and prevent blocking the park access from Tyrone Street, the park can only accommodate a small garden (see figure 2).

·      Car park – provides for park visitors, ECE staff and parent/caregivers drop-off/collection and is likely to have limited weekday capacity to provide for community garden users.

·      Adjacent neighbours – potential odour or aesthetics may result in complaints from neighbours.

·      Park privatisation - Loss of passive recreation space may restrict the functionality of the park to provide for passive recreation (informal sports).

·      Conduct further investigations (garden development costs and soil testing) before conducting community consultation to determine the need for a community garden at this location.

Table 1: Pearl Baker Park service assessment summary.

 

II.   Whitley Park

Graphical user interface

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Figure 3: Whitley Park – Potential location for a community garden.

 

Opportunities

Constraints

Recommendation

·      Large space – dedicate the whole park to provide for food production.

·      Nearby residential catchment – garden is within walking and cycling distance of a large residential catchment.

·      Loss of passive recreation space – there is insufficient space at the park to provide a garden and retain useable passive recreation space. The loss of space is off-set by the nearby Cooper Park and Sandbrook Park which provide access to playspaces and passive recreation space.

·      Supporting infrastructure – The park provides no supporting infrastructure including car parks or toilets. On-road car parking may cause problems for adjacent neighbours.

·      Adjacent neighbours – potential odour or aesthetics may result in complaints from neighbours.

·      Conduct further investigations (garden development costs and soil testing) before conducting community consultation to determine the need for a community garden at this location.

Table 2: Whitley Park service assessment summary.

 

III.  Swaffield Park

Map

Description automatically generated

Figure 4: Swaffield Park – Potential location for a community garden.

 

Opportunities

Constraints

Recommendation

·      Potential to accommodate a large community garden with associated infrastructure including a small car park.

·      Passive recreation space – the garden will occupy half the park with the remainder available for community use.

·      Nearby residential catchment – garden is within walking and cycling distance of a large residential catchment.

 

·      Adjacent neighbours – potential odour or aesthetics may result in complaints from neighbours.

·      ATGT – Middlemore Park teaching garden is located 400 metres away and already provides the community with access to a garden.

·      Loss of park space – while there is space within the park to develop a garden there are few other local parks located nearby.

 

·      Conduct further investigations (garden development costs and soil testing) before conducting community consultation to determine the need for a community garden at this location.

Table 3: Swaffield Park service assessment summary.

 

23.     The community garden service assessment findings provide the board with high-level direction on community garden development. The high-level recommendations in this report will be validated through:

·    Feasibility and development cost assessment – investigate the feasibility and costs to develop a community garden including the required infrastructure (equipment storage facilities, raised garden beds, pathways, water connection, toilet provision, etc.).

·    Soil testing for contaminants – which can be mitigated through raised bed development at extra cost.

·    Community consultation - determine the communities appetite to change the function and purpose of a reserve for community garden purposes.

24.     The feasibility and development costs phase of the project will be managed by Community Facilities as part of their FY 2022/2023 work programme.

25.     In addition, the board should continue to further investigate with Healthy Families alternative sustainable community garden management models to provide improved benefits and outcomes to the local community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     Community gardens located near densely populated residential areas may contribute to reductions in carbon emissions by providing access to locally grown food, thereby reducing car dependency and supermarket visits. In addition, food education programmes give people the skills to grow and produce at home or in shared spaces outside the parks network which may further reduce car usage.

27.     Trees are largely incompatible with food production gardens as they cast shadows over beds and reduce the availability of water in the soil. However, the planting of fruit trees at suitable, strategic locations within both community gardens and the local parks network will provide the community with a seasonal food source and contribute to Urban Ngahere Strategy outcomes by increasing the local board’s tree canopy coverage.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Approval of the service assessment findings will not impact current approved work programmes or budgets. Community Facilities as part of their FY 2022/2023 work programme will investigate the feasibility and costs associated with the development of a community garden at the approved locations.

29.     The development of a community garden may also align with the Good Food Road Map framework adopted by the local board and supported by Healthy Families South Auckland. The Good Food Road Map aims to support the development of resilient food systems where individuals/whanau have access to food/drink that is affordable, appetising, sustainable, locally produced and culturally appropriate.

30.     It is recommended that the board explores with Healthy Families opportunities to develop a sustainable community garden management model for the identified sites.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The local board provided support for the development of a service assessment to help inform network planning and manage community requests for garden development.

32.     At a September 2021 service assessment findings workshop, the board indicated that there are community groups ready to make use of appropriately located gardens and that mana whenua be engaged to help inform the Community Facilities led feasibility study phase of the project. The board also requested that the feasibility investigation consider the planting of fruit trees at the approved locations.

33.     Community garden development will provide the local community with access to a needed resource and contribute to the delivery of the Local Board Plan 2020 aspiration outlined in outcome 4 Parks and facilities that meet our people’s needs and contribute to the Auckland Plan 2050 outcome: Belonging and Participation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Parks are of fundamental importance to iwi, their culture and their traditions. Community garden development will benefit Māori and the wider community with access to locally grown produce. It will also provide a base for the delivery of education programmes to support food resiliency in the community.

35.     In addition, community garden development will also contribute to the following outcome identified in Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Kia ora te Taiao, Māori exercise tino rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga through Te Tiriti based relationships with the council group, to enhance the mauri of te taiao.

36.     Mana whenua will be engaged to help inform the Community Facilities led feasibility study phase of the project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     Should the local board support the report recommendations, capital funding (Capex) and ongoing operational funding (Opex) will be required to develop and maintain community gardens. In addition, garden development will have an impact on future asset renewals funding as the local board manage the renewal of failing community garden infrastructure.

38.     However, there may be scope to develop a sustainable community garden model that is not dependent on local board funding with the Healthy Families team.

39.     Community Facilities will lead the feasibility investigations to determine the feasibility of community garden development at the recommended locations and provide the board with oversight of the associated development costs as part of the FY 2022/2023 work programme.

 Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     Failure to approve the recommendations in this report will be a missed opportunity to understand the feasibility and costs to develop community gardens at the recommended locations. In addition, the board will also miss the chance to respond to community requests for access to community gardens located within the local parks network.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     As part of the FY 2022/2023 work programme Community Facilities will lead the investigations to determine the feasibility and the associated development costs of community garden development at the following locations:

·    Pearl Baker Park

·    Whitley Park

·    Swaffield Park.

42.     The board should also continue to explore sustainable community garden management models with Healthy Families.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Steve Owens - Parks and Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18320

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname. 

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the other of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology. 

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e. the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e. the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data show that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/local-impacts-local-board-views-reports.aspx

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order. Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias.  If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ballot order effects and Auckland Council elections_November 2021

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

File No.: CP2021/16892

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek support for the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho/Thriving Communities Strategy 2022-2032.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s strategy for community and social wellbeing. A review of the plan in 2018 identified it needed to be refreshed to align with the Auckland Plan 2050 outcomes and better address the changes and challenges in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

3.       These challenges include growing socio-economic disparities, population growth and intensification, the impacts of climate change and more recently COVID-19. These impact on communities’ ability to thrive. 

4.       Through the refresh process we heard from diverse communities across the region on what is needed to help them thrive. These insights have shaped the draft strategy. 

5.       The draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy sets out the high-level direction for the next 10 years to respond to these challenges and to what communities told us was important. 

6.       The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which are the building blocks for thriving: 

·    Manaakitanga | Quality of life: 

All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

·    Whanaungatanga | Community Connection: 
Aucklanders are connected and feel as though they belong 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action:  

All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures:  

Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

7.       The high-level outcomes are supported by objectives that cascade to three key shifts in the way we work:  from “one-size fits all” to targeting our responses, from adhoc and siloed to working in integrated ways, and shifting from council as expert to enabling community leadership. 

8.       Four investment principles focus resources to impact on community challenges. This will ensure there is a strong, intentional link between aspiration, investment and action, and that we focus on communities who experience the greatest inequities.

9.       A key constraint is that there is currently no additional budget attached to the strategy. This means the pace of change will be reliant on future budget and implementation planning to either seek new investment or to refocus existing resources to the strategy’s objectives.

10.     Another limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors where the council is not the primary deliverer.  

11.     The draft strategy will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022 for adoption. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      support the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Strategy 2022 – 2032 as set out in Attachment A to this report.  

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The Auckland Plan Participation and Belonging outcome in particular sets the aspiration that ‘All Aucklanders will be part of and contribute to society, access opportunities, and have the chance to develop to their full potential’ 

13.     Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities was adopted in 2014 as council’s community and social wellbeing plan. It is a core plan to deliver the Auckland Plan 2050 which has a strong focus on fostering an inclusive Auckland where everyone has the chance to thrive. 

14.     In 2018 a review of Ngā Hapori Momoho identified several improvement areas. This included refreshing the strategy to better align it the new Auckland Plan 2050 and to address the changes and growing challenges facing Auckland.  

Diverse community voices have shaped the draft strategy approach

 

15.     The refreshed draft Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities strategy (Attachment A) has been informed by feedback from the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau, key sector stakeholders, partners, and mana whenua. These voices are central to both the content of the strategy and how it will be used.  

16.     During 2019 and 2020 staff looked at feedback from over 50 previous public engagements, and then undertook face to-face interviews, focus groups and online hui. We heard from over 400 community groups and leaders from across the region on what it means to thrive and what council can do to support that.  

17.     Staff presented the findings from this community engagement to local boards in April 2021 and can be viewed by the public by following this link: https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/thriving-communities

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland is facing local and international challenges impacting thriving communities  

18.     At the 2018 Census there were nearly 1.6 million usual residents in Auckland, an increase of 11% since the 2013 Census, and this is projected to grow to 2.4 million by 2050[1].

19.     Tāmaki Makaurau is very diverse – it is home to the largest Polynesian population of any city in the world, and 40% of the population were born overseas.  

20.     Whilst many of those living in Auckland can make the most of all this region has to offer, there are still many who have limited capability to access social and economic resources and opportunities compared to the general population.  

21.     Many Aucklanders do not have access to the things they need to thrive. This restricts their ability to fully participate in society and in activities that have meaning and value to them. 

22.     Tāmaki Makaurau’s strong economic growth has not been shared equally, with Māori and Pasifika communities making considerably less each week than the rest of the Auckland population.  

23.     Over a third (38.5%) of Pasifika people and 46% of young people in Auckland are living in overcrowded and unsuitable homes[2].

24.     Only 50% of Aucklanders feel a sense of belonging in their neighbourhoods, and 49% have felt isolated and lonely[3]. 

25.     Tāmaki Makaurau is facing some key challenges over the next 10-20 years that provide the strategic drivers for the refreshed strategy. We need to respond to these if we want to maintain social cohesion and ensure all our people and communities are thriving.   

Challenge 1 

Challenge 2 

Challenge 3 

Growing wealth and income inequality will mean too many whānau cannot thrive. 

The pace and scale of growth and social change could undermine Aucklander’s sense of belonging and connection. 

Our changing climate will make outcomes worse for those communities already struggling. 

 

26.     More recently other significant changes both locally and globally are contributing to why we need a strategy that takes an intentional approach to supporting thriving, inclusive and sustainable communities:  

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Changing the way council works can help address community challenges 

27.     In recognition of the 2018 review findings and from our community and stakeholder engagement, we know there needed to be some key shifts in the underlying thinking and approach of the council. We also need to be explicit in our priorities. Key shifts proposed include the following:  

 

 

 

 

 

From

To

Ad hoc and siloed

Working in integrated ways

We will work across the Auckland Council group, with government and across communities and sectors to support Aucklanders to thrive. We will share data, evidence and learning. 

 

We will prioritise interventions which support coordination and collective impact to deliver on the multiple outcomes which impact Aucklander’s wellbeing (social, environmental, cultural and economic).

One size fits all

Targeting our responses

We will change our current services, activities and ways of working to better meet the needs of whānau and communities, particularly those experiencing the greatest disparity in outcomes.  

We will tailor services and activities to meet local needs and opportunities. 

Council as expert

Enabling community leadership

We will support communities (whānau, hapū, iwi, people) to lead their own responses. We will enable them to define, deliver, and monitor the things that enable them to thrive.

What we want to achieve – an overview of the draft strategy 

28.     To guide how we respond to these identified challenges and to support the key shifts we need to make, the draft strategy sets out four outcomes and six objectives. The outcomes set out where communities want to be in the future. Objectives identify where to focus to get there.  

Outcomes: Four building blocks for thriving 

29.     The draft strategy has four main outcome areas which if achieved would contribute to thriving communities. 

·    Manaakitanga |Quality of life 
All Aucklanders enjoy the essentials of a good life and fulfil their potential  

 

·    Whanaungatanga | Community connection 
Auckland are connected and feel as though they belong 

 

·    Kotahitanga | Collective action 
All Aucklanders can participate and they take collective action to meet common goals 

 

·    Kaitiakitanga | Sustainable futures 
Aucklanders are connected to and care for the environment. 

 

Objectives: Where should we focus our action 

30.     To help give direction on how we might achieve the intended outcomes, we have identified six objective areas which will provide guidance on what actions could be taken by the organisation to contribute to the outcomes. 

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31.     While we have grouped action areas under each objective many of these will contribute to multiple objectives. Many are focused on addressing complex societal challenges which council does not have all the levers, resource or influence to directly address.  

32.     These objectives do however provide direction on how we can use the levers available to us (such as our procurement power) to affect and influence change, within our control.  

Investment principles will help us to invest in what will make the greatest difference 

33.     The draft strategy proposes we invest in our resource to make the biggest impact, and this will be guided by four key principles:

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34.     Auckland Council also has a range of roles and levers that we can use to effect change in conjunction with partners to help communities thrive.  

35.     Our presence in and understanding of the community is one of our most powerful tools. This can be utilised in several areas: urban form, procurement, community facilities, our workforce, transport, community development and grants.  

Strengths of the draft strategy  

36.     As an outcome focused strategy, it provides focus and direction, but is not prescriptive on processes or actions. It provides scope for creative and innovative responses to achieving the outcomes and objectives.  

37.     The high-level outcomes and objective in the strategy cascade to key shifts, investment principles and to three-year implementation plans. This will ensure there is a strong and intentional link between aspiration, investment and action.   

38.     The draft strategy also presents both council and partners with an opportunity to do things differently, apply new approaches and have the flexibility to respond to local needs in ways that are appropriate and effective.  

39.     This is important as it not only addresses current challenges but allows flexibility to respond to emerging challenges in the future as our intended end outcomes will not change.  

40.     It also presents us with an opportunity to partner with our communities to incorporate existing and emerging approaches from global research as well as those generated in Aotearoa, so that we are using all tools available to collectively to achieve the outcomes.  

Constraints and limitations of the draft strategy 

41.     Nga Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities is a 10-year strategy focused on long-term outcomes. It will take some time to see progress and the impact of actions, especially given the complexity of the challenges. 

42.     A key limitation is that many of the barriers to people thriving relate to complex socio-economic factors that council does not hold the primary levers for. 

43.     Council is, however, well-placed to use all of its resources and levers more effectively and work alongside central government and communities to support change. 

44.     A key constraint is that there is no additional budget to support delivery of the strategy, so the pace of change will be subject to how effectively existing resources and budget can be realigned and directed to the strategy’s new objectives.  

45.     New investment will need to be considered as part of future annual and long-term budget processes. 

46.     There is opportunity, however, for reprioritisation of existing resource and investment to be considered as part of implementation planning. The outcome of this will be reported to the governing body as part of the first three-year implementation plan (FY22-25). 

47.     The draft strategy relies heavily on the significant cooperation and commitment across the council, elected members and community partners for it to be effective.  This in turn relies on visible and active leadership, and ongoing monitoring of progress and impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     During engagement, we heard from communities that the environment was a significant contributor to their wellbeing. Climate change and environmental degradation are a threat to the way our communities aspire to live in Tāmaki Makaurau. 

49.     The Kaitiakitanga outcome was created to reflect the voices of mana whenua and community, through prioritising environmental wellbeing and encouraging community action and sustainability. Actions developed in the Thriving Communities three-year implementation plans will need to consider the connection between the wellbeing of our communities and the wellbeing of the environment. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     This is a strategy for the whole council group and will also be used to challenge and guide council teams and CCO’s in their implementation roles.  

51.     Staff and teams from across the council and CCO’s have been involved in the refresh process, including attending a series of workshops to help identify existing and future actions to support what communities told us was important.  

52.     Going forward staff will work closely with the council group on implementation planning and the development of the first three-year implementation plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local boards have a strong interest, and play a key role, in creating thriving communities in their areas. All local boards have local board plan outcomes that support thriving communities, and many are already working towards several Thriving Communities objectives.

54.     Community engagement included communities from across all local board areas.  

55.     The findings from the engagement phase were shared with elected members and engagement participants in early 2021. They were also published on the Thriving Communities Have Your Say page. 

56.     Staff attended local board workshops in October 2021 to share the high-level draft strategy. Local boards were broadly supportive of the approach and provided helpful feedback that has helped shape the revised draft.  Common themes in local board feedback include: 

·    concern for isolated communities

·    a strong desire to build the strategy into work plans. Boards could see the benefit of the approach and were eager to turn this into a practical response through their local plans

·    concerns about funding the strategy, and opportunities to leverage existing or additional resource to support their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     The 2018 Census found that over 23% of Aotearoa’s Māori population live in Tāmaki Makaurau, making up 11.5% of Auckland’s population – the highest Māori population in any city in Aotearoa[4].

58.     The average age of Auckland’s Māori population is 24.9 years, compared to Auckland’s average of 34.7 years. As this young population grows and reaches working age, Māori will be a critical part of supporting our economy and ageing population. 

59.     Although Māori make up a large proportion of Tamaki Makaurau’s population, they have not equitably shared in our economic growth. In 2018 the median income for all Aucklanders was $34,000, but for Māori it was $27,000[5]. 

60.     By focusing on achieving equitable outcomes for Māori, this strategy will make a positive impact on the social, cultural and economic wellbeing of tangata, whanau and hapori.  

Engagement to understand the needs of Māori communities 

61.     To ensure the strategy is relevant and effective for Māori, staff undertook individual engagement interviews with 17 mana whenua iwi and two mataawaka organisations.  

62.     Key inputs into the strategy from the engagement process include:

·    an environmental objective to reflect the importance of whenua to wellbeing and thriving

·    focus on achieving equity

·    recognition that whakawhanaungatanga and connection is central to thriving communities.

Delivering Māori outcomes 

63.     The council’s direction for delivering Māori outcomes is set out in Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau, which reflects the aspirations of Auckland ‘s Māori communities.  

64.     The draft strategy supports the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 by addressing the four pou of social, cultural, economic, and environmental wellbeing for Māori in Tamaki Makaurau. 

65.     Mana whenua and Mataawaka will have an opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan in November 2021. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     There is currently no additional budget attached to the draft Ngā Hapori Momoho /Thriving Communities strategy. This means in the short term it will need to be delivered within existing budgets and resources of council and CCOs. Where any additional investment is required, this will need to be considered through the long-term plan or annual plan processes.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

If <event>: 

Then <impact>: 

Possible mitigations: 

If it is not clear that the draft strategy should drive reprioritisation of existing resources.   

It may create expectations that there will be additional budget to support the implementation of the draft strategy. 

All public-facing communications and guidance about the draft strategy will make it clear it is intended to focus & re-prioritise existing resources.  

Future budget and implementation planning will identify how actions will be funded from existing budgets or through seeking new investment.  

If the draft strategy is viewed as too ‘high level’ and does not provide clear enough direction.

The draft strategy may fail to have any meaningful impact on the way the organisation delivers services and therefore would have no meaningful impact on the desired outcomes.  

Develop a strong implementation plan and ensure there is visible and active senior leadership to drive implementation.  

The objectives will provide appropriate level of direction without being too prescriptive.  

Incorporating a measurement framework in the implementation plan to help understand impact. 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Community engagement on the draft strategy will be undertaken in November 2021.

68.     This feedback and local board resolutions will be reported to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in February 2022, when the committee considers the draft strategy for adoption.  

69.     The draft strategy will be supported by a three-year implementation plan with tailored actions, and a monitoring and evaluation framework to track progress and impact. These two items are being developed for consideration in April 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngā Hapori Momoho | Thriving Communities Draft Strategy

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mackenzie Blucher - Graduate Policy Advisor

Dave Jaggs - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022

File No.: CP2021/17143

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (the draft policy).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Significance and Engagement Policy, adopted in 2014, is undergoing a policy refresh to make it more contemporary and user-friendly.

3.       The goal of the policy refresh is to provide for a simplified decision-making process through a high-level guiding document that allows for case-by-case assessments.

4.       Minor updates are needed in both the significance and engagement components of the policy.

5.       Updates around the significance component of the draft policy include:

·    the assessment of significance in terms of a continuum

·    taking a cumulative approach to a package of proposals or decisions

·    adjusting the list of strategic assets to include only assets critical for the delivery of services and clarifying that most strategic assets are identified as groups or networks of assets to reflect the way in which they deliver services

·    adding guidance for assessing the significance of decisions for assets that do not meet the criteria for being strategic.

6.       Updates around the engagement component of the draft policy include:

·    simplifying existing text to make the policy more user-friendly

·    ensuring the engagement principles capture a more diverse Tāmaki Makaurau

·    capturing the need to safeguard staff, elected members and the community during consultation and engagement

·    giving more visibility to the connection between the policy and the forthcoming and separate refresh of the Engagement Guidelines, which will support staff to operationalise the policy.

7.       The draft policy was adopted for public consultation by Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 meeting, resolution number GB/2021/111.

8.       Public consultation ran from 27 September to 18 October 2021.

9.       Adoption of the final policy is projected for February 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy as part of the overall consideration for final adoption in February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Significance and Engagement Policy (the 2014 policy) was created and adopted in 2014 to fulfill the legislative requirements outlined in section 76AA of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).

11.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is a key document for decision-making and the consultation process. It is comprised of two interrelated sections on significance and engagement.

12.     The significance section sets out how and when communities can expect the council to engage before making decisions, describes the council’s approach to determining the significance of proposals and decisions, and lists the council’s strategic assets.

13.     The engagement section provides high-level principles on how to engage inclusively with the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau. These high-level principles ensure that engagement is fit-for-purpose according to the level of significance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have undertaken a policy refresh as the 2014 policy has not undergone changes since its initial adoption.

15.     An internal assessment of the 2014 policy found that that it was largely easy to use, but minor improvements would allow for more efficient decision-making and more fit-for-purpose engagement processes.

16.     General high-level updates and clarifications are being proposed for the draft policy to create a more contemporary policy.

17.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to be a prescriptive policy document, and any accepted changes to the draft policy will not change the purpose for which it is used.

18.     The proposed changes to the Significance and Engagement Policy 2021 were reported to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September – see Attachment A Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation, also found online with associated documents.

Consultation

19.     Formal public consultation was held from 27 September to 18 October 2021. The consultation document is part of Attachment A, or online here.

20.     Given COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the region, consultation was conducted entirely virtually and consisted of:

·    consultation materials and online feedback forms made available on the council’s engagement website (AK Have Your Say)

·    virtual workshops with community partners with demographic advisory panels

·    working with community partners to reach diverse groups.

21.     All feedback has been captured and will be reported through to the Governing Body meeting in February 2022 to inform decision-making on the final policy.

22.     A summary of the regional feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B and local board specific feedback in Attachment C.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Accepting the proposed changes to the draft policy allows for a fit-for-purpose and contemporary significance and engagement policy that will encourage a richer engagement process during future consultations around climate change issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Any strategic asset under the draft policy that is held or managed by a substantive Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) will be identified in the CCO Accountability Policy. CCO’s must comply with that policy when making decisions on strategic assets under their control.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local boards play a key role in engaging with their local communities. The change to enable more fit-for-purpose consultation and engagement for some asset-based decisions may provide local boards with greater flexibility to customise some engagement processes to better meet the needs of their community.

26.     Local board chairs were invited to a workshop held on 4 August 2021 that also included the Parks, Arts, Community and Events, and Finance and Performance committees for a high-level overview on proposed amendments to the draft policy.

27.     Formalised local board views from this workshop and report will be incorporated into the February 2022 Governing Body report for the policy adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The refresh of the Significance and Engagement Policy will strengthen the council’s capacity and capability to engage with and meet the needs of the Māori community. This will be achieved through the delivery of bespoke training initiatives and resources which align to best practice engagement that responds to the needs and is supported by Māori. Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides a foundation to build council’s engagement approach and supports initiatives already underway such as Te Matapuna 2 as a pilot for spatial-based engagement. Work on relationship agreements is progressing, and there is good support for capacity contracts. Further work is required to streamline engagement forums to ensure they are fit for purpose and respond to priorities from Māori.

29.     Ongoing collaboration on the development of the Māori engagement practice and approach will inform the Engagement Guidelines and will ensure council’s size and engagement reach is leveraged effectively. This collaboration will ensure that the operational execution of the Engagement Guidelines is well-informed and aligned with best practice in te ao Māori.

30.     This focus on practice, capacity and capability will guide operational performance so that the aspirations for Māori engagement in Tāmaki Makaurau are progressed, aligned and achievable. Further work on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau performance measures will be aligned with the engagement approach as it continues to be developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed changes to the significance section of the policy assists in the assessment of significance and may reduce the financial costs of engagement approaches that are not fit-for-purpose.

32.     Reclassifying some assets as non-strategic will also remove the burden of audit costs if the council seeks to make any future decisions around changing ownership or control of those assets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present any risk. The risks associated with refreshing the draft policy are set out in the report to the 23 September Governing Body meeting in Attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Feedback from the consultation along with local board views will be reported to the 24 February 2022 Governing Body meeting as part of the materials for the finalised draft policy approval.

35.     The final Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 is proposed to be implemented following approval at the same Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation

109

b

Summary of regional feedback

149

c

Local Board specific feedback

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Yu - Senior Advisor - Fin Policy

Eddie Tuiavii - Principal Advisor - Democracy and Engage

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Kenneth Aiolupotea - General Manager Democracy and Engagement

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)

File No.: CP2021/18825

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formalise local board feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Through Vision Zero, Auckland Transport (AT) has adopted the goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050. One of the faster and most cost-effective ways to prevent DSI is to set safe and appropriate speed limits for the function, safety, design and layout of roads.

3.       As part of Tranche 1 of Auckland Transports Safe Speeds Programme, safe speed limits were set on many high risk urban and rural roads and within town centres across Auckland between June 2020 and June 2021.

4.       Roads where safe speed limits were set on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent  reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries[6]. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced on these roads by seven per cent, compared to an upward trend in road trauma seen on the rest of the road network.

5.       Further changes to speed limits are now being proposed for a number of roads across Auckland where current speed limits are not deemed safe and appropriate. This is referred to as Tranche 2A of the Safe Speeds Programme.

6.       Details of the changes proposed in each local board area are provided as Attachment A.

7.       Public Consultation on Tranche 2A closed on 14 November 2021. A summary of  the consultation feedback is provided as Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       AT is the road controlling authority for all roads within the Auckland transport system. Generally, this is the local road network which includes public roads and beaches but excludes State Highways for which Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency has responsibility.

9.       Reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at speeds that are appropriate for road function, safety, design and use, is one of the key measures that AT is undertaking to improve safety on Auckland’s roads. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits will contribute to a reduction in deaths and serious injuries on our roads and ensure speed limit consistency on the network.

10.     Setting safe and appropriate speed limits also supports AT’s Vision Zero approach (adopted by the AT Board in September 2019), which provides that no deaths or serious injuries are acceptable while travelling on our transport network.

11.     AT controls more than 7,300 kilometres of roads and - through the Safe Speeds Programme -  is working through a multi-year programme to review all speed limits across its network.

12.     Speed limits must be reviewed and set (by bylaw) in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017. In line with government strategy and legislation, AT is prioritising high risk roads for review.

13.     Previously AT made the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) which set new speed limits for the highest risk roads following AT’s first tranche of speed limit reviews. Within this first tranche, speed limits were reviewed on around 10 per cent of the local road network. Where new safe and appropriate speed limits were required to be set, these came into effect from mid-2020 to mid-2021.

All road performance

14.     Roads where speed limits were changed on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced by seven per cent.

15.     This equals four lives saved and 48 less injury crashes on roads treated with safe and appropriate speeds.

Rural road performance

16.     Rural roads where speeds were changed on 30 June 2020 have seen a 78 per cent reduction in fatalities and a small reduction in serious injuries.

17.     This equates to a DSI reduction of 16 per cent on the rural network where speed limit changes have been made. The overall number of crashes is similar to pre-implementation, but the crash severity rates have reduced. More severe crashes would be expected on higher speed roads.

18.     While it will take additional time to confirm that these trends are sustained, initial indications are promising.

19.     AT is now proposing further speed limit changes for a number of roads across Auckland after reviewing and finding that their current speed limits are not safe and appropriate. This is part of the second tranche of reviews under the Safe Speeds Programme (Tranche 2A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     AT is proposing to amend the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 and set new safe and appropriate speed limits for 823 roads across Auckland with a total length of 614km (approximately eight per cent of the road network), with these new limits proposed to come into force mid-2022.

21.     AT has reviewed the existing speed limits for each of the roads identified and found they are not safe and appropriate for the function, design and use of the roads. This means there is now a legal obligation to improve the safety of the roads. Making no change is not an option. This means AT is required to either:

·    set a new safe and appropriate speed limit, or

·    install engineering measures to improve the safety of the road, like road widening, resurfacing, barriers, road markings, speed humps etc.

22.     Physical constraints and the corresponding costs involved mean that it isn’t viable to ‘engineer up’ these roads to support their existing speed limits. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits is one of the fastest and most cost-effective ways of reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

Community Engagement

23.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Tranche 2A took place from 27 September – 14 November 2021, including:

·    a flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes on/near the roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

·    advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist/ethnic media:

Central Leader, East & Bays Courier, Eastern Courier, Manukau Courier, North Harbour News, North Shore Times, Nor-West News, Papakura Courier, Rodney Times, Franklin County News, Western Leader, Hibiscus Matters, Pohutukawa Times, Chinese Herald, Mandarin Pages, Ponsonby News

·    radio advertising on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    radio interviews and adlibs on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    media release and on-going media management

·    published an article in Our Auckland

·    translated consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Tongan, Samoan, Simplified Chinese, Korean and NZ Sign Language

·    sent flyers, posters and hardcopy Freepost feedback forms, in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

·    put posters on trains, buses and ferries that could reach 280,000 commuters each day

·    15 online webinars.

24.     Feedback has been provided through a number of channels:

·    online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

·    via a survey

·    via a mapping tool

·    at public hearings held on 25 November.

25.     Local boards have also had the opportunity to present at public hearings.

26.     A summary of feedback from the local community has been provided as Attachment B. This includes feedback on specific streets in your area, as well as broad feedback about the Safe Speeds Programme more generally.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

28.     For town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced under the first tranche of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of respondents advising they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The Safe Speeds Programme has been endorsed by the AT Board, the Auckland Council Planning Committee and conforms with direction from the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2018/19 – 2027/28 and the Auckland Transport Alignment Project.

30.     In March 2021, Auckland Transport staff held a workshop with Auckland Council’s Planning Committee to provide an update to councillors on Vision Zero road safety performance over the past three years, and sought feedback on the direction and priorities for Tranche 2 of the programme. The Committee expressed informal strong support for the direction of the Safe Speeds Programme, with a number of members supportive of the programme moving faster into their community areas.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Public submissions and feedback are provided as Attachment B.

32.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide feedback on changes proposed in Tranche 2A.

33.     Feedback provided in relation to Tranche 1 has also been considered by Auckland Transport in the development of the current proposals.

34.     For the residential areas where speed limits have been reduced under the first tranche of the Safe Speeds Programme, there has been strong positive feedback on the safety improvements, with 79 per cent of respondents commenting that the area feels safer overall. As noted above, 19 per cent of respondents advised they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g. walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Engagement on Tranche 2 has been undertaken with kaitiaki at northern, central and southern transport hui during 2021 alongside detailed engagement on the rural marae workstream, which is part of the second stage of Tranche 2.

36.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of the second phase of Tranche 2.

37.     Further engagement will be undertaken following the public engagement period to determine feedback on and support for the final proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines.

40.     When Auckland moved into Alert Level Four, a temporary pause was put on all new consultations to allow time to adapt our consultation strategy and increase our digital engagement. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    the consultation start date was delayed by three weeks from 6 September to 27 September

·    the consultation length was extended from 5 to 7 weeks

·    the number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased

·    digital advertising spend was increased, and digital engagement plans were put in place with Auckland Council’s Engagement Partners who helped reach our diverse communities.

41.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline, and local boards will be kept up to date with any changes to the dates that the new speed limits will take effect.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Early in 2022 Auckland Transport will finalise an analysis and feedback report, including feedback from both the public and local boards.

43.     On 31 March 2022 staff will present this report and recommendations to the AT Board.

44.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force on 31 May 2022 for the majority of roads, and 13 June 2022 for roads associated with schools, allowing for school speed changes to be made at the start of a school week.

45.     These dates may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept updated if any changes are made.

46.     More speed limit changes (Tranche 2B) are planned to be publicly consulted in 2022. AT has engaged with all local boards affected by Tranche 2B and will continue to keep local boards updated as the speed reviews are finalised.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

List of changes proposed for local board area

167

b

Summary report of consultation feedback on speed limit changes (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Oliver Roberts - Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter One, 2021-22

File No.: CP2021/18177

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with proposed changes to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A number of general changes are proposed for the Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plans, as part of ongoing work to improve and refine the approach to engagement with Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs).

3.       The four substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare – may also propose specific changes.

4.       General changes are shown in Attachment A. Attachments B-D include work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, and Watercare.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter One 2021-22

b)      adopt the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

6.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

7.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans.

8.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·    additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

9.       In addition, as part of implementing the Joint CCO Engagement Plan, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

10.     We are introducing these new reports gradually, so for Quarter One your report may not include updates from all four CCOs.

11.     For Quarter Two reporting, we expect to have updates from all four CCOs for all local board areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes proposed by Local Board Services

12.     The original discussions with local boards used the five levels of engagement outlined by the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2): inform, consult, involve, collaborate and empower. Feedback from local boards indicated that using all five levels was unwieldy, and in particular that there was confusion and disagreement about when ‘empower’ might be used.

13.     We are proposing that we reduce the engagement levels down to a simplified three step model of inform, consult and collaborate. This helps to better distinguish between projects and to clarify the kinds of engagement that are expected at each step.

14.     We have also moved the CCO work programme tables from being embedded within the engagement plan, to being a series of four attachments. This makes it easier to use the work programmes as the basis for quarterly reporting.

15.     Minor changes may have also been made to names of Local Board Services and/or CCO contacts.

16.     These changes are all shown as tracked changes in Attachment A – Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

17.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment B.

18.     Auckland Transport has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme. 

Auckland Unlimited

19.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment C.

Changes to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

20.     Auckland Unlimited had previously responded to local board requests to include more information on major events by adding a line item for each event.

21.     As part of ongoing work to improve and refine this process, we are proposing to replace all the individual major event lines with the three following lines:

·    delivered Events (Diwali, Lantern Festival, Pasifika, Tāmaki Herenga Waka)

·    sponsored Events (i.e., Elemental)

·    supported Events (i.e., FIFA World Cup, World Choir Games)

22.     This change reduces the number of amendments and additions required to the engagement plan each quarter as events are completed and provides a more consistent update pattern going forward. 

23.     These proposed changes are reflected in Attachment A.

24.     No other changes have been proposed by Auckland Unlimited to the engagement programme.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

25.     Eke Panuku has not provided updates for this quarter’s report. Eke Panuku will be joining the combined reporting framework for Quarter Two.

26.     Eke Panuku has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme. 

Watercare

27.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment D.

28.     Watercare has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

30.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Adopting the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

32.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

34.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

36.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

38.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Two in March 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

173

b

Auckland Transport 2021-22 Q1 Report - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

189

c

Auckland Unlimited 2021-22 Q1 Report - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

191

d

Watercare 2021-22 Q1 Report - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

193

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/17320

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status (behind delivery, significant risk).

4.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        One hundred and three activities within the agreed work programmes of 110 activities are on track (green), including four which are complete. There are six activities with some risk or issues (amber), and one cancelled activity (grey).

·        The Thirsty Liquor Bairds Road, Papatoetoe application, which the board provided an objection to, was denied (#372).

·        Prior to lockdown many activities and events in the community were able to take place successfully through Sistema Aotearoa (#368), Ōtara Music Arts Centre (#369) and Fresh Gallery (#367).

·        Planting and restoration programmes that started before lockdown made significant progress, and some were able to continue under alert level 3 (#774, #890).

·        Te ao Māori and Matariki events were able to take place in July (#380, #1360).

5.       The financial performance report compared to the budget 2021/2022 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note. Net operating performance for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area is four per cent below budget for the quarter ended September 2021 mainly resulting from a substantial decrease in revenue. Operating expenditure is two per cent below budget and operating revenue is 30 per cent below budget. Capital expenditure has achieved 88 per cent of budget spend for the quarter.

6.         The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2021

b)      note that the Customer and Community Services Capex work programme been updated to reflect financial deferrals as shown in Attachment C.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Auckland Emergency Management

·        Auckland Unlimited.

8.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, or projects from Auckland Transport or Eke Panuku are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

COVID-19 restrictions

9.       Auckland has faced COVID-19 restrictions (Level 3 and 4) from 17 August 2021 for 6 weeks of quarter one, which is just under half the period this report covers.

10.     Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were closed.

11.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update in Attachment A.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

13.     The graph below shows the status of activities in each department’s work programme. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes.

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates

14.     Community Arts Initiatives Programme (#368): Sistema Aotearoa delivered 20 programmes with 68 sessions to a combined total of 791 participants and attendees. Under lockdown 589 online Zoom lessons were delivered.

15.     Operational expenditure for Fresh Gallery Ōtara (Council facility) (#367): Fresh Gallery delivered eight programmes, five of which had Māori outcomes, with 11 sessions to a combined total of 620 participants and attendees.

16.     Operational expenditure for Ōtara Music Arts Centre (Council facility) (#369): OMAC delivered 12 programmes, with 168 sessions to a combined total of 1,097 participants and attendees. Highlights included the collaboration with Fresh Gallery and the Ōtara Library to deliver weaving, bone carving and jewellery making workshops.

17.     Build Capacity: Community-led response to social concerns (#372): This workline addresses support for action to reduce harm from proliferation of off-licenses in the local area. Last quarter the contractor undertook capacity building through three monthly meetings and three objector workshops. The Thirsty Liquor Bairds Road, Papatoetoe application, which the board also provided an objection to, was denied.

18.     Activation of community places Ōtara-Papatoetoe (#380): Clover Park Community House collaborated with Te Hononga o Tamak i Me Hoturoa to run a free community event celebrating Matariki.

19.     Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language, celebrate te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori - Ōtara-Papatoetoe (#1360): The July school holiday theme focussed on Matariki: 'Taku Tuakiri, My Environment, My Identity' gave increased opportunity to explore the use of te reo in our programmes across the libraries.

20.     Community capacity building with young people (#376): This quarter the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Squad (TOPS) has worked with language weeks, held study zooms for students, online check-ins, promoted food banks and facilitated civic participation workshops at schools.

21.     Bike Programme (#1615): In September staff received support from the local board to provide 800-1,000 students bike ready lessons, and in partnership with Ōtara Bike Hub, include bike repair workshops in schools.

22.     Ecological and environmental volunteers programme FY22 (#774): Prior to lockdown, 630 volunteer hours have been logged and 4,300 native plants planted this quarter.

23.     Ōtara Waterways and Lake Trust (#890): In September 2021 the Stream Team planted 2,000 native plants around the pond at Preston Road Reserve.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

24.     The following work programme activity has been identified by Community Facilities as cancelled:

·        Hayman Park - develop playground Stage 1 of Phase 2 (#2556): Project cancelled as Eke Panuku is funding and managing this project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

26.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     When developing the work programmes, council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     This report informs the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board has many work programme activities and projects that have a direct Māori outcome and focus. The following work programme lines have a strong focus on Māori and are all on track for quarter one:

·        Operational expenditure for Ōtara Music Arts Centre (Council facility) (#369)

·        Build Capacity: Community-led response to social concerns (#372)

·        Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori - Ōtara-Papatoetoe (#1360)

·        Youth: Community capacity building with young people (#376)

·        Māori Responsiveness (#377)

·        Community grants Ōtara-Papatoetoe (#389)

·        Community Arts Initiatives Programme (#368)

·        Operational expenditure for Fresh Gallery Ōtara (Council facility) (#367)

·        Apply the Empowered Communities Approach: Connecting communities Ōtara-Papatoetoe (#390)

·        Ōtara Waterways and Lake Trust - Ōtara-Papatoetoe projects (#890).

30.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is working in collaboration with, or engaged in partnerships with mana whenua on the following programmes (this is not an exhaustive list as it does not include programmes delivered by Council Control Organisations such as Auckland Transport and Eke Panuku):

·        Carry forward of Puhinui Reserve and Colin Dale Park service assessment (#3048)

·        Develop Manukau Sports Bowl Master Plan (#1548)

·        Carry forward of Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one (#3114)

·        Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche two (#841)

·        Renew signage -Te Kete Rukuruku - Māori naming of parks and places (#28374)

·        Restoring biodiversity and improving water quality in local streams, the Manukau Harbour and the Tāmaki Estuary (#3128)

·        Manukau Harbour Forum (#1011)

·        Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum (#1189)

·        Enviroschools phase two: Building sustainable community Ōtara-Papatoetoe (#888)

·        Pearl Baker Reserve- renew playground and Investigate options develop a walkway and volleyball court (#30112)

·        A review of parts of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu area plan and of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe area plan (#1519).

31.     Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is a part of Ara Kōtui, a joint mana whenua and southern local boards initiative that explores and supports opportunities that enable mana whenua involvement in local board decision-making. Currently 12 mana whenua are involved in this initiative.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     This report is provided to enable the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

33.     Operating expenditure of $4.81 million is $108,000 (two per cent) below budget. Asset Based Services operating expenditure (ABS Opex) is $52,000 underspent overall and Locally Driven Initiatives operating expenditure (LDI Opex) is $56,000 behind budget. Many programmes and community initiatives with restrictions on attendance at events have been disrupted under COVID-19 constraints.

34.     Operating revenue of $620,000 is $270,000 below budget due to continued facility closures in Auckland under COVID-19 alert level 3 affecting venues for hire, library services, recreation, leisure, fitness, and aquatics facilities.

35.     Capital Expenditure of $562,000 is 88 per cent of budget for the quarter.

36.     The financial report for the quarter ended September 2021 for Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area is provided in Appendix B.

Revised Capex Budget

37.     Capex budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

38.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2021 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

39.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2021 to reflect early completion.

40.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

41.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

42.     The Customer and Community Services Capex work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards (refer attachment C).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (for example, building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

44.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

OP Q1 Attachment A WP Update

203

b

Otara-Papatoetoe Financial Report quarter ending Sep 2021

239

c

OP CCS Capex Work Programme 21-22

245

d

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board Summer events 2022

267

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Abbot - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 



Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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07 December 2021

 

 

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07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

 

 

Memorandum

Thursday 18 November 2021

To:

Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board       

Subject:

Planning for the delivery of summer events

From:

David Daniela, Manager Event Production

Contact information:

David.daniela@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

Purpose

1. To seek direction on planning for the delivery of summer events within the COVID-19 Protection Framework.

 

 

Summary

2.       The Event Production Team is planning for a great summer in Auckland, full of free community events. These are likely to be delivered within the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

3.       The proposed COVID-19 Protection Framework intends to ease restrictions of access for fully vaccinated people, including attending events.

4.       To implement the framework at events, there will be planning and cost implications for which the Event Production team seeks local board direction on by 29 November 2021.

5.       This memo is about three work-lines in the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workprogramme 2021/2022, namely Diversity Festival (workline #3202 and #386) and Movies in the Park (#387)

6.       There are three options outlined with the Events team recommendation that the Movies in Parks at Hayman Park and the 2021/2022 Diversity Festival proceed as planned using underspend from the cancelled 2020/2021 Diversity Festival to cover additional safety requirements, up to $6,000 per event, and that any remaining 2020/2021 Diversity Festival funding be reallocated to the 2021/2022 Diversity Festival.

 

Context

7.       The Event Production Team is planning for a great summer in Auckland, full of free community events. These are likely to be delivered within the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

8.       The general purpose of free local board events is to celebrate people and communities by bringing people together and helping create pride of place. Traditionally summer in Auckland is a busy and exciting time with hundreds of local events each summer month.

9.       Otara-Papatoetoe Local board has confirmed in its 2021/2022 work programme the delivery of two events to take place during the summer season (January to April). These are:

·    Movies in Parks (workline #387) Friday 11 March, Hayman Park, approved budget $14,000

·    Diversity Festival (workline #386), date TBC, Hayman Park, approved budget $55,000

         Please also note the rescheduled 2020/2021 Diversity Festival (workline #3202, carry forward budget $55,000), was cancelled in October. 

10.     Movies in Parks is a regionally promoted series and the ‘go live’, which includes publication of the website, social media, event listings and publicity, is 10 December 2021.  The Music in Parks series, which includes some local board events will also go live on this date.

11.     Early direction from local boards will enable event staff to prioritise where to invest time, which is important for events that require high levels of community participation, as well as enable us to carry-out supplier negotiations on bulk hireage across all events.

COVID-19 Protection Framework and Events

12.     Government advice is that Auckland will be moved to the new COVID-19 Protection Framework once the population reaches 90% double-vaccination. This could occur on 29 November.

13.     The COVID-19 Protection Framework shifts focus to easing restrictions for fully vaccinated people using a Vaccination Certificate (also referred to as Vaccination Pass).  The information available currently indicates the following for events:

Level

If Vaccination Passes are used.

Events to have systems for managing vaccination pass validation, record-keeping, increased hygiene and face coverings.

If Vaccination Passes are not used.

Events to follow advice on record-keeping, increased hygiene and face coverings.

Green

Events can proceed with no limits

Restricted to a maximum of 100 people at the event.  They must be seated and maintain 1 metre physical distancing.

Orange

Events can proceed with no limits

No events

Red

Events can proceed with a maximum of 100 people and only if they can maintain 1 metre physical distancing.

No events

 

13.     With the use of the Vaccination Pass at any level, event organisers will need to establish a way to validate these prior to allowing people access to the event.

14.     For outdoor events this will mean creating a secure boundary of the site with managed entry / exit points, as well as implementing systems for validation.  It is not yet clear what these systems will be.

15.     At all times, Auckland Council will follow the guidance provided by the Ministry of Health.

16.     Auckland Council is creating specific vaccination guidelines/policies for Elected Members, Staff & Volunteers, Procurements & Suppliers and Customers.  The Event team will be required to follow council guidelines/policies once implemented.

17.       Staff acknowledge the short timeframe for providing direction by 29 November, this date is to ensure we do not launch the promotion of events which local boards may wish to cancel if unable to fund the additional requirements.

18.       The scope of this memo is for Event Production work programme items, the implications for civic events will be addressed with boards on a case-by-case basis when the Civic Events Team work with boards on event briefs and scheduling.

 

 

Discussion

19.     Event Production staff are looking into the operational requirements and costs for implementing the vaccination checks and additional health measures, such as

a)   securing the event site (security, fencing, barriers)

b)   creating multiple, controlled entrance/exit points

c)   increased security personnel and possibly wristbands or identifiers

d)   introduction of technology for certificate/pass validation

e)   provision of face-coverings

f)    provision of more hand-washing facilities or hand-sanitiser

20.     These measures will incur costs which were not considered in the original event budget which was approved in the 2021/2022 work programme.

21.     Estimates are that costs could be up to $6000 extra for some events.

22.     Each event will have a tailored approach and costs will vary depending on the expected audience size and park/location used.  It will take time for staff to work through every event on the summer schedule, therefore we are requesting that boards consider allocating up to $6000 per event to cover these additional measures.

23.     The 2020/2021 Diversity Festival scheduled for February 2021 was postponed to October 2021 (with a carry forward budget). This was cancelled due to Covid restrictions. As the 2021/2022 Diversity Festival and the Movies in Parks event both require additional funding as outlined in this memo, perhaps funding from the cancelled Diversity Festival could be reallocated to support the boards summer events.

Options for delivery of summer events

Option

Pros

Cons

Recommendation

Option 1:

 

Events budgets increased to cover the new safety management costs

 

Compliance with government advice on delivering the event safely.

 

The event can be successfully delivered as intended with no reduction in event offering.

 

Community sees local board taking safety seriously but not at the cost of reducing community participation and enjoyment.

 

By supporting these events, the board will provide their communities with some sense of a return to normality, and an opportunity to safely gather.

 

 

 

Potential reputational risk if attendance is low due to COVID uncertainty or other factors and people are against the increased spend on events when funding could be placed elsewhere.

 

Events could be a target for protests against the vaccination mandates, or those without a Vaccination Pass may try to access the site and be declined causing upset.

That the Movies in Parks at Hayman Park and the 2021/2022 Diversity Festival proceed as planned using underspend from the cancelled 2020/2021 Diversity Festival to cover additional safety requirements, up to $6,000 per event, and that any remaining 2020/2021 Diversity Festival funding be reallocated to the 2021/2022 Diversity Festival.

Option 2:

 

Event budget remains the same with new safety costs funded by reducing other elements within the event.

 

Compliance with government advice on delivering event safely.

 

No additional funding required.

 

To afford safety measures programming is reduced which could cause disappointment for those who engage and participate in the event. 

 

Reduction in offering will minimise delivery on local board outcomes.

 

Events could be a target for protests against the vaccination mandates, or those without a Vaccination Pass may try to access the site and be declined causing upset.

 

Not recommended for movies. 

Movies in Parks budgets are not large enough to accommodate the anticipated extra costs even with the removal of all pre-entertainment.

Option

Pros

Cons

Recommendation

Option 3:

 

Event is cancelled prior to the promotion of summer season commencing

With early cancellation no costs will be incurred, the budget can be reallocated or put forward as savings.

 

This option avoids confusion with community (event simply left off promotions rather than cancelled later).

Not delivering agreed work programme.

 

Potential risk of losing momentum when events miss a year. Attendance and profile need to be rebuilt in subsequent years.

 

Disappointment by local community that the event is not proceeding (another thing cancelled due to COVID).

 

Potential reputational risk for cancelling when other local boards may choose to proceed.

 

Not recommended.

 

Further considerations

24.     The Event Production Team does not have capacity to carry out surveys of local board areas to determine how local communities feel about the COVID-19 Protection Framework and if this will increase or decrease the likelihood of them attending events.  We cannot guarantee attendance.

25.     We look to the local boards for guidance on how communities may respond to physical barriers stopping Aucklanders who do not have a valid Vaccination Pass attending local events and any potential political or reputational risks associated with this.

26.     Some of the areas of uncertainty to be aware of are outlined below.  When there is more clarity on these, Event staff may need to come back to the board for further direction:

·    When Auckland will enter the orange or green levels of the new COVID-19 Protection Framework or how long the region will remain in each level.

·    Within the framework it mentions “Specified outdoor community events” as places people “can go” with no definition on what this means, and if this applies to free community-orientated, local board events.

·    The specifics around what the vaccination passes are, and what will be required in validating these including medically exempt and people who were vaccinated overseas.

·    What the details are within the council vaccination polices/guidelines currently being developed and how these will be applied to events.

 

Next steps

27.     Local board to provide direction to Event Production staff by Monday 29 November 2021 as to its preferred options.

28.     Staff will continue to follow Ministry of Health requirements and cancel or plan the events as directed by the local board. Staff will keep the local board informed if Ministry of Health requirements, or council vaccination polices change and impact further on the events.

29.     Publicity for Movies in Parks and Music in Parks (including local board events) will go live on 10 December 2021.

Attachments

None

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2021/15585

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Information reports for the local board:

2.       The Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board provided feedback on the Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill for inclusion as part of council’s submission to the Bill.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/sThat the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the feedback to the Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill for inclusion as part of council’s submission to the Bill provided as Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Enabling Housing Supply Amendment Bill -  feedback

275

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2021/11166

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

281

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2021/11175

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board record for the workshops held on 2 November, 9 November, 16 November and 23 November 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshop records for: 2 November, 9 November, 16 November and 23 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 2 November 2021

285

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 9 November 2021

287

c

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 16 November 2021

289

d

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 23 November 2021

291

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Papatoetoe Historical Society Incorporated - presentation                                                   Page 295

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Access to Change infomation sheet              Page 307

Item 8.2      Attachment b    Access to Change - Presentation                  Page 309


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 












Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

07 December 2021

 

 

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[1] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census data – Auckland region. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/tools/2018-census-place-summaries/auckland-region

[2] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census household crowding. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[3] Allpress, J. and Reid, A. (2021). Quality of Life survey 2020: results for Auckland. Auckland Council technical report, TR2021/16

[4] Stats NZ (2020). 2018 Census. Retrieved from https://www.stats.govt.nz/

[5] ibid

[6] For the 12-month period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021, compared to an average of the prior five years.