I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manukau Harbour Forum will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Friday, 11 February 2022

12.15 pm

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams and either a recording or a written summary will be uploaded to the Auckland Council website.

 

Manukau Harbour Forum

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Jon Turner

 

Deputy Chairperson

Alan Cole

 

Members

Rangi McLean

 

 

Maria Meredith

 

 

Sue Smurthwaite

 

 

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

 

Kay Thomas

 

 

Saffron Toms

 

 

Dawn Trenberth

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Brenda Railey

Democracy Advisor

 

8 February 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 820 781

Email: brenda.railey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Manukau Harbour Forum chair's report October 2021-January 2022                     7

12        Manukau Harbour Forum coordinator's report                                                        11

13        Auckland’s Water Strategy                                                                                         27

14        Endorsement of Manukau Harbour Forum Communications Plan and work programme budget reallocation to progress delivery                                            65

15        Manukau Harbour update memorandum to Environment and Climate Change Committee 23 November 2021                                                                                   97

16        Elected Member updates                                                                                          105

17        Confirmation of Workshop Record                                                                          107

18        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Friday, 8 October 2021, as a true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manukau Harbour Forum. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

Manukau Harbour Forum chair's report October 2021-January 2022

 

File No.: CP2022/00047

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Manukau Harbour Forum Chair, Jon Turner, with an opportunity to update forum members on the Manukau Harbour Forum activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that the Chairperson will speak to the report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)      receive Chair Jon Turner’s report from October 2021-January 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manukau Habour Forum Chairpersons report Oct 21 - Jan 22

9

      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Authors

Brenda Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

PDF Creator


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

Manukau Harbour Forum coordinator's report

File No.: CP2022/00790

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Manukau Harbour Forum co-ordinator’s report.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Julie Chambers, Manukau Harbour Forum co-ordinator, has captured the Forum’s activities for 2021 and provided an end of report. (Attachment A)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)      receive the Manukau Harbour Forum co-ordinator’s end of year report for 2021.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manukau Harbour Forum's end of year report for 2021

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 














Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

Auckland’s Water Strategy

File No.: CP2022/00621

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek Manukau Harbour Forum feedback on the Auckland Water Strategy framework before it is recommended for adoption by the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Water Strategy sets a vision for Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland’s waters and provides strategic direction for investment and action across the Auckland Council group.

3.       The vision of the Water Strategy is: te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water, is protected and enhanced.

4.       The Manukau Harbour Forum and local boards have previously provided feedback on the 2019 public discussion document (Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei), and this was considered in the development of the Auckland Water Strategy. Local board, including the Manukau Harbour Forum, feedback is now being sought on the draft Auckland Water Strategy framework.

5.       The core content for the Auckland Water Strategy framework was endorsed at the Environment and Climate Change Committee on the 2nd of December 2021 (ECC/2021/44). The content is now being drafted into a final document and will be brought to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for consideration and adoption in March 2022.

6.       Staff workshopped the framework with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and local board chairpersons throughout September-November 2021. The chairpersons received explanatory memos and supporting material ahead of workshops. Feedback during those workshops shaped the core content adopted at committee in December 2021.

7.       The Manukau Harbour Forum had a specific workshop presentation on 8th October 2021.

8.       Refer to Attachment A to the agenda report for the core content of the Auckland Water Strategy framework.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)      provide feedback on the eight strategic shifts of the Water Strategy framework:

i)        Te Tiriti Partnership

ii)       Empowered Aucklanders

iii)      Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access

iv)      Regenerative Water Infrastructure

v)      Water Security

vi)      Integrated Land use and Water Planning

vii)     Restoring and Enhancing Water Ecosystems

viii)    Pooling Knowledge.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Auckland Council group has a broad role in delivering water outcomes:

·     Auckland Council provides storm water infrastructure and services; resource management regulation, consenting, monitoring, and compliance for effects on fresh water and coastal water; and research, reporting, policy, and strategy functions

·     Watercare provides drinking water and wastewater infrastructure and services

·     Auckland Transport influences land use and the storm water network. The transport network is Auckland’s largest public realm asset and investment.

10.     The Auckland Council (the Water Strategy) project began as a response to the 2017 Section 17A Value for Money review of three waters[1] delivery across the council group. The review recommended the council produces a three waters strategy. The scope of the water strategy was subsequently expanded to incorporate other water related responsibilities, outcomes, and domains (e.g. natural waterbodies, groundwater, coastal waters, etc).

11.     A discussion document (Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei) was consulted on in 2019. The purpose of this document was to elicit community views on the future of Auckland’s waters and how the council should be planning for these in its water strategy.

12.     This process established a high-level vision for Auckland’s waters, ‘te Mauri o te Wai o Tāmaki Makaurau - the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water - is protected and enhanced’, and presented key values, issues and principles that were designed to inform strategy development. Actions and targets were not discussed. Strategic direction, actions and targets have been identified as part of the subsequent strategy development.

13.     The Water Strategy sets a vision for Auckland’s waters and provides strategic direction for investment and action across the council group. The council has developed the strategy drawing on:

·     relevant legislation and central government direction

·     the council’s strategies, policies and plans, and guidance including:

The Auckland Plan 2050 - includes high-level approaches for how we can prioritise the health of water in Auckland by adopting a te ao Māori approach to protecting our waters; adapting to a changing water future; developing Aucklanders’ stewardship; restoring our damaged environments; protecting our significant water bodies; and using Auckland’s growth to achieve better water outcomes.

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri Auckland's Climate Action Plan - acknowledges that climate change will mean a changing water future and identifies integrated, adaptive planning approaches and water-sensitive design as key enablers of a climate-ready Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland.

·     the council’s Three Waters Value for Money (s17A) Review 2017

·     the Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei discussion document framework and feedback from local boards, community and mana whenua from 2019

·     individual iwi engagement and Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum engagement in 2021

·     internal staff engagement during 2020-2021

·     the Water Sensitive Cities Index and benchmarking in 2021.

14.     The intent of the Water Strategy is that the council fulfils its obligations to identify and plan for future challenges across its broad range of functions that affect water outcomes. These challenges are:

·     protecting and enhancing the health of waterbodies and their ecosystems

·     delivering three-waters services at the right time, in the right place, at the right scale, as the city grows

·     having enough water for people now and in the future

·     reducing flood and coastal inundation risk over time

·     water affordability for Aucklanders

·     improving how the council works with its treaty partners

·     improving how the council organises itself to achieve these outcomes.

15.     The Water Strategy is intended to guide decision-making to 2050. Staff have therefore considered Tāmaki Makaurau’s broader context over the life of the strategy including:

·     land use change, as driven by population growth in particular

·     mitigating and adapting to climate change

·     partnership approach with mana whenua

·     growing iwi capacity and further settlements that will affect governance structures

·     technological change.

16.     Council has also considered the direction from central government to deliver management of freshwater, land use and development in catchments in an integrated and sustainable way to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects, including cumulative effects[2].

Central Government Three Waters Reform

17.     The Water Strategy has been developed during a period of significant uncertainty for the council group. Central government has recently indicated that participation in the proposed Three Waters Reforms will be mandated in the planned enabling legislation. The reforms would move management of three waters assets to a new inter-regional entity. Economic regulation is also planned.

18.     While the final form of the proposed structures is not known, it is important to understand that the proposed reform would not affect all areas of delivery for the Water Strategy. Council would retain its:

·     core role as environmental regulator

·     core role as regulatory planning authority

·     core treaty partnership role for local government

·     core role to engage and be the voice for Auckland communities

·     management of the council group’s own water consumption (towards consumption targets).

19.     The Water Strategy provides strategic direction to the council group. Over the next few years, as the shape and impacts of proposed reform become clearer, the council would use the strategy in appropriate ways to provide direction to any processes that arise. This strategy would become council’s position on the aims and outcomes sought from any new entity. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The purpose of this report is to provide local boards with an opportunity to feedback on the Auckland Water Strategy framework before it is finalised and recommended for adoption by the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

The Water Strategy Framework

21.     The Water Strategy framework sets a vision for the future (previously adopted in 2019), a foundational partnership and eight key strategic shifts to guide change. The vision of the Water Strategy is: te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water, is protected and enhanced.

22.     The framework articulates Auckland’s context, challenges, aims, and required actions. The framework is designed to make implementation steps clear for council to track progress and so that communities and partners can hold council accountable to progress over time.

23.     The framework consists of:

·     vision

·     treaty context

·     challenges

·     cross-cutting themes

·     strategic shifts and associated aims and actions

·     implementation.

24.     The diagram below shows the Auckland Water Strategy Framework. Refer to Attachment A for the core content of the Auckland Water Strategy framework, including the aims and actions associated with each strategic shift.

 

A picture containing table

Description automatically generated

 

Vision: te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water, is protected and enhanced

25.     Auckland’s vision for the future is ‘te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s waters, is protected and enhanced’.

26.     The Water Strategy vision describes Tāmaki Makaurau’s desired long-term future and will guide council decision-making over time towards that agreed goal. The vision outlines a future for Tāmaki Makaurau where the region’s waters are healthy, thriving, and treasured. This vision also describes a future where the deep connections between water, the environment and people are recognised and valued.

27.     The mauri – the life sustaining capacity – of water is a fundamentally intuitive concept.  It is something all Aucklanders can appreciate. There is a qualitative difference that is readily felt and sensed when walking alongside a healthy waterbody compared to a waterbody that has been channeled, polluted, or piped, for example.

28.     The Our Water Future public discussion document received strong support for the vision. In the document, the vision was explained as:

·     special to this place (Auckland)

·     recognising the vital relationship between our water and our people

·     recognising the role of mana whenua as kaitiaki within the region

·     representing values that can unify us in our actions

·     setting a long-term aspiration for the way we take care of our waters.

29.     The council set a long-term aspiration for Auckland when it adopted this vision in 2019. An aspiration for a future in which:

a)    Aucklanders are able to swim in, and harvest from, our rivers, estuaries and harbours.

b)    Life in and sustained by water is thriving.

c)    Everyone has access to enough water of the appropriate quality to meet their needs.

30.     Adopting this vision recognised that addressing Auckland’s water issues and challenges over time requires a bold vision and new ways of working together with council’s treaty partners and communities. The vision signals a greater recognition of a Māori worldview, of environmental limits and interconnectedness of people and environment.

31.     The vision is also consistent with council’s obligations and aspirations, as well as central government direction. For example,

·     the purpose of local government is to take a sustainable development approach to the broad role of promoting the four well-beings

·     the purpose of the Resource Management Act is sustainable management of natural and physical resources in ways that enables the four well-beings

·     Te Mauri o te Wai aligns with te Mana o te Wai in the National Policy Statement – Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM), which provides for local expression

·     the Auckland Plan directs council to ‘Apply a Māori worldview to treasure and protect our natural environment (taonga tuku iho)’

·     mauri is embedded in the Auckland Unitary Plan

·     the Our Water Future public discussion document introduced the vision of te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau and applying a Māori world view

·     Te mauri o te wai is referenced in the council’s 2021 Infrastructure Strategy.

 

Over-arching challenges

32.     The intent of the Water Strategy is that the council fulfils its obligations to identify and plan for future challenges across its broad range of functions that affect water outcomes. Tāmaki Makaurau faces several overarching challenges that inform the strategic direction set by the Water Strategy. These are:

·     protecting and enhancing the health of waterbodies and their ecosystems

·     delivering three-waters services at the right time, in the right place, at the right scale, as the city grows

·     having enough water for people now and in the future

·     reducing flood and coastal inundation risk over time

·     affordability for Aucklanders

·     improving how the council works with its treaty partners

·     improving how the council organises itself.

33.     Attachment A provides a more detailed description of each over-arching challenge.

Treaty Context

34.     Māori have enduring rights and interests related to water as a taonga and as indigenous peoples. These rights are affirmed under Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi and international law. 

35.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its statutory Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi responsibilities. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland context. Like the council, mana whenua are long-term contributors to water outcomes.

36.     This section within the framework acknowledges that the treaty provides the context for partnership between council and mana whenua for the protection, management, and enhancement of water.

Cross-cutting themes

37.     In addition to over-arching challenges, there are cross-cutting themes that inform the council’s strategic approach in the Water Strategy. The cross-cutting themes must be accounted for as the actions in the strategy are delivered.

Climate Change

38.     Water and climate change are intrinsically linked. The twin challenges of mitigation and adaptation have been integrated within the strategy.

Equity

39.     The Auckland Plan 2050 describes sharing prosperity with all Aucklanders as a key challenge now and for the future. Auckland has equitable access to water supply and sanitation and performs well against international peers; however, there are areas for improvement that are captured in the strategy. Other equity issues such as flood protection and access to blue-green space for recreation are also considered within the strategy.

Strategic Shifts

40.     The Water Strategy framework includes eight overarching strategic shifts. Each strategic shift is intended to represent long-term change in the council’s approach towards a stated aim. To achieve this, each strategic shift has associated actions with indicative implementation timings identified. Shifts are designed so that the council can add actions over time to the framework as progress is made.

41.     The strategic shifts were arrived at by considering the changes that the council must make to respond to the challenges and cross-cutting themes above, as well as responding to the water sensitive cities benchmarking undertaken. Actions were developed and grouped according to council functions so that they might be more easily implemented by areas in the council group.

 

Table one: Water Strategy Strategic Shifts and Associated Aims

Strategic shift

Aim

Te Tiriti Partnership

The council and mana whenua working together in agreed ways on agreed things.

The council and mana whenua iwi are partners in the protection, management, and enhancement of water.

Empowering Aucklanders

Working with Aucklanders for better water outcomes.

Aucklanders are empowered to shape decisions about and are prepared for our changing water future.

Regenerative Water Infrastructure

Auckland’s water infrastructure is regenerative, resilient, low carbon, and increases the mauri of water. It’s able to be seen and understood by Aucklanders.

 

Regenerative infrastructure systems enhance the life-sustaining capacity of water (mauri).

Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access

Prioritising mauri when using water, to sustain the environment and people in the long term.

 

When the council allocates water from the natural environment, water use is sustainable, and considers the health and wellbeing of ecosystems and people.

Water Security

Water abundance and security for growing population through efficient use and diverse sources.

Auckland captures, uses, and recycles water efficiently so that everyone has access to enough water of the appropriate quality to meet their needs.

Integrated Land use and Water Planning

Integrating land use and water planning at a regional, catchment and site scale.

Water and its life-sustaining capacity is a central principle in land management and planning decisions.

Restoring and Enhancing Water Ecosystems

Catchment-based approaches to the health of water ecosystems.

Auckland has thriving and sustainable natural water ecosystems that support life, food gathering and recreation.

Pooling Knowledge

Shared understanding enabling better decisions for our water future.

Auckland has the knowledge about water needed to make good quality, timely, and strategic decisions about water.

Implementation

42.     Successfully delivering on the vision and integrated aims of the Water Strategy will require a coordinated and sustained approach to delivery across the council group.

43.     The Water Strategy sets out a range of actions to be implemented over time for the council group. The actions fall within two broad timeframes: near term (year one and years one – three) and medium term (years four – ten). Near term actions are prescriptive and specific. Medium term actions are more illustrative and require further development to implement successfully.

44.     To implement the Water Strategy, the council will need:

·     to take a consistent, sustained approach to putting te mauri o te wai at the centre of council group planning and investment decisions and action

·     the skills and capacity to deliver on the water strategy, legislative requirements, and partnership relationships

·     a strong culture of holistic planning, action, reporting and post-implementation review that feeds back into adaptive planning processes

·     clarity of the roles and responsibilities across the council group, with all teams directed and accountable for their role and function

·     to give mana whenua clear sight of the council’s work on water and enable participation/direction.

45.     Changes required to give effect to the implementation of the strategy include:

·     appoint Executive Lead Team Water Lead (complete)

·     Water Strategy programme implementation coordinator

·     coordinated workforce planning to fill gaps and changing needs

·     update investment prioritisation criteria to reflect the Water Strategy

·     council reporting on te mauri o te wai

·     integrated Asset Investment and Asset Management Planning, with an independent audit process.

Central government context

46.     The Water Strategy considers and responds to current and expected direction from central government to:

·     deliver management of freshwater, land use and development in catchments in an integrated and sustainable way

·     a strengthening of the partnership between the council and mana whenua in environmental management goal setting and decision-making frameworks

·     the inclusion of Te Mana o Te Wai in the Auckland Unitary Plan

·     a switch from an individual activity effects-based assessment (under the Resource Management Act 1991) to a more holistic limits-based approach, reflecting the need to better manage cumulative effects on water bodies

·     an expectation of stronger enforcement of regulatory environmental obligations through policy effectiveness reporting (feedback loops between policy and actions) and improved compliance monitoring and enforcement reporting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     Water and climate change are intrinsically linked. Climate change is a cross cutting theme of the Water Strategy (along with equity). The twin challenges of mitigation and adaptation were integrated into the strategy’s core content as it was developed.

48.     Climate change will have wide-ranging implications for the issues raised in the Water Strategy, including:

·     influencing demand for water use

·     affecting water availability of a given water source over time

·     increasing flood and coastal inundation hazard risk to life and property.

49.     Improving our mitigation of and resilience to these impacts via the approaches described in the Water Strategy aligns with council’s existing goals and work programmes for climate action.

50.     The physical impacts of climate change will have implications both for water management (including Māori water rights) in Auckland, and for related issues such as energy supply, social welfare, food security, and Māori land.

51.     Water infrastructure has significant embodied carbon emissions. The regenerative water infrastructure strategic shift sets the council on a path to zero or low emissions water infrastructure.

52.     The projected impacts of climate change on Auckland’s aquatic environments, and the associated risks, are detailed in two key report series: the Auckland Region Climate Change Projections and Impacts[3] and the Climate Change Risk in Auckland technical report series[4].

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     There is broad agreement across the council group that better integration in water-related matters is needed, and that improvements in investment and decision-making processes are possible.

54.     Staff have worked across the council group to develop the Water Strategy’s core content through working groups, workshops, and review of material.

55.     The strategic shifts and actions in the Water Strategy represent significant change in the way that the council group approaches water-related challenges and opportunities in Auckland. In time, the way that staff work and the tools they have available will change. Greater and more coordinated oversight of resources that are used to deliver water outcomes is essential.

56.     The Water Strategy embeds concepts like mauri and water-sensitive design into council’s approach going forward. These actions require careful, considered partnership with mana whenua to create new frameworks that will guide decision-making. Coordinated education and upskilling programmes for staff will be needed to enable successful implementation.

57.     Of note is the action to implement a council group knowledge governance framework for water. This will mean review and redesign of processes governing the production of knowledge; how council mobilises knowledge for different users and uses; and how council promotes the use of knowledge.

58.     The framework will help facilitate a culture change across the council group, encouraging the sharing of knowledge across departments and organisations, and better connecting teams in the ownership of knowledge and insights.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     Local boards have a strong interest and role in improving water outcomes across Auckland and currently fund many local projects focused on restoration of local waterways.

60.     The Manukau Harbour Forum is a collective comprised of representatives of the nine Auckland local boards on the shores of the Manukau Harbour. The forum was created in 2010 in response to concern about the deteriorating state of the Manukau Harbour and the urgent need for a collaborative response to improve its condition.

61.     Staff workshopped the Water Strategy framework, including each strategic shift and associated aims and actions, with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and local board chairpersons September to November 2021. Manukau Harbour Forum Chairperson Jon Turner was also invited to attend. The chairpersons received explanatory memos and supporting material ahead of workshops. Feedback during those workshops shaped the core content adopted at committee in December 2021.

62.     Previous local board and Manukau Harbour Forum feedback informed development of the Water Strategy. Staff held workshops with all local boards in late 2018 on the Our Water Future – Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei discussion document and sought their feedback through formal business meetings. Local board and Manukau Harbour Forum resolutions were provided to the Environment and Community Committee in December 2018 (ENV/2018/168) when the discussion document was approved for public consultation.

63.     During public engagement, local boards hosted many of the Have Your Say consultation events and helped to ensure local views were fed into the feedback. This feedback has been an input to the development of the strategy. There was broad support for the vision, values, issues, processes and principles presented in the discussion document. The Environment and Climate Change Committee adopted the framework as the basis for developing the Auckland water strategy.

64.     Key themes from local board engagement are presented below. Staff have designed the strategic shifts and actions to address these key themes – these are noted in italics:

i)     A desire to improve engagement with local communities and deliver targeted education programmes – Empowering Aucklanders strategic shift.

ii)     Recognising water is a limited resource, that access to water is a human right and supply must be allocated fairly – Water Security and Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access strategic shifts.

A need to improve the diminishing water quality of local water bodies including urban streams, gulfs and harbours – Restoring and Enhancing water ecosystems strategic shift.

iii)    A need to carefully manage urban development and take up opportunities to embed water-sensitive design - Integrated Land use and Water Planning strategic shift.

iv)   A need for proactive monitoring and enforcement, supported by a robust and transparent evidence base – Pooling Knowledge strategic shift.

65.     Feedback on several water-related topics that were not part of the discussion document’s scope was also received from local boards. This included water infrastructure, the importance of future proofing our assets, incorporating sustainable options such as greywater reuse and roof collection, and the management of contaminant run-off and stormwater discharges.

66.     Staff considered these important issues and they have been incorporated into the strategy – see Regenerative Water Infrastructure strategic shift.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

67.     Every iwi and hapū has associations with particular waterbodies[5] that are reflected in their whakapapa, waiata, and whaikōrero tuku iho (stories of the past). Protecting the health and mauri of our freshwater ecosystems is fundamental to providing for the food, materials, customary practices, te reo Māori, and overall well-being of iwi and hapū.

68.     Engagement with Māori that has informed this work includes:

·     Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum Guidance to the Water Strategy 2019

·     submissions to the Our Water Future Public Discussion Document 2019

·     Te Pou Taiao engagement throughout 2021

·     individual engagement with iwi partners 2021 including face-to-face hui.

69.     Refer to Our Water Future: Report on Māori response to Auckland Council Water Strategy consultation for further information on the submissions of Māori who responded to public discussion document consultation. Key themes from Māori engagement are presented below. Staff have designed the strategic shifts and actions to address these key themes – these are noted in italics:

i)     Māori are committed to the maintenance of the mauri of water and they want to be a part of the conversation – Te Tiriti Partnership and Empowering Aucklanders strategic shifts.

ii)    Awareness/Education (concerns for peoples’ priorities, climate change has arrived – inevitable there will be changing water patterns) – Empowering Aucklanders strategic shift.

iii)   Water sovereignty (should be allowed water tanks on our properties) – Water Security strategic shift.

iv)   Reciprocity (look after our environment it will continue to look after us) – Restore and Enhance Water Ecosystems, Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access and Regenerative Water Infrastructure strategic shifts.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

70.     Implementing the proposed Water Strategy actions will have budgetary implications in time.  Cost scenarios have not been undertaken for the actions as this is work that is required as the group works through the implementation of the strategy.  Most actions do not commit the council group to a singular solution, but rather to investigate options and their associated cost within the action, for subsequent decision making.  From a cost perspective it is expected that the actions associated with each strategic shift will be possible through:

·     providing clear strategic direction to improve current processes (no new spend)

·     redirecting current spend to higher priority activity aligned to strategic direction

·     new spend, prioritised through council processes (i.e. Annual Budget and Long-Term Plan/10-year Budget).

71.     Over the next 30 years, the council expects to spend approximately $85 billion on infrastructure for three waters alone (capital and operational expenditure). There is considerable scope to align that spend to the vision of the water strategy.

72.     Where actions do require additional spend, such spend must be considered through council’s Annual Plan and Long-term Plan/10-year Budget processes. Additional spend would not be limited to three waters infrastructure and services and would include all council group functions related to water outcomes.

73.     It is also noted that central government’s messaging for its Three Waters Reform programme suggests the proposed new water entities may have access to greater lending facilities. This would presumably impact delivery of three waters infrastructure and services in Auckland, some of which would relate to the proposed Water Strategy’s strategic shifts and associated actions.


 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

74.     The recommendation requesting local board views does not present a risk.

75.     The risks and mitigations listed below relate to the Environment and Climate Change Committee’s decision to adopt the Water Strategy.

Risk

Assessment

Mitigation/Control measures

Insufficient or inconsistent implementation of the strategy

Medium risk

 

Poor coordination is a key driver for the strategy and implementation must respond to this reality.

The Strategy needs buy-in across the council leadership and consistent political leadership to ensure coherent implementation.

 

Staff with responsibilities for shifts and actions have been engaged in the development of the strategy.

 

A Water Strategy programme implementation coordinator will provide support to implementation.

 

Central government reform: if established, a new three waters entity disregards strategic intent of Water Strategy

High risk

 

The council should use the Water Strategy to assist in articulating the long-term aims for water in Auckland. The Strategy may also be useful to guide discussions during any transition process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     The Water Strategy final document and will be brought to Environment and Climate Change Committee for consideration and adoption in March 2022.

77.     A high-level implementation plan for the Water Strategy, with action-owners, will accompany the final document.

78.     The actions related to each strategic shift may require further refinement and the core content will require editing appropriate for an external-facing document. A workshop of the Environment and Climate Change Committee on actions and the draft strategy will be scheduled prior to the Water Strategy document being presented to Environment and Climate Change Committee for adoption. Local board and Manukau Harbour Forum chairpersons will be invited to that workshop.


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Core Content for Auckland Water Strategy framework

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Toby Shephard - Strategist

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

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Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

Endorsement of Manukau Harbour Forum Communications Plan and work programme budget reallocation to progress delivery

File No.: CP2022/00892

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is firstly for the Manukau Harbour Forum to receive and endorse the Manukau Harbour Forum Communications Plan (Attachment A).

2.       And secondly, for the Manukau Harbour Forum to approve the reallocation of $5,000 currently allocated to support Māori engagement via hui to be used to progress actions outlined in the Manukau Harbour Forum communications plan, particularly those that will support more effective communication and engagement with Māori.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Manukau Harbour Forum Communications Plan

3.       In July 2021 the Manukau Harbour Forum approved the allocation of $6,600 to develop a communications plan.

4.       Members indicated that they would like to see more communications coming from the forum and that a plan would be beneficial. It was identified that any communications strategy would need to be relevant to the forum’s aims and capacity.

5.       A communications specialist was appointed and following workshops, stakeholder interviews, review of past practice, and assessment of similar function entities, has written the attached Manukau Harbour Forum Communications Plan.

6.       The communications plan identifies key audiences for Manukau Harbour Forum communications and the purposes of communications from the forum. It also establishes preferable methods of developing and disseminating communications.

7.       The communications plan includes an outline of recommended immediate and longer-term actions.

8.       It is envisaged that the part-time Manukau Harbour Forum coordinator will monitor actions and implementation, with staff in supporting areas of Council assisting with direct implementation or additional contractor enabled delivery.

Reallocation of mana whenua engagement hui budget to communications plan actions

9.       In July 2021 the Manukau Harbour Forum allocated $5,000 to hold a hui to support the forum in further fostering face to face connection and relationships with mana whenua to provide mana whenua with a better understanding of the Manukau Harbour Forum and its roles. Unfortunately, Covid-19 has meant the proposed hui and several prior supporting site visits have not been able to be planned and delivered.

10.     Given ongoing constraints staff identify that the hui budget line will very likely not be able to be delivered this financial year 22/23.

11.     Staff recommend that the Manukau Harbour Forum reallocate budget from the hui budget allocation to support the immediate progression of actions outlined in the Manukau Harbour Forum communications plan, particularly those that will support more effective communication and engagement with Māori including the two items of:

-      Work with Healthy Waters Kaiwhakatere to develop a Manukau Harbour Forum mana whenua engagement plan with the aim of implementing after elections

-      Establish hui for mana whenua and stakeholders to come together, share information, acknowledge challenges and celebrate success.

12.     This reallocation will better enable integration across the two work areas and progressing the higher-level intents of the hui of fostering stronger connection and growing positive relationships between the Manukau Harbour Forum and mana whenua who have an interest in the Manukau harbour and catchments.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)      receive and endorse the Manukau Harbour Forum Communications Plan 2022 (Attachment A).

b)      approve the reallocation of $5,000 from the Māori engagement hui project line to be used to progress actions outlined in the Manukau Harbour Forum communications plan, particularly those that will support more effective communication and engagement with Māori.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manukau Harbour Forum Communications Plan 2022

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

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Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

Manukau Harbour update memorandum to Environment and Climate Change Committee 23 November 2021

File No.: CP2022/00907

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the Manukau Harbour Forum to receive a copy of the Manukau Harbour update memorandum prepared for the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 23rd November 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached memorandum provides an update on the progress towards ‘Achieving Better Outcomes for the Manukau Harbour’, an overview of which was provided to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 12 November 2020.

3.       The memorandum was circulated via email to Manukau Harbour Forum delegates and alternates by Manukau Harbour Forum Chairperson Jon Turner on 25 November 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)      note the Manukau Harbour update memorandum (Attachment A) prepared for the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 23 November 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manukau Harbour update memorandum prepared for the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 23 November 2021

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

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Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

Elected Member updates

File No.: CP2022/00046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of 15 minutes has been set aside for the attending elected members to update the Forum on significant matters relating to Manukau Harbour.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)      receive any elected member verbal or tabled updates.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

Confirmation of Workshop Record

File No.: CP2022/00049

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the workshop record held by the Manukau Harbour Forum.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Briefings provided at the workshop are as follows:

          Friday 8 October 2021

1.   Coordinator’s update

 

2.   Water Strategy update

 

3.   Freshwater management modelling update

 

4.   Watercare- Southwest Wastewater Servicing

 

5.   Onehunga Wharf update

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manukau Harbour Forum:

a)      note the workshop record for the workshop held on 8 October 2021.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manukau Harbour Forum workshop record - 8 October 2021

109

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brenda Railey - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 


Manukau Harbour Forum

11 February 2022

 

 

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[1] Three waters refers to drinking water, wastewater, and storm water.

[2] National Policy Statement – Freshwater Management policy 3.5

[3] http://www.knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=1747&DocumentType=1&

[4] http://knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=2807

[5] Streams, springs, rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater, estuaries, harbours.