I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 15 December 2021

5.15pm

Via Skype-for-Business

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kylee Matthews

 

Members

Robin Tucker

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Dileeka Senewiratne

Democracy Advisor

 

9 December 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 840 914

Email: dileeka.senewiratne@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       7

12        Chairperson's report                                                                                                   25

13        Auckland Transport Report - December 2021                                                          33

14        Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 1 December 2021                                 39

15        Response regarding Helicopter consents on Waiheke                                           69

16        Community Resilience and Local Economic Development 2021/2022 - Waiheke Island Tourism Inc                                                                                                       97

17        Community Led Housing Initiatives 2022                                                               105

18        Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022                                                                                                                    115

19        Update to delegation for resource consent feedback                                           169

20        Waiheke Low Carbon Action Plan                                                                           171

21        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                   251

22        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents        303

23        Māori Outcomes Annual Report - Te Pūrongo a te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021                                                                                   313

24        Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings                                      361

25        List of resource consent applications - 8 November to 3 December 2021         369

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal) - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace… good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 24 November 2021 and the minutes of its extraordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 1 December 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2021/18837

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom’s update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor's Update - December 2021

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2021/18839

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson, Cath Handley’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's Update - December 2021

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport Report - December 2021

File No.: CP2021/18840

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

This report covers:

2.       A general summary of operational projects and activities of interest to the Waiheke Local Board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport December 2021 update report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

4.       The current amount of funding proposed in the Regional Land Transport Plan is $400,000 per annum.

5.       The unspent budget of $71,493.50 from 2020/2021 can be carried forward for the board to allocate as they see fit providing a total fund available for 2021/2022 of $471,493.50. Auckland Transport will work with the local board to discuss and advise on the best use of the budget. An initial meeting is planned for 8 December to discuss options.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

6.       The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

7.       The CSF is funded from Auckland Transport’s safety budget, and funding for the design and construction for the Causeway project has been confirmed for 2021/2022.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

8.       The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

9.       The CSF is funded from Auckland Transport’s safety budget, and funding for the design and construction for the Causeway project has been confirmed for 2021/2022.

Update on Auckland Transport operations:

10.     The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their status. Please note that:

·    All timings are indicative and are subject to change.

·    Due to the COVID lockdown period in place since 18 August, this report is reduced in content to include only operational items where there has been any activity or change since the 25 August local board business meeting.

·    The Waiheke Operations Manager will update the local board in the event of any amendments or changes to the summaries provided for below.

Activity

Update

EV chargers

AT is working on establishing a process to approve the installation of kerbside EV infrastructure to support the applications from Vector (on behalf of Electric Island) for new stations planned at 26 Anzac Rd, Orapiu, and 1 Third Ave, Onetangi.

 

Once the design details are finalised for each site, AT will consult with the public before approving a formal parking resolution and granting a licence to Vector to occupy the sites.

 

The charging infrastructure at the Kennedy Point carpark is formalised and licenced. Installation is due on 14 December with line marking and signage planned to be complete before the holiday closedown.

 

Road Maintenance

Programmed works

December works includes routine cyclic maintenance of signs, drains and potholes.

Grading

1.   Cowes Bay Rd, Omiha.

2.   Waimangu Rd, Omiha

3.   Scotts Tce, Onetangi

Road maintenance

1.   Surfdale Rd. Surfdale

2.   Trig Hill Rd, Onetangi

3.   Orapiu Rd, Orapiu

Preseal repairs

1.    Weka Rd, Oneroa

2.    Church Bay Rd, Oneroa

Matiatia Carpark

Alternate carpark access for SPSVs (small passenger service vehicles)

Pre-booked and unbooked SPSVs (taxis/shuttles/tours) are currently required to line up together while waiting for access to the dedicated ranks.

During busy periods particularly (Saturdays, Sundays, Friday afternoons) parked vehicles get obstructed by queuing taxis, with the congestion making it unsafe for pedestrians and people moving through the lower carpark.

Alternate access for the unbooked taxis has been provided through the $3 unsealed carpark, whilst the pre-booked taxis and shuttles access is directly into the $6 lower carpark.

New signage has been installed to direct the SPSVs from Ocean View Rd to their respective ranks.

Separation of $3 and $6 carparks

To provide a safer pedestrian environment in the lower carpark, it is proposed to install bollards between the lower ($3) and upper ($6) carparks. Vehicles will no longer be able to cross over between the two carparks.

Each carpark has its own entrance and exit off or onto Ocean View Rd.

Carpark separation is intended to assist the SPSV operators by creating separate waiting queues for them.

With unbooked SPSVs accessing the taxi queue via the alternate route through the unsealed carpark, fewer vehicles will be moving into the lower carpark directly off Ocean View Rd.

Wharves

Matiatia Wharf (main)

Preparations are under way for the second stage of AT’s wharf renewal project at Matiatia. Sea trials have been undertaken with Fullers, with operations shifted to the old wharf for a day’s trial with the public.

All items (pontoons, gangways, and hydraulics platforms) are being fabricated off-site, and work on the new wharf will only commence once these items are ready to be shipped to the site. Initial works will consist of dismantling and removing the existing infrastructure, and all ferry services will temporarily relocate to the old wharf while the renewal work is carried out.

Once onsite, works are expected to take between 6-8 weeks, with March/April being considered for implementation. Some items are being sourced from overseas with timeframes having to be adjusted to accommodate inbound shipping schedules.

Phase one – the southern berth (Pier 1)

·    Pontoon replacement

·    New hydraulic platform

·    New fixed landing platform

·    New upper and lower gangways

 

Phase two – to replace the northern berth (Pier 2)

Expected to take place within 12-18 months.

 

Metro Ferry Services

Ferry Services

COVID restrictions continued to impact on patronage during November. Whilst the region remained at various stages of Alert Level 3 during the month, additional travel restrictions were implemented which had a significant impact on ferry patronage.

 

Average daily patronage steadily increased through the month as restrictions were gradually eased, with patronage settling at around twice the daily October average by the end of the month.

 

As the city moves to the new Traffic Light System, patronage is expected to further increase as we enter the busy summer period. Fullers360 are already making arrangements for additional services to be operated on the route over the Christmas and New Year period.

 

AT and all its PT operators will continue to monitor usage and demand and will flex timetables accordingly should patronage increase sufficiently to require a review of capacity provided.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

12.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     There are no financial implications of receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all their projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board at a future business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard La Ville – Operations Manager – Waiheke and Gulf Islands Airfields – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

John Strawbridge – Group Manager Parking Services and Compliance – Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 1 December 2021

File No.: CP2021/19343

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present an update and minutes from the business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum (the forum) held on 1 December 2021 to the Waiheke Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum was held on 1 December 2021 and minutes are included as Attachment A.

3.       The following items were discussed:

·    Following the resignation of Bianca Ranson as the Waiheke Transport Forum Chair, thanks were given to Bianca for her service to the forum, and Grant Crawford was elected as Waiheke Transport Forum Chair and subsequently Norm Robins as Deputy Chair.

 

·    Auckland Transport Regional Streets for People Programme application – this year’s application was submitted for the pedestrianisation of the Blackpool Esplanade (Attachment B and C).

 

·    Richard La Ville updated the forum on the proposed improvements at Matiatia for queueing of small passenger service vehicles whilst waiting for space on the taxi rank in the main carpark.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         note the minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum business meeting dated 1 

            December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20211201 Waiheke Transport Forum Minutes

41

b

Regional Streets for People programme application

47

c

Regional Streets for People programme outline and letters of support

61

  

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Response regarding Helicopter consents on Waiheke

File No.: CP2021/19019

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the response from the Plans and Places Department and the Resource Consents Department to the notice of motion by the Waiheke Local Board regarding helicopter activity.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

At its meeting held 21 July 2021, the Waiheke Local Board resolved as follows:

14

Notice of Motion - Robin Tucker - Helicopter Consents

 

Resolution number WHK/2021/1

MOVED by Member R Tucker, seconded by Chairperson C Handley:  

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         request an information report from council staff on options to increase control over the number of helicopter pads being consented, their locations, as well as the associated numbers of flights per helicopter pad, and means by which to manage cumulative and specific effects of the number of helipad consents and flight movements on Waiheke and the other islands in the Waiheke Local Board area. This also relates to nuisance and the protection, promotion and maintenance of public health and safety. This should also include an outline of the implications on Waiheke’s current rules once the Hauraki Gulf Islands District Plan (HGIDP) is replaced with the Unitary Plan (UP), and to advise whether it is feasible to apply a Moratorium on Helicopter Pad Consents until such controls are implemented.

b)         ask Auckland Council’s Planning Committee to endorse a change in the assessment criteria for new helipad consents on Waiheke Island to:

i. enable public notification of all helipad consents so those directly affected in the vicinity and on projected flight paths can place submissions.

ii. include the consideration of the cumulative effects of helicopter movements.

iii.widen the assessment of the effects of helicopter flights, take offs and landings on the wider community and the amenity values of Waiheke and the rights of residents to the quiet enjoyment of their property.

c)         review all existing helipad consents to determine if any have lapsed during the past 5 years so that the resource consent can be cancelled pursuant to Resource Management Act Section 126.

d)         request where a review provision exists in the consent, a review be undertaken pursuant to Resource Management Act Section 128, to determine how conditions of operation could be changed to reduce their impact on amenity value. Notification should be made of each review to receive public comment on effects.  

e)         request that subsequent to each review, conditions should be amended or added, including, at a minimum, a requirement that each helicopter shall implement tracking (such as the ADS-B satellite-based system) sufficient to show its approach and departure routes taken to any consented helipad, and that the tracking shall be available online to the public so that it can be monitored even in the absence of any Council monitoring.

f)          request Auckland Council’s Planning Committee supports a request from the Waiheke Local Board to the Civil Aviation Authority for approval of the Minister of Transport to establish a Special Use Airspace pursuant to Section 29A of the Civil Aviation Act of 1990 to help to manage the impacts of helicopter flights over Waiheke.

CARRIED UNANIMOUSLY

 

 

2.       Attachment A provides the response to the above resolutions from the Plans and Places Department and the Resource Consents Department.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the response from the Plans and Places Department and the Resource Consents Department to the notice of motion by the Waiheke Local Board regarding helicopter activity.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Response to NOM dated 3 December 2021

71

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Community Resilience and Local Economic Development 2021/2022 - Waiheke Island Tourism Inc

File No.: CP2021/19322

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a grant of $15,000 for Waiheke Island Tourism Inc from the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board has $20,000 available in the 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme to facilitate local economic development, support social enterprises and community networks, build community resilience, and support economic recovery.

3.       Waiheke Island Tourism Inc (WITI) has requested a grant of $15,000 to towards a “Covid Recovery Package” to assist with reactivating the Waiheke economy post-Covid lockdown and to safely welcome visitors back to the island.

4.       The recovery package includes a “Warm Waiheke Welcome” media campaign that encourages domestic visitors to the island to stay longer, experience a diversity of Waiheke activities and engage with a wide range of local businesses.

5.       WITI’s proposal is a community-led action that responds to the changing environment of the pandemic and is an example of local businesses working together to support economic activation and enhance resilience.

6.       Staff recommend that the local board allocate $15,000 from the Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme to WITI to support the delivery of its Covid Recovery Package.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve a grant of $15,000 for Waiheke Island Tourism Inc from the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 2 “A sustainable economy” seeks “to address both the rebuild of the visitor economy and further economic diversification”. It includes the objective to “Strengthen our economy in keeping with the island’s character and our need to increase our resiliency”.

8.       The Waiheke Local Board has made $20,000 available within its 2021/2022 Work Programme for Community Resilience and Local Economic Development. 

9.       The purpose of this fund is to “fund community groups to facilitate local economic development through social enterprise and entrepreneurship, support the development of sustainable social enterprises and community networks, build community resilience and support economic recovery”.

10.     One of the key outcomes of the fund is that “community and business networks are strengthened to enhance community resilience and support post-Covid economic recovery”.

11.     Waiheke Island Tourism Inc (WITI) is a business network that provides a collective voice for tourism stakeholders and promotes Waiheke as a visitor destination. WITI has over 250 members including accommodation and activity providers, hospitality, retailers, transport operators, ferry companies, tour operators and various other businesses and community organisations that engage with visitors to the island.

12.     WITI has developed a proposal for a “Covid Recovery Package” to support its members and assist the wider Waiheke business community to reactivate economic activity post-lockdown and safely welcome visitors back to the island (see Attachment A).

13.     Representatives of WITI presented the proposal at the public forum of the local board meeting on 24 November 2021. The proposal included two elements: “A Warm Waiheke Welcome” media campaign; and visual tools to support businesses to implement vaccination certificates required by the government’s new Covid Protection Framework (traffic light system).

14.     The local board has agreed to allocate $5,000 funding towards the visual tools from the Community Response Fund work programme, a discretionary fund to respond to community issues as they arise during the year. “Vaccinated people only” decals and signs have been distributed to businesses and community organisations across the island.

15.     WITI is seeking a further $15,000 grant towards the “Warm Waiheke Welcome” media campaign, which will profile local business owners, local families, and local people, promote that Waiheke is open for business and welcoming visitors, and educate visitors about the safety protocols in place.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     WITI’s proposed Covid Recovery Package is a proactive community-led action that responds to the quickly changing environment of the New Zealand’s COVID-19 response and the new traffic light system.

17.     COVID-19 has had a significant impact on the Waiheke economy. Auckland has been in Covid Alert Level 3 or 4 since 18 August 2021, preventing or restricting trade for many of the island’s businesses and having a flow on effect to local employment and the wider community.

18.     Representatives from WITI presented to the local board at the Extraordinary Business Meeting on 17 November 2021. They outlined the difficulties of the prolonged Covid lockdown, which has created significant financial and personal strain for the local business community.

19.     On 3 December 2021, New Zealand transitioned to the traffic light system, which allows businesses to reopen and domestic tourism to resume, including recreational travel from Auckland to Waiheke.

20.     The Covid Recovery Package includes a media campaign that encourages domestic visitors to the island to stay longer, experience a diversity of Waiheke activities and engage with a wide range of local businesses.

21.     The objectives of the proposal are to:

·        Support businesses to navigate the new way of working with their customers in the red level of the traffic light system.

·        Build community resilience and support businesses to work together for the island’s recovery.

·        Ensure economic sustainability of local businesses, by supporting them with tools and marketing support.

·        Reassure visitors to the island that Waiheke businesses are both compliant with the framework requirements and providing a uniquely Waiheke tone of voice.

·        Welcome the return of visitors, including multi-night stays, by giving them a genuinely ‘warm welcome back to Waiheke’.

·        Inform visitors ahead of their visit that Waiheke is prepared for the ‘new normal’ and reassure them that Waiheke is a safe destination to visit.

22.     The media campaign encourages visitors to engage with the island’s character. It features a diverse range of Waiheke business owners and community members.

23.     It represents different visitor experiences including hospitality, retail, boating, tours, and arts. It promotes activities such as beach visits, walking, cycling, and Stoney Batter that enable visitors to engage in the natural environment and history of the island.

24.     Because of the need for WITI to move quickly, the project has already commenced, with a video promoting the island already circulating via social media channels.

25.     A local board grant would be used to widely promote the video and other sector-specific edits across multiple channels over summer to achieve a greater audience and attract new and returning visitors to the island.

26.     A strong local economy is an important aspect of a resilient community. Local business networks play an important role in activating local economic development, connecting with the wider community and supporting their members to navigate challenging times.

27.     WITI’s Covid Recovery Package is an example of the way business networks can facilitate businesses to collaborate and use the resources available to them to support economic activation and enhance community resilience on the island.

28.     Staff recommend the local board approve a grant of $15,000 to WITI to support Waiheke’s economic rebuild post COVID-19 lockdowns.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Increased tourism can result in adverse climate and environmental impacts. However, without international tourists, the largest proportion of visitors are expected to come from within the Auckland region and will typically have a smaller carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     The Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme is administered by staff from Council’s Connected Communities team.

31.     Auckland Unlimited work with WITI and its members to provide funding, support and by promoting Waiheke as a destination within a broader regional tourism campaign. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 outcome 2 “A sustainable economy” includes the objective to “Strengthen our economy in keeping with the island’s character and our need to increase our resiliency”.

33.     WITI’s Covid Recovery Package aligns with this objective by building the capacity of WITI as a business network and by encouraging visitors to stay longer on the island and engage with the many different aspects of the economy and environment.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     WITI includes Māori businesses and members, some of whom are featured in the media campaign and welcome visitors in Te Reo Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     The 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme has an allocated budget of $20,000 to facilitate local economic development, support sustainable social enterprises and community networks, build community resilience, and support economic recovery.

36.     If the board approves a grant of $15,000 to WITI then $5,000 will remain in the budget to respond to emerging needs.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.     WITI has already commenced the campaign. Staff would usually recommend to groups that they wait until after funding is approved, however WITI has taken a proactive approach to the introduction of the traffic light system and the need to respond in a timely manner. This does not prevent staff from recommending that the project is supported.

38.     If WITI’s funding request is not supported, the media campaign will have less reach and will be less effective. WITI will need to fund the video from reserves.

39.     No funding has been made available for local media campaigns from the government’s recently announced Reactive Tāmaki Makaurau package. WITI will work with Auckland Unlimited to identify other opportunities related to this fund.

40.     WITI has decided not to increase membership fees in 2022 in recognition of the challenging financial situation of member businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

41.     Staff from Connected Communities will work with Waiheke Island Tourism Inc to develop a funding agreement.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

WITI Covid Record Package Proposal November 2021

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Community Led Housing Initiatives 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/19363

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grants from the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community-Led Housing Initiatives work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Waiheke Local Board has $10,000 available within its 2021/2022 work programme for community-led housing initiatives.

3.       Staff recommend that the local board allocate the available budget to two initiatives: Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme and Waiheke Hope Centre’s Emergency and Transitional Housing.

4.       Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme provides interventions for people whose health and wellbeing is negatively affected by living in cold, damp, mouldy homes.

5.       The programme was initiated in 2017 by Waiheke Health Trust (WHT). Following successful collaboration between WHT and Habitat for Humanity in 2020 and 2021, the programme is now transitioning to be managed by Habitat for Humanity, which has specific expertise in housing. The programme will continue a strong relationship with WHT, will employ the existing coordinator and be based at the WHT offices in Ostend.

6.       Habitat for Humanity is seeking a grant of $10,000 towards coordinator costs to continue the Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme in 2022. This will enable Habitat for Humanity to maintain its services on the island, while seeking ongoing alternative funding for project. If approved, it would be the third and final year of capacity-building support for the programme.

7.       Waiheke Hope Centre provides emergency and transitional accommodation, with a focus on senior housing, at the Living Waters Church property in Surfdale.

8.       The Hope Centre is replacing its onsite wastewater system, which will enable it to comply with resource consent requirements, work towards providing additional transitional and emergency housing, and expand its community services.

9.       The Hope Centre has received funding from Foundation North and community donations to pay for the system but has a funding shortfall for tree removal required before installation can proceed. It is seeking a grant of $9,000 towards the cost of tree removal.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve a grant of $5,000 from the 2021/2022 Community-Led Housing Initiatives work programme to Habitat for Humanity to support capacity-building for the Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme

b)      approve a grant of $5,000 from the 2021/2022 Community-Led Housing Initiatives work programme to Waiheke Hope Centre towards the costs of replacing its onsite wastewater system.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Waiheke Local Board Housing Strategy 2019 – 2021 aims to ensure all Waiheke residents have access to safe and healthy housing options. One of the key strategies is ‘to support appropriate community-led initiatives focusing on housing issues’

11.     The local board has allocated $10,000 within its 2021/2022 work programme to fund community-led housing initiatives and respond to the Housing Strategy. The purpose of this fund is to strengthen community-led housing initiatives and support innovative community-led solutions to improve the availability and affordability of safe, healthy housing for families, workers and older residents.

Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme

12.     The Healthy Homes Programme was initiated by the Waiheke Health Trust (WHT) in 2017 to provide interventions for people living in cold, damp, mouldy homes. The project targets vulnerable, low-income people with ongoing health issues, including seniors and people with disabilities.

13.     The local board provided previous grants to WHT to assist with the establishment of the Healthy Homes Programme. In 2016/2017 a grant of $10,000 funded a Housing Quality pilot study that established evidence of need for a programme to address the impact of housing quality issues on health. In 2017/2018 a $4,500 grant was provided for a community planning day to establish strategic direction for the project.

14.     In 2019/2020 and 2022/2021 the local board provided grants to WHT of $10,000 each year for capacity building. The funding was utilised by WHT to employ a part time coordinator to implement the programme and establish a collaboration with other agencies and local tradespeople to assess homes and complete repairs.

15.     In 2020 and 2021, WHT collaborated with Habitat for Humanity to deliver activities including the Home Repair Programme, Winter Warmer Packs and Curtain Bank. Following this successful collaboration, the programme is now transitioning to be managed by Habitat for Humanity Northern Region (see Appendix A).

16.     Habitat for Humanity Northern Region is a housing charity that aims to relieve poverty through the provision of affordable, safe, healthy and sustainable housing. It provides a wide range of home construction, repair, renovation and advocacy programmes across Auckland and Northland.

17.     The Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme will continue to maintain a strong relationship with WHT. Habitat for Humanity is continuing to employ the existing coordinator and will be based at the WHT offices in Ostend. WHT will continue to support with health information, referrals among its home support clients and involvement in local community networks.

18.     Habitat for Humanity is seeking a $10,000 grant towards coordinator wages to support the transition and continue delivering the programme on Waiheke. This will further build capacity for the programme, enable Habitat for Humanity to seek ongoing alternative funding and help secure the ongoing sustainability of the Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme.

Emergency and Transitional Housing

19.     Waiheke Hope Centre Trust provides emergency and transitional housing and other community services at the Living Waters Church property in Surfdale. The Hope Centre is currently focused on providing longer-term transitional housing for seniors and people with disabilities, in addition to food recovery and delivery services for vulnerable households in the community.

20.     The Hope Centre has been aware for some time of the need to replace its wastewater system and apply for resource consent in order to continue to provide emergency and transitional housing. Only eight people can reside on site but at times the Hope Centre has temporarily housed up to 20 people to meet emergency housing needs in the community.

21.     Earlier this year, the Hope Centre was issued with a Notice to Fix under the Building Act. This required changes at the site including resolving height to boundary issues of the current housing units, repairing a shared bathroom, replacing the wastewater system, and applying for resource consent. The Hope Centre has reduced the number of residents to eight and is working with the council’s compliance team to ensure issues are resolved.

22.     The Hope Centre has developed a concept plan for the property, which was presented to the local board at its Community Forum on 10 December. The first step is to replace its on-site wastewater system, which will enable an additional four accommodation units with ensuite bathroom facilities to better cater for seniors. The existing units have been moved away from the boundary and the bathroom will be renovated with assistance from Habitat for Humanity.

23.     The second stage will be to build 10-12 new units in a dormitory style designated for transitional and emergency accommodation. This will be dependent on funding. A planner and architect have both donated their services to assist the project.

24.     The Hope Centre has successfully applied to Foundation North for a grant of $100,000 towards the septic tank and installation expenses. Community donations have also been received towards the project.

25.     In order to install the new wastewater system, the Hope Centre will also need to remove nine she-oaks and a phoenix palm from the site. It is seeking a $9,000 contribution from the local board to cover the unexpected expense of tree removal.

26.     The local board previously provided a grant of $10,000 to the Hope Centre in 2018 towards capacity building to enable the Hope Centre to tender for government contracts. However it has not yet been successful in gaining government funding and still relies on community grants and donations to continue operating.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme

27.     The Healthy Homes Programme aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 key initiative to ‘Support community-led healthy homes projects for low-income residents to create warm, dry, energy efficient homes’.

28.     It also aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Housing Strategy goal to ‘support housing quality improvement programmes that lead to better health outcomes’.

29.     The aim of the Waiheke Healthy Homes Programme is for everyone on Waiheke to live in warm and dry homes. The target group include people with disabilities and older people, who may own their own home but are unable to afford repairs and maintenance. The project assists Waiheke residents to be able to safely age in place.

30.     The programme has achieved significant results and demonstrated positive well-being impacts for home occupiers, including improved accessibility for people with disabilities and decreased risks of respiratory illness associated with inadequate housing.

31.     The Healthy Homes Coordinator works with other local Waiheke community organisations, manages client referrals, coordinates repairs and supports homeowners through the process.

32.     One of the 2021 goals for the Waiheke Healthy Homes was to explore options for ongoing sustainable funding of the project. WHT’s core work is to deliver primary health services, for which it receives funding from the Auckland District Health Board. Although the Waiheke Healthy Homes programme is not included in this funding, WHT’s high proportion of government funding also precludes it from applying for grant funding for Healthy Homes from other sources such as DIA or Foundation North.

33.     Initially WHT found it difficult fund repairs identified through its Healthy Homes assessments. However, since 2020, a successful collaboration with Habitat for Humanity has provided support and funding for eligible households through interest free loans or grants.

34.     In September 2021, Habitat for Humanity agreed to manage the project and employ the existing coordinator, Martha Slimm. Habitat for Humanity’s focus as an organisation is on housing and it therefore has specific resources and expertise to bring to the island.

35.     Under this new arrangement, Habitat for Humanity will continue to work closely with WHT to identify clients with health and housing needs. The coordinator will continue to work from the WHT premises.

36.     Staff recommend that the local board allocate $5,000 of the available $10,000 budget from the 2021/2022 Community-Led Housing Initiatives work programme to Habitat for Humanity towards the Healthy Homes Coordinator role for a third year. The grant will support the transition of the programme and continue to deliver positive outcomes for Waiheke people whose health is affected by inadequate housing.

Emergency and Transitional Housing

37.     The Hope Centre’s proposed concept plan aligns with the Housing Strategy goal to ‘support the development of emergency housing initiatives on Waiheke’.

38.     The Hope Centre is the only provider of emergency and transitional housing on the island. Clients are referred to the Hope Centre by police, health providers or other community organisations, in addition to self-referrals. Many of the clients have additional health concerns. The available accommodation is fully occupied.

39.     A new septic tank will strengthen the Hope Centre’s ability to move forward with its plan to build additional units to meet community demand for emergency and transitional housing, especially for elderly people. It will allow for capacity for up to 25 people on site, subject to resource consent approval, and will potentially enable expansion of other community services in future.

40.     A local board grant will allow the Hope Centre to move forward with the new wastewater system as soon as possible. If the grant is declined the Hope Centre will need to fundraise the amount required to remove the trees.

41.     Staff recommend that the local board allocate $5,000 of the available $10,000 budget from the 2021/2022 Community-Led Housing Initiatives work programme to Waiheke Hope Centre to enable it to complete the tree removal required to install the new wastewater system and help to strengthen the capacity of the organisation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     The Waiheke Healthy Homes Project improves housing quality to create warmer, drier homes. It has the potential to decrease carbon emissions through more efficient energy consumption for heating and to increase household rainwater catchment through improved roofing and gutters.

43.     Waiheke Hope Centre’s new wastewater system has features to mitigate environmental impacts on the nearby stream and coastal area should the property be flooded in a storm. Following the removal of the she-oaks and phoenix palm, the Hope Centre intends to plant natives at the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     The Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community-Led Housing Initiatives work programme is administered by staff from the council’s Connected Communities team.

45.     Environmental Services Low Carbon Living team provides ongoing advice and support to the Healthy Homes Programme to assist with healthy homes education in the community. 

46.     The Compliance and Regularity Services Unit has been supporting Waiheke Hope Centre and Living Waters to meet the requirements of the Building Act.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

47.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 4: Thriving, Strong and Engaged Communities, includes the objective to ‘foster sustainable living and healthy homes and the initiative to ‘support community-led healthy homes projects for low income residents to create warm, dry, energy efficient homes.’

48.     Waiheke Healthy Homes and Waiheke Hope Centre both help to meet this objective by improving housing quality and providing accommodation for low-income residents and seniors in the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     The Waiheke Local Board Housing Strategy contains the goal to ‘support appropriate community-led initiatives focusing on housing issues and to be responsive to the needs and aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka Māori’.

50.     Habitat for Humanity assists Māori homeowners on Waiheke to access home improvement grants and interest free loans.

51.     Māori are more likely to experience homelessness throughout New Zealand and Waiheke Hope Centre reports that over 50% of the people it assists are Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     The 2021/2022 Community-Led Housing Initiatives work programme has an allocated budget of $10,000 to address local housing needs and respond to the Waiheke Local Board Housing Strategy.

53.     The Waiheke Housing Quality Programme budget includes $31,460 for Coordinator wages and operational costs. Habitat for Humanity will seek alternative long-term funding for the Waiheke role to enable it to continue in future.

54.     Waiheke Hope Centre budget includes $133,400 for a septic tank and $ 9,085 for arborist expenses to remove the trees. It has received a $100,000 grant from Foundation North.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     The Healthy Homes Programme mitigates health risks for people living in damp and inadequate housing on Waiheke.

56.     Habitat for Humanity will be seeking ongoing sources of revenue to ensure long term sustainability of the project. There is a risk the project will be discontinued in future if sustainable funding is unable to be achieved. Habitat for Humanity may have greater potential funding sources than Waiheke Health Trust, which was limited in its ability to apply for community grants due to the high level of government funding for its other health programmes.

57.     Waiheke Hope Centre mitigates risks of homelessness for vulnerable people on Waiheke.

58.     If the board approves funding to the Hope Centre for tree removal, there will be less risk that the wastewater system upgrade will be delayed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     Staff from the Connected Communities Department will work with the successful organisation(s) to develop a funding agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Habitat for Humanity Waiheke Island Delivery

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Fiona Gregory – Strategic Broker – Connected Communities

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Morgan Borthwick - Manager Advisory

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Council’s Performance Report: Waiheke Local Board for quarter one 2021/2022

File No.: CP2021/18220

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waiheke Local Board with an integrated performance report for quarter one, 1 July – 30 September 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The key activity updates from this period are:

·        Ngahere (Urban Forest) - Knowing phase (ID 3083):  The first phase of the Ngahere (Urban Forest) Knowing Phase was adopted at the board’s August business meeting. This is the first of three phases and provides an analysis of canopy cover, gaps for future focus and an action plan.

·        Climate Action Programme – Waiheke (ID 732): Finalisation of the draft Waiheke Climate Action Plan occurred during this quarter. This is a key strategy document for the board and the draft plan is included on this agenda for adoption.

4.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided an update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        Feasibility study for Swimming Pool (ID 3106) and Swimming Pool Development fund (ID3103):  The Waiheke Pool Society are awaiting permission from Te Huruhi School and the Ministry of Education for the consultant to begin work on the feasibility study.

·        Onetangi Sports Park - install lighting & upgrade to sand carpet on field 3 (ID 16183): The concept design is completed, and design is being revised to align water consumption with bore capacity. However, growth funding has been deferred into future years and therefore the project has been deferred.

5.       The financial performance report compared to budget 2021/2022 is attached. There are some points for the local board to note:

·        Overall operating results for the first three months of the year is 12 per cent below the budget due to higher revenue and lower expenditure.  Revenue is above budget by 84 per cent. Overall, expenditure is below budget by 11 per cent as only restricted services are offered to the public in COVID-19 Alert Levels 3 and 4.  In Locally Driven Initiatives, expenditure is 7 per cent below budget as some projects are still in progress.  Capital expenditure delivery is mainly focused on local asset renewals programme and is currently below budget. COVID -19 restrictions have had an impact on the delivery of capital projects.

·        The Customer and Community Services capex budget has been revised to incorporate delayed delivery or earlier commencement of individual projects or other changes that are of material value.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter one ending 30 September 2021.

b)      note that the Customer and Community Services Capex work programme been updated to reflect financial deferrals (Attachment C).

c)      note the allocation under delegation of $5000 from the Community Response fund to Waiheke Island Tourism Inc to support development of ‘Covid Vaccinated Persons Only’ signage and decals which will be distributed to all relevant businesses on Waiheke.

d)      note the Waiheke Walking Festival scheduled to be held in November 2021 has been cancelled due to COVID-19 uncertainty and the board’s funding of $10,000 (FY20/21) will go towards the underwrite for fixed costs and funds already spent.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Waiheke Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services;

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

·        Auckland Emergency Management;

7.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph. [standard paragraph]

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Chart, bar chart

Description automatically generated

 

COVID-19 restrictions

8.       Auckland has faced COVID-19 restrictions (Level 3 and 4) from 17 August 2021 - 6 weeks of quarter one (just under half the period this report covers).

9.       Asset based services were significantly impacted as all regional and community facilities were closed.

10.     Impacts to individual activities are reported in the work programme update (attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), and activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme by RAG status

Chart, pie chart

Description automatically generated

 

12.     The graph below shows the activity status of activities which shows the stage of the activity in each departments the work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme by activity status and department

Chart, waterfall chart

Description automatically generated

 

Key activity updates

Local Board Plan Outcome 1: : Sustainable development and liveable places

13.     Waiheke Area Plan (ID 1522):  The draft plan has been finalised and direct consultation is underway with the three iwi groups which have been involved in the process to date.

Local Board Plan Outcome 2: A sustainable economy

14.     Waiheke Destination Management Plan (led by Auckland Unlimited): During this quarter consultants provided an update to the board on the development of the plan. Due to COVID-19 the draft has been delayed and will now be presented to the board for review in February 2022.

15.     Community Response Fund (ID 1758):  Following a public forum presentation in November from the Waiheke Island Tourism Inc the board allocated $5000 to support development of ‘Covid Vaccinated Persons Only’ signage. These will be distributed to all relevant businesses on Waiheke. Funding for their ‘Warm Welcome Waiheke’ campaign proposal will be considered at the December board meeting.

16.     Waiheke Community Art Gallery (ID 562):  During this quarter there were 14 programmes attracting 3,312 participants. Highlights included Matariki enrichment programming. In August and September, the Gallery worked to keep audiences engaged and delivered the scheduled Artist in Residence exhibition online with an e-catalogue, online gallery, and social media outreach.

17.     Artworks Theatre (ID 565):  Artworks Theatre provided 33 programmes, 55 sessions attracting 2,608 participants. Highlights of July included The Ladies and Gentlemen Ball which featured local bands and dancers. The Jordan Luck Band was a sold-out performance giving the opportunity for local audiences to see NZ famous musicians on the island. The Rocky Horror Picture show screening in collaboration with Waiheke Cinema attracted new audiences who dressed up in theme. The Waiheke Theatre Company's family show, Wyrd Sisters, attracted full audiences, received positive feedback.

18.     Arts and Culture response programme (ID 480): The Kāhui Creative Network coordinator continues to work under the guidance of the volunteer steering group. The monthly e-newsletter continues highlighting arts activities on the island approximately reaching 250 people.

Local Board Plan Outcome 3: Waiheke's environment is protected, restored and enhanced

19.     Dark Sky Park - Eastern Waiheke (ID 497): During this quarter the board approved the Application for a Dark Sky Park in Eastern Waiheke. Currently awaiting feedback from relevant Auckland Council and Auckland Transport departments on the draft Lighting Management Plan and compliance schedule.

20.     Ngahere (Urban Forest) - Knowing phase (ID 3083):  The first phase of the Ngahere Report was adopted at the board’s August business meeting. This ‘Knowing’ analysis report included analysis of 2016 LIDAR information, identification of trees above three meters, and highlighted gaps in canopy cover. Phase two, the ‘Growing Plan’ is underway, and Community Facilities are liaising with local nursery owners. 

21.     Climate Action Programme – Waiheke (ID 732): The Waiheke Climate Action Plan is included on this agenda for adoption following consultation and board workshops. Recruitment will then commence for the Climate Activator role. It is anticipated this will be filled by February 2022.

22.     Waiheke Environmental Fund (ID 954): During this quarter the board approved grants for a number of environmental programmes including the Kaitiaki of Newton Reserve ($7438), Omiha Welfare and Recreation Society ($3000) and the Marine Project ($6000). Funds remaining will support applications received for round two, opening 21 February 2022.

23.     Conservation Advocate (ID 794): Following assessment of tasks to be undertaken in the additional biodiversity/biosecurity position, staff made the decision to fill this as an Auckland Council role which will be advertised in quarter two. This role will be partially funded by Pest Free 2050 partnership funding for Kawau however the new role will be focused on Waiheke.

24.     Waiheke Ecological Restoration contracts (ID 1167): Inclement weather, supplier capacity and covid lockdown significantly reduced ecological delivery works during Q1. Stoat control continued through level 4. Some work on the Rangihoua maunga was able to be delivered before lockdown arrived and re-started at alert level 3.

A picture containing text, plant, grass

Description automatically generated

 

Local Board Plan Outcome 4: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

25.     Youth Hub placemaking (ID 483): Staff are preparing a funding agreement which will support the Waiheke Youth Trust to continue to activate Surfdale Hall through youth-led placemaking, programmes and activities. The Trust are awaiting the response of a funding application submitted to Foundation North to support the redesign of Surfdale Hall. Planning is in progress to ensure that the redesign of the space is youth led.

26.     Sustainable community and tourism (ID 488): Staff are developing options for a local board award or endorsement framework to acknowledge and promote local organisations that enhance community, environmental and economic sustainability. Further details will be provided in Q2.

27.     Waiheke Walking and Cycling Promotion (ID 775): Unfortunately, due to the uncertainty and regulations faced due to the COVID-19 Delta outbreak, the Waiheke Walking Festival scheduled to be held in November 2021 was cancelled.  The board allocated $10,000 (from 20/21 budgets) and this will go towards the underwrite for the fixed costs and funds already spent.

28.     Funding agreements have been progressed with Cycle Action Waiheke's umbrella groups. COVID-19 lockdowns have delayed the planned "Biketober" events, which will now be incorporated in a "Summer of Cycling programme. Some activities were able to go ahead, including a July "ride to the Marae" as part of Matariki, and an online cycle maintainence workshop, which is now available online as a recorded resource. CAW's Bike Map will be completed in Q2.

29.     Access to Library Services (ID 1305): During lock-down high usage rates for digital online services were recorded. Staff were also involved in making phone calls to older people 80+ within the community. Conversations were one on one to check if they needed information or support around library queries, access to Skinny Jump, Welfare and Housebound services. These personal calls were very welcome, and most of their older customers were doing well despite missing the personal contact through physical visits to the library.

30.     Community emergency resilience programme – Waiheke (ID 1600): During this quarter staff worked with the Rakino community to draft a community resilience plan. On 17 August a training session was delivered for Waiheke's Emergency Management Committee. This will inform the future direction for the group and how it can support first responders in case of an emergency event.

31.     Event partnership fund – Christmas event (ID 494): Funding agreements have been completed however due to COVID-19 uncertainty an alternative event is being planned. The board have agreed on the repurposing of the funding towards the new plans.

32.     Community grants programme (ID 495): During this period the board approved funding to a number of social and community organisations such as Budgeting Services ($4000), Waiheke Living Waters ($1900), Habitat for Humanity ($4000), the Toy Library ($3110) and the Waiheke Hope Centre ($2000). Arts and Culture groups were also granted funding during these rounds.

Local Board Plan Outcome 5:  Māori Outcomes

33.     Māori Responsiveness Waiheke (ID 485): During this quarter staff connected with local Māori organisations to support their welfare and outreach work during the lockdown period.

34.     A workshop was held in September to discuss Ngati Paoa Co-Governance. Once mandate issues are clearer the board will review Local Board Plan initiatives and alignment with Issues of Significance for Māaori in Tāamaki Makaurau.

Local Board Plan Outcome 6: Vibrant places for people

35.     Waiheke Island strategic response fund (ID 3060): Staff reported the community consultation findings for the Onetangi Beach Services Assessment to the local board workshop in October 2021. The community consultation submissions and local board feedback will be incorporated into the final draft of the services assessment prior to local board endorsement in February 2022.

36.     Waiheke Equestrian Service Provision Assessment: Staff provided an update on the Equestrian Service provision assessment at a September workshop. It was anticipated the draft would be ready for review in October 2021 however this has been delayed due to COVID-19.

37.     Kayaks / Dinghies on beaches: The campaign for watercraft removal from beaches was delayed due to COVID-19 restrictions. Awaiting confirmation that this campaign will be recommencing for the summer period with an initial pilot at Enclosure Bay.

38.     Little Oneroa Reserve - renew play space, stairs and pathways (ID 15451): A draft playground design has been developed which differs from that which the local board had approved in 2020. The new design is currently being reviewed against the coastal instability and erosion mapping to review implications. The design will then be presented to the Mana Whenua Forum and the local board.

39.     Albert Crescent to Wharf Road - renew walkway and retaining wall (ID 18438): The new alternative soft engineering design has been reviewed by Council specialists. A Tree Consent will be required and likely a Heritage works authority.

40.     Catherine Mitchell Cottage - comprehensive renewal (ID 26682): Design works are completed and building consent has been lodged. Physical works commenced October 2021.

41.     Putaki Bay and Ostend Domain - renew coastal assets (ID 2833): This project has been transferred from Community Facilities to the Resilient Land and Coasts department for delivery from the 2021/2022 financial year. A solution as been proposed as below.

 

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42.     Renewal of furniture, fixings, equipment and signage (ID 24122): The Community Facilities team have been busy over this quarter with a number of renewal projects. This includes maintenance on various playgrounds, new recycling and rubbish bins at Putiki Reserve and a new concrete path at Onetangi beach toilets.

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Local Board Plan Outcome 7:  Resilient transport and Infrastructure

43.     Waiheke Pathways Plan - prioritisation review (ID 680): The scope and methodology for the Waiheke Greenways prioritisation review were discussed at the July 2021 local board workshop. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, the local board review of the draft assessment will be delayed and staff now intend to present at the February 2022 workshop.

44.     Matiatia Gateway Masterplan (ID 1664): The project has been delayed while Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust seeks a governance relationship with the Waiheke Local Board and prior to engaging in operational matters. A workshop to discuss Mātiatia Plan transport options and consultation was held in August.

45.     Bike Hub (ID 733): Building consent requirements are complete and the fit-out of the interior of the container has been completed using donated materials. Cycle Action Waiheke have sourced two $5,000 grants from external sources, and combined with the local board's funding, this will cover the wages for a Bike Hub coordinator for the year, including running bike repair workshops and advertising the Bike Hub.

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Activities with significant issues

46.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on having significant issues:

·        Feasibility study for Swimming Pool (ID3106) and Swimming Pool Development fund (ID3103):  The Waiheke Pool Society are awaiting permission from Te Huruhi School and the Ministry of Education for the consultant to begin work on the feasibility study.

·        Onetangi Sports Park - install lighting & upgrade to sand carpet on field 3 (ID16183): Concept design is completed, and design is being revised to align water consumption with bore capacity. However, growth funding has been deferred into future years and therefore the project has been deferred.

Activities on hold

47.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Swimming Pool Development fund (ID3103): this activity will be on hold until ID3106 "Feasibility Study for Swimming Pool" is completed.

·        Church Bay - purchase adjacent land and stabilise (ID19993): Awaiting acceptance of a right of way from the private landowner for relocation of fencing.

·        Waiheke - Urban Forest (Ngahere) Strategy - Growing Phase – (capex funding $10,000) (ID31048): Awaiting finalisation of the action plan prior to progressing.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

49.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate change impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements. Any changes to the timing of approved projects are unlikely to result in changes to emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the boards. As this is an information only report there are no further impacts identified.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

51.     This report informs the Waiheke Local Board of the performance for ending 30 September 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     The Matiatia planning project aims to prepare a strategic plan for Matiatia which reflects the aspirations of the Waiheke community and respects the interests and rights of mana whenua for the future use of that land. Ngāti Paoa has representation on the project working group and are working to identify their aspirations for the site. 

53.     Korero with Ngāti Paoa representatives continue regarding Tawaipareira Reserve and Mātiatia Reserve. During this period workshops were held for the Rangihoua / Onetangi Sports Park Management Plan with the board and iwi representatives. They will continue to be involved during reserve management plan development.

54.     The Waiheke Library continues to coordinate a variety of programmes which provide opportunities to engagement with local iwi and mana whenua and collaborate on initiatives such as Te Tiriti o Waitangi, Matariki and Te Wiki o te Reo Māori. Staff champion and are beginning to use te reo Māori in everyday communication with our customers. Collection resources are on display to further assist learning. During this quarter they held a Matariki storytime, scavenger hunt, activity booklets and Matariki booklet, also a Matariki Beanstack digital offer for tamariki in the July school holidays and in-house displays of library materials from Māori collections.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     This report is provided to enable the Waiheke Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

56.     Revenue at $46,000 is above the budget by $21,000. This is mainly from the Waiheke library, community and commercial leases and general local parks.

57.     Expenditure of $1,494,000 is below the budget by $182,000 overall. In asset-based services, some maintenance and arboriculture services are impacted by COVID-19 restrictions while essential services continued to be delivered. In Locally Driven Initiatives, expenditure is slightly below the budget by $9,000. Projects totaling over $423,000 are carried forward to this financial year. This includes the Swimming pool development fund of $313,000.

58.     Capital spend is made up of $146,000 expenditure on local asset renewals programme and a reversal of $122,000 in minor capital works which was over provided last year.

59.     The Waiheke Local Board Financial Performance report is in Appendix C.

Revised Capex Budget

60.     Capex budgets are revised to reflect changes in timing of delivery for individual projects.

61.     Projects that were still in progress at 30 June 2021 have had their remaining required budget carried forward to the current or future financial years to fund the remaining works.

62.     If a multi-year capital project was completed earlier than anticipated, the budget is reduced or brought forward to 30 June 2021 to reflect early completion.

63.     Consideration is also given to the status of current capital projects and where required budgets are rephased in whole or part to outer years to reflect current timelines for delivery.

64.     The net budgetary impact of these changes is reflected in the revised budget for the board.

65.     The Customer and Community Services Capex work programme financial allocations have been updated in accordance with the carry forwards (refer attachment C).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

66.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

67.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

68.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter two, December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programme update Q1

127

b

Work Programme capex financial report Q1 (including deferrals)

151

c

Financial Performance report Q1

163

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 



Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Update to delegation for resource consent feedback

File No.: CP2021/19289

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the local board delegate for the alternate and second signatory for Waiheke Local Board resource consent feedback.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting held 4 December 2019, the Waiheke Local Board resolved as follows:

That the Waiheke Local Board:

e)    delegate to Deputy Chairperson Upchurch and Member Walden as an alternate and second signatory, the authority to provide the local board views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application (noting all board member’s views will be included as feedback).

3.       In order to provide the Deputy Chair with opportunity to develop knowledge and experience in resource consents and planning matters, members propose updating the delegation for the alternative and secondary signatory from Member Paul Walden to the Deputy Chair, Kylee Matthews.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      delegate to Deputy Chair Matthews as an alternate and second signatory, the authority to provide the local board views on whether a resource consent should proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application (noting all board member’s views will be included as feedback).

b)      thank Member Walden for carrying out the alternate and second signatory role to date.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Waiheke Low Carbon Action Plan

File No.: CP2021/17378

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the ‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the ‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’ (referred to as the ‘action plan’ in this report) for the board’s consideration and adoption (see Attachment A).

3.       The local board allocated $10,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the development of a local climate action plan in 2020/2021 (resolution WHK/2020/126). In 2021/2022 the local board allocated a further $25,000 to a Climate Action Programme (resolution WHK/2021/111) with $10,000 of this allocated towards the finalisation of the plan and $15,000 towards a local climate activator to support the implementation of the plan.  

4.       The action plan was developed to align with The Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These two plans lay the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a resilient, zero carbon community which is actively adapting to the impacts of climate change. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri sets a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

5.       The ‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’ adopts even bolder climate goals, with the aim of Waiheke local board area becoming a world leader in climate change response to achieve a net positive carbon footprint by 2040. Waiheke’s vision is to become a shining example of how to respond to climate change, socially, economically, and ecologically, creating a resilient, self-sustaining, independent, and net carbon positive community where the mauri of people (tangata), the atmosphere (kōhauhau) and the natural environment (taiao) on land (whenua) and sea (moana) thrives.

6.       The action plan was developed in alignment with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020. In particular, the action plan supports the Local Board Plan objective to ‘respond to the challenge of climate change’ and the aspiration to ‘encourage collaboration between existing community organisations and businesses already involved in low carbon initiatives.’

7.       A draft action plan was developed during 2020/2021 based on a stocktake of existing low carbon projects, a series of virtual meetings held with more than 50 community stakeholders, Auckland Council staff, and council-controlled organisations, and workshops with local board members.

8.       The action plan builds on existing initiatives of the council, local board, council-controlled organisations, Fullers, Vector, and key community-based organisations including the Waiheke Resource Trust, Carbon Neutral Waiheke, Electric Island Waiheke, Cycle Action Waiheke, Piritahi Marae and various natural environment restoration initiatives under the umbrella of the Waiheke Collective.

9.       The action plan identifies a number of opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and recommends the agencies that will have a leading role in the implementation of these opportunities. Once adopted, the action plan will be implemented, where possible, using a combination of support and advocacy for new and existing projects, direct local and regional funding, and partnerships with businesses and community organisations to leverage investment and grant funding from external sources.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      adopt the ‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’ as per Attachment A.

b)      note that an allocation of $15,000 of the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 locally-driven initiatives budget has been approved to support the establishment of a Waiheke Climate Action Activator through the board’s approval of its 2021/2022 environment work programme at the June 2021 business meeting

c)      delegate to the Waiheke Local Board Chair the ability to approve minor amendments of the action plan document ahead of publication

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Auckland Plan and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan lay the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a resilient, zero carbon community which is actively adapting to the impacts of climate change.

11.     In 2019 Auckland Council declared a Climate Emergency and in 2020 Auckland Council launched ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’.

12.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out a decarbonisation pathway and core goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050, and to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway.

13.     The opportunity to examine the connection between the Auckland-wide plan and local action was identified by the Waiheke Local Board. A local climate action plan has been developed which seeks to define focus areas at a local level that align with ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ and will contribute to Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emission reduction target.

14.     The action plan was developed in alignment with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020. In particular, the action plan supports the Local Board Plan objective to ‘respond to the challenge of climate change’ and the aspiration to ‘encourage collaboration between existing community organisations and businesses already involved in low carbon initiatives.’

15.     Over fifty stakeholders including representatives from key community organisations and businesses, Auckland Council staff, and council-controlled organisations, contributed to developing a draft plan. These contributors are identified in Appendix 2 of the action plan document (Attachment A). Due to the COVID-19 lockdown conditions an online hui to develop the draft plan was held in two parts on February 17, 2021, and March 19, 2021. This was followed by interviews with key stakeholders for additional input. 

16.     In October 2021 the draft action plan was put out for wider community consultation through the “Have Your Say” process.  There were 22 responses using the online form and a further 8 email submissions.   Seventy seven percent of respondents supported the Waiheke action plan target of carbon positive by 2040 and 81% supported most or all goals under the eight priority areas.  The submissions were considered by the local board at a workshop on 17 November 2021 and further edits were made to the action plan accordingly.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     The action plan focuses on promoting actions in households, businesses, infrastructure, buildings, consumption patterns and behaviour, which lead to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. It gives effect to both local board and regional outcomes which relate to sustainability, carbon reduction and caring for the environment.

18.     The action plan aligns with council’s regional Live Lightly programme launched in October 2017. The Live Lightly programme involves collaboration between community groups, Auckland Council, and partners to engage with Aucklanders about how they can take impactful action to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and live a low carbon lifestyle.

19.     Feedback from mana whenua on the Live Lightly programme indicated a need to focus on low or no-cost solutions and initiatives enabling behaviour change, and this feedback has been considered through the development of the action plan.

20.     The action plan builds on Waiheke local board’s existing environmental and sustainability initiatives and focuses on the eight action priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These action areas are listed below, and are further detailed in Attachment A to this report:

·    Natural Environment

·    Built Environment

·    Transport

·    Economy

·    Community and Coast

·    Food

·    Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai

·    Energy and Industry.

21.     For each of these action areas, the action plan includes:

·    goals based on achieving regional, national, and global greenhouse gas emission reduction targets

·    opportunities to amplify existing regional and local initiatives

·    actions suggested through consultation with community stakeholders, including:

flagship climate action projects for which seed funding should be prioritised by the board where needed and as funding allows over the next three years

a monitoring framework for measuring progress against these targets.

22.     The action plan includes quantitative detail on specific targets, as well as a proposed programme to measure progress against these (see Attachment A).

23.     The draft action plan was discussed with the local board at workshops held on 28 July, 29 September and 17 November 2021, and local board feedback was incorporated into the final version.

24.     The intention of the action plan is for implementation and ownership by the whole community. The Waiheke Local Board will support the implementation of the action plan where possible through a variety of mechanisms including:

·    advocacy

·    funding to enable local project delivery

·    further investigation of potential climate initiatives

·    leadership (delivering projects directly as well as enabling and encouraging others)

·    partnerships

·    promotion

·    monitoring and recognition.

25.     The Waiheke local board approved $25,000 of its 2021/2022 locally driven initiatives budget for the climate action programme (resolution WHK/2021/111). This included completing the climate action plan ($10,000) and supporting the establishment of a climate activator role ($15,000).

26.     The establishment of the climate activator will be the first step in implementing the action plan. This position will coordinate and monitor progress on the action plan and facilitate an advisory group with representation from key stakeholders across the eight priority areas of the action plan.

27.     The local board has approved in principle a further $25,000 to support the plan’s implementation in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. Approval of these in-principle budgets will be sought through the respective work programme approval process each financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

29.     The ‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’ provides a roadmap for Waiheke to become a low carbon community and deliver on the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

30.     The plan focuses on the priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan which include: Natural Environment, Built Environment, Transport, Economy, Community and Coast, Food, Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai and Energy and Industry.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

31.     Key staff from across the council group contributed to the development of the action plan, including representatives from Chief Sustainability Office, Community Facilities, Auckland Emergency Management, Resilient Land and Coasts, Environmental Services, Parks Services, Local Board Services, Auckland Transport and Auckland Unlimited.

32.     Goals in the action plan relating specifically to the council group are those outlined in existing council group plans and strategies.

33.     Input from key staff from across the council group will continue throughout the implementation of the action plan and will also contribute to periodic review and update of the action plan.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The action plan supports the Waiheke Local Board’s objective to ‘respond to the challenge of climate change’ and the aspiration to ‘encourage collaboration between existing community organisations and businesses already involved in low carbon initiatives’.

35.     Waiheke Local Board members considered draft versions of the action plan at workshops held on 28 July, 29 September and 17 November 2021. Feedback received in the workshops from board members was positive, with edits incorporated into the final version of the action plan.

36.     The intention of the action plan is for implementation and ownership by the whole community. The Waiheke Local Board will support the implementation of the action plan including establishing a Climate Activator position.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     A Te Ao Māori lens was used for the development of the action plan to help frame thinking about and approaches to climate change. This helped ensure that taiao (nature), whenua (land) and tangata (people) remain the focal point for all climate related decisions. Key values and principles of the Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau Wellbeing Framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan will be applied as the action plan is developed and implemented.

38.     Engagement with local Māori in the development of the action plan included consulting with the Piritahi Marae Committee, Ngati Paoa Trust Board, Ngati Paoa Iwi Trust and Ngai Tai ki Tamaki. Feedback from mana whenua expressed aspirations to strengthen partnership relationships with the Waiheke local board.

39.     Practical ways of supporting kaitiakitanga outcomes have been identified and included in the Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai section of the action plan including supporting rangatahi Māori leadership on climate change, the protection and restoration of our natural environment, strengthening awareness of tikanga, taonga species, and continuing to identify and protect sites of cultural heritage which may be impacted by climate change.

40.     The plan proposes that there is Māori representation on the advisory group that will be established and coordinated by the climate activator to guide implementation of the action plan. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Auckland Council adopted a new climate action investment package as part of the Recovery Budget 2021-2031 with a total value of $152 million over ten years to implement Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan including supporting some of the council led actions in the ‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’

42.     As a part of the new climate action investment package Auckland Council is establishing a new Community Climate Fund. This will expand the pool of contestable funding that Waiheke community groups can apply for to implement community led actions in this plan.

43.     The Waiheke local board currently provides funding for some of the climate actions identified in the Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan through its locally driven initiatives budget and Environment Grants programme. E.g Bike Hub – Waiheke, Waiheke Environmental Fund and Waiheke Marine Education Initiative.

44.     The ‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’ is aspirational and as such, many of the proposed actions are not currently funded within regional or local board budgets. Implementing the plan is not solely reliant on investment derived from Auckland Council-related funding. Central government incentives and programmes, philanthropic funding entities, as well as investment decisions of local businesses all have a part to play. There are opportunities for partnerships with businesses and community organisations to leverage funding from external sources to deliver on the aspirations of the action plan.

45.     The action plan proposes the activator establish a Waiheke Climate Fund. This would set up a mechanism for voluntary offset contributions for all people travelling to or residing in Waiheke who want to invest directly in accelerating local climate actions.

46.     The intention of the action plan is implementation and ownership by the whole community. As such, flagship projects outlined in the action plan may be subject to change, due to community interest and any legislative changes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.     There is a risk that some actions within the plan may not be implemented due to budgetary constraints from council and non-council sources. To minimise the risk, it has been communicated in the action plan that the intention of the plan is implementation and ownership by the whole community. As such, flagship projects outlined in the action plan may be subject to change, due to factors such as community interest, funding, and legislative changes. The action plan is designed as an evolving plan with regular updates in anticipation of a rapidly changing environment as Auckland and Aotearoa’s climate response accelerates. Establishing a Waiheke Climate Activator and advisory group will enable input from key community stakeholders as the action plan evolves.     

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     Following the local board’s approval of the ‘‘Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan: Waiheke ki uta, Waiheke ki tai, Waiheke ki tua’, recruitment for the Climate Activator position will commence. This position will coordinate and monitor progress on the action plan and facilitate an advisory group with representation from Māori and key stakeholders across the eight priority areas of the action plan. Terms of reference for the advisory group will be developed and agreed with the Waiheke Local Board.

49.     The local board has approved in principle a further $25,000 to support the plan’s implementation in the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. Approval of these in-principle budgets will be sought through the respective work programme approval process each financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Islands Local Climate Action Plan 2020-2030

177

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Donna Carter - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter – Director - Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022

File No.: CP2021/18254

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (the draft policy).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Significance and Engagement Policy, adopted in 2014, is undergoing a policy refresh to make it more contemporary and user-friendly.

3.       The goal of the policy refresh is to provide for a simplified decision-making process through a high-level guiding document that allows for case-by-case assessments.

4.       Minor updates are needed in both the significance and engagement components of the policy.

5.       Updates around the significance component of the draft policy include:

·    the assessment of significance in terms of a continuum

·    taking a cumulative approach to a package of proposals or decisions

·    adjusting the list of strategic assets to include only assets critical for the delivery of services and clarifying that most strategic assets are identified as groups or networks of assets to reflect the way in which they deliver services

·    adding guidance for assessing the significance of decisions for assets that do not meet the criteria for being strategic.

6.       Updates around the engagement component of the draft policy include:

·    simplifying existing text to make the policy more user-friendly

·    ensuring the engagement principles capture a more diverse Tāmaki Makaurau

·    capturing the need to safeguard staff, elected members and the community during consultation and engagement

·    giving more visibility to the connection between the policy and the forthcoming and separate refresh of the Engagement Guidelines, which will support staff to operationalise the policy.

7.       The draft policy was adopted for public consultation by Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 meeting, resolution number GB/2021/111.

8.       Public consultation ran from 27 September to 18 October 2021.

9.       Adoption of the final policy is projected for February 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy as part of the overall consideration for final adoption in February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Significance and Engagement Policy (the 2014 policy) was created and adopted in 2014 to fulfill the legislative requirements outlined in section 76AA of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).

11.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is a key document for decision-making and the consultation process. It is comprised of two interrelated sections on significance and engagement.

12.     The significance section sets out how and when communities can expect the council to engage before making decisions, describes the council’s approach to determining the significance of proposals and decisions, and lists the council’s strategic assets.

13.     The engagement section provides high-level principles on how to engage inclusively with the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau. These high-level principles ensure that engagement is fit-for-purpose according to the level of significance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have undertaken a policy refresh as the 2014 policy has not undergone changes since its initial adoption.

15.     An internal assessment of the 2014 policy found that that it was largely easy to use, but minor improvements would allow for more efficient decision-making and more fit-for-purpose engagement processes.

16.     General high-level updates and clarifications are being proposed for the draft policy to create a more contemporary policy.

17.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to be a prescriptive policy document, and any accepted changes to the draft policy will not change the purpose for which it is used.

18.     The proposed changes to the Significance and Engagement Policy 2021 were reported to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September – see Attachment A Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation, also found online with associated documents.

Consultation

19.     Formal public consultation was held from 27 September to 18 October 2021. The consultation document is part of Attachment A, or online here.

20.     Given COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the region, consultation was conducted entirely virtually and consisted of:

·    consultation materials and online feedback forms made available on the council’s engagement website (AK Have Your Say)

·    virtual workshops with community partners with demographic advisory panels

·    working with community partners to reach diverse groups.

21.     All feedback has been captured and will be reported through to the Governing Body meeting in February 2022 to inform decision-making on the final policy.

A summary of the regional feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B. There was no local board specific feedback from the Waiheke Local Board area.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Accepting the proposed changes to the draft policy allows for a fit-for-purpose and contemporary significance and engagement policy that will encourage a richer engagement process during future consultations around climate change issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Any strategic asset under the draft policy that is held or managed by a substantive Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) will be identified in the CCO Accountability Policy. CCO’s must comply with that policy when making decisions on strategic assets under their control.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Local boards play a key role in engaging with their local communities. The change to enable more fit-for-purpose consultation and engagement for some asset-based decisions may provide local boards with greater flexibility to customise some engagement processes to better meet the needs of their community.

25.     Local board chairs were invited to a workshop held on 4 August 2021 that also included the Parks, Arts, Community and Events, and Finance and Performance committees for a high-level overview on proposed amendments to the draft policy.

26.     Formalised local board views from this workshop and report will be incorporated into the February 2022 Governing Body report for the policy adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The refresh of the Significance and Engagement Policy will strengthen the council’s capacity and capability to engage with and meet the needs of the Māori community. This will be achieved through the delivery of bespoke training initiatives and resources which align to best practice engagement that responds to the needs and is supported by Māori. Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides a foundation to build council’s engagement approach and supports initiatives already underway such as Te Matapuna 2 as a pilot for spatial-based engagement. Work on relationship agreements is progressing, and there is good support for capacity contracts. Further work is required to streamline engagement forums to ensure they are fit for purpose and respond to priorities from Māori.

28.     Ongoing collaboration on the development of the Māori engagement practice and approach will inform the Engagement Guidelines and will ensure council’s size and engagement reach is leveraged effectively. This collaboration will ensure that the operational execution of the Engagement Guidelines is well-informed and aligned with best practice in te ao Māori.

29.     This focus on practice, capacity and capability will guide operational performance so that the aspirations for Māori engagement in Tāmaki Makaurau are progressed, aligned and achievable. Further work on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau performance measures will be aligned with the engagement approach as it continues to be developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The proposed changes to the significance section of the policy assists in the assessment of significance and may reduce the financial costs of engagement approaches that are not fit-for-purpose.

31.     Reclassifying some assets as non-strategic will also remove the burden of audit costs if the council seeks to make any future decisions around changing ownership or control of those assets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present any risk. The risks associated with refreshing the draft policy are set out in the report to the 23 September Governing Body meeting in Attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Feedback from the consultation along with local board views will be reported to the 24 February 2022 Governing Body meeting as part of the materials for the finalised draft policy approval.

34.     The final Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 is proposed to be implemented following approval at the same Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation

255

b

Summary of regional feedback

295

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Yu - Senior Advisor - Fin Policy

Eddie Tuiavii - Principal Advisor - Democracy and Engage

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager - Financial Strategy and Planning

Kenneth Aiolupotea - General Manager - Democracy and Engagement

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18332

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname. 

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the other of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology. 

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e. the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e. the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data show that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order. Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias.  If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ballot order effects and Auckland Council elections_November 2021

309

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager - Governance Services

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Māori Outcomes Annual Report - Te Pūrongo a te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021

File No.: CP2021/18900

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongoPurpose of the report

1.       To present the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report 2020-2021 shows how the council group is contributing to the 10 mana outcomes of Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, and the LTP 10-year budget priorities.

3.       The council group published its first Māori Outcomes Report in 2019. This third edition flows on from earlier reports and provides information on performance, including how the council group has been supporting a Māori response and recovery from COVID-19. Each report aims to provide a comprehensive picture of annual progress to decision makers across the council group, Māori partners, elected members, leaders in governance, and whānau Māori.

4.       Highlights for the 2020-2021 year include:

·    approval by Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee of ‘Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau – a Māori outcomes performance measurement framework’

·    support for Māori led COVID-19 response and recovery initiatives through the Manaaki Fund 2020 which saw a total of $2.9m granted

·    the Māori Outcomes Fund achieving its highest ever annual spend of $17.6 million

·    Toi o Tāmaki / Auckland Art Gallery hosting the Toi Tū Toi Ora exhibition which was the largest exhibition in the 132-year history of the Gallery. Toi Tū Toi Ora received a record number of Māori visitors and showcased several up-and-coming and established Māori artists.

5.       A key learning for the year is the need to move towards a Māori-led funding approach by partnering with Māori organisations with similar aspirations and outcomes. Work is underway on this through a Māori-led initiatives fund.

6.       Separate to the annual Māori outcomes report is the 6-monthly measures report for Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau. The inaugural measures report for the July 2021 – Dec 2021 period will be presented to the PACE committee in the new year.

7.       The Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021 will be publicly published with copies distributed to key partners including mana whenua iwi and mataawaka entities.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the annual Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report: Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Pūrongo a Te Kaunihera o Tāmaki Makaurau Ngā Huanga Māori 2020-2021: Auckland Council Group Māori Outcomes Report.

315

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ashley Walker - Advisor - Maori Outcomes

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager - Governance Services

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2021/18844

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held on 17 and 24 November and 1 December 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held 17 and 24 November and 1 December 2021 are appended to the report.

5.       These can also be viewed, together with workshop agendas, at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 17 and 24 November and 1 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Proceedings - 17 November 2021

363

b

Workshop Proceedings - 24 November 2021

365

c

Workshop Proceedings - 1 December 2021

367

  

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

List of resource consent applications - 8 November to 3 December 2021

File No.: CP2021/18845

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Attached is the list of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 8 November to 3 December 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the list of resource consents applications related to Waiheke Island. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resource Consents Applications Report

371

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 


Waiheke Local Board

15 December 2021

 

 

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