I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 2 December 2021

10.00am

This meeting will proceed via SKYPE for Business.  Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jon Turner

 

Members

Harry Doig

 

 

Ella Kumar, JP

 

 

Fiona Lai

 

 

Bobby Shen

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor

 

29 November 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Rob Mayo - Lilac Grove                                                                                       5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Draft Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards - approval for consultation                                                                                                              7

12        New community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand, Margaret Griffen Park, 16-18 Griffen Park Road, Mt Roskill                                                                 71

13        New community lease to Active Transport Trust, War Memorial Park, 740 Sandringham Road, Mount Roskill                                                                            79

14        Renewal and variation of community lease to New Zealand Kannada Koota Incorporated, Three Kings Reserve, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings                87

15        Renewal and variation of community lease to Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated, War Memorial Park, 744 Sandringham Road, Mt Roskill                                                                                                                                       95

16        Auckland Council's Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022                                                                                                                    103

17        Council-Controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter One, 2021-2022 167

18        Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission                                                  201

19        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                   209

20        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents        265

21        Local board feedback on the National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document                                                                                                                    275

22        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           281

23        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                283

24        Board Member Reports                                                                                             289

25        Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                                                297

26        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          299

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

28        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               313

C1       Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation                                                                  313


1          Welcome

 

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 18 November 2021 as a true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Rob Mayo - Lilac Grove

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Rob Mayo local resident to update the local board on where things are at with the planned Auckland Transport Safety improvements for Carlton Street/Frederick Street/Lilac Grove intersection.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Rob Mayo will update the local board on the planned Auckland Transport safety improvements for the Carlton Street / Frederick Street / Lilac Grove intersection and the Lilac Grove residents’ input into the public consultation process. The residents have had good interaction with Auckland Transport on this project to date and are now awaiting the next version of their detailed design for the intersection.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      thank Rob Mayo for his presentation via SKYPE for Business.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Draft Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards - approval for consultation

File No.: CP2021/16821

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the draft Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The draft Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Board areas, provides a framework so that communities can help shape the area for the change that will come with growth and development in the suburbs of Mt Roskill, Ōwairaka, Sandringham, Wesley, Waikōwhai and Three Kings over the next 30 years.

3.       The draft area plan sets out the vision, outcomes and actions for the plan area relating to natural environment, heritage, Māori Identity and wellbeing, climate change responsiveness, healthy communities, housing, centres, open spaces, community facilities, transport and network infrastructure. It also identifies outcomes desired for eight areas of special focus, where significant growth and change is anticipated.

4.       Engagement with mana whenua and key stakeholders has occurred during 2020/21 and the first phase of community consultation was held from 2 October to 15 November 2020. The ideas and insights from engagement, along with advice from subject matter experts at council and council-controlled organisations (CCOs), have informed the development of the draft area plan.

5.       Feedback from the second phase of community consultation will be used to fine-tune the final version of the area plan. It is proposed that the final area plan be reported to the local board for adoption in July 2022. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve the draft Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards shown in Attachment A of the agenda report for public consultation.

b)      delegate the final approval of any minor amendments or corrections in the draft Area Plan to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The draft area plan is a 30-year plan that seeks to support the growth and development in the ‘Development Areas’ of Mt Roskill and Three Kings identified in the Auckland Plan 2050, and the significant redevelopment of Kāinga Ora’s (formerly Housing New Zealand) land holdings in Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Board areas for new homes.

7.       In the Mt Roskill area (encompassing the current Kāinga Ora development areas of Roskill South, Waikowhai and Ōwairaka), Kāinga Ora are proposing to replace approximately 3,000 state homes with up to 11,000 new homes on their landholdings over the next 15 to 20 years. Redevelopment of Kāinga Ora’s land holdings forms part of the regeneration of these suburbs, alongside private residential and commercial developments.

8.       A working group comprising all Puketāpapa Local Board members, two members from Albert-Eden Local Board, and mana whenua representatives have provided direction to the project team on the development of plan content.

9.       The draft area plan (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) has been informed by specialist inputs and feedback, and through engagement with mana whenua, stakeholders and the community. The project team received many ideas during these meetings and events, and these have informed the outcomes and actions proposed in the draft plan. Specialist teams within council and the CCOs have provided information about the existing environment and priority issues and opportunities for the area.

10.     The draft plan sets out a vision, outcomes and actions focused on the suburbs of Mt Roskill, Ōwairaka, Sandringham, Wesley, Waikōwhai and Three Kings. The vision proposed in the draft plan is:

With Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) at its heart, linking Ōwairaka, Puketāpapa and Te Tātua-a-Riukiuta (Big King); this is an area with strong heritage and vibrant, diverse communities. 

Our vision is that future growth, in partnership with mana whenua as kaitiaki, will:

•      regenerate and develop this area

•                  build a great place to live, work and visit 

•                  be climate change resilient, with a low carbon footprint.

Our people celebrate the area’s rich history, care for the environment and are proud to call this place home.           

11.     The draft plan comprises ten key outcomes:

No

            Theme

Outcome

1

Natural environment

A protected, regenerated and healthy natural environment.

 

2

Māori Identity and wellbeing

The kaitiaki role of mana whenua is respected, and Māori identity and wellbeing supported and uplifted.

 

3

Cultural and social history

The area’s diverse history and community is recognised, celebrated and retained.

 

4

Climate change responsiveness

A low carbon community that is resilient to climate change and natural hazards.

 

5

Healthy Communities

Engaged, healthy and connected communities.

 

6

Housing

 

Enable an increase in housing supply and choices to meet current and future community needs.

 

7

Centres and employment

Revitalised and growing centres, providing a range of employment choices for local residents.

 

8

Open spaces and community facilities

A high quality network of parks and open spaces that are accessible and safe, with active community spaces and places.

 

9

Transport

Connected, walkable neighbourhoods that are safe and easy to get around and enable the use of active and public modes of transport.

 

10

Network infrastructure

New and upgraded infrastructure that embodies water sensitive design, including enhancement of water quality, that is resilient to the pressures of a growing population and climate change.

 

 

12.     A set of actions are proposed to deliver the vision and outcomes in the draft plan. A number of these actions will require further investigation, before they can be confirmed with timeframes and costs.

13.     The draft area plan also identifies eight areas of special focus being Ōwairaka, Sandringham Local Centre and surrounds, Roma Road light industrial area, Stoddard Road corridor, Wesley, Mt Roskill Local Centre, Three Kings Town Centre and surrounds, and the Waikōwhai area. These are areas, where significant growth and change is anticipated due to the development of Kāinga Ora’s landholdings for housing, or where existing centres and employment areas are likely to come under pressure from future growth of the plan area. For each area of special focus, desired outcomes are identified to assist future planning. 

14.     The upcoming second phase of community engagement will enable local stakeholders and the community to review and provide feedback on priorities in the draft plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The draft area plan has been prepared and the next phase is to seek feedback from stakeholders and the community. It has been developed to reflect technical inputs from across council and inputs from local stakeholders and the community.

16.     Feedback will be used to confirm the content of the plan and to refine and amend it where necessary. This will ensure that the plan reflects the priorities of the local community and that the final version of the plan has considered a range of inputs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The draft area plan addresses the impact of climate change through Outcome 4 – A low carbon community that is resilient to climate change and natural hazards. Actions to achieve this outcome include supporting initiatives in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan 2020, and the Low Carbon Community Action Plans of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa Local Boards.

18.     The transport outcome of the draft plan focusses on providing a range of transport options for people in, to and through the plan area and a strong focus on active modes (including bus, walking and cycling). The draft plan highlights the need to identify and implement improvements to bus, walking and cycling to support the large-scale housing redevelopments and redevelopment of centres within the plan area.

19.     The natural environment and open space outcomes of the plan seek to improve green spaces in the plan area, including increased tree coverage. The plan also highlights the need for more shade and trees in parks, to ensure that people are able to continue to enjoy these spaces in times of rain events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The draft area plan has been developed in consultation with specialists from teams across council. Staff from these teams have provided information about the current context for the plan area, as well as local issues, priorities and opportunities relating to their specialist subject area. 

21.     Staff from Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare Services have been involved in the development of the plan.  Feedback has been received from Auckland Transport and Watercare Services on the draft plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The Puketāpapa Local Board has provided input into the draft area plan through monthly working group meetings and local board workshops. The working group meetings have provided guidance on the development of the draft plan, to discuss project updates, public feedback and the emerging content of the draft plan. The final draft area plan incorporates the feedback and suggestions made by local board members at the working group meetings held on 23 September and 28 October 2021.

23.     Local stakeholders and the local community have provided inputs into the draft plan through attending engagement events, providing comments on feedback forms (hard copy and online) and having discussions with the project team. Local stakeholder events included with the Albert-Eden Youth Board, Puketāpapa Youth Foundation, Roskill Chinese Group, Puketāpapa Business Voice and Sandringham Project in Community Empowerment. Public engagement events were held at the Mt Roskill Library, Cameron Pools, Wesley Market, Wesley Community Centre, and Sandringham Spring Festival.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     In December 2019, the project team contacted representatives from thirteen mana whenua groups known to have an interest in the plan area to ascertain their interest in being involved in developing the area plan. Individual hui were held with representatives from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngaati Whanaunga, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Ahiwaru Waiohua, and Te Kawerau ā Maki.

25.      In addition, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Maru, Te Patukirikiri and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua advised that they wished to be engaged on a collective basis in relation to developing the area plan.

26.     Cultural value assessments were provided by Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngaati Whanaunga and Te Kawerau ā Maki to describe their histories, whakapapa, and areas of interest. 

27.     The project team held a number of collective hui with mana whenua representatives to identify actions in the draft plan to support their aspirations including recognition of the status of mana whenua and their kaitiaki role, effective engagement and collaboration, recognizing and protecting natural and cultural landscapes, greater planting of native trees and plants, for restoring the life force/mauri of the waterways, greater use of active transport modes (walking, cycling and public transport), and sustainable development.

28.     The draft plan also seeks to improve the stormwater quality from land use, development and roads; and to improve water quality reaching Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) and its receiving environments.

29.     Mana whenua representatives were also interested in enhancing the recognition of the history and cultural heritage of the plan area. The draft plan proposes actions to increase the use of Māori place names within the landscape, and to investigate opportunities to celebrate and showcase the area’s cultural landscape in the design of new developments.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The area plan was allocated a budget of $15,000 for engagement by Plans and Places in 2020/21. The project team has undertaken all the specialist work on the draft plan with other teams from the council and CCOs. Almost $6,000 has been spent on engagement events and materials. An amount of $9,000 has been carried over into the 2021/22 financial year to contribute to planned engagement and document design and production. The costs associated with the consultation for the draft plan are associated with printing and translation work.

31.     There are no other financial implications of this decision.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     Planning for the second phase of public consultation on the draft area plan is currently underway taking into account the risks and uncertainties relating to COVID-19 restrictions. Due to the risk inherent in public events at this time, consultation will target key community and stakeholder groups. This will also avoid the risks of spending money on venue hire and resources for events that may later be cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions at the time of the event.

33.     However, there will be public ‘drop-in sessions’ where people can meet with the project team and ask questions on the draft plan. There will also be a display with hard copy materials available at the Mount Roskill Library and other suitable venues.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     After the draft area plan is approved for consultation, the project team will continue to develop plans and materials for engagement.  It is proposed that the public engagement period will run from 1 February until 4 March 2022. 

35.     After this time, feedback will be analysed, and the plan will be refined based on the feedback received. Potential changes to the plan will be discussed with the working group before the final plan is reported to the local board for adoption in July 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards.

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Wong - Principal Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

New community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand, Margaret Griffen Park, 16-18 Griffen Park Road, Mt Roskill

File No.: CP2021/17471

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand, known as Western Bays Sea Scouts Group, located on part of Margaret Griffen Park, 16-18 Griffen Park Road, Mt Roskill. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Scout Association of New Zealand has a community lease with Auckland City Council commencing 1 July 2006 for a term of five years to 30 June 2011.  There are two further renewal terms of five years each which have been executed and the lease reached final expiry on 30 June 2021.

3.       The land is described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 184413 and held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002. Prior to any lease being granted, engagement with mana whenua is required under section 81 of the Act.

4.       On 26 May 2021, the scouts informed council of its desire to continue the occupation of its group owned facility at Margaret Griffen Park.

5.       Annual rent is $250.00 plus GST per annum and the club owns the building and improvements.

6.       As specified in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own building have an automatic right to re-apply at the end of their occupancy term without the need to call for expressions of interest.

7.       This report recommends that the Puketāpapa Local Board approve a new community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand for the site located at Margaret Griffen Park, 16-18 Griffen Park Road, Mt Roskill.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve a new community lease to The Scout Association of New Zealand for 300 m2 (more or less) on part of Margaret Griffen Park, 16-18 Griffen Park Road, Mt Roskill, described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 184413, (Attachment A) on the following terms and conditions: -

i)        term: ten years commencing 2 December 2021 with one further right of renewal of ten years

ii)       rent: $250.00 plus GST per annum

iii)      provision of the community outcomes plan (Attachment B) to be attached as a schedule to the renewal of lease document.

iv)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Local Government Act 2002.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers the recommendation for a new community lease to the scouts.  

9.       The Puketāpapa Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The Land

10.     The land is described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 184413 and held in fee simple by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

11.     Staff wrote to Mana Whenua who have a key interest in the site. Engagement with Mana Whenua is outlined in the Maori Impact Statement section of this report.

Scout Association of New Zealand

12.     The scouts have been incorporated under the Registrar of Incorporated Societies since 31 January 2003. Its objectives are to:

-     be the national body in New Zealand to promote, develop, and foster scouting for the education, personal development, health, wellbeing, empowerment and benefit of the youth of New Zealand

-     to support and assist its members to deliver scouting to New Zealand

-     to affiliate and co-operate with kindred and other organisations, including the World Organisation of the scout movement.

13.     The Den is located by the playcentre behind Lynfield Recreation Centre, looking onto Margaret Griffen Park.

14.     The scouts have 58 members. Membership and ethnicity of its members is outlined below:

Age

Members

Children 5-13

40

Youth 14-21

10

Adults 22-50

6

Adults 51+

2

Total

58

 

Ethnicity

Estimated % of members

NZ European

40

Indian

27

Asian

27

Pacific Island

2

Other

4

 

15.     All sections welcome new Leaders who are vetted and provided with training.  Non-uniformed help is also provided where parents and friends ensure the group has the resources and skill base it needs. Parental involvement is welcome and encouraged for activities, working bees and fundraising events. Parents of Keas often accompany their children on activities, and at least one caregiver is required to stay with their Kea at sleepover events.

16.     Scout programmes focus on three core areas:  personal development, adventure and community engagement. The scouts participate in local, regional and national community and scouting events and consistently achieve the highest level of participation and receive pennants for sailing, camping, swimming and attending local, regional and national events.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

-     to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

-     to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

18.     Council makes key decisions relating to the form and function of the region which can have significant implications for both the climate resilience and greenhouse gas emissions of the region’s infrastructure, businesses and communities.

19.     The proposed site may experience medium wind zones.

20.     To mitigate the above, the scouts may need to undertake the following:

-     subscribe to emergency alerts and be ready by making a plan and preparing emergency items

-     prepare the site for medium winds by securing large outdoor objects

-     adopt a recycling plan outlining provisions to reduce waste

-     look at ways to reduce its carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     In compiling the recommendations contained herein staff have obtained input from colleagues in Connected Communities, Area Operations, and Parks Sports and Recreation. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The recommendations in this report were workshopped with the local board in August 2021. 

23.     The recommendation for a new lease to the scouts support the Puketāpapa Local Board 2020 outcomes: 

·    Inclusive communities that are healthy, connected and thriving

·    Thriving local economy with opportunities to learn, work and volunteer.

24.     The recommended lease term for an established group on council land under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 is ten years with a ten year right of renewal.

25.     The Puketāpapa Local Board may, at their discretion, choose to vary from these recommendations on a case-by-case basis as they deem appropriate. The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms contained in the guidelines.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Delivering on Auckland Council’s commitment to Māori at a local level is a priority for local boards.  Puketāpapa Local Board are focused on building strong and meaningful relationships with local Māori to ensure that Māori needs and aspirations are understood.

27.     Staff attended a Mana Whenua Forum in September 2021 and wrote to Mana Whenua in October 2021. There were no concerns from Mana Whenua in granting a new community lease to the scouts.  

28.     A community outcomes plan will be developed with the scouts to include activities that support Māori outcomes and Auckland Council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     Rent is currently $250 plus GST. It is recommended that the current rental rolls forward until the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 are reviewed and aligned to the Local Board Funding Policy.  This will ensure consistency.

30.     If the recommended $1.00 peppercorn rental is supported, there will be a shortfall of $249 in revenue. Any shortfall in rental revenue will need to be offset by the Puketāpapa Local Board with a contribution from the boards locally driven initiative allocation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     If a new community lease is not granted this will inhibit the scouts ability to continue to provide its services to the local community and to apply for funding. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Subject to the Puketāpapa Local Board granting a new community lease, council staff will work with key representatives of the scouts to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

75

b

Attachment B - Community Outcomes Plan

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michelle Knudsen - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

New community lease to Active Transport Trust, War Memorial Park, 740 Sandringham Road, Mount Roskill

File No.: CP2021/17487

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to Active Transport Trust located on part of War Memorial Park, 740 Sandringham Road, Mt Roskill.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Landowner approval was previously granted in 2016 to Active Transport Trust to occupy an area of War Memorial Park for the temporary placement of a 20-foot shipping container for a period of six months. The landowner approval expired and the Trust requested further approval from council to allow the container to be kept on-site. 

3.       On 10 September 2020, landowner approval was granted to Active Transport Trust for the area to be used for the long-term placement and modification of a Bike Kitchen shipping container. The shipping container will be on-site for a period of three years with the opportunity to extend the approval period.

4.       The land is described as Part Lot 136 Deposited Plan 42461 and classified as a Recreation Reserve and held under the Reserves Act (1977).

5.       Public notification is required under Section 119 of the Reserves Act 1977 and engagement with Mana Whenua is required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

6.       This report recommends that Puketāpapa Local Board grant a new community lease to Active Transport Trust for a term of three years commencing 2 December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve a new community lease to Active Transport Trust for the group owned container being 1.85m2 (more or less) located at War Memorial Park, 740 Sandringham Road, Mt Roskill (Attachment A), on the following terms and conditions:

i)        term: three years commencing 2 December 2021

ii)       rent: $1.00 per annum

iii)      provision of the community outcomes plan (Attachment B) to be attached as a schedule to the renewal of lease document.

iv)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       This report considers the recommendation for a new community lease to the Trust. 

8.       The Puketāpapa Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The Land

9.       The land is legally described as Part Lot 136 Deposited Plan 42461 and classified as a Recreation Reserve held under the Reserves Act 1977.  

10.     The proposed lease was notified in the Central Leader on 7 October 2021.   No submissions in respect to the proposal were received.

11.     Staff attended a Mana Whenua forum in September 2021 and also wrote to Mana Whenua who have a key interest in the site.  There were no concerns from Mana Whenua.

Landowner Approval

12.     Landowner approval was previously granted in 2016 for the temporary placement of a 20-foot shipping container for a period of six months. The landowner approval expired, and the Trust requested landowner approval to allow the container to be kept on-site for another three years and to undertake works to the existing shipping container to make it a more permanent feature of the reserve.

13.     The container is used for storing tools and spare parts and has resulted in 850 bikes being repaired and given to families in the area since 2016. It is also used to repair bikes for members of the community during their monthly Bike Fix Days.

Shipping Container

14.     To mitigate the visual impacts and to make the container a more permanent feature of the reserve, the Trust will make alterations to the shipping container to include:

- placing the container on four concrete piles in the ground to support each corner

- constructing a covered deck area to the side of the shipping container

- adding low maintenance planting around the shipping container

- extending the existing concrete paving to meet the container

15.     The Trust is responsible for full maintenance of the shipping container and planting. Any graffiti will be removed immediately at the cost of the Trust.

Active Transport Trust

16.     The Trust has been incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 since 1 September 2016.  Its objectives are to:

-     promote cycling and walking as a healthy, environmentally sound, sustainable and convenient form of transport

-     benefit the community by assisting with the improvement of infrastructure and conditions for cyclists and walkers

-     improve public healthy by undertaking activities that encourage active transport modes’

-     educate walkers, cyclists, road and path users in order to improve safety for cyclists and walkers.

17.     The bike kitchen has 35 volunteers who support the bike kitchen activities and provide invaluable help in the delivery of programmes. Active Transport Trust collaborate with other organisations such as Global Hope Mission and the New Zealand Red Cross.

18.     The main recipients of the Bike Kitchen bikes are former refugee families from Red Cross and the Mt Roskill community.

19.     A new partnership has been established with Kāinga Ora who have begun to build 11,000 new dwellings in the Puketāpapa area and the Trust will be opening a new satellite Bike Kitchen in Roskill South at the Kāinga Ora information centre in May Road, Mt Roskill.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

-     to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

-     to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

21.     Council makes key decisions relating to the form and function of the region which can have significant implications for both the climate resilience and greenhouse gas emissions of the region’s infrastructure, businesses and communities.

22.     The proposed site may experience floods and medium wind zones.

23.     To mitigate the above, the Trust may need to undertake the following:

-     subscribe to emergency alerts and be ready by making a plan and preparing emergency items

-     prepare the site for medium winds by securing large outdoor objects

-     adopt a recycling plan outlining provisions to reduce waste

-     look at ways to reduce its carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     In compiling the recommendations contained herein staff have obtained input from colleagues in Connected Communities, Community Facilities Area Operations, and Parks Sports and Recreation. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The recommendations in this report were workshopped with the local board in August 2021.

26.     The recommendations for a new lease to the Trust support the Puketāpapa Local Board 2020 outcomes: 

-     inclusive communities that are healthy, connected and thriving

-     transport options that are reliable, accessible and less polluting.

27.     The recommended lease term for an established group on council land under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 is five years with a five year right of renewal.

28.     The Puketāpapa Local Board may, at their discretion, choose to vary from these recommendations on a case-by-case basis as they deem appropriate. The guidelines suggest that where a term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms contained in the guidelines.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Delivering on Auckland Council’s commitment to Māori at a local level is a priority for local boards.  Puketāpapa Local Board are focused on building strong and meaningful relationships with local Māori to ensure that Māori needs and aspirations are understood.

30.     Staff wrote to Mana Whenua who have a key interest in the site in October 2021. There were no concerns from Mana Whenua in granting a new community lease to the Trust.  

31.     A community outcomes plan will be developed with the Trust to include activities that support Māori outcomes and Auckland Council’s commitment to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Provided there are no objections, the cost implications for Auckland Council is the cost of public notification of the lease estimated at approximately $750.00.  This cost is borne by the Community Facilities Department.

33.     Rent will be $1.00 plus GST per annum.

34.     The Lead Financial Advisor for the Puketāpapa Local Board has indicated there are no other financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     If a new community lease is not granted this will inhibit the Trusts ability to continue to provide its services to the local community and to apply for funding. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Subject to the Puketāpapa Local Board granting a new community lease, council staff will work with key representatives of the Trust to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

83

b

Attachment B - Community Outcomes Plan

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michelle Knudsen - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Renewal and variation of community lease to New Zealand Kannada Koota Incorporated, Three Kings Reserve, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings

File No.: CP2021/17476

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a renewal and variation of community lease to New Zealand Kannada Koota Incorporated, Three Kings Reserve, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       New Zealand Kannada Koota Incorporated (NZKKI) has a community lease with Auckland City Council for a room located within the Fickling Convention Centre, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

3.       The lease commenced 1 April 2010 for a term of five years to 31 March 2015 and contains two five-year renewal terms.  The first renewal term from 1 April 2015 to 31 March 2020 has been executed. There is one final renewal term of five years from 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2025.

4.       NZKKI submitted a comprehensive application on 22 May 2021 of its intent to exercise its second and final renewal term for the period 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2025.

5.       Community groups exercising a right of renewal are asked to consider having their community lease varied to include a community outcomes plan and the inclusion of a Smokefree Policy clause.

6.       NZKKI informed council in writing that it would like to vary its lease agreement to include a Smokefree Policy clause and a community outcomes plan.

7.       This report recommends a renewal and variation of community lease to be approved for NZKKI for a further term of five years commencing 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2025.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve a renewal of community lease to New Zealand Kannada Koota Incorporated, located in part of the Fickling Community Centre, Three Kings Reserve, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings (Attachment A), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – five years commencing 1 April 2020 to 31 March 2025

ii)       rent - $500.00 plus GST per annum.

b)      approve a variation to the renewal of community lease to:

i)        include a Smoke-free Policy clause

ii)       include a community outcomes plan (Attachment B) to be attached as a schedule to the renewal of lease document.

c)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Deed of Lease signed and dated 23 June 2010.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers the renewal and variation of community lease to NZKKI located on part of Three Kings Reserve, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

9.       The Puketāpapa Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Three Kings Reserve

10.     NZKKI occupies part of the land on Three Kings Reserve described as Lot 3 Deposited Plan 103058. The land is held under the Local Government Act 2002.

11.     The room occupied by NZKKI is approximately 50m2 and is located within the council owned Fickling Convention Centre, 546 Mt Albert Road, Three Kings.

New Zealand Kannada Koota Incorporated

12.     NZKKI has been incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act since 23 January 1996. Its objectives are to:

·        promote, foster and maintain the cultural and linguistic heritage of Karnataka, India

·        promote friendship and respect between NZKKI and the people of NZ

·        assist families in need especially for job search, family support, financial help and network building.

13.     NZKKI has 600 members and a strong commitment to providing services and activities to the Karnataka and wider community. 

14.     NZKKI provides workshops, training, student forums, cultural activities, mother’s forums, JP services and has a library for its members to utilise.

15.     NZKKI meets the criteria required for a renewal of lease as follows:

-     the club is a registered incorporated society

-     the club has complied with the terms of the current lease

-     the club has a history of delivering its services to the local community

-     the club is financially viable.

16.     NZKKI is responsible for the maintenance of its leased area and a site visit on 12 July 2021 ascertained the leased area to be in a neat and tidy condition.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

18.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

19.     To improve environmental outcomes and climate change impacts, community outcomes plans advocate that the lease holder:

·    use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·    use eco labelled products and services

·    seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     Staff have obtained input from colleagues in Parks, Sport and Recreation, Connected Communities and Community Facilities.  

21.     The proposed renewal and variation of community lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group.

22.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The Puketāpapa Local Board is the allocated authority to approve a renewal and variation of community lease.

24.     The Puketāpapa Local Board expressed their support for a renewal and variation of community lease at a workshop held on 19 August 2021. 

25.     The recommendations within this report support the Puketāpapa Local Board 2020 plan outcome of:

-     inclusive communities that are healthy, connected and thriving

-     thriving local economy with opportunities to learn, work and volunteer.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.  The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

27.     There are no changes in use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

28.     Additionally, the objectives of community leases is to ensure community facilities are well maintained and accessible to all members of the community, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     There is no direct cost to Auckland Council in approving this renewal and variation of community lease.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The provision for a renewal of community lease is granted to NZKKI. As such, where a group meets the criteria stipulated in the lease agreement, council has a contractual obligation to affect the renewal.

31.     If the renewal of lease is not approved this will compromise NZKKI’s ability to provide its services to the community and will impact Puketāpapa Local Board outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Subject to the Puketāpapa Local Board approving a renewal and variation of community lease, council staff will work with key representatives of NZKKI to finalise the deed of renewal and variation of community lease.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

91

b

Attachment B - Community Outcomes Plan

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michelle Knudsen - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Renewal and variation of community lease to Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated, War Memorial Park, 744 Sandringham Road, Mt Roskill

File No.: CP2021/17480

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a renewal and variation of community lease to Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated, War Memorial Park, 744 Sandringham Road, Mt Roskill. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated (the club) has a community lease with Auckland Council for an area located within the council owned building known as the Wesley Community Centre, War Memorial Park, 744 Sandringham Road, Mt Roskill.

3.       The lease commenced 3 June 2011 for a term of ten years to 2 June 2021.  There is one renewal term of ten years from 3 June 2021 to 2 June 2031.

4.       The club submitted a comprehensive application on 22 April 2021 of its intent to exercise its renewal term for the period 3 June 2021 to 2 June 2031.

5.       Community groups exercising a right of renewal are asked to consider having their community lease varied to include a community outcomes plan and the inclusion of a Smokefree Policy clause.

6.       The club informed council in writing that it would like to include a Smokefree Policy clause and a community outcomes plan.

7.       This report recommends a renewal and variation of community lease to be approved for Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated for a further term of ten years commencing 3 June 2021 to 2 June 2031.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve a renewal of community lease to Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated, located in part of the Wesley Community Centre, War Memorial Park, 744 Sandringham Road, Mt Roskill (Attachment A), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – ten years commencing 3 June 2021 to 2 June 2031

ii)       rent - $250.00 plus GST per annum.

b)      approve a variation to the renewal of community lease to:

i)        include a Smoke-free Policy clause

ii)       include a community outcomes plan (Attachment B) to be attached as a schedule to the renewal of lease document.

c)      All other terms and conditions in accordance with the Deed of Lease signed and dated 14 December 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers the renewal and variation of community lease to Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated. 

9.       The Puketāpapa Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

War Memorial Park

10.     The club occupies part of the land on War Memorial Park described as Part Lot 136 Deposited Plan 42461.  The land is classified as a Local Purpose Reserve (Community Buildings) and held under the Reserves Act (1977). 

Owairaka Amateur Athletic and Harrier Club Incorporated

11.     The club has been incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act since 27 June 1958. The objectives of the club are to:

-     promote, encourage and practice athletics in accordance with current NZAAA and IAAF laws.

12.     The club has 191 members.  Membership consists of:

-     134 members aged 25 years and under

-     57 members aged 25 years and over.

13.     The club is a family friendly and supportive environment connected to Athletics New Zealand best practice. The club champion competitive excellence and the enjoyment of participation and this is reflected by the diversity of the community:

Pacific Island

8%

Asian

4%

Māori

3%

NZ European

59%

Other

18%

14.     Club members train several nights a week, and the junior athletics program is well attended from October to March.  Members compete in track, cross-country and ultra-events.

15.     The club has a busy committee of volunteers who are passionate about continually improving the clubs competitive success and community involvement.

16.     The club is responsible for the maintenance of its leased area and a site visit on 12 June 2021 ascertained the leased area to be in a neat and tidy condition.

17.     The club meets the criteria required for a renewal of lease as follows:

-     the club is a registered incorporated society

-     the club has complied with the terms of the current lease

-     the club has a history of delivering its services to the local community

-     the club is financially viable.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

-     to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

-     to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

19.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

20.     To improve environmental outcomes and climate change impacts, community outcomes plans advocate that the lease holder:

-     use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

-     use eco labelled products and services

-     seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Staff have obtained input from colleagues in Parks, Sport and Recreation, Connected Communities and Community Facilities.  

22.     The proposed renewal and variation of community lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group.

23.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The Puketāpapa Local Board is the allocated authority to approve a renewal and variation of community lease.

25.     The Puketāpapa Local Board expressed their support for a renewal and variation of community lease at a workshop held on 19 August 2021. 

26.     The recommendations within this report support the Puketāpapa Local Board 2020 plan outcome of:

-     inclusive communities that are healthy, connected and thriving

-     thriving local economy with opportunities to learn, work and volunteer.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.  The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, the Unitary Plan and Local Board Plans.

28.     There are no changes in use or operational activities being conducted on the land.

29.     Additionally, the objectives of community leases is to ensure community facilities are well maintained and accessible to all members of the community, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     There is no direct cost to Auckland Council in approving this renewal and variation of community lease.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The provision for a renewal of community lease is granted to the club. As such, where a group meets the criteria stipulated in the lease agreement, council has a contractual obligation to affect the renewal.

32.     If the renewal of lease is not approved this will compromise the clubs ability to provide its services to the community and impact the Puketāpapa Local Board outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Subject to the Puketāpapa Local Board approving a renewal and variation of community lease, council staff will work with key representatives of the club to finalise the deed of renewal and variation of community lease.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

99

b

Attachment B - Community Outcomes Plan

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michelle Knudsen - Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Council's Performance Report: Puketāpapa Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/18250

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Puketāpapa Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme. There are three attachments to this report:

·        Attachment A: Work Programme Report 2021/2022,1 July – 30 September 2021.

·        Attachment B: Financial Performance Report 2021/2022,1 July – 30 September 2021.

·        Attachment C: The Customer and Community Services 2021/2022 Capex work programme, including carry forward updates.

3.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery (Attachment A). Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). There are no activities with a red status.

4.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·    ID 1573 Youth Economy – The Southern Initiative is working with Te Karanga Trust (management team and rangatahi) to refine a co-design process supporting work readiness that will lead to entrepreneurial pathways and employment for 15 rangatahi. This involves adapting the programme to longer lockdown periods.

·    ID 426 Youth Development - The Puketāpapa Youth Foundation (PYF) have adapted to the lockdown restrictions with only a couple of postponements, by switching community activities online. PYF now has a Hauora team, working on ways to keep its members well during the lockdown and has increased membership to meet the increased workload expected (ten new members have been recruited).

·    ID 691 Low Carbon Lifestyles - An evaluation report on the outcomes of the 2021/2022 low carbon lifestyles project has been completed. Planning is underway for the delivery of this project during quarters three and four, when issues of cold damp homes and heating affordability are of greater interest.

·    ID 1219 – Ecological and Environment volunteers programme - 317 volunteer hours this quarter, focused on Lynfield Reserve and Wairaki Reserve

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2021/2022 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·    Operating expenditure of $2.09 million is $411,000 below budget.  Asset Based Services operating expenditure (ABS Opex) is $494,000 below budget and Locally Driven Initiatives operating expenditure (LDI Opex) is $83,000 over budget. Some programmes and community initiatives have been disrupted under COVID-19 constraints however, grants to our community groups and strategic partners has more than offset these for the first quarter.

·    Operating revenue of $69,000 is $64,000 below budget. The shortfall is mainly in venues for hire facilities at Fickling convention centre, Mt Roskill War Memorial Hall and Wesley Community centre accounting for ninety- seven percent of the total.  This is mitigated by expenditure being under budget for these facilities.

·    Capital Expenditure of $56,000 is below budget by $40,000 with delivery of capital programmes impacted by COVID-19 disruptions or at early stages of development.

·    The board has accrued $5,052 from film revenue and $2,016 from legacy rates grants, which (ABS) available for allocation.

·    The financial report for the three months ended September 2021 for the Puketāpapa local board area is in Attachment B

6.       This report seeks the reallocation of funds within the Events budgets, due to the need to implement the COVID-19 Protection Framework.

7.       The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value (Attachment C).

         

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2021

b)      note that ID 441 Christmas Event - Puketāpapa has been cancelled and this $20,000 budget is available for reallocation

c)      note that the Events department has provided advice that the remaining summer events will need additional funds, to support the implementation of the COVID-19 Protection Framework

d)      delegate to the Chair or Deputy Chair the approval of additional budget for the implementation of the COVID-19 Protection Framework for Movies in Parks Puketāpapa (ID 442) and ANZAC services Puketāpapa (ID 440), from the Christmas Event – Puketāpapa budget (ID441, $20,000).

e)      note that the Customer and Community Services Capex work programme been updated to reflect financial deferrals (Attachment C).

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Puketāpapa Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Local Economic Development;

·        Plans and Places;

·        Auckland Emergency Management;

·        Auckland Unlimited.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

COVID-19 restrictions

10.     Auckland has faced COVID-19 restrictions (Level 3 and 4) from 17 August 2021 - 6 weeks of quarter one (just under half the period this report covers).

11.     Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were closed.

12.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update (attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

 

14.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Key activity updates

15.     The key activity updates from this period are:

·     ID 1573 Youth Economy – The Southern Initiative is working with Te Karanga Trust (management team and rangatahi) to refine a co-design process supporting work readiness that will lead to entrepreneurial pathways and employment for 15 rangatahi. This involves adapting the programme to longer lockdown periods.

·     ID 426 Youth Development - The Puketāpapa Youth Foundation (PYF) have adapted to the lockdown restrictions with only a couple of postponements, by switching community activities online. PYF now has a Hauora team, working on ways to keep its members well during the lockdown and has increased membership to meet the increased workload expected (ten new members have been recruited).

·     ID 691 Low Carbon Lifestyles - An evaluation report on the outcomes of the 2021/2022 low carbon lifestyles project has been completed. Planning is underway for the delivery of this project during quarters three and four, when issues of cold damp homes and heating affordability are of greater interest.

·     ID 1219 – Ecological and Environment volunteers programme - 317 volunteer hours this quarter, focused on Lynfield Reserve and Wairaki Reserve

16.     The board has accrued $5,052 from film revenue and $2,016 from legacy rates grants, (ABS), which are available for allocation.

17.     The Event Production team provided the board with a memo dated 17 November 2021 about planning for the delivery of summer events. This notes that, since August 2021 COVID-19 alert restrictions have resulted in the cancellation of local board events in Auckland, the most recent of these being the Christmas events. This will result in the underspend of the local board Christmas event budget of $20,000

18.     The work programme includes the delivery of other events, which will now require implementation of the upcoming COVID-19 Protection Framework:

·        Movies in Parks at Monte Cecilia Park. This has an approved budget of $14,000. To respond to the requirements of the upcoming COVID-19 Protection Framework, staff will need to include measures to accommodate vaccination checks and additional health measures. These will incur costs which were not considered in the approved in the 2021/2022 work programme. Estimates are that costs could be up to $6,000 extra for some events. This top-up in funding is being sought through this report.

·        ANZAC services will also require additional funding for implementation of the upcoming COVID-19 Protection Framework. Current estimates for this are in the order of $4,500-$6,500.

19.     The board’s Strategic Broker is considering projects that might require additional funding and will seek a decision from the board in February 2022, once it is clear what levels of service can be delivered within the new COVID-19 Protection Framework.

Activities on hold

20.     The following six work programme activities from the Customer and Community Services department have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        ID 24303 Fearon Park – renew road and carpark within the park.

·        ID 20492 Harold Long and Fearon stage 3 development

·        ID 24287 Open space buildings – renewal

·        ID 24309 Open space structures in parks – renew

·        ID 26299 Open space walkways and paths - renew

ID 20723 Waikowhai walkways – development of priority walkway routes

Changes to the local board work programme

Activities with changes

21.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

#18343

CF: Project Delivery

Waikōwhai Reserve Playground

Receive $49,000 from financial year 2022/2023, under the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) process

Anticipated labour and equipment costs have risen since the time this project was originally scoped and planned.

Total project budget is now $436,000

#30119

CF: Project Delivery

Wesley Community Centre –renew –playground

Reallocate funding in financial year 2022/2023

 

This reallocation will not delay this project as the funding is set for next financial year and can be topped up in the upcoming three-year work programme discussion.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

23.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     This report informs the Puketāpapa Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     The list below, outlines the activities in the 2020/2021 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of Māori outcomes.

Project

Māori Outcomes

Māori Outcomes description

ID 430 Māori responsiveness

No specific outcome focus areas

 

ID 439 Local Civic Events Puketapapa

Māori identity and culture

Direct engagement with mana whenua for the delivery of the events

ID 845 Te Kete Rukuruku Tranche 2

Te reo Māori

Māori identity and culture

Return te reo Māori names and narratives to parks and places

ID 1029 Manukau Harbour Forum

Kaitiakitanga

Realising rangatahi potential

Māori youth will be involved in the youth sustainabiliy wānanga and are supported to develop and implement projects relevant to them and their communities. The wānanga also engages with kaumātua from Makaurau Marae to provide advice and mātauranga Māori that informs programme delivery. During the wānanga, te reo Māori is actively promoted, as a key component of programme delivery.

ID 26714 Faulkner Bay seawall revetment and renewal

Kaitiakitanga

 

 

ID 3118 Te Kete Rukuruku Tranche 1

Te reo Māori

Māori identity and culture

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

 

ID 242 Manu Aute kite day

Māori identity and culture

 

ID 425 Childrens’ panels

Māori identity and culture,Whānau and tamariki wellbein

Encouraging tamariki Māori to participate and lead in the Children Stakeholder Group. Empower them to shape their communities

ID 426 Youth capacity building

Māori identity and culture

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Support and empower rangatahi Māori in local leadership

 

ID 428 Apply the Empowered Community Approach

No specific outcome focus areas

 

ID 438 Citizenship ceremonies

Māori identity and culture

 

ID 443 Contribution to Culture Fest

Māori identity and culture

Realising rangatahi potential

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

 

ID 445 Healthy Puketapapa

Kaitiakitanga

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

 

ID 809 Urban Ngahere

Kaitiakitanga

Work with mana whenua to implement the Urban Ngahere Strategy, to increase the tree canopy cover and promote the importance of kaitiakitanga.

ID 1297 Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori - Puketāpapa

Te reo Māori

 

Libraries will continue to support, promote and embed Te reo Māori within our communities and staff.

ID 1521 Integrated Area Plan

Kaitiakitanga

Māori identity and culture

 

ID1573 Youth Economy

Realising rangatahi potential

Connecting to the culture, language will be a focus along with assisting rangatahi into quality employment opportunities and educational pathways.

ID 1621 Local Small Business Mentors programme

Māori business, tourism and employment

Ka Hao i te Ao is a Māori focused programme. Next Steps could be targeted at Māori businesses

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     This report is provided to enable the Puketāpapa Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

28.     The financial performance report compared to budget 2021/2022 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·    Operating expenditure of $2.09 million is $411,000 below budget.  Asset Based Services operating expenditure (ABS Opex) is $494,000 below budget and Locally Driven Initiatives operating expenditure (LDI Opex) is $83,000 over budget. Some programmes and community initiatives have been disrupted under COVID-19 constraints however, grants to our community groups and strategic partners has   more than offset these for the first quarter.

·    Operating revenue of $69,000 is $64,000 below budget. The shortfall is mainly in venues for hire facilities at Fickling convention centre, Mt Roskill War Memorial Hall and Wesley Community centre accounting for ninety- seven percent of the total.  This is mitigated by expenditure being under budget for these facilities.

·    Capital Expenditure of $56,000 is below budget by $40,000 with delivery of capital programmes impacted by COVID-19 disruptions or at early stages of development.

·    The board has accrued $5,052 from film revenue and $2,016 from legacy rates grants, which (ABS) available for allocation.

Revised Capex Budget

29.     Capex budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

30.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2021 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

31.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2021 to reflect early completion.

32.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

33.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

34.     The Customer and Community Services Capex work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards (refer attachment C).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

36.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programme Report 2021/2022, 01 July - 30 September 2021

113

b

Financial Performance Report 2021/2022, 01 July - September 2021

149

c

The Customer and Community Services 2021/2022 Capex Work Programme, including carry forward updates

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mary Hay - Senior Local Board Advisor

David Rose, Lead Financial Advisor, Financial Strategy and Planning

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 



Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Council-Controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter One, 2021-2022

File No.: CP2021/18010

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Puketāpapa Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with proposed changes to the Puketāpapa Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A number of general changes are proposed for the Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plans, as part of ongoing work to improve and refine the approach to engagement with Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs).

3.       The four substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare – may also propose specific changes.

4.       General changes are shown in Attachment A. Attachments B-D include work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited and Watercare.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter One 2021-22

b)      adopt the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

6.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

7.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans.

8.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·        Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·        Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·        Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

9.       In addition, as part of implementing the Joint CCO Engagement Plan, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

10.     We are introducing these new reports gradually, so for Quarter One your report may not include updates from all four CCOs.

11.     For Quarter Two reporting, we expect to have updates from all four CCOs for all local board areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The original discussions with local boards used the five levels of engagement outlined by the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2): inform, consult, involve, collaborate and empower. Feedback from local boards indicated that using all five levels was unwieldy, and in particular that there was confusion and disagreement about when ‘empower’ might be used.

13.     We are proposing that we reduce the engagement levels down to a simplified three step model of inform, consult and collaborate. This helps to better distinguish between projects and to clarify the kinds of engagement that are expected at each step.

14.     We have also moved the CCO work programme tables from being embedded within the engagement plan, to being a series of four attachments. This makes it easier to use the work programmes as the basis for quarterly reporting.

15.     Minor changes may have also been made to names of Local Board Services and/or CCO contacts.

16.     These changes are all shown as tracked changes in Attachment A – Puketāpapa Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

17.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment B.

Changes to the Auckland Transport work programme

18.     The following changes have been proposed to the engagement plan work programme.

Three local board transport capital fund projects added:

·    639 Richardson Road – raise existing zebra crossing,

·    Melrose Road pedestrian facility

·    Safety Improvements at Mt Albert and Hillsborough Road intersection.

Two additional projects added:

·    228 White Swan Road raised pedestrian crossing improvement

·    Landscape Road/Mt Eden Road intersection separated into two projects - long-term and short-term measures.

One cancelled project removed:

·    Dominion Road Extension/Richardson Road/Dominion Road intersection (all three zebra crossings)

One “not applicable” project removed:

·    Mt Roskill Spatial Priority Area (Note: this is not an Auckland Transport project and thus cannot be reported on by AT. Any new AT projects arising within the Mt Roskill Spatial Priority Area will be added to the engagement plan work programme).

19.     These changes are reflected the Auckland Transport work programme within the engagement plan (Attachment A).

Auckland Unlimited

20.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment C.

Changes to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

21.     Auckland Unlimited had previously responded to local board requests to include more information on major events by adding a line item for each event.

22.     As part of ongoing work to improve and refine this process, we are proposing to replace all the individual major event lines with the three following lines:

·    Delivered Events (Diwali, Lantern Festival, Pasifika, Tāmaki Herenga Waka)

·    Sponsored Events (i.e., Elemental)

·    Supported Events (i.e., FIFA World Cup, World Choir Games)

23.     This change reduces the number of amendments and additions required to the engagement plan each quarter as events are completed and provides a more consistent update pattern going forward. 

24.     These proposed changes are reflected in Attachment A.

25.     No other changes to the engagement plan work programme have been proposed.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

26.     Eke Panuku has not provided updates for this quarter’s report. Eke Panuku will be joining the combined reporting framework for Quarter Two.

27.     Eke Panuku has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme.

Watercare

28.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment D.

29.     Watercare has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

31.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Adopting the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

33.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

35.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

37.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

39.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Two in March 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

173

b

Auckland Transport 2021-2022 Q1 Report - Puketāpapa Local Board

191

c

Auckland Unlimited 2021-2022 Q1 Report Puketāpapa Local Board

197

d

Watercare Work Programme 2021-2022 Q1 Report Puketāpapa  Local Board

199

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Three Waters Economic Regulation Submission

File No.: CP2021/16930

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To outline the Government’s Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper, circulated by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, and to seek feedback from local boards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

3.       The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

4.       The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

5.       Final submissions from Auckland Council to Government on this topic are due at 5pm on 20 December 2021.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper

Horopaki

Context

6.       On 27 October 2021, the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released a discussion paper, “Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand”.

7.       The issues of economic regulation and consumer protection for three waters services in New Zealand is related, but separate, to the broader issue of the Water Services Bill. They require separate submissions as they are two different processes run by two different bodies and on different timeframes. There is a separate process to provide feedback about the reform in general. This process is to provide feedback on only the proposed economic regulation.

8.       According to central government, economic regulation will have a crucial role to play in driving the level of efficiency that will be required to keep water services affordable in the long run.

9.       Economic regulation ensures that the best outcomes for consumers will occur when there are monopoly markets, and the suppliers have a large amount of market power.

10.     In this case, it is proposed that the economic regulator will also act as the consumer protection regulator and be funded through levies.

11.     It is proposed that the Commerce Commission act in both capacities to regulate the newly-formed three waters industry in New Zealand after the Water Services Bill is enacted.

12.     The discussion document describes how the economic regulator is envisioned to operate and what its statutory obligations would be. The discussion document also provides a brief explanation of why economic regulation is required in the face of three waters reform. Finally, it asks for feedback on several topics.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     What follows is a short summary of the discussion document and the areas where feedback is sought through the submissions process.

What is economic regulation and why do we need it?

14.     Economic regulation protects consumers from the problems that can occur in markets with little or no competition and/or a large amount of market power. The regulation is intended to make businesses in the market behave similarly to how they would in a competitive market.

15.     Utilities tend to be what is known as a “natural monopoly”. These markets are more cheaply served by one firm rather than many because of massive fixed costs.

16.     Without regulation, markets with natural monopolies tend to have higher prices and/or lower outputs and/or lower output quality.

17.     While consumer involvement in the governance of natural monopolies is helpful, it is not sufficient to ensure the best outcomes for consumers. Consumer involvement must work in concert with regulation.

18.     Ultimately, the purpose of economic regulation is to advance the long-term interests of consumers. This ensures that suppliers deliver high-quality services that reflect consumer demand and incentivises improved efficiency. It also ensures any gains by the suppliers are passed through to the consumers.

What type of regulation is being proposed and who would pay the costs?

19.     There are several types of regulation – price-quality, information disclosure, and quality-only. In this case, it is proposed that the regulator be a price-quality regulator.

20.     Price-quality regulators essentially set upper limits on the price that can be charged by the supplier while setting lower limits on the quality of service that must be delivered.

21.     Typically, price-quality regulators operate on regulatory cycles of four to six years. It is proposed that the economic regulator operate on a five-year cycle, with the possibility of the first regulatory cycle being shorter.

22.     Economic regulation has costs. These costs come from two places. On one hand, the economic regulator costs money to operate and administer. On the other hand, the suppliers incur compliance costs to meet the requirements of the regulator.

23.     It is proposed that the administrative costs of the regulator be recovered through levies. This is a straightforward, transparent, and standard way of recovering these costs. Ultimately these costs are borne by the consumers.

24.     The cost to the supplier of complying with regulation is also ultimately borne by the consumers. Since both categories of regulatory costs are borne by the consumers, it is necessary to design the regulations to ensure they are net beneficial to consumers.

25.     Given the amalgamation proposed by the Water Services Bill will increase the market power of the water providers, it is likely that regulation is necessary. Further, the research for the Water Services Bill finds that even the current absence of profit motives, and the obligations to promote the social, cultural, environmental, and financial wellbeing of communities has been insufficient to ensure delivery of effective and efficient three waters service. Put another way, there is probably a case for economic regulation, even in the absence of the proposed three waters amalgamation.

26.     Thus, the MBIE’s recommendation is that three waters be price-quality regulated.

27.     However, there is also a question as to whether the regulation should be applied generically across all suppliers or tailored to individual suppliers. Given the inflexibility of generic regulation and Government’s strong commitment to water service quality, it is recommended that the price-quality regulation be flexible to allow for different incentives to the different suppliers.

What parts of three waters should regulation apply to?

28.     The delivery of stormwater services is fundamentally different to drinking water and wastewater.

29.     While drinking water and wastewater services are delivered directly to the beneficiaries (that is, the person drinking the water or flushing the toilet), stormwater services have a public good element as well. When the stormwater in one area is managed, it could make other areas less likely to flood, for instance. This means that it is difficult to identify and charge the consumers of stormwater services.

30.     Additionally, while drinking water and wastewater infrastructure is easily identified, stormwater infrastructure is more difficult. Stormwater systems are often integrated into roading networks, use natural topographical features, and are owned by various land holders and infrastructure providers.

31.     Internationally, when stormwater systems are operated alongside drinking water and wastewater, they tend to be economically regulated.

32.     The preliminary view put forward by the MBIE is that stormwater should be economically regulated, but it will be less straightforward to demonstrate that it is net beneficial.

Should the regulation apply to all providers?

33.     Three waters reform is proposed to result in four main entities serving approximately 85% of the population. The remainder would be served by small community or private schemes, or through self-supply. A recent study for Taumata Arowai suggested that there could be between 75,000 and 130,000 unregistered drinking water suppliers.

34.     None of these small-scale suppliers serves more than 5,000 customers. There are only three non-defense force suppliers that serve between 500 and 5,000 customers. 

35.     For even smaller (less than 500 customers) providers, it is likely that the owners of three waters supplier and the consumers of the services are largely the same people. Therefore, it is less critical to have a regulatory framework to ensure consumer wellbeing.

36.     Since the goal of the reform is to further consumer wellbeing, these other suppliers should only be regulated if the cost of regulation is outweighed by the benefits.

37.     Given the small scale and relatively high compliance costs, the MBIE has recommended that regulatory framework only apply to the new water service entities created by the Water Services Bill.

How and when should regulation be implemented?

38.     To be effective, price-quality regulation requires high quality information on the assets, costs and quality of service provided by regulated suppliers. However, the Three Waters Reform Programme has found that the scope and quality of the available information is not currently at the level that would be required to implement an effective economic regulation regime.

39.     Because of this information gap, it is unlikely that the regulatory regime would be operational by the time the new three waters entities are set to begin operation in 1 July 2024.

40.     However, starting the new entities operations without a regulatory framework in place poses its own risk.

41.     Therefore, the Government’s recommendation is that there should be a graduated approach to implementing a conventional cost-based price-quality path, with the first regulatory pricing period beginning 1 July 2027. In the interim the industry would improve its data and the regulator would work with the industry on information disclosure.

42.     This interim period from 1 July 2024 through to 30 June 2027 would leave the supplies unregulated in terms of price-quality. There are two potential solutions to this gap. The first is that the regulator impose a price-quality path based on incomplete information but using its best judgment. The second option is that an interim price-quality path be implemented by government. There are significant pros and cons to each option and the MBIE is seeking feedback on this issue.

What should be the statutory objectives of the regulation regime?

43.     Recently in New Zealand, regulatory regimes are set to achieve four goals.

a)     There must be incentives to innovate and invest.

b)     There should be incentives to improve efficiency.

c)     That the efficiency gains must be shared with consumers.

d)     Lastly, suppliers are limited in their ability to turn profits. This point is irrelevant to the three waters reform scenario.

44.     However, there is scope for the economic regulator to have responsibility for a broader range of objectives (including issues such as climate change and Te mana o te Wai).

45.     There is also a question as to how Te Tiriti o Waitangi considerations factor into the design of any economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector.

46.     The MBIE seeks feedback on what the precise role of the economic regulator should be and whether it should be expanded in the ways described above.

What should compliance and enforcement look like?

47.     Compliance and enforcement are essential for regulation to be effective.

48.     An economic regulator’s compliance and enforcement toolkit typically includes education initiatives, warning letters, infringement offences, pecuniary penalties, enforceable undertakings, and other civil remedies such as out-of-court settlements.

49.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on whether there needs to be any other tools in the toolkit.

Who should the economic regulator be?

50.     To be effective, regulators need to be at arms-length from government, transparent, accountable, credible, freely share information, and act in a coordinated way with policy agencies.

51.     There are three potential options for the economic regulator: Taumata Arowai, the Commerce Commission, or a new regulatory authority created specifically for economic regulation of three waters.

52.     The MBIE’s multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission is best suited to be the economic regulator. 

Do we need additional consumer protections and how are those regulated?

53.     Due to the nature of the three waters sector, there may be other consumer protections required. There likely needs to be rules around the acceptable likelihood and duration of supply outages, the acceptable level of leakage from reticulated supply networks, the level of resilience to natural and man-made hazards, and the amount of innovation and efficiencies delivered to consumers.

54.     These protections will be required because three waters is a natural monopoly and consumers cannot go elsewhere when unhappy with their service.

55.     Importantly, the current democratic, consultation, and governance mechanisms that are provided for in the Local Government Act 2002 will not apply to the proposed new Water Services Entities. In addition, the Ombudsman’s current role in dealing with complaints about local government agencies will cease.

56.     These points suggest that regulation needs to consider these angles of consumer protection above and beyond the standard roles of an economic regulator.

57.     There is also a need for additional protections for vulnerable consumers. It is recommended that that there should be a positive obligation on the regulator to consider interests of vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough able to accommodate a wide range of approaches to addressing consumer harm and vulnerability.

58.     The MBIE is seeking feedback on how the consumer protection regime could be designed in a way that contributes to equitable outcomes and mitigates unintended impacts on Māori. This includes impacts on different iwi/hapū, Māori landowners, urban Māori consumers, and rural Māori consumers. Additionally, views are sought on how the consumer protection regulator could be expected to consider Treaty obligations, and the cultural competency of the economic regulator to recognise the significance of water as a taonga for Māori.

59.     As with economic regulation, a multi-criteria analysis suggests that the Commerce Commission should be the consumer protection regulator.

How should consumer disputes be resolved?

60.     There are several ways that consumer disputes can be resolved.

61.     The preliminary preferred option put forward by the MBIE is for mandatory provision of consumer dispute resolution services, but feedback is sought as to whether this should be achieved through a new scheme or by expanding the mandate of an existing scheme.

62.     Traditionally, vulnerable populations face difficulties in accessing dispute resolution schemes. Therefore, it is important that both suppliers and the dispute resolution provider ensure that underserved and vulnerable communities can participate in processes that affect them including dispute resolution processes.

Local Board Feedback

63.     While the MBIE has posed 46 questions to submitters in the discussion document, only a few are acutely relevant. The following 11 questions are the most critical for the council family to provide feedback:

a)      What are your views on whether the stormwater networks that are currently operated by local authorities should be economically regulated, alongside drinking water and wastewater?

b)      Do you consider that the economic regulation regime should be implemented gradually from 2024 to 2027, or do you consider that a transitional price-quality path is also required?

c)      If you consider a transitional price-quality path is required, do you consider that this should be developed and implemented by an independent economic regulator, or by Government and implemented through a Government Policy Statement?

d)      What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of an economic regulatory regime for the three waters sector?

e)      Who do you consider should have primary responsibility for determining the structure of three waters prices: a. The Water Services Entity, following engagement with their governance group, communities, and consumers; b. The economic regulator; or c. The Government or Ministers?

f)       Who do you think is the most suitable body to be the economic regulator for the three waters sector? Please provide reasons for your view.

g)      What are your views on whether minimum service level requirements should be able to vary across different types of consumers?

h)      What are your views on whether the regulatory regime should include a positive obligation to protect vulnerable consumers, and that minimum service level requirements are flexible enough to accommodate a wide range of approaches to protecting vulnerable consumers?

i)        What are your views on how Treaty of Waitangi principles, as well as the rights and interests of iwi/Māori, should be factored into the design of a consumer protection regime for the three waters sector?

j)        Do you agree with the preliminary view that the Commerce Commission is the most suitable body to be the consumer protection regulator for the three waters sector?

k)      Do you consider that there should be special considerations for traditionally under-served or vulnerable communities? If so, how do you think these should be given effect?

64.     A resolution requesting the views of local boards on the proposal is included in this report.

65.     Local board views are requested by 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

66.     The discussion paper acknowledges that addressing climate change challenges and ensuring water service resilience is one of the drivers of the overall Three Waters Reform. However, the economic regulation regime is not being considered for these reasons directly.

67.     The proposed economic regulation framework does not have direct impacts on greenhouse gas emissions or climate. However, it may be in the purview of the regulator to ensure consumer expectations are met with regards to environmental and climate outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

68.     Relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations have been identified and contributions will be sought from them in developing the council group’s response to the Economic Regulation and Consumer Protection for Three Waters Services in New Zealand discussion paper.

69.     While overall three waters reform will have a direct impact on council and council-controlled organisations, economic regulation put in place after that reform will not have any impact on council or remaining council-controlled organisations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

70.     Local board views are sought as part of the development of the council’s submission and will be reported back to Governing Body. Local board resolutions will be included as part of council’s submission. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

71.     The overall three waters reform is, in part, to recognise and provide for iwi/Māori rights and interests with a specific focus on service delivery. It is proposed that iwi/Māori will have a greater role in the new Three Waters system, including pathways for enhanced participation by whānau and hapū as these services relate to their Treaty rights and interests.

72.     On a price-quality basis, economic regulation of the three waters industry does not directly impact on Māori any differently than other three waters services consumers. However, the overall three waters reform and specific topics within the economic regulation of three waters are likely to be of significant interest. In particular, how treaty obligations are considered, the recognition of water as taonga for Māori, and the overrepresentation of Māori in the group of consumers vulnerable to price shocks.

73.     Māori outcomes leads within the council family are being consulted on these topics.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     The submission can be developed within existing budget provision and as part of business-as-usual central government advocacy activity.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

75.     There is little risk in making a submission on the economic regulation of three waters. Conversely, there is high risk if we do not make a submission. As the work programme progresses, staff can provide further information about the potential impacts on council’s activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     The office of the Chief Economist is currently drafting a submission on behalf of Auckland Council.

77.     Staff are preparing a report for the Governing Body seeking a delegation of Governing Body members to approve the council’s submission.

78.     The views of local boards on the proposal are requested by the 6 December 2021 to enable those views to influence the overall submission and to be included as an attachment to the council submission.

79.     The deadline for the final submission to Government is 20 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shane Martin - Senior Economist

Authoriser

Jim Stabback - Chief Executive

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022

File No.: CP2021/17913

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (the draft policy).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Significance and Engagement Policy, adopted in 2014, is undergoing a policy refresh to make it more contemporary and user-friendly.

3.       The goal of the policy refresh is to provide for a simplified decision-making process through a high-level guiding document that allows for case-by-case assessments.

4.       Minor updates are needed in both the significance and engagement components of the policy.

5.       Updates around the significance component of the draft policy include:

·    the assessment of significance in terms of a continuum

·    taking a cumulative approach to a package of proposals or decisions

·    adjusting the list of strategic assets to include only assets critical for the delivery of services and clarifying that most strategic assets are identified as groups or networks of assets to reflect the way in which they deliver services

·    adding guidance for assessing the significance of decisions for assets that do not meet the criteria for being strategic.

6.       Updates around the engagement component of the draft policy include:

·    simplifying existing text to make the policy more user-friendly

·    ensuring the engagement principles capture a more diverse Tāmaki Makaurau

·    capturing the need to safeguard staff, elected members and the community during consultation and engagement

·    giving more visibility to the connection between the policy and the forthcoming and separate refresh of the Engagement Guidelines, which will support staff to operationalise the policy.

7.       The draft policy was adopted for public consultation by Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 meeting, resolution number GB/2021/111.

8.       Public consultation ran from 27 September to 18 October 2021.

9.       Adoption of the final policy is projected for February 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy as part of the overall consideration for final adoption in February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Significance and Engagement Policy (the 2014 policy) was created and adopted in 2014 to fulfill the legislative requirements outlined in section 76AA of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).

11.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is a key document for decision-making and the consultation process. It is comprised of two interrelated sections on significance and engagement.

12.     The significance section sets out how and when communities can expect the council to engage before making decisions, describes the council’s approach to determining the significance of proposals and decisions, and lists the council’s strategic assets.

13.     The engagement section provides high-level principles on how to engage inclusively with the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau. These high-level principles ensure that engagement is fit-for-purpose according to the level of significance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have undertaken a policy refresh as the 2014 policy has not undergone changes since its initial adoption.

15.     An internal assessment of the 2014 policy found that that it was largely easy to use, but minor improvements would allow for more efficient decision-making and more fit-for-purpose engagement processes.

16.     General high-level updates and clarifications are being proposed for the draft policy to create a more contemporary policy.

17.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to be a prescriptive policy document, and any accepted changes to the draft policy will not change the purpose for which it is used.

18.     The proposed changes to the Significance and Engagement Policy 2021 were reported to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September – see Attachment A Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation, also found online with associated documents.

Consultation

19.     Formal public consultation was held from 27 September to 18 October 2021. The consultation document is part of Attachment A, or online here.

20.     Given COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the region, consultation was conducted entirely virtually and consisted of:

·    consultation materials and online feedback forms made available on the council’s engagement website (AK Have Your Say)

·    virtual workshops with community partners with demographic advisory panels

·    working with community partners to reach diverse groups.

21.     All feedback has been captured and will be reported through to the Governing Body meeting in February 2022 to inform decision-making on the final policy.

22.     A summary of the regional feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B and local board specific feedback in Attachment C.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Accepting the proposed changes to the draft policy allows for a fit-for-purpose and contemporary significance and engagement policy that will encourage a richer engagement process during future consultations around climate change issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Any strategic asset under the draft policy that is held or managed by a substantive Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) will be identified in the CCO Accountability Policy. CCO’s must comply with that policy when making decisions on strategic assets under their control.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local boards play a key role in engaging with their local communities. The change to enable more fit-for-purpose consultation and engagement for some asset-based decisions may provide local boards with greater flexibility to customise some engagement processes to better meet the needs of their community.

26.     Local board chairs were invited to a workshop held on 4 August 2021 that also included the Parks, Arts, Community and Events, and Finance and Performance committees for a high-level overview on proposed amendments to the draft policy.

27.     Formalised local board views from this workshop and report will be incorporated into the February 2022 Governing Body report for the policy adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The refresh of the Significance and Engagement Policy will strengthen the council’s capacity and capability to engage with and meet the needs of the Māori community. This will be achieved through the delivery of bespoke training initiatives and resources which align to best practice engagement that responds to the needs and is supported by Māori. Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides a foundation to build council’s engagement approach and supports initiatives already underway such as Te Matapuna 2 as a pilot for spatial-based engagement. Work on relationship agreements is progressing, and there is good support for capacity contracts. Further work is required to streamline engagement forums to ensure they are fit for purpose and respond to priorities from Māori.

29.     Ongoing collaboration on the development of the Māori engagement practice and approach will inform the Engagement Guidelines and will ensure council’s size and engagement reach is leveraged effectively. This collaboration will ensure that the operational execution of the Engagement Guidelines is well-informed and aligned with best practice in te ao Māori.

30.     This focus on practice, capacity and capability will guide operational performance so that the aspirations for Māori engagement in Tāmaki Makaurau are progressed, aligned and achievable. Further work on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau performance measures will be aligned with the engagement approach as it continues to be developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed changes to the significance section of the policy assists in the assessment of significance and may reduce the financial costs of engagement approaches that are not fit-for-purpose.

32.     Reclassifying some assets as non-strategic will also remove the burden of audit costs if the council seeks to make any future decisions around changing ownership or control of those assets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present any risk. The risks associated with refreshing the draft policy are set out in the report to the 23 September Governing Body meeting in Attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Feedback from the consultation along with local board views will be reported to the 24 February 2022 Governing Body meeting as part of the materials for the finalised draft policy approval.

35.     The final Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 is proposed to be implemented following approval at the same Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation

213

b

Summary of regional feedback

253

c

Local Board specific feedback

261

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Justine Yu - Senior Advisor - Fin Policy

Eddie Tuiavii - Principal Advisor - Democracy and Engage

Authoriser

Ross Tucker - General Manager, Financial Strategy and Planning

Kenneth Aiolupotea - General Manager Democracy and Engagement

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18392

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname. 

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology. 

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e. the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e. the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data show that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/local-impacts-local-board-views-reports.aspx

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order. Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias.  If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ballot order effects and Auckland Council elections_November 2021

271

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Local board feedback on the National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document

File No.: CP2021/17139

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the local board’s formal input into Auckland Council’s submission on the National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document, Te hau mārohi ki anamata: Transitioning to a low-emissions and climate-resilient future.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry for the Environment released a discussion document on 13 October 2021 for public consultation, seeking to inform the development of the first National Emissions Reduction Plan. 

3.       The discussion document describes existing actions the Government has committed to and sets out new proposed actions it may include in the National Emissions Reduction Plan to further reduce emissions and meet climate targets.

4.       The document proposes a range of new strategies and policies for consideration which span every sector of the economy and include changes to our funding and finance system, the way we organise our urban areas, and a shift to a circular economy.

5.       The Government is required to publish the National Emissions Reduction Plan by the end of May 2022.

6.       Auckland Council already has existing strategic direction in emissions reduction through Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan and has agreed positions that have recently been provided through previous submissions on climate change and transport emissions.

7.       As such, the council will not, in the main, be developing new positions through this submission, but will base it on relevant strategies and these existing agreed positions.

8.       Local boards were invited to provide input with a deadline of 17 November for feedback to be incorporated into the council’s submission. As this deadline fell before the next scheduled business meeting, formal feedback from the Puketapapa Local Board was provided by delegation to the Chair, Julie Fairey, in accordance with Puketāpapa Local Board resolution PKTPP/2020/57.

9.       The local board’s feedback was provided to Auckland Council subject-matter experts prior to the deadline. A copy of the local board’s feedback is attached to this report (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      note the board’s feedback on the National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document for incorporation into an Auckland Council submission (Attachment A) as authorised by delegation to Chair J Fairey.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board input into Auckland Council feedback on the "Transitioning to a low-emissions and climate-resilient future" discussion document

277

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Samantha Tan Rodrigo - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2021/17314

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey’s verbal updates.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2021/17003

 

  

 

Te take mō te p,ūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson, Julie Fairey, with an opportunity to update local board members on the activities she has been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that the Chairperson will speak to the report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive Chair, Julie Fairey’s report for 01 October – 22 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair, J Fairey's Report 01 October - 22 November 2021

285

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Board Member Reports

 

File No.: CP2021/17315

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the local board members on the activities they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that Local Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the member reports for November 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Fiona Lai's Member Report, 01 November - 30 November 2021

291

b

Ella Kumar's Member Report, 01 October - 24 November 2021

293

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2021/17316

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Puketāpapa Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Puketāpapa Local Board is in Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the tabled governance forward work programme calendar for December 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2021/17317

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in November 2021.

3.       These sessions are held to give informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Puketāpapa Local Board workshop notes for: 11 November, 18 November and 25 November 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 11 November 2021

301

b

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 18 November 2021

305

c

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 25 November 2021

309

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

02 December 2021

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Puketāpapa Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains information covered in confidential Finance and Performance workshops and information relating to the draft Mayoral proposal which has not been finalised or released publicly. This report can be restated on 9 December once the final Mayoral Proposal and the material relating to the Annual Budget is available following the Finance and Performance Committee meeting on 8 December 2021.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.