I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Whau Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 8 December 2021

6.00pm

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams.  Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Whau Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay Thomas

 

Deputy Chairperson

Fasitua Amosa

 

Members

Catherine Farmer

 

 

Ulalemamae Te'eva Matafai

 

 

Warren Piper

 

 

Jessica Rose

 

 

Susan Zhu

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rodica Chelaru

Democracy Advisor

 

2 December 2021

 

Contact Telephone: 021 02185527

Email: rodica.chelaru@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Whau Ward Councillor's update                                                                                  7

12        Accessible Design within Parks in the Whau 2020                                                  11

13        Council-Controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter ending 30 September 2021                                                                                                                               51

14        Whau Local Board Plan 2020: Year one achievements report                               89

15        Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents        113

16        Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022                                                   123

17        Allocation of 2021-2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund                             179

18        Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)                   191

19        Reporting back decisions made under delegation                                                247

20        Whau Local Board Workshop Records                                                                   277

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      285

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

Specifically, members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

 

The following are declared interests of the Whau Local Board:

 

Member

Organisation

Position

Kay Thomas

·         New Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau

·         Friends of Arataki

·         Western Quilters

·         Citizens Advice Bureau
Waitākere Board

Volunteer

Committee member

Member

Chair

Susan Zhu

·         Chinese Oral History Foundation

·         The Chinese Garden Steering Committee of Auckland

Committee member

Board member

Fasitua Amosa

·         Equity NZ

·         Massive Theatre Company

·         Avondale Business Association

Vice President

Board member

A family member is the Chair

Catherine Farmer

·         Avondale-Waterview Historical Society

·         Blockhouse Bay Historical Society

·         Portage Licensing Trust

·         Blockhouse Bay Bowls

·         Forest and Bird organisation

·         Grey Power

Member

 

Member

Trustee

Patron

Member

Member

Te’eva Matafai

·         Pacific Events and Entertainment Trust

·         Miss Samoa NZ

·         Malu Measina Samoan Dance Group

·         Aspire Events

Co-Founder

 

Director

Director/Founder

 

Director

Warren Piper

·         New Lynn RSA

·         ·         New Lynn Business Association

Associate member

Member

Jessica Rose

·         Women in Urbanism-Aotearoa, Auckland Branch

·         Forest & Bird

·         Big Feels Club

·         Frocks on Bikes

·         Bike Auckland

·         Department of Conservation

Committee member

 

Member

Patron

Former co-chair

Former committee member

Employee

Member appointments

Board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the board members represent Auckland Council.

External organisation

Leads

Alternate

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Warren Piper

Catherine Farmer

Avondale Business Association

Kay Thomas

Warren Piper

Blockhouse Bay Business Association

Warren Piper

Fasitua Amosa

New Lynn Business Association

Susan Zhu

Kay Thomas
Warren Piper

Rosebank Business Association

Fasitua Amosa

Warren Piper

Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust

Fasitua Amosa

Jessica Rose

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Whau Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 24 November 2021 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 1 December 2021, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Whau Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Whau Ward Councillor's update

File No.: CP2021/11582

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Whau Ward Councillor to have an opportunity to update the Whau Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the report and thank Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland, for her update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Ward Councillor's Update

9

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Accessible Design within Parks in the Whau 2020

File No.: CP2021/18663

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Whau Local Board Accessibility in Parks Best Practice Report 2020 outlining key principles for accessible design of parks and open spaces in the Whau Local Board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Parks improve mental, social and physical wellbeing, and are therefore an important component of Auckland’s urban design. Parks should be accessible to everyone, regardless of age, culture or ability.

3.       The number of Aucklanders with access needs is currently one in five. This is predicted to increase. Therefore, accessibility must be a key component when planning and designing parks and open spaces.

4.       This is reflected in one of the outcomes of the Auckland Plan 2050; Belonging and Participation. Focus Area 2 under this outcome includes the provision of accessible services, and social and cultural infrastructure that is responsive in meeting the evolving needs of the community.

5.       In 2020/2021, the Whau Local Board funded an investigation and report into the accessibility of local parks within its local board area (resolution number WH/2020/94). The report recommends universal design principles for parks and open space and outlines specific issues related to accessibility within key parks in the Whau Local Board area.

6.       Be Lab were contracted to undertake an expert assessment of accessibility within eleven parks in the Whau Local Board area, and engaged with members of access needs communities in the Whau.

7.       Key principles have been grouped into three categories based on the experience of planning, arriving and enjoying a visit to a park. Details of these principles are outlined in paragraph 21 of this report and are expanded upon in section 6 of the Whau Best Practice Report (Attachment A).

8.       Adoption of these principles will ensure that they are embedded in the decision-making process during planning for future park asset renewals and development. Over time this will increase the number of accessibly designed parks in the Whau Local Board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      adopt the Whau Local Board Accessibility in Parks Best Practice Report 2020 as per Attachment A.

b)      endorse the key principles of accessible design for parks and open spaces in the Whau Local Board area as outlined in Section 6 of the Whau Local Board Accessibility in Parks Best Practice Report 2020 (Attachment A).

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Parks are fundamental spaces for every neighbourhood, providing a focus for social, cultural and recreational activities, and improving the mental and physical health and resilience of communities. Auckland Council has a responsibility to provide facilities and public open spaces which are inclusive and welcoming to everyone, regardless of their age or ability, including those with specific access needs.

10.     One of the six outcomes of the Auckland Plan 2050 is Belonging and Participation. Focus Area 2 under this outcome includes the provision of accessible services, and social and cultural infrastructure that is responsive in meeting the evolving needs of the community.

11.     One in five people in Auckland will have difficulty accessing parks unless they have been designed for the ‘access citizen’. An access citizen is defined by accessibility consultants Be Lab as someone who:

·        Has difficulty reading small print or is blind

·        Uses a wheelchair or is unable to walk easily

·        Has trouble hearing in noisy places or is deaf

·        Is from a different country using a different language

·        Is out and about with family or young children

·        Finds it difficult to read and understand things unless provided in plain English.

12.     The number of people in Auckland who are access citizens is expected to grow as the population continues to age. By 2050 it is estimated that 25 per cent of residents will be over 65, and 50 per cent of them will have access needs. Stats NZ reported in 2018 that 24.4 per cent of Whau residents were currently over 65 years old, above the average number for Auckland.

13.     The 2018 Census recorded that 6.6 per cent of residents (~5,237 people) in the Whau Local Board area currently live with a physical disability. In addition, the local board hosts the most nationality-diverse population within Auckland, with 60 per cent of residents from non-European communities (nearly double the national average). Many of these people may have language or cultural differences which impact their park experience.

14.     The combination of these factors within the Whau means that accessibility should be seen as a key component when planning and designing parks and park infrastructure.

15.     Auckland Council’s Disability Operational Action Plan outlines high level goals for creating accessible buildings, places and spaces. Actions to achieve this goal include consideration of accessibility needs in the design of our capital projects and improving knowledge and communication of accessibility issues and opportunities. The end goal is for Auckland to become a fair, inclusive, accessible and well-connected city, built with universal design as a key objective.

16.     Universal design, also referred to as ‘accessibility for all’, means that everyone receives the same experience regardless of age, culture or ability. Universal design goes beyond minimum standards of compliance to ensure a level of quality is achieved that is suitable for a wider spectrum of the population.

17.     In the context of parks, universal design promotes safe, accessible, barrier-free play and recreation opportunities for people of all ages and abilities. Many universal design outcomes are already included in the Auckland Design Manual, which is used to guide development within Auckland. The best practice report outlines several additional considerations.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     In financial year 2020/2021, the Whau Local Board funded an investigation and report into the accessibility of local parks within its local board area (resolution number WH/2020/94). The report recommends universal design principles for parks and open spaces and outlines specific issues related to accessibility within key parks in the Whau Local Board area.

19.     To assess accessibility within parks in the Whau, eleven of the highest profile parks were chosen for on site assessment by an accessibility expert. Members of the access needs community were also invited to attend these audits to provide lived experience feedback.

20.     The eleven parks selected for audit were as below:


21.       Following these site audits, key principles were developed outlining high level

improvements to the access citizen’s experience of parks in the Whau (section 6 in the best practice report). The principles have been categorized into the three stages of visiting a park, summarised below:

 

Planning a visit to the park

Planning involves the provision of information to enable an access citizen to plan their visit to a park, and so that they know what to expect when they arrive. This includes:

·    Website Information – describing the features of interest, amenities and level of accessibility within a park to inform visitors what they might expect when planning their visit

·    Website Accessibility – Information should be provided in a clear manner, with consideration for alternative language needs, including sign language

·    Maps – maps should be provided both online and on-site which clearly outlines accessible routes, toilet facilities and other amenities.

 

Arriving and getting into the park

Arriving is the experience of travelling to a park and being able to safely navigate from the carpark or park entrance into the park itself. This includes:

·    Access Options – access to the site in most cases should be available via public transport or walking and cycling routes, clearly identified on council and AT websites

·    Accessible Car Parking – accessible carpark marking and drop off zones should be provided as per the design standards outlined in New Zealand Standards (NZS) 4121:2001, including high quality and accessible park signage and wayfinding guidance to accessible car parking locations

·    Bollards / Barriers –safe and barrier free transition should be provided for transition from the carpark to park footpaths, with any hazards such as bollards clearly marked.

 

 Enjoying the park

Enjoying is the experience of park users while within the park itself. Parks should be designed following principles of Universal Design, including both the landscaping and assets within the park. This includes:

·    Wayfinding – signage should be of a high quality, including maps and directional information to key facilities such as the location of toilets, playgrounds, sports fields, and park entrance/exits. An accessible route through the park should be indicated, including information on path types and walking options.

·    Surfaces – footpaths should allow access for all users to key facilities within the park, with slip resistant surfaces favored over gravel and dirt walking surfaces where appropriate. Tactile ground indicators should be installed where necessary to inform users of changes or hazards in the environment and all walkways should be flush with the surrounding grass.

·    Playgrounds – should be accessible to all, with accessible edging and slip-resistant soft fall surfaces that are suitable for children and family members using mobility equipment.

·    Accessible Toilets – accessible all-gender toilet facilities should be provided in large parks, with clear directional signage to inform visitors where accessible toilet facilities are located.

·    Furniture – furniture should be connected to accessible routes and designed to allow space for those using mobility equipment. These should include both arm and back rests, and a wide flush platform adjacent to the seat.

 

21.     These key principles help to deliver several actions set out in Auckland Council’s Disability Operational Action Plan and provide an in-depth and local focus for the implementation of universal design within parks and open space in the Whau. These principles are consistent with the advice in the Auckland Design Manual, with additional parks focus.

22.     In addition to endorsing principles of accessible design for future implementation within parks projects, the Whau Local Board may wish in the future to allocate funding to improvements to address key concerns raised in the eleven park accessibility audits.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Any formal development of parks infrastructure will contribute to climate change through carbon emissions, particularly during construction and renewal phases, and through ongoing maintenance. This needs to be carefully considered when creating new parks assets.

24.     The application of universal design within parks may cause additional carbon emissions through path widening, additional assets and removal of impervious surfaces, particularly when assets are being replaced/upgraded before the end of their life. However, investment in targeted locations as identified within the report will ensure that money is spent on the areas of greatest need, minimising the impact on the climate and environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     The advice outlined within this assessment will assist council departments and CCO’s undertaking development within parks in the future, including Community Facilities, Healthy Waters, Auckland Transport and Watercare, to deliver improved outcomes for the accessible needs community of the Whau.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Endorsement and implementation of the principles outlined above helps to meet several objectives identified within the Whau Local Board Plan 2020, including Outcome One, “strong, resilient and inclusive communities where local identity, diversity and creativity are nurtured” and Outcome Three, “quality urban development and community facilities to meet the needs of our growing and changing population”.

27.     Specifically, this links to a key initiative from the plan to “develop a strategy for accessibility and inclusion in the Whau that can identify ways to reduce barriers to opportunity or participation due to age, ability, economic status, culture and identity (however defined)”.

28.     Workshops were held with the local board to discuss this project in July 2020, November 2020, February 2021, and July 2021. Local board feedback was positive, with full support for the key principles of accessible design that were presented at the February 2021 workshop. The local board directed staff to progress adoption/endorsement of the key principles of universal design, as detailed in paragraph 21 above.

29.     Relevant local accessibility stakeholders were identified and engaged in consultation. Their input has been incorporated within the best practice report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.     Accessible design helps to improve the use of a space for all people, irrespective of culture or race. This investigation was not seen to impact Māori any more significantly than other cultures and communities.

31.     The project was outlined to mana whenua at the North-West Park, Sports and Recreation Kaitiaki Forum in August 2021. The project was supported by all mana whenua present, and no specific actions related to Māori were identified at this hui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Implementation of the key principles of accessible design identified in this report as part of future development or renewal projects may increase the budget requirements for those projects. Potential budget increases will be discussed with the local board at a project level by the relevant department as part of regular work programme planning.

33.     The specific actions identified to improve accessibility at eleven key parks in the Whau will be explored further by the Community Facilities department to inform financial requirements for future implementation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     Should the board not endorse the key principles of accessible design in parks, the ability for access citizens to explore and visit parks in the Whau Local Board area will not improve in future. Rejection of these key principles could be seen as contrary to the Whau Local Board Plan 2020, which may present a reputational risk for the local board.

35.     Given the current financial constraints that Auckland Council faces, there may be insufficient budget to deliver on actions identified within the eleven audited parks. To mitigate this, it is suggested that the local board consider funding implementation spread over several years across future work programming.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     The key principles of accessible design within parks, as identified above, will be passed on to appropriate council departments and CCOs for consideration in any future development projects within parks in the Whau.

37.     Priority actions to improve accessibility within the eleven parks audited in the Whau will be passed on to the Community Facilities department for further exploration to inform future local board work programmes.

38.     Staff will continue to work with the Whau Local Board and local community in future years to identify further opportunities to improve accessibility within the local board area.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board Accessibility in Parks Best Practice Report

17

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Thomas Dixon - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Council-Controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter ending 30 September 2021

File No.: CP2021/17661

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Whau Local Board with an update on council-controlled organisation (CCO) work programme items in its area, along with proposed changes to the Whau Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A number of general changes are proposed for the Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plans, as part of ongoing work to improve and refine the approach to engagement with CCOs.

3.       The four substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, and Watercare – may also propose specific changes.

4.       General changes are shown in Attachment A. Attachments B-D include work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited and Watercare.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      approve the changes to the Joint council-controlled organisations Engagement Plan 2021/2022 as outlined in Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021/2022 local work programme. 

6.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

7.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans.

8.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

9.       In addition, as part of implementing the Joint CCO Engagement Plan, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

10.     We are introducing these new reports gradually, so for quarter one the report may not include updates from all four CCOs.

11.     For Quarter Two reporting, we expect to have updates from all four CCOs for all local board areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes proposed by Local Board Services

12.     The original discussions with local boards used the five levels of engagement outlined by the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2): inform, consult, involve, collaborate and empower. Feedback from local boards indicated that using all five levels was unwieldy, and in particular that there was confusion and disagreement about when ‘empower’ might be used.

13.     We are proposing that we reduce the engagement levels down to a simplified three step model of inform, consult and collaborate. This helps to better distinguish between projects and to clarify the kinds of engagement that are expected at each step.

14.     We have also moved the CCOs work programme tables from being embedded within the engagement plan to being a series of four attachments. This makes it easier to use the work programmes as the basis for quarterly reporting.

15.     Minor changes may have also been made to names of Local Board Services and/or CCOs contacts.

16.     Changes to the Whau Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022, were shown as tracked changes and circulated to all board members who confirmed as part of an informal discussion in the workshop on 17 November 2021, that they had all sited and accepted all the changes. This document forms Agenda Attachment A.

Auckland Transport

17.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment B.

18.     A number of changes are proposed to the engagement plan work programme to reflect the following changes.

19.     The following projects are not proceeding:

·    Blockhouse Bay Roundabout – (Community Safety Fund)

·    Residential Speed Management – New Windsor, Blockhouse Bay.

20.     The following projects have been completed:

·    Bus stop relocation and new pedestrian crossing, 110 Golf Rd (Capital Projects)

·    Vanguard Road (Community Programme)

·    Exminster Street traffic calming (Community Programme)

·    110 Golf Road – bus stop upgrade (Public Transport Infrastructure)

·    Rosebank Road pedestrian improvements (Community Programme).

21.     The following projects have been deferred to 2022/2023 financial year:

·    Avondale Town Centre Review and Implementation (Parking)

·    110 and Opposite 110 Ash Street, Avondale (bus stop upgrade and signalised pedestrian crossing) – (Public Transport Infrastructure)

·    590/607 Rosebank Road, Avondale bus stop upgrades (Public Transport Infrastructure).

Auckland Unlimited

22.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment C.

Changes to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

23.     Auckland Unlimited had previously responded to local board requests to include more information on major events by adding a line item for each event.

24.     As part of ongoing work to improve and refine this process, we are proposing to replace all the individual major event lines with the three following lines:

·    Delivered Events (Diwali, Lantern Festival, Pasifika, Tāmaki Herenga Waka)

·    Sponsored Events (i.e., Elemental)

·    Supported Events (i.e., FIFA World Cup, World Choir Games).

25.     This change reduces the number of amendments and additions required to the engagement plan each quarter as events are completed and provides a more consistent update pattern going forward.

26.     These proposed changes are reflected in Attachment A.

27.     No other changes are proposed to the Auckland Unlimited work programme.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku)

28.     Eke Panuku has not provided updates for this quarter’s report. Eke Panuku will be joining the combined reporting framework for Quarter Two.

29.     Eke Panuku has not proposed any changes to the engagement plan work programme. 

Watercare

30.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment D.

31.     Watercare has proposed to remove the following project from the engagement plan as the site is no longer needed:

·    Central Interceptor: Whitney Street construction site.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

33.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Adopting the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

35.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCOs work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

37.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

39.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

41.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Two in March 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Joint Engagement Plan 2021-2022 Whau Local Board and CCOs

57

b

Auckland Transport Quarter1 2021-2022 Report

73

c

Auckland Unlimited Quarter 1 2021-2022 Report

85

d

Watercare Quarter 1 2021-2022 Report

87

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Antonina Georgetti - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Whau Local Board Plan 2020: Year one achievements report

File No.: CP2021/17807

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide members of the Whau Local Board with an update on achievements in the first year of the Whau Local Board Plan 2020.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 4 November 2020, the Whau Local Board adopted its local board plan for the period 2020-2023.

3.       The Local Government Auckland Council Act 2009 requires that each of Auckland’s 21 local boards adopt a local board plan within a year of a triennial local government election. In 2020, an extension was provided to this timeframe in light of the disruption caused by the COVID-19 global pandemic and its associated impacts.

4.       A local board plan is the key strategic document for a local board; it forms the basis of its accountability to its communities, and is required to reflect those communities’ needs and preferences.

5.       COVID-19 has also impacted on delivery of initiatives in this plan, but implementation in this first year has nevertheless been strong, with the majority of outcomes, objectives and initiatives seeing some degree of implementation.

6.       The Whau Local Board Plan 2020: Year one achievements report, appended herewith as Attachment A, has been prepared by staff based on data from quarterly reporting, local board advocacy and discussions with the Whau Integrated Work Programme team.

7.       The content was presented to the Whau Local Board in a workshop on 13 October 2021 and will continue to inform decisions around future local board work programmes, investment and advocacy for the next two years.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the Whau Local Board Plan 2020: Year one achievements report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board Plan 2020: Year one achievements report

91

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Binney - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Local government elections 2022 - order of names on voting documents

File No.: CP2021/18375

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide feedback to the Governing Body on how names should be arranged on the voting documents for the Auckland Council 2019 elections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 provide a local authority the opportunity to decide by resolution whether the names on voting documents are arranged in:

·        alphabetical order of surname

·        pseudo-random order; or

·        random order.

3.       Pseudo-random order means names are listed in a random order and the same random order is used on every voting document.

4.       Random order means names are listed in a random order and a different random order is used on every voting document.

5.       The order of names has been alphabetical for the 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 Auckland Council elections. An analysis conducted on these election results shows there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected. The analysis is contained in Attachment A.

6.       Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body that candidate names on voting documents should continue to be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

 

 


 

Horopaki

Context

Options available

7.       Clause 31 of The Local Electoral Regulations 2001 states:

(1)  The names under which each candidate is seeking election may be arranged on the voting document in alphabetical order of surname, pseudo-random order, or random order.

(2)  Before the electoral officer gives further public notice under section 65(1) of the Act, a local authority may determine, by a resolution, which order, as set out in subclause (1), the candidates' names are to be arranged on the voting document.

(3)  If there is no applicable resolution, the candidates' names must be arranged in alphabetical order of surname.

(4)  If a local authority has determined that pseudo-random order is to be used, the electoral officer must state, in the notice given under section 65(1) of the Act, the date, time, and place at which the order of the candidates' names will be arranged and any person is entitled to attend.

(5)  In this regulation, -

pseudo-random order means an arrangement where -

(a)  the order of the names of the candidates is determined randomly; and

(b)  all voting documents use that order

random order means an arrangement where the other of the names of the candidates is determined randomly or nearly randomly for each voting document by, for example, the process used to print each voting document.

Previous elections

8.       In 2013 the council resolved to use alphabetical order of names. A key consideration was an additional cost of $100,000 if the council chose the random order. From 2016 there has been no additional cost to use random order, due to changes in printing technology.

9.       For the 2019 elections the following table outlines decisions of those regional and metropolitan councils whose data was available:

Council

Order

Auckland Council

Alphabetical

Bay Of Plenty Regional Council

Random

Environment Southland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Hawke's Bay Regional Council

Alphabetical

Northland Regional Council

Alphabetical

Otago Regional Council

Alphabetical

Taranaki Regional Council

Alphabetical

Waikato Regional Council

Random

West Coast Regional Council

Alphabetical

Christchurch City Council

Random

Dunedin City Council

Random

Hamilton City Council

Random

Hutt City Council

Random

Invercargill City Council

Random

Napier City Council

Random

Nelson City Council

Random

Palmerston North City Council

Random

Porirua City Council

Random

Tauranga City Council

Random

Upper Hutt City Council

Random

Wellington City Council

Random

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Options for 2022

Pseudo-random order and true random order

10.     Random order printing removes the perception of name order bias, but the pseudo-random order of names simply substitutes a different order for an alphabetical order. Any perceived first-name bias will transfer to the name at the top of the pseudo-random list. The only effective alternative to alphabetical order is true random order, which means the order on every voting document is different.

11.     A disadvantage to both the random printing options is voter confusion as it is not possible for the supporting documents such as the directory of candidate profile statements to follow the order of a random voting paper. Making voting more difficult carries the risk of deterring the voter.

Alphabetical order

12.     The advantage of the alphabetical order printing is that it is familiar, easier to use and to understand. When a large number of candidates compete for a position it is easier for a voter to find the candidate the voter wishes to support if names are listed alphabetically.

13.     It is also easier for a voter if the order of names on the voting documents follows the order of names in the directory of candidate profile statements accompanying the voting document. The directory is listed in alphabetical order. It is not possible to print it in such a way that each copy aligns with the random order of names on the accompanying voting documents.

14.     The disadvantage of alphabetical printing is that there is some documented evidence, mainly from overseas, of voter bias to those at the top of a voting list.

Analysis of previous election results

15.     An analysis of the council’s election results for 2010, 2013, 2016 and 2019 is contained in Attachment A. It shows that any bias to those at the top of the voting lists is very small. The analysis looked at:

·    The impact of ballot position on the number of votes received by candidates (i.e., the impact on the vote share) for local boards and wards

·    The impact of ballot position on whether an individual was elected or not (i.e., the impact on election outcomes).

16.     This analysis of Auckland Council elections data shows that while there might be a small impact of being listed first on the percentage share of votes received in local board elections, there is no compelling evidence that candidates being listed first were more likely to be elected in the last four elections. Given the relatively small sample size and variability in the data, these analyses may be less able to detect the real effects. Therefore, conclusions should be drawn with caution. That said, it is reasonable to conclude that results from the last four elections were not significantly affected by the use of alphabetical ordering on voting documents.

17.     Staff recommend that the current approach of alphabetical printing is retained for the 2022 council elections, as the noted benefits to the voter outweigh any perception of a name order bias problem that analysis of previous election results show does not exist.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The order of names on voting documents does not have an impact on the wider group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/local-impacts-local-board-views-reports.aspx

20.     Feedback from local boards will be reported to the Governing Body when it is asked to determine the matter by resolution.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The order of names on voting documents does not specifically impact on the Māori community. It is noted that candidates can provide their profile statements both in English and Māori and that such profile statements are contained in the candidate profile booklet in alphabetic order. Having voting documents in alphabetic order makes it easier for any voter to match the candidate in the profile booklet.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     There is no additional cost to the printing of voting documents if names are ordered using the random method.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     If names are ordered alphabetically there is the risk of perceived bias. If names are randomised there is the risk of increasing the complexity of the voting experience and deterring voters. The analysis that has been conducted shows that the risk of bias is very small.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

24.     The feedback from the local board will be reported to the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ballot order effects and Auckland Council elections_November 2021

119

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022

File No.: CP2021/17799

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 (the draft policy).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Significance and Engagement Policy, adopted in 2014, is undergoing a policy refresh to make it more contemporary and user-friendly.

3.       The goal of the policy refresh is to provide for a simplified decision-making process through a high-level guiding document that allows for case-by-case assessments.

4.       Minor updates are needed in both the significance and engagement components of the policy.

5.       Updates around the significance component of the draft policy include:

·    the assessment of significance in terms of a continuum

·    taking a cumulative approach to a package of proposals or decisions

·    adjusting the list of strategic assets to include only assets critical for the delivery of services and clarifying that most strategic assets are identified as groups or networks of assets to reflect the way in which they deliver services

·    adding guidance for assessing the significance of decisions for assets that do not meet the criteria for being strategic.

6.       Updates around the engagement component of the draft policy include:

·    simplifying existing text to make the policy more user-friendly

·    ensuring the engagement principles capture a more diverse Tāmaki Makaurau

·    capturing the need to safeguard staff, elected members and the community during consultation and engagement

·    giving more visibility to the connection between the policy and the forthcoming and separate refresh of the Engagement Guidelines, which will support staff to operationalise the policy.

7.       The draft policy was adopted for public consultation by Governing Body at its 23 September 2021 meeting, resolution number GB/2021/111.

8.       Public consultation ran from 27 September to 18 October 2021.

9.       Adoption of the final policy is projected for February 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Significance and Engagement Policy as part of the overall consideration for final adoption in February 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Significance and Engagement Policy (the 2014 policy) was created and adopted in 2014 to fulfill the legislative requirements outlined in section 76AA of the Local Government Act 2002 (the LGA).

11.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is a key document for decision-making and the consultation process. It is comprised of two interrelated sections on significance and engagement.

12.     The significance section sets out how and when communities can expect the Council to engage before making decisions, describes the Council’s approach to determining the significance of proposals and decisions, and lists the Council’s strategic assets.

13.     The engagement section provides high-level principles on how to engage inclusively with the diverse communities of Tāmaki Makaurau. These high-level principles ensure that engagement is fit-for-purpose according to the level of significance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Staff have undertaken a policy refresh as the 2014 policy has not undergone changes since its initial adoption.

15.     An internal assessment of the 2014 policy found that that it was largely easy to use, but minor improvements would allow for more efficient decision-making and more fit-for-purpose engagement processes.

16.     General high-level updates and clarifications are being proposed for the draft policy to create a more contemporary policy.

17.     The Significance and Engagement Policy is not intended to be a prescriptive policy document, and any accepted changes to the draft policy will not change the purpose for which it is used.

18.     The proposed changes to the Significance and Engagement Policy 2021 were reported to the Governing Body at its meeting on 23 September – see Attachment A Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation, also found online with associated documents.

Consultation

19.     Formal public consultation was held from 27 September to 18 October 2021. The consultation document is part of Attachment A, or online here.

20.     Given COVID-19 lockdown restrictions across the region, consultation was conducted entirely virtually and consisted of:

·    consultation materials and online feedback forms made available on the Council’s engagement website (AK Have Your Say)

·    virtual workshops with community partners with demographic advisory panels

·    working with community partners to reach diverse groups.

21.     All feedback has been captured and will be reported through to the Governing Body meeting in February 2022 to inform decision-making on the final policy.

22.     A summary of the regional feedback received from submitters is set out in Attachment B and local board specific feedback in Attachment C.



Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Accepting the proposed changes to the draft policy allows for a fit-for-purpose and contemporary significance and engagement policy that will encourage a richer engagement process during future consultations around climate change issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Any strategic asset under the draft policy that is held or managed by a substantive Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) will be identified in the CCO Accountability Policy. CCO’s must comply with that policy when making decisions on strategic assets under their control.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local boards play a key role in engaging with their local communities. The change to enable more fit-for-purpose consultation and engagement for some asset-based decisions may provide local boards with greater flexibility to customise some engagement processes to better meet the needs of their community.

26.     Local board chairs were invited to a workshop held on 4 August 2021 that also included the Parks, Arts, Community and Events, and Finance and Performance committees for a high-level overview on proposed amendments to the draft policy.

27.     Formalised local board views from this workshop and report will be incorporated into the February 2022 Governing Body report for the policy adoption.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The refresh of the Significance and Engagement Policy will strengthen the Council’s capacity and capability to engage with and meet the needs of the Māori community. This will be achieved through the delivery of bespoke training initiatives and resources which align to best practice engagement that responds to the needs and is supported by Māori. Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau provides a foundation to build council’s engagement approach and supports initiatives already underway such as Te Matapuna 2 as a pilot for spatial-based engagement. Work on relationship agreements is progressing, and there is good support for capacity contracts. Further work is required to streamline engagement forums to ensure they are fit for purpose and respond to priorities from Māori.

29.     Ongoing collaboration on the development of the Māori engagement practice and approach will inform the Engagement Guidelines and will ensure council’s size and engagement reach is leveraged effectively. This collaboration will ensure that the operational execution of the Engagement Guidelines is well-informed and aligned with best practice in te ao Māori.

30.     This focus on practice, capacity and capability will guide operational performance so that the aspirations for Māori engagement in Tāmaki Makaurau are progressed, aligned and achievable. Further work on Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau performance measures will be aligned with the engagement approach as it continues to be developed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The proposed changes to the significance section of the policy assists in the assessment of significance and may reduce the financial costs of engagement approaches that are not fit-for-purpose.

32.     Reclassifying some assets as non-strategic will also remove the burden of audit costs if the Council seeks to make any future decisions around changing ownership or control of those assets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present any risk. The risks associated with refreshing the draft policy are set out in the report to the 23 September Governing Body meeting in Attachment A.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Feedback from the consultation along with local board views will be reported to the 24 February 2022 Governing Body meeting as part of the materials for the finalised draft policy approval.

35.     The final Significance and Engagement Policy 2022 is proposed to be implemented following approval at the same Governing Body meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Significance and Engagement Policy: Approval of draft policy for consultation

127

b

Summary of regional feedback

167

c

Local Board specific feedback

175

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Yu - Senior Advisor - Fin Policy

Eddie Tuiavii - Principal Advisor - Democracy and Engage

Authorisers

Ross Tucker - General Manager Financial Strategy and Planning

Kenneth Aiolupotea - General Manager Democracy and Engagement

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Allocation of 2021-2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2021/18168

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allocate the remaining 2021-2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) of $799,268.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report provides an update to the Whau Local Board on its LBTCF for the current political term (until 30 June 2023) and an opportunity for the local board to resolve on allocation on the remaining funds.

3.       The Board has previously allocated $1,075,477 to complete the Avondale Streetscape project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      allocate the remaining funds of $799,268 from its 2021-2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund to the following projects:

i)        Hepburn Road raised crossing - $260,000.

ii)       South Lynn Road improvements - construction of a new raised pedestrian crossing between Golf Road and the Grove and in addition extending the footpath on the eastern side of South Lynn Road from Golf Road to the Grove - $330,000

iii)      Rizal Boardwalk crossing wayfinding - $156,000.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Allocation of 2021/2023 Local Board Transport Capital Fund

181

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Auckland Transport - proposed speed limit changes (Tranche 2A)

File No.: CP2021/17791

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To formalise local board feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Through Vision Zero, Auckland Transport (AT) has adopted the goal of eliminating road transport related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050. One of the faster and most cost-effective ways to prevent DSI is to set safe and appropriate speed limits for the function, safety, design and layout of roads.

3.       As part of Tranche 1 of Auckland Transports Safe Speeds Programme safe speed limits were set on many high risk urban and rural roads and within town centres across Auckland between June 2020 and June 2021.

4.       Roads where safe speed limits were set on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries[1]. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced on these roads by seven per cent, compared to an upward trend in road trauma seen on the rest of the road network.

5.       Further changes to speed limits are now being proposed for a number of roads across Auckland where current speed limits are not deemed safe and appropriate. This is referred to as Tranche 2A of the Safe Speeds Programme.

6.       Details of the changes proposed in each local board area are provided as Attachment A

7.       Public Consultation on Tranche 2A closed on 14 November 2021. A summary of the consultation feedback is provided as Attachment B.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on Tranche 2A of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       AT is the road controlling authority for all roads within the Auckland transport system. Generally, this is the local road network which includes public roads and beaches but excludes State Highways for which Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency has responsibility.

9.       Reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at speeds that are appropriate for road function, safety, design and use, is one of the key measures that AT is undertaking to improve safety on Auckland’s roads. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits will contribute to a reduction in deaths and serious injuries on our roads and ensure speed limit consistency on the network.

10.     Setting safe and appropriate speed limits also supports AT’s Vision Zero approach (adopted by the AT Board in September 2019), which provides that no deaths or serious injuries are acceptable while travelling on our transport network.

11.     AT controls more than 7,300 kilometres of roads and - through the Safe Speeds Programme - is working through a multi-year programme to review all speed limits across its network.

12.     Speed limits must be reviewed and set (by bylaw) in accordance with the Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2017. In line with government strategy and legislation, AT is prioritising high risk roads for review.

13.     Previously AT made the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) which set new speed limits for the highest risk roads following AT’s first tranche of speed limit reviews. Within this first tranche, speed limits were reviewed on around 10 per cent of the local road network. Where new safe and appropriate speed limits were required to be set, these came into effect from mid-2020 to mid-2021.

All road performance

14.     Roads where speed limits were changed on 30 June 2020 have experienced a 67 per cent reduction in fatalities, 19 per cent reduction in all injury crashes, and a minor reduction in serious injuries. Total deaths and serious injuries (DSI) reduced by seven per cent.

15.     This equals four lives saved and 48 less injury crashes on roads treated with safe and appropriate speeds.

Rural road performance

16.     Rural roads where speeds were changed on 30 June 2020 have seen a 78 per cent reduction in fatalities and a small reduction in serious injuries.

17.     This equates to a DSI reduction of 16 per cent on the rural network where speed limit changes have been made. The overall number of crashes is similar to pre-implementation, but the crash severity rates have reduced, this is what would be expected on higher speed roads.

18.     While it will take additional time to confirm that these trends are sustained, initial indications are promising.

19.     AT is now proposing further speed limit changes for a number of roads across Auckland after reviewing and finding that their current speed limits are not safe and appropriate. This is part of the second tranche of reviews under the Safe Speeds Programme (Tranche 2A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     AT is proposing to amend the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 and set new safe and appropriate speed limits for 823 roads across Auckland with a total length of 614 kilometers (approximately eight per cent of the road network), with these new limits proposed to come into force mid-2022.

21.     AT has reviewed the existing speed limits for each of the roads identified and found they are not safe and appropriate for the function, design and use of the roads. This means there is now a legal obligation to improve the safety of the roads. Making no change is not an option. This means AT is required to either:

·    set a new safe and appropriate speed limit, or

·    install engineering measures to improve the safety of the road, like road widening, resurfacing, barriers, road markings, speed humps etc.

22.     Physical constraints and the corresponding costs involved mean that it isn’t viable to ‘engineer up’ these roads to support their existing speed limits. Setting safe and appropriate speed limits is one of the fastest and most cost-effective ways of reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

Community Engagement

23.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Tranche 2A took place from 27 September to 14 November 2021, including:

·    a flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes on/near the roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

·    advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist/ethnic media:

Central Leader, East & Bays Courier, Eastern Courier, Manukau Courier, North Harbour News, North Shore Times, Nor-West News, Papakura Courier, Rodney Times, Franklin County News, Western Leader, Hibiscus Matters, Pohutukawa Times, Chinese Herald, Mandarin Pages, Ponsonby News

·    radio advertising on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    radio interviews and adlibs on: Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    media release and on-going media management

·    published an article in Our Auckland

·    translated consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Tongan, Samoan, Simplified Chinese, Korean and NZ Sign Language

·    sent flyers, posters and hardcopy Freepost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

·    put posters on trains, buses and ferries that could reach 280,000 commuters each day

·    15 online webinars.

24.     Feedback has been provided through a number of channels:

·    online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

·    via a survey

·    via a mapping tool

·    at public hearings held on 25 November.

25.     Local boards have also had the opportunity to present at public hearings.

26.     A summary of feedback from the local community has been provided as Attachment B. This includes feedback on specific streets in your area, as well as broad feedback about the Safe Speeds Programme more generally.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

28.     For town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced under the first tranche of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of respondents advising they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The Safe Speeds Programme has been endorsed by the AT Board, the Auckland Council Planning Committee and conforms with direction from the Government Policy Statement on Land Transport 2018/2019 – 2027/2028 and the Auckland Transport Alignment Project.

30.     In March 2021, Auckland Transport staff held a workshop with Auckland Council’s Planning Committee to provide an update to Councillors on Vision Zero, road safety performance over the past three years and sought feedback on the direction and priorities for Tranche 2 of the programme. The Committee expressed informal strong support for the direction of the Safe Speeds Programme, with a number of members supportive of the programme moving faster into their community areas.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     Public submissions and feedback are provided as Attachment B.

32.     This report provides the opportunity for local boards to provide feedback on changes proposed in Tranche 2A.

33.     Feedback provided in relation to Tranche 1 has also been considered by Auckland Transport in the development of the current proposals.

34.     For the residential areas where speed limits have been reduced under the first tranche of the Safe Speeds Programme, there has been strong positive feedback on the safety improvements, with 79 per cent of respondents commenting that the area feels safer overall. As noted above, 19 per cent of respondents advised they are now participating in at least one active mode activity (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     Engagement on Tranche 2 has been undertaken with kaitiaki at northern, central and southern transport hui during 2021 alongside detailed engagement on the rural marae workstream, which is part of the second stage of Tranche 2.

36.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of the second phase of Tranche 2.

37.     Further engagement will be undertaken following the public engagement period to determine feedback on and support for the final proposal.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

38.     There are no financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     Delays due to COVID-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines.

40.     When Auckland moved into Alert Level Four, a temporary pause was put on all new consultations to allow time to adapt our consultation strategy and increase our digital engagement. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    the consultation start date was delayed by three weeks from 6 September to 27 September 2021

·    the consultation length was extended from five to seven weeks

·    the number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased

·    digital advertising spend was increased and digital engagement plans were put in place with Auckland Council’s Engagement Partners who helped reach our diverse communities.

41.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline, and local boards will be kept up to date with any changes to the dates that the new speed limits will take effect.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Early in 2022 Auckland Transport will finalise an analysis and feedback report, including feedback from both the public and local boards.

43.     On 31 March 2022 staff will present this report and recommendations to the AT Board.

44.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force on 31 May 2022 for the majority of roads, and on 13 June 2022 for roads associated with schools, allowing for school speed changes to be made at the start of a school week.

45.     These dates may need to be revised due to the impacts of COVID-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept updated if any changes are made.

46.     More speed limit changes (Tranche 2B) are planned to be publicly consulted in 2022. AT has engaged with all local boards affected by Tranche 2B and will continue to keep local boards updated as the speed reviews are finalised.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

List of changes proposed for the Whau Local Board area

197

b

Summary report of consultation feedback on speed limit changes

199

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Oliver Roberts – Acting General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 



Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Reporting back decisions made under delegation

File No.: CP2021/17176

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report back three decisions of the Whau Local Board made under delegation to provide feedback to inform Auckland Council submissions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 28 April 2021 the Whau Local Board resolved (resolution number WH/2021/38) as follows:

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils.

b)      note that the local board can continue to use its urgent decision process to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, if the Chair and Deputy Chair choose not to exercise the delegation sought in recommendation (a).

c)      note that this delegation will only be exercised where the timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

d)      note all local input approved and submitted for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission is to be included on the next local board meeting agenda for the public record.

3.       On 8 November 2021 the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson signed off under delegation feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Resource Management Act (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Bill.

4.       This feedback and its supporting documentation are appended as Attachment A. Further information can be found on Parliament’s website: https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/bills-and-laws/bills-proposed-laws/document/BILL_116288/resource-management-enabling-housing-supply-and-other.

5.       On 10 November 2021 the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson signed off under delegation feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Government’s proposed new National Waste Strategy and associated waste legislation.

6.       This feedback and its supporting documentation are appended as Attachment B. Further information can be found on the Ministry for the Environment website: https://environment.govt.nz/what-government-is-doing/areas-of-work/waste/waste-legislation-review/.

7.       On 16 November 2021 the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson signed off under delegation feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the National Emissions Reduction Plan consultation document.

8.       This feedback and its supporting documentation are appended as Attachment C. Further information can be found on the Ministry for the Environment’s website: https://consult.environment.govt.nz/climate/emissions-reduction-plan/.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the decision made under delegation on 8 November 2021 providing feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Resource Management Act (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Bill.

b)      receive the decision made under delegation on 10 November 2021 providing feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed new National Waste Strategy and associated waste legislation.

c)      receive the decision made under delegation on 16 November 2021 providing feedback from the Whau Local Board for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the National Emissions Reduction Plan consultation document.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board feedback and supporting documentation on the Resource Management (enabling housing supply and other matters) Amendment Bill

249

b

Whau Local Board feedback and supporting documentation on the proposed new National Waste Strategy and associated waste legislation

261

c

Whau Local Board feedback and supporting documentation on the National Emissions Reduction Plan consultation document
Attachment C - Whau Local Board feedback and supporting documentation on the National Emissions Reduction Plan consulta

267

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Binney - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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08 December 2021

 

 

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08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Whau Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2021/11466

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the records of the workshop held by the Whau Local Board on 10 November and 17 November 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop were as follows:

10 November 2021 (Attachment A)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Community Facilities (CF): update

·    Significance and Engagement Policy refresh 2021

·    Joint Auckland Transport/Parks, Sport and Recreation/Community Facilities: Gardner Reserve toilet facility

·    Parks Sports and Recreation (PSR): Update

·    Development Contributions policy

·    LB Annual Planning workshop #3: Annual Budget regional input and advocacy (Confidential).

 

17 November 2021 (Attachment B)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Grants - 2021/2022 Whau Quick Response Round Two

·    LB Annual Planning workshop #4 - Finalise consultation content

·    EcoMatters update from Acting CEO, Carla Gee

·    Auckland Transport capital work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)   note the records of the workshops held on 10 and 17 November 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board workshop records - 10 November 2021

279

b

Whau Local Board workshop records - 17 November 2021

283

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2021/11460

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the local board the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Whau Local Board is appended as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for December 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar December 2021

287

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 


Whau Local Board

08 December 2021

 

 

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[1] For the 12-month period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2021, compared to an average of the prior five years.