I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

 

 

Thursday, 2 December 2021

4.30pm

Via Microsoft Teams

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Mr Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Troy Elliott

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Sarah Powrie

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Michael Mendoza

Democracy Advisor

 

29 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 809 149

Email: Michael.Mendoza@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022                                                                                                                        7

12        Council-Controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter One, 2021/2022   75

13        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                   109

14        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents        125

15        Urgent decision - Ōrākei Local Board feedback to the National Emissions Reduction Plan                                                                                                                              135

16        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

17        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               143

C1       Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation                                                                  143


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the minutes of the Ōrākei Local Board meeting, held on Thursday, 18 November 2021, be confirmed as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Part 13 of the Board’s Standing Orders provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairman of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/18214

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        During lockdown, community groups in the local board area remained connected through online meetings.

·        Changes have been required for events that were scheduled for delivery but were impacted by the COVID-19 lockdown. These include Enviro Forum, Business Awards and Carols on the Green.

·        Carols on the Green, scheduled to be held in December, has been cancelled due to the uncertainty around delivering events under the red traffic light system. Staff recommend allocating $6,000 from the unspent Carols in the Green budget towards the increased costs associated with security and staffing required to hold Movies in the Park at Glover Park under the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

·        An additional $10,000 is required to allow for the completion of design changes and consultation for The Landing (3053). Staff recommend reallocating a portion of the budget from Hakumau Reserve consultation (3054).

·        Selwyn Reserve playspace renewals (24166) were scheduled to commence in Q1 but due to delays caused by lockdown, this will now commence in early February 2022.

·        Pourewa Valley programme deliverables and some ecological restoration projects have been delayed due to the lockdown however it is anticipated that these works will be delivered by end of financial year.

 

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed), red (significant issues) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged).

·        In the overall work programme, there are five projects with amber status and one grey status. There is one activity with a red status.  All other projects are in green status.

·        Projects with red, amber and grey status are as follows:

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

24166

Selwyn Reserve playspace renewal

Playspace renewals were scheduled to commence but lockdown resulted in delays and will now commence in early February 2022.

2458

Ōrākei rabbit eradication implementation

Works have not yet taken place on this due to some operational challenges associated with bringing the dog into Auckland. These risks are being managed so that works will be completed by end of financial year.

24351

Remuera Library – interior and exterior renewals

This was delayed due to the lockdowns. However, physical works recommenced under Alert Level 3. The revised date for completion is now November 2021 in Q2. The amber status reflects the completion being past its initial completion date.

806

Implementation of Urban Ngāhere Action Plan

Delayed due to lockdown and a workshop will be scheduled in early 2022 to establish planting priorities.

361

Carols on the Green

Planning commenced in Q1. The event is cancelled due to the uncertainty of events in December in the traffic light system. Staff recommend allocating $6,000 from the unspent budget to Movies in the Park at Glover Park (362) to cover the increased costs associated with security and staffing required to hold Movies in the Park under the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

1747

Ellerslie War Memorial Hall feasibility study

There have been delays due to some resourcing issues from staff turnover. However, this is now being managed and staff will seek further direction on options at a board workshop in February.

30550

Ōrākei Kauri Dieback local parks project 2021/2022

This project is grey status (merged) as it has been consolidated across the financial years. It will be delivered and reported on in the new project ID 29334.

 

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2021/2022 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note; Net operating performance overall for Ōrākei Local Board area is two percent below the budget for the quarter ended 30 September 2021. Operating revenue is 27 percent below budget and operating expenditure is six percent below budget. Capital expenditure is six percent over budget for the quarter.   

6.       This report is provided to enable Ōrākei Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

7.         The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2021

b)      note the impacts of COVID-19 Delta lockdown restrictions on delivering work programmes

c)      note that the Customer and Community Services Capex work programme been updated to reflect financial deferrals (Attachment C)

d)      approve the reallocation of $6,000 from cancelled Carols on the Green (361) to Movies in the Park (362) to cover the increased costs associated with security and staffing required to hold Movies in the Park under the new COVID-19 Protection Framework

e)      approve the reallocation of $10,000 from the Hakumau Reserve consultation (3054) to The Landing concept refresh (3053) for the completion of consultation and design elements.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Ōrākei Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Auckland Unlimited.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet the 2020 Ōrākei Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

COVID-19 restrictions

10.     Auckland has faced COVID-19 restrictions (Level 3 and 4) from 17 August 2021 - 6 weeks of quarter one (just under half the period this report covers).

11.     Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were closed.

12.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update (Attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

 

 

14.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Chart, bar chart, waterfall chart

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates

15.     Projects with amber and grey status and some key projects with green status are discussed below by directorate:

Arts, Community and Events work programme

16.     Community groups have continued to stay connected during the lockdowns. Eastern Bays Community Network meetings continued to happen online (349).

17.     As of July 2021, prior to the August lockdown, both booking hours and number of participants had increased by 31 per cent compared to July 2020. Both council and community managed venues were closed to the public during the Delta lockdown. Venues were made available to support essential services including vaccination centres, food banks and NZ Blood Service.

18.     92 per cent of venue hirers stated that they were satisfied and would recommend the venues they visited in the Ōrākei Local Board. This is an improvement from the previous quarter where 88 per cent of hirers stated that they were satisfied and would recommend the venues. The top two activity types were art/cultural events and religious.

19.     Auckland libraries at all locations were closed during the lockdown. However, St. Heliers Library held book a librarian and digital drop-in sessions (1378). Ōrākei library staff connected with over 1065 elderly customers and regular book group attendees during lockdown (1383).

20.     There have been delays with the feasibility study for Ellerslie War Memorial Hall due to resourcing issues, however this is now being managed. Staff will come to the board for further direction on options at a workshop in December/February.

21.     Enviro Forum (364) was rescheduled to 6 March 2022. Business Awards (1457) was modified for contactless, filmed delivery of awards with plans for a cocktail evening early next year.

22.     Carols on the Green event (361) is cancelled due to the uncertainty of the delivery of events under the red traffic light system. Staff recommend allocating $6,000 from the unspent budget to Movies in the Park at Glover Park (362) to cover the increased costs associated with security and staffing required to hold Movies in the Park under the new COVID-19 Protection Framework as discussed in the memo Attachment B.

23.     A total of $100,300 was allocated as part of the Ōrākei Local Board and Multi-board Round One 2021/2022, leaving an amount of $178,700 for the remaining grant rounds. (363)

24.     In September 2021, the Ōrākei Local Board approved a community grant to LG2212-123 Communicare CMA towards venue hire of the Barfoot & Thompson stadium (Resolution number OR/2021/143).  The local board has approved to amend the purpose of this grant towards the venue hire for the Glendowie and Remuera Friendship Centres as noted in Attachment A.

Parks, Sport and Recreation

25.     The activation programme was presented to the Board in October with all programmes being rescheduled to January school holidays (13)

26.     Ellerslie Sports Club received building consent in mid-August but physical works have been delayed due to the lockdown (3101).

27.     The Auckland Netball-Basketball partnership project was one of the Sports and Recreation Facility Investment Fund that the local board formally endorsed in 2020. Parks, Arts, Community and Events resolved to allocate $190,000 for the investigation and design towards future indoor and covered courts. This project has commenced investigation and design work, and the needs assessment and feasibility study are due for completion in December 2021. (3102)

28.     Hakumau Reserve consultation (3054) has an allocated budget of $20,000 while the amount required to complete the consultation and design elements is no more than $10,000. Therefore, there is $10,000 of underspend available for reallocation. Staff recommend that the $10,000 excess to requirements is transferred to The Landing Concept Plan refresh project and seek formal board approval for the allocation.

29.     At the August business meeting, the local board approved three concept options to go out to consultation for the Landing (3053). This was planned to occur in September/October. However, this has been delayed due to lockdown. $12,000 was spent on the hard-stand services assessment which was more than the anticipated budget of $5,000 for this assessment. Additional budget is required to offset the cost of the boat haul out and hard-stand services assessment, and to allow for the completion of design changes and consultation. Staff recommend allocating the $10,000 underspend from Hakumau Reserve to The Landing.

30.     Nehu Triangle draft services assessment (3058) will be coming to a November workshop where the assessment will be finalised, with formal adoption by the board intended for February 2022.

31.     Staff presented a prioritised work programme and key deliverables at the local board workshop for Pourewa Valley (755). However, the delivery has been delayed due to lockdown restrictions. The draft wayfinding report (3059) will also be presented for further review and comment in Q2.

32.     Implementation of Urban Ngahere Action Plan (806) has been delayed due to lockdown and a workshop will be scheduled in early 2022 to establish planting priorities.

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

33.     All volunteer activities were suspended from start of lockdown in mid-August, but prior to that many community plantings took place with a total of 3090 plantings across Waiatarua Reserve, Tahuna Torea Nature Reserve, and Michaels Ave Reserve (762).

34.     Waiata Reserve restoration Hobson catchment (855) - Procurement for weed control and site preparation is almost complete and though COVID restrictions may impact on delivery it will be completed by financial year end.

35.     Tahuna Torea shorebird habitat restoration (1449) – mana whenua engagement commenced and consent for mangrove removal was lodged. Planning is underway with ongoing pest plant control plans and the preparation of a drone contract to undertake baseline monitoring.

Community Facilities

36.     Churchill Park detailed design stage to develop and enhance lookout site. Next steps include completing the tender documents and progressing physical works for November 2021 or early 2022 (28404, 26091, 29070)

37.     Crossfield Reserve changing room and toilets renewals physical works contract granted, works scheduled to commence at end of September 2021.

38.     Michaels Ave Reserve (23998) investigation and design stage for carpark works will commence shortly, dependent on clubrooms construction timeframe.

39.     Lighting renewals at Selwyn Reserve (30706) are due for completion in December 2021. Playspace renewals were scheduled to commence but lockdown resulted in delays and will now commence in early February 2022 (24166).

40.     Waka Kotahi is completing the separable portion 2 along section 2 of the Glen Innes to Tāmaki Shared Path. A “separable portion” is defined as any part of the works which the parties agreed would be completed and handed over separately from the rest of the works.  Work resumed on 22 September 2021 due to delays from lockdown (17468).

41.     Shore Road Reserve – install sand carpet and lighting on field 3 (16172) – the landowner approval application is awaiting approval with physical works scheduled to commence in December.

42.     Ōrākei Basin renew and automate sluice gates (20606) – initial stakeholder engagement and detailed design stage has been completed. Staff will carry out a follow-up workshop with stakeholders and Auckland Council operational staff to ensure that the proposal is fully understood. Staff will provide an update to the board on the proposed automation system with a view to complete the tender process and proceed with automation physical works in early 2022.

Auckland Unlimited

43.     Young Enterprise Scheme (1483) – The Auckland Business Chamber will use the funds allocated by the Local Board in Q3 to deliver the YES Kick Start days in February 2022.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

44.     Carols on the Green (361) has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 restrictions at which the event cannot proceed. Staff recommend allocating $6,000 from the unspent budget to Movies in the Park at Glover Park (362) to cover the increased costs associated with security and staffing required to hold Movies in the Park under the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

Activities with changes

45.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

364

Local Civic Events Ōrākei – Enviro Forum

Enviro Forum

Date of the event has been rescheduled to 6 March 2022.

Event could not proceed at current COVID-19 restrictions

None

1457

Business Awards Ōrākei

Business Awards

Awards to be presented to recipients through contactless delivery by board members. A celebration cocktail evening will be planned for early 2022.

Event could not proceed at current COVID-19 restrictions

Potential costings for cocktail event

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

47.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     This report informs the Ōrākei Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     Ōrākei Community arts programmes (348) – discussions have commenced with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei for ideas and possibilities for next year’s Matariki celebrations.

51.     Māori Responsiveness Ōrākei (354) – Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Maia delivered ten Takina Te Reo sessions for the local board members and staff and continued to provide some sessions online during the Delta lockdown. In Q2, staff will co-ordinate a funding agreement with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei Whai Maia to continue to support local board members with cultural processes in mana whenua engagement.

52.     Whākātīpū I te reo Māori / Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori (1380) – Matariki celebrations and activities were delivered in libraries through arts and crafts. A te reo Māori conversational Kōrero group from Remuera Library continued online throughout lockdown.

53.     Tāhuna Torea shorebird habitat restoration (1449) – this project involves mana whenua engagement which commenced in Q1.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     This report is provided to enable the Ōrākei Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are recommendations to reallocate budgets from the work programme for a total of $16,000. These recommendations have no financial impact on the overall locally driven initiative budget.

Financial Performance

55.     Operating expenditure of $3.22 million is $216,000 below budget for the first quarter. The Asset Based Services (ABS) is $330,000 below budget and the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) is $114,000 above budget. LDI Opex projects totaling $241,455 was carried forward into this financial year.

56.     Operating revenue of $400,000 is $150,000 below budget in facility hire and library services revenue.

57.     Capital expenditure of $658,000 is over budget by $40,000 in this quarter mainly local renewal programme despite significant COVID-19 disruptions to the local renewal programme.

58.     The financial report for the first quarter ended 30 September 2021 for Ōrākei Local Board area is in Attachment D attached.

Revised Capex Budget

59.     Capex budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

60.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2021 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

61.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2021 to reflect early completion.

62.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

63.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

64.     The Customer and Community Services Capex work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards (refer attachment C).

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

66.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022 Q1 Report

17

b

Memo to the Ōrākei Local Board - Planning for the delivery of summer events

47

c

Customer and Community Services Capex Work Programme 2021/2022 - Ōrākei Local Board

53

d

Financial report for the first quarter ended 30 September 2021

69

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rachel Cho - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Council-Controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter One, 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/18009

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with proposed changes to the Ōrākei Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A number of general changes are proposed for the Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plans, as part of ongoing work to improve and refine the approach to engagement with Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs).

3.       The four substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare – may also propose specific changes.

4.       General changes are shown in Attachment A. Attachments B-D include work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited and Watercare.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter One 2021/2022

b)      adopt the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021/2022 local work programme. 

6.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

7.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans.

8.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·      Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·      Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·      Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

9.       In addition, as part of implementing the Joint CCO Engagement Plan, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

10.     We are introducing these new reports gradually, so for Quarter One the report may not include updates from all four CCOs.

11.     For Quarter Two reporting, we expect to have updates from all four CCOs for all local board areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes proposed by Local Board Services

12.     The original discussions with local boards used the five levels of engagement outlined by the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2): inform, consult, involve, collaborate and empower. Feedback from local boards indicated that using all five levels was unwieldy, and in particular that there was confusion and disagreement about when ‘empower’ might be used.

13.     We are proposing that we reduce the engagement levels down to a simplified three step model of inform, consult and collaborate. This helps to better distinguish between projects and to clarify the kinds of engagement that are expected at each step.

14.     We have also moved the CCO work programme tables from being embedded within the engagement plan, to being a series of four attachments. This makes it easier to use the work programmes as the basis for quarterly reporting.

15.     Minor changes may have also been made to names of Local Board Services and/or CCO contacts.

16.     These changes are all shown as tracked changes in Attachment A – Ōrākei Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

17.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment B.

Changes to the Auckland Transport work programme

Additional activities

18.     These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided in Attachment A alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·      Local Board Transport Capital Fund:

Roberta Ave Crossing

Ōrākei School Crossing and Drop-off facility

Bus shelter in Stonefields at bus stop number 1317

Bus shelter at approximately 131 St Johns Road, St Johns

Raised zebra crossing at approximately 274 Victoria Avenue to support Victoria Avenue School.

·        8 Portland Road - Raised Zebra Crossing

·        129 Portland Road - Raised zebra crossing

·        177 St Heliers Bay Road Bus shelters and crossing facility (Grace Joel)

·        135 St Johns Road (by Truman Street (AT) and install bus shelter (LBTCF)

·        Grand Drive bus stop upgrades/pedestrian crossing

·        137 Tamaki Drive, Mission Bay – new bus shelter, stop upgrades

·        Howard Hunter Avenue – removal of redundant bus stop infrastructure

·        44 / 69 Riddell Road – bus stop upgrades

·        81 St Heliers Bay Road – new bus shelter

·        Remuera Paid Parking

·        St Heliers Village Parking Survey.

Auckland Unlimited

19.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment C.

Changes to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

20.     Auckland Unlimited had previously responded to local board requests to include more information on major events by adding a line item for each event.

21.     As part of ongoing work to improve and refine this process, we are proposing to replace all the individual major event lines with the three following lines:

·        Delivered Events (Diwali, Lantern Festival, Pasifika, Tāmaki Herenga Waka)

·        Sponsored Events (i.e., Elemental)

·        Supported Events (i.e., FIFA World Cup, World Choir Games)

22.     This change reduces the number of amendments and additions required to the engagement plan each quarter as events are completed and provides a more consistent update pattern going forward. 

23.     These proposed changes are reflected in Attachment A.

24.     Auckland Unlimited has not proposed any other changes to the engagement plan work programme. 

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

25.     Eke Panuku has not provided updates for this quarter’s report. Eke Panuku will be joining the combined reporting framework for Quarter Two.

26.     Eke Panuku has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme. 

Watercare

27.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment D.

28.     Watercare has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

30.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Adopting the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

32.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

34.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

36.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

38.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Two in March 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

81

b

Auckland Transport Quarter One 2021-22 Report - Ōrākei Local Board

99

c

Auckland Unlimited Quarter One 2021-22 Report - Ōrākei Local Board

105

d

Watercare work programme 2021-22 Q1 Report - Ōrākei Local Board

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Asmead – Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022

File No.: CP2021/17720

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (the draft policy).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Significance and Engagement Policy, adopted in 2014, is undergoing a policy refresh to make it more contemporary and user-friendly.

3.       The goal of the policy refresh is to provide for a simplified decision-making process through a high-level guiding document that allows for case-by-case assessments.

4.       Minor updates are needed in both the significance and engagement components of the policy.

5.       Updates around the significance component of the draft policy include:

·    the assessment of significance in terms of a continuum

·    taking a cumulative approach to a package of proposals or decisions

·    adjusting the list of strategic assets to include only assets critical for the delivery of services and clarifying that most strategic assets are identified as groups or networks of assets to reflect the way in which they deliver services

·    adding guidance for assessing the significance of decisions for assets that do not meet the criteria for being strategic.

6.       Updates around the engagement component of the draft policy include:

·    simplifying existing text to make the policy more user-friendly

·    ensuring the engagement principles capture a more diverse Tāmaki Makaurau

·    capturing the need to safeguard staff, elected members and the community during consultation and engagement

·    giving more visibility to the connection between the policy and the forthcoming and separate refresh of the Engagement Guidelines, which will support staff to operationalise the policy.

7.       The draft policy was adopted for public consultation by Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 meeting, resolution number GB/2021/111.

8.       Public consultation ran from 27 September to 18 October 2021.

9.       Adoption of the final policy is projected for February 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy as part of the overall consideration for final adoption in February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Significance and Engagement Policy (the 2014 policy) was created and adopted in 2014 to fulfill the legislative requirements outlined in section 76AA of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).

11.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is a key document for decision-making and the consultation process. It is comprised of two interrelated sections on significance and engagement.

12.     The significance section sets out how and when communities can expect the council to engage before making decisions, describes the council’s approach to determining the significance of proposals and decisions, and lists the council’s strategic assets.

13.     The engagement section provides high-level principles on how to engage inclusively with the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau. These high-level principles ensure that engagement is fit-for-purpose according to the level of significance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have undertaken a policy refresh as the 2014 policy has not undergone changes since its initial adoption.

15.     An internal assessment of the 2014 policy found that that it was largely easy to use, but minor improvements would allow for more efficient decision-making and more fit-for-purpose engagement processes.

16.     General high-level updates and clarifications are being proposed for the draft policy to create a more contemporary policy.

17.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to be a prescriptive policy document, and any accepted changes to the draft policy will not change the purpose for which it is used.

18.     The proposed changes to the Significance and Engagement Policy 2021 were reported to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September – see Attachment A Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation, also found online with associated documents.

Consultation

19.     Formal public consultation was held from 27 September to 18 October 2021. The consultation document is part of Attachment A, or online here.

20.     Given COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the region, consultation was conducted entirely virtually and consisted of:

·    consultation materials and online feedback forms made available on the council’s engagement website (AK Have Your Say)

·    virtual workshops with community partners with demographic advisory panels

·    working with community partners to reach diverse groups.

21.     All feedback has been captured and will be reported through to the Governing Body meeting in February 2022 to inform decision-making on the final policy.

22.     A summary of the regional feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B and local board specific feedback in Attachment C.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Accepting the proposed changes to the draft policy allows for a fit-for-purpose and contemporary significance and engagement policy that will encourage a richer engagement process during future consultations around climate change issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Any strategic asset under the draft policy that is held or managed by a substantive Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) will be identified in the CCO Accountability Policy. CCO’s must comply with that policy when making decisions on strategic assets under their control.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local boards play a key role in engaging with their local communities. The change to enable more fit-for-purpose consultation and engagement for some asset-based decisions may provide local boards with greater flexibility to customise some engagement processes to better meet the needs of their community.

26.     Local board chairs were invited to a workshop held on 4 August 2021 that also included the Parks, Arts, Community and Events, and Finance and Performance committees for a high-level overview on proposed amendments to the draft policy.

27.     Formalised local board views from this workshop and report will be incorporated into the February 2022 Governing Body report for the policy adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The refresh of the Significance and Engagement Policy will strengthen the council’s capacity and capability to engage with and meet the needs of the Māori community. This will be achieved through the delivery of bespoke training initiatives and resources which align to best practice engagement that responds to the needs and is supported by Māori. Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides a foundation to build council’s engagement approach and supports initiatives already underway such as Te Matapuna 2 as a pilot for spatial-based engagement. Work on relationship agreements is progressing, and there is good support for capacity contracts. Further work is required to streamline engagement forums to ensure they are fit for purpose and respond to priorities from Māori.

29.     Ongoing collaboration on the development of the Māori engagement practice and approach will inform the Engagement Guidelines and will ensure council’s size and engagement reach is leveraged effectively. This collaboration will ensure that the operational execution of the Engagement Guidelines is well-informed and aligned with best practice in te ao Māori.

30.     This focus on practice, capacity and capability will guide operational performance so that the aspirations for Māori engagement in Tāmaki Makaurau are progressed, aligned and achievable. Further work on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau performance measures will be aligned with the engagement approach as it continues to be developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed changes to the significance section of the policy assists in the assessment of significance and may reduce the financial costs of engagement approaches that are not fit-for-purpose.

32.     Reclassifying some assets as non-strategic will also remove the burden of audit costs if the council seeks to make any future decisions around changing ownership or control of those assets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present any risk. The risks associated with refreshing the draft policy are set out in the report to the 23 September Governing Body meeting in Attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Feedback from the consultation along with local board views will be reported to the 24 February 2022 Governing Body meeting as part of the materials for the finalised draft policy approval.

35.     The final Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 is proposed to be implemented following approval at the same Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Summary of regional feedback

113

c

Local Board specific feedback

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Yu - Senior Advisor - Fin Policy

Eddie Tuiavii - Principal Advisor - Democracy and Engage

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18481

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2022 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname. 

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology. 

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e., the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e. the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data show that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order. Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias.  If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ballot order effects and Auckland Council elections_November 2021

131

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Trina Thompson – Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Urgent decision - Ōrākei Local Board feedback to the National Emissions Reduction Plan

File No.: CP2021/17832

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Ōrākei Local Board Urgent Decision to provide formal feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission to the National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment (MfE) has released for public consultation a discussion document seeking to inform the development of the first National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP).

3.       This describes existing actions the Government has committed to and sets out new proposed actions it may include in the ERP to further reduce emissions and meet climate targets.

4.       The document proposes a range of new strategies and policies for consideration which span every sector of the economy and include changes to our funding and finance system, the way we organise our urban areas, and a shift to a circular economy.

5.       The Government is required to publish the ERP by the end of May 2022.

6.       The discussion document containing these proposals is set out here:

https://environment.govt.nz/assets/publications/Emissions-reduction-plan-discussion-document.pdf

7.       Auckland Council already has existing strategic direction in emissions reduction through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and has agreed positions that have recently been provided through previous submissions on climate change and transport emissions.

8.       As such, the council will not, in the main, be developing new positions through this submission, but will base it on relevant strategies and these existing agreed positions.

9.       Local board input into that submission was due on 17 November for feedback to be considered in the council’s submission or 19 November 2021 for feedback to be appended.

10.     As the closing date of 17 November 2021 was prior to the Board’s 18 November 2021 business meeting and it was not practical to call the full board together and meet requirements of a quorum, it was decided to use the urgent decision-making process to formalise the Board’s feedback as per the attached memo (Attachment A).

11.     A copy of the Board’s feedback on the National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) is also attached to this report (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the urgent decision to formally provide the Ōrākei Local Board’s feedback on the National Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) for consideration for inclusion in the draft Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memo - Urgent decision and Ōrākei Local Board feedback to be included in Auckland Council’s submission on the National Emmisions Reduction Plan

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Ōrākei Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains information covered in confidential Finance and Performance workshops and information relating to the draft Mayoral proposal which has not been finalised or released publicly. This report can be restated on 9 December 2021 once the final Mayoral Proposal and the material relating to the Annual Budget is available following the Finance and Performance Committee meeting on 8 December 2021.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.