]

I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 10 March 2022

10.00am

This meeting will be held remotely and can be viewed on the Auckland Council website:  https://councillive.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Richard Hills

Cr Shane Henderson

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Tracy Mulholland

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Cr Angela Dalton

Cr John Watson

 

Cr Chris Darby

IMSB Member Karen Wilson

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

IMSB Member Glenn Wilcox

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Paul Young

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Suad Allie

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua /

Senior Governance Advisor

 

7 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 977 6953

Email: suad.allie@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


 

Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities.   The committee will establish an annual work programme outlining key focus areas in line with its key responsibilities, which include:

 

·        climate change mitigation and adaptation policy, and implementation (with other committee chairs where cross over of responsibilities exists)

·        coastal renewals, slips and remediation

·        Auckland’s Climate Action Framework

·        natural heritage (including ecology, biodiversity and biosecurity matters, such as kauri dieback)

·        protection and restoration of Auckland’s ecological health

·        water, including Auckland’s Water Strategy

·        waste minimisation

·        acquisition of property relating to the committee’s responsibilities and in accordance with the LTP

·        grants for regional environmental outcomes.

 

Powers

 

(i)      All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities, including:

(a)     approval of a submission to an external body

(b)     establishment of working parties or steering groups.

(ii)     The committee has the powers to perform the responsibilities of another committee, where it is necessary to make a decision prior to the next meeting of that other committee.

(iii)     If a policy or project relates primarily to the responsibilities of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, but aspects require additional decisions by the Planning Committee and/or the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee, then the Environment and Climate Change Committee has the powers to make associated decisions on behalf of those other committee(s). For the avoidance of doubt, this means that matters do not need to be taken to more than one of these committees for decisions.

(iii)    The committee does not have:

(a)     the power to establish subcommittees

(b)     powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2).

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 

 

 


 

 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·          Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·          Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·          Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·          In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·          The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·          However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·          All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·          Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·          Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·          All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·          Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·          Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·          Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                           9

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                   9

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   9

4          Petitions                                                                                          9  

5          Public Input                                                                                     9

6          Local Board Input                                                                           9

7          Extraordinary Business                                                               10

8          Adoption of the Auckland Water Strategy                                11

9          Too Much Water - A statement of Auckland Council's current role and direction                                                                       103

10        Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Whangaparāoa Pilot                   123

11        Regional Streets for People Programme                                 255

12        Proposed Auckland Council submission on Hākaimangō-Matiatia Marine Reserve application, northwest Waiheke Island                                                                                           269

13        Review of the Forward Work Programme - Environment and Climate Change Committee                                                      313

14        Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings - 10 March 2022        327

15        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 2 December 2021, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

Adoption of the Auckland Water Strategy

File No.: CP2022/01379

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To recommend the final Auckland Water Strategy document for adoption.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Water Strategy (the Water Strategy) sets a vision for Auckland’s waters and provides strategic direction for investment and action across the Auckland Council Group.

3.      The vision of the Water Strategy is: te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau, the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water, is protected and enhanced.

4.      The Water Strategy framework describes the vision for the future and strategic shifts to guide change. It articulates Auckland’s context, challenges, aims, and required actions related to water. The framework is designed to make implementation steps clear for council to track progress, and so that communities and partners can hold council group accountable to progress over time.

5.      Staff workshopped the Water Strategy framework, including each strategic shift and associated aims and actions, with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Local Board Chairs throughout September-November 2021. Feedback during those workshops has shaped the final Water Strategy.

6.      The Water Strategy framework consists of:

i)        A vision

ii)       Treaty context

iii)      Over-arching challenges

iv)      Cross-cutting themes

v)       Strategic shifts and associated aims and actions

vi)      Implementation

7.      The Environment and Climate Change Committee endorsed the core content of the Water Strategy in December 2021 (ECC/2021/44). Staff used this core content to prepare the final Water Strategy document (Attachment A). Staff have also prepared several supporting documents, including a high-level Implementation Plan for the Water Strategy. Should the Water Strategy be adopted, it and the supporting documents will be made publicly available online following the committee meeting.

8.      The Water Strategy provides strategic direction to the council group. With regard to water reforms, Auckland Council will continue in its current form until at least mid-2024[1]. While the final structure of any reform is not known, council would retain its core roles as environmental regulator, planning authority, Treaty partner and importantly, as the voice for Aucklanders’ aspirations.

9.      Over the next few years, as the shape and impacts of proposed reform become clearer, the council will use the strategy in appropriate ways to provide direction to any processes that arise. This strategy would become council’s position on the aims and outcomes sought from any new entity.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      tango/adopt the Auckland Water Strategy (Attachment A of the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

10.    The Auckland Council group has a broad role in delivering water outcomes:

i)        Auckland Council is a Unitary Authority with both regional and district council functions. The Resource Management Act and the Local Government Act are two key pieces of legislation that structure the council’s activities. National direction through legislation and national planning instruments drives inter-related planning and policy outcomes expected from council. At the regional level, key strategic and planning documents guide or direct council delivery functions, particularly in the interrelated land and water management planning space. 

These planning and strategy mechanisms (e.g. Auckland Plan, Auckland Unitary Plan, Local Board Plans, Long-term Plan etc.) inform several functional areas of council, and are delivered through council’s asset managers, including Council Controlled Organisations. Some of the key council delivery activities include:

A)      regulatory services such as consenting, monitoring, and compliance for effects on fresh water and coastal water

B)      policy evaluation and research activities into plan objectives and associated council work programmes

C)      storm water infrastructure and inter-related services.

ii)       Watercare provides drinking water and wastewater infrastructure and services.

iii)      Auckland Transport influences land use and the storm water network with associated significant discharges. The transport network is Auckland’s largest public realm asset and investment.

11.    The Auckland Water Strategy (the Water Strategy) sets a vision for Auckland’s waters and provides strategic direction for investment and action across the Auckland Council Group. The strategy takes direction from and builds on existing council strategic documents including the Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri Auckland's Climate Action Plan.

12.    The Water Strategy project began as a response to the 2017 Section 17A Value for Money review of three waters[2] delivery across the council group. The review recommended that the council produce a three waters strategy. The scope of the water strategy was subsequently expanded to incorporate other water related responsibilities, outcomes, and domains (e.g. natural waterbodies, groundwater, coastal waters, etc.).

13.    A discussion document (Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei) was publicly consulted on in February 2019. The purpose of the discussion document was to elicit community views on the future of Auckland’s waters and how the council should be planning for these through its water strategy. This process established a high-level vision for Auckland’s waters, ‘te Mauri o te Wai o Tāmaki Makaurau - the life-sustaining capacity of Auckland’s water - is protected and enhanced’, and presented key values, issues and principles that were designed to inform strategy development. Actions and targets were not discussed and have been identified as part of the subsequent strategy development. 

14.    The council developed the strategy drawing on:

i)        relevant legislation and central government direction

ii)       the council’s strategies, policies and plans, and guidance

iii)      the council’s Three Waters Value for Money (s17A) Review 2017

iv)      the Our Water Future discussion document framework and feedback from local boards, community and mana whenua in 2019

v)       individual iwi engagement and Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum engagement in 2021

vi)      internal staff engagement during 2020-2021

vii)     the Water Sensitive Cities Index and benchmarking in 2021

viii)    Environment and Climate Change Committee workshops 2021

ix)      Local Board feedback February 2022.

15.    The Water Strategy is intended to guide decision-making to 2050. Staff have therefore considered Tāmaki Makaurau’s broader context over the life of the strategy including:

i)        land use change, in particular as driven by population growth

ii)       mitigating and adapting to climate change

iii)      partnership approach with mana whenua

iv)      growing iwi capacity and further settlements that will affect governance structures

v)       technological change.

16.    The Water Strategy has been developed during a period of significant uncertainty for the council. Central government has indicated that participation in the proposed Three Waters Reforms will be mandated. The reforms would move management of three waters assets to a new inter-regional entity. Economic regulation is also planned.

17.    Over the next few years, as the shape and impacts of proposed reforms become clearer, the council will use the strategy in appropriate ways to provide direction to any processes that arise. This strategy will become council’s position on the aims and outcomes sought from any new entity. 

18.    While the final form of the proposed structures is not known, the proposed reforms will not affect all areas of delivery for the Water Strategy. Council would retain its:

i)        core role as environmental regulator

ii)       core role as regulatory planning authority

iii)      core Treaty partnership role for local government

iv)      core role to engage and be the voice for Auckland communities

v)       management of the council group’s own water consumption (towards consumption targets).

19.    Council has also considered the direction from central government to deliver management of freshwater, land use and development in catchments in an integrated and sustainable way to avoid, remedy or mitigate adverse effects, including cumulative effects. This direction is primarily through the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management.

20.    Staff workshopped the Water Strategy framework, including each strategic shift and associated aims and actions, with the Environment and Climate Change Committee and Local Board Chairs throughout September-November 2021. Feedback during those workshops has shaped the content of the final Water Strategy. A final draft of the Water Strategy and Implementation Plan was shared with Committee members on 21 February 2022 for feedback.

 


 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The Water Strategy will guide decision making across the council group

21.    The purpose of this report is to recommend the Auckland Water Strategy for adoption. The council group can and must improve coordination and delivery of its broad role in delivering water outcomes and meeting community expectations. The adoption of a Water Strategy would represent a milestone in the council’s history, in that it would provide the first integrated and coordinated strategic approach to Auckland’s water outcomes.

22.    The Water Strategy will guide decision-making and investment in two important ways:

i)        by articulating strategic direction via the strategy’s strategic framework and

ii)       through specific near-to-medium term actions identified for each strategic shift.

Water Strategy Framework 

23.    The Water Strategy framework was adopted by the committee in December 2021. It consists of:

i)        A vision

ii)       Treaty context

iii)      Over-arching challenges

iv)      Cross-cutting themes

v)       Strategic shifts and associated aims and actions

vi)      Implementation

24.    The diagram below shows the Auckland Water Strategy Framework. Each section is explained in full in the Water Strategy document (refer to Attachment A).  

Table

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25.    The framework can be used to understand how services the council provides and the functions it performs contribute to a collective vision. Aligning ongoing council activity to the framework will take a coordinated and sustained approach to delivery across the council group.  Delivery will also depend upon and should strengthen relationships with Treaty partners and community.

26.    A strategy enables greater and more coordinated oversight of resources to deliver water outcomes. The Water Strategy has been developed in recognition that many of the council’s current approaches needs to change to enact a meaningful improvement to the mauri of water in Auckland. Auckland Council has given strong political direction to coordinate water management. The Water Strategy and its Implementation Plan are reflective of this direction.

Specific near-to-medium term actions

27.    Each strategic shift has associated actions with indicative implementation timings identified. Strategic shifts are designed so that the council can add actions to the framework as progress is made (i.e. those actions identified in the Implementation Plan are not the full extent of actions required to shift the council towards the vision of the Water Strategy over the 30-year period of the strategy).

28.    In the Implementation Plan, each action has a short description designed to provide indicative detail to guide delivery. The descriptions are not scopes and are therefore not exhaustive. For each action, an indicative delivery timeframe and owner is identified. Actions are concentrated on years 1 – 3 and so generally represent short-term delivery. Delivery in years 1 – 3 often means work to better understand what the best next steps are, generating better information and an evidence base, or what possible options are. The development of the strategy has identified the need for this work given the gaps in council group coordination, issue identification and the generation of appropriate options to address the issues. Where an action is listed as ongoing, this identifies that once scoped and undertaken, that action should continue. The timeframes shown provide for further scoping and may be adjusted as a result.

29.    Costs for all actions have not been identified. In some cases, actions are underway or already planned as part of council group work programmes and will be adjusted to meet the requirements of the Water Strategy. Other actions can be accommodated without significant additional resources and will lead to changes in business-as-usual activity. Some actions may require additional resourcing, and these will be prioritised through normal council group funding processes. It is expected that the actions associated with each strategic shift will be possible through:

i)        providing clear strategic direction to improve current processes (no new spend)

ii)       redirecting current spend to higher priority activity aligned to strategic direction

iii)      prioritsting new spend through council processes (i.e. Annual Budget and Long-term Plan).

30.    The Implementation Plan, which was shared with Committee members on the 21 February for feedback, is for council group staff and elected members (those who will make decisions and implement the strategy). It will also be made available publicly alongside the Water Strategy.

Minor changes to core content endorsed in December 2021

31.    In December 2021 the committee noted that the actions related to each strategic shift may require further refinement and will be brought to committee for consideration and adoption as part of the final Auckland Water Strategy document. Attachment B summarises these minor changes. These changes largely relate to timeframes where staff considered longer timeframes were warranted on account of the scale of action and/or need for delivery of other prerequisite actions. Note that a small number of actions were also renumbered so that they are presented in chronological order.

Implementation of the Water Strategy

32.    The strategy will direct investment and activity across the council group. It is a ‘tier two strategy’ sitting underneath the Auckland Plan 2050, alongside Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and directs other strategies, policies and plans across the council group. Successfully delivering on the vision and integrated aims of the Water Strategy will require a coordinated and sustained approach to delivery across the council group.

33.    This strategy commits the council to taking a consistent, sustained approach to putting te mauri o te wai at the centre of council group planning and investment decisions and action. The council will need a strong culture of holistic planning, action, reporting as well as post-implementation review to improve how we deliver for Auckland. 

34.    By adopting the Water Strategy, the council commits to showing how future investment decisions align to the Water Strategy strategic framework. For example, the council and its council-controlled organisations collaborate to produce asset management plans. These need to show how they prioritise the wellbeing of water and how the strategic direction of the Water Strategy is embedded in advice and decisions. This requires the council group to work together in an ongoing manner[3].

35.    To implement the Water Strategy, the council will need:

i)        to take a consistent, sustained approach to putting te mauri o te wai at the centre of council group planning and investment decisions and action

ii)       the skills and capacity to deliver on the strategy, legislative requirements, and partnership relationships

iii)      a strong culture of holistic planning, action, reporting and post-implementation review that feeds back into adaptive planning processes

iv)      clarity of the roles and responsibilities across the council group, with all teams directed and accountable for their role and function

v)       to give mana whenua clear sight of the council’s work on water and enable participation/direction.

36.    Changes required to give specific effect to the implementation of the strategy include:

i)        appoint Executive Lead Team Water Lead (complete: Chief of Strategy)

ii)       Water Strategy programme implementation coordinator

iii)      coordinated workforce planning to fill gaps and changing needs

iv)      update investment prioritisation criteria to reflect the Water Strategy

v)       council reporting on te mauri o te wai

vi)      integrated investment and asset management planning, with an independent audit process.

37.    It is important to draw attention to the need for new and different ways of working and for strengthened relationships. By explicitly naming the protection and enhancement of mauri as the organising principle of the council’s approach to water outcomes in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland, the council commits to the prioritisation of the life-sustaining capacity of water in decision-making and commits to strengthening its partnership with mana whenua to do so. The vision, Te Tiriti Partnership strategic shift, and the benchmarking are all elements of a changing relationship with mātauranga Māori, te ao Māori, Treaty partners / mana whenua and mataawaka.

38.    Finally it is important to note that the council has several work programmes, large and small, that are directly related to and deliver on the vision of the Water Strategy. Where appropriate, actions in the Water Strategy identify opportunities to deliver outcomes through those programmes (many of which are under development at time of writing). Those programmes and opportunities include:

i)        Te-Tāruke-a-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

ii)       The council’s response to the Essential Freshwater Programme (including National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management)

iii)      The council’s Too Much Water Policy

iv)      Shoreline Adaptation Plans

 

 

v)       Future Development Strategy

vi)      The council’s response to Resource Management reform

vii)     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau Māori Outcomes Framework

viii)    The council’s decision-making as part of three water reforms transition

ix)      Infrastructure Strategy and Asset Management Plan (para 34)

Monitoring and reporting progress

39.    Progress against the Water Strategy’s vision will be monitored and reported against in three ways:

i)        Delivery of Actions will be reported annually to this committee (or future committee with Water Strategy in its Terms of Reference). Each strategic shift has associated actions with indicative implementation timings identified. Actions are concentrated on years 1-3 and so generally represent short-term delivery. The Implementation Plan provides detail for each action in the Water Strategy.

ii)       Benchmarking water outcomes at agreed intervals provides a way to assess our journey to the realisation of the vision of the Water Strategy. Scores from both the Water Sensitive Cities and Mātauranga Māori frameworks will inform future decisions and action. 

iii)      Water Strategy targets are long-term measures of success. Over time, the council may develop further targets and add these to the Water Strategy framework. Some actions provide for this explicitly such as a target for water literacy. Targets will be reflected in the council’s instructions to its Council Controlled Organisations and its Long-term Plan.

40.    Staff are working on a structure to oversee and coordinate implementation that will be represented by the key functional areas responsible for policy and implementation. That structure would coordinate investment and applications for investment through the council’s funding processes.

Review and revisiting the strategy

41.    The Water Strategy is a long-term strategic document that sets a direction for the council group. The strategic shifts are designed so that the council can add actions to the framework as progress is made. i.e. the strategic shifts are enduring but the challenges and actions will evolve over time. This means that the council can update the Water Strategy and Implementation Plan as progress is made.

42.    Many of the actions in the Implementation Plan are concentrated on years 1-3. Therefore, year three may provide a good opportunity to review the strategy and determine whether additional actions are required.

43.    Another potential driver for review is the dual benchmarking. The two benchmarking frameworks are: Water Sensitive Cities (an international framework) and a Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework that is in development. The intention is to undertake the dual benchmarking at the same time as the State of the Environment Reporting (currently every five years). The results of the benchmarking must be presented together to track progress against the strategy and considered together to inform ongoing action development and delivery. The publication of results provides a good opportunity to review the strategy and determine whether a refresh is warranted.


 

Supporting documents

44.    Several supporting documents have been produced that will be made publicly available alongside the Water Strategy. These are:

Supporting Documents                    

Notes

1

Summary version of the Water Strategy

Available in English and Te Reo Māori

Summary version retains core structure and shortens explanations for each element of the framework as well as removes actions. The audience for the summary version is an interested Aucklander who does not need large amounts of detail.

2

Water Strategy Implementation Plan

 

3

Water Sensitive Cities Benchmarking and Assessment Tāmaki Makaurau - Auckland Report

Results report completed following council group scoring sessions in 2021. Shared with the committee in October 2021

4

Regenerative (mauri-enhancing) Infrastructure

Likely three explanatory reports

5

Investigation of barriers to and opportunities for implementing Water Sensitive Design in Auckland

Specifically related to action 6.9 Deliver a package of non-regulatory & regulatory interventions to support the uptake of water-sensitive design processes and ongoing management of devices.

 

45.    The Water Strategy embeds concepts like mauri and water-sensitive design into council’s approach going forward. Supporting documents four and five are designed to further collective understanding of these concepts for practitioners.

46.    At the time of writing the development of the Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework is ongoing. Alongside the Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework itself, three documents are intended to be produced to evidence/support the development of the framework[4]:

i)        Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework explanation and guidelines

ii)       Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework results report

47.    More supporting documents may be required over time, including future iterations of the benchmarking results reports. These will be added to the public website

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.    Water and climate change are intrinsically linked. Climate change is a cross cutting theme of the Water Strategy (along with equity). The twin challenges of mitigation and adaptation were integrated into the strategy’s core content as it was developed.

49.    Climate change will have wide-ranging implications for the issues raised in the Water Strategy, including:

i)        influencing demand for water use

ii)       affecting water availability of a given water source over time

iii)      increasing flood and coastal inundation hazard risk to life and property.

50.    Improving our mitigation of and resilience to these impacts via the approaches described in the Water Strategy aligns with council’s existing goals and work programmes for climate action.

51.    The physical impacts of climate change will have implications both for water management (including Māori water rights) in Auckland, and for related issues such as energy supply, social welfare, food security, and Māori land.

52.    Additionally, water infrastructure has significant embodied carbon emissions. The 2021 Infrastructure Strategy anticipates a likely ‘acceleration of the move away from carbon heavy assets to carbon sequestering (green) assets.’ That strategic direction is reflected in the Water Strategy. The Regenerative Water Infrastructure Strategic shift sets the council on a path to zero or low emissions water infrastructure.

53.    Note that the projected impacts of climate change on Auckland’s aquatic environments, and the associated risks, are detailed in two key report series: the Auckland Region Climate Change Projections and Impacts[5] and the Climate Change Risk in Auckland technical report series[6].

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

54.    There is broad agreement across the council group that better integration in water-related matters is needed, and that improvements in investment and decision-making processes are both possible and needed.

55.    Staff have worked across the council group to develop the Water Strategy’s core content through working groups, workshops, and review of material. Additionally, staff across the group participated in the Water-Sensitive Cities Benchmarking sessions. More detail on the benchmarking is included in the strategy document itself.

56.    The strategic shifts and actions in the Water Strategy represent significant change in the way that the council group approaches water-related challenges and opportunities in Auckland. In time, the way that staff work and the tools they have available will change. Greater and more coordinated oversight of resources that are used to deliver water outcomes is essential.

57.    The Water Strategy embeds concepts like mauri and water-sensitive design into council’s approach going forward. Actions require careful, considered partnership with mana whenua to create new frameworks that will guide decision-making. Coordinated education and upskilling programmes for staff will be needed to enable successful implementation.

58.    Of note is the action to implement a council group knowledge governance framework for water. This will mean review and redesign of processes governing the production of knowledge; how council mobilises knowledge for different users and uses; and how council promotes the use of knowledge. The framework will help facilitate a culture change across the council group, encouraging the sharing of knowledge across departments and organisations, and better connecting teams in the ownership of knowledge and insights.

59.    Note that, as staff finalised the Implementation Plan, concerns were expressed about delivery of actions during the period of uncertainty and increased workload associated with responding to the government’s three waters reform programme. It will be important to carefully manage resources across the council group through the transition period of the reform and into its implementation to ensure Water Strategy actions are delivered.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

60.    Staff held workshops with all local boards in late 2018 on the Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei discussion document and sought their feedback through formal business meetings. Local board resolutions were provided to the Environment and Community Committee in December 2018 when the discussion document was approved for public consultation.

61.    During public engagement, local boards hosted many of the Have Your Say consultation events and helped to ensure local views were fed into the feedback. There was broad support for the vision, values, issues, processes and principles presented in the discussion document. This feedback has been an input to the development of the strategy and the framework adopted by the Environment and Climate Change Committee.

62.    More information on local board feedback is available in supporting material to the ‘Public feedback on the Our Water Future - Tō Tātou Wai Ahu Ake Nei’ discussion document (CP2018/25165). Key themes from local board engagement are presented below. Staff have designed the strategic shifts and actions to address these key themes – these are noted in italics:

i)        a desire to improve engagement with local communities and deliver targeted education programmes – Empowering Aucklanders strategic shift

ii)       recognising water is a limited resource, that access to water is a human right and supply must be allocated fairly – Water Security and Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access strategic shifts

iii)      a need to improve the diminishing water quality of local water bodies including urban streams, gulfs and harbours – Restoring and Enhancing water ecosystems strategic shift

iv)      a need to carefully manage urban development and take up opportunities to embed water-sensitive design - Integrated Land use and Water Planning strategic shift

v)       a need for proactive monitoring and enforcement, supported by a robust and transparent evidence base – Pooling Knowledge strategic shift.

63.    Local boards provided feedback on several water-related topics that were not part of discussion document’s scope. This included water infrastructure, the importance of future proofing our assets, incorporating sustainable options such as grey-water reuse and roof collection, and the management of contaminant run-off and stormwater discharges. These issues have been incorporated into the Water Strategy – see regenerative water infrastructure strategic shift.

64.    Local Board Chairs were invited to workshops held with the Environment and Climate Change Committee during strategy development in 2021. Chairs received explanatory memos and supporting material ahead of workshops.

65.    Local boards were presented with the endorsed core content of the Water Strategy and invited to provide feedback at their business meetings in February 2022. Feedback was specifically sought on the strategic shifts and their aims and actions. A template was provided to assist boards in making their feedback. Many boards opted to provide feedback in other formats. The full content of local board feedback is included as Attachment C.


 

 

66.    The graph below shows local board support for the core content of the Water Strategy.

67.    Local board feedback was categorised into three groups:

i)        address feedback in final strategy document text

ii)       reply to request for further information

iii)      note feedback.

68.    Several boards (Aotea / Great Barrier, Franklin, Manurewa, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Upper Harbour and Whau) asked that the role of local boards be better explained in the final document. This has been reflected in the ‘About this strategy’ section.

69.    As a result of local board feedback, minor changes were made to the draft strategy shared with the committee on 21 February and agreed with the Chair and Deputy Chair of the committee. Changes included:

Local board

Feedback (board resolution)

Addressed in final strategy document

Howick

Requests that encouragement and support be given to organisations focused on the care and protection of Auckland’s waterways and harbours

Reflected in Empowered Aucklanders main text

Kaipātiki

Request that council includes an official position statement on access to water for health and wellbeing.

Reflected in action 2.5 Develop a measure of Aucklanders' access to blue-green spaces; a programme to increase access over time; and track progress (similar to 5.1 affordable access)

Māngare-Ōtāhuhu

Support the strategy of adopting an equitable approach to ensure that communities that are disadvantaged or require different approaches still can achieve equity of outcomes: i) request a review of the pricing of water in our region to inform and implement how equity outcomes can be delivered through this strategy

Reflected in dealt with in action 5.2 Develop a plan to address affordable water access in Auckland

Ōrākei

The Water Strategy proposes the development of a blue-green network to inform future strategy and processes and planning. The blue-green spatial plan should be informed by local knowledge that can be provided by the local board. The spatial plan should also align with existing local board objectives that concern the management of our local parks, local planting activities and greenways planning.

Reflected in action 6.4 Develop a regional blue-green network spatial plan

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

70.    Every iwi and hapū has associations with particular waterbodies[7] that are reflected in their whakapapa, waiata, and whaikōrero tuku iho (stories of the past). Protecting the health and mauri of our freshwater ecosystems is fundamental to providing for the food, materials, customary practices, te reo Māori, and overall well-being of iwi and hapū.

71.    The Water Strategy project reported monthly to Te Pou Taiao (the Environment subcommittee of the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum). Water is recognised as a significant issue in the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum 10-year Strategic Plan, particularly in its objectives to fulfil member iwi’s roles as kaitiaki and to improve and enhance te mauri o te wai. Involvement in the Auckland Water Strategy also features in the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum’s 2021-22 Annual Plan.

72.    Engagement with Māori that has informed this work includes:

i)        Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum Guidance to the Water Strategy 2019

ii)       submissions to the Our Water Future Public Discussion Document 2019

iii)      Te Pou Taiao engagement throughout 2021

iv)      individual engagement with iwi partners throughout 2021 including face-to-face hui.


 

73.    See Our Water Future: Report on Māori response to Auckland Council Water Strategy consultation for further information on the submissions of Māori who responded to public discussion document consultation. Key themes from Māori engagement are presented below. Staff have designed the strategic shifts and actions to address these key themes – these are noted in italics:

i)        Māori are committed to the maintenance of the mauri of water and they want to be a part of the conversation – Te Tiriti Partnership and Empowering Aucklanders strategic shifts

ii)       Awareness/Education (concerns for peoples’ priorities, climate change has arrived – inevitable there will be changing water patterns) – Empowering Aucklanders strategic shift

iii)      Water sovereignty (should be allowed water tanks on our properties) – Water Security strategic shift

iv)      Reciprocity (look after our environment it will continue to look after us) – Restore and Enhance Water Ecosystems, Sustainable Allocation and Equitable Access and Regenerative Water Infrastructure strategic shifts.

74.    During 2021 the council combined engagement for three significant work programmes focused on water:

i)        the development of the Auckland Water Strategy

ii)       council’s implementation programme for the National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management

iii)      sharing information on central government’s Three Waters Reform programme.

75.    Staff worked together to coordinate their mana whenua engagement and provide a ‘joined-up’ engagement process for mana whenua. This approach sought to respond to mana whenua requests for the council to be coordinated and aligned in its mana whenua engagement.

76.    Feedback has been organised into high-level themes below:

i)        the council should align engagement on water to mana whenua aspirations. Successful engagement requires the council to work carefully, sensitively, and collaboratively.

ii)       engagement with individual entities is on the basis of a treaty relationship and should be prioritised. Collective engagement on issues of regional importance, such as that undertaken through Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum, can play an important role.

iii)      the council should use existing statutory provisions available to them to devolve environmental monitoring, consenting and allocation decisions[8]. Some of the specific functions mentioned included water monitoring, resource consenting, and water allocation decisions.

iv)      several groups expressed a desire for what one group called ‘kaitiaki flows’: water allocations specific to local iwi that may be for any combination of commercial, environmental, or cultural uses.

v)       mana whenua were concerned mauri and te mauri o te wai might lose its wider significance if its meaning was reduced to a single indicator such as water quality, or if the council re-frames mauri into bureaucratic and/or policy terms.

vi)      mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) can play a role in helping council deliver on the vision of te mauri o te wai o Tāmaki Makaurau; however, this was accompanied by specific views on how mātauranga Māori should be used and by whom, including that engagement with mātauranga Māori requires mana whenua leadership and direction as mātauranga has a local expression - the mātauranga of wai (water) is held by local people, at the level of the whānau and marae.

77.    In response to this feedback, the Water Strategy provides for a growing partnership with Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua over time. Specific elements of the strategy that address partnership include:

i)        reflecting the treaty context at a higher level within the framework

ii)       clearly articulating where there is opportunity for mana whenua to direct and/or lead on actions

iii)      ensuring the actions that refer to mauri also link to provisions for mana whenua participation/direction

iv)      supporting accountability and implementation by putting timeframes and responsible parties alongside the Water Strategy actions (see Appendix A).

78.    The secretariat of the Independent Māori Statutory Board participated in staff workshops and was invited to input into the development of the emerging framework and actions during their development.

79.    The council, through the Water Strategy project, has also partnered with Te Pou Taiao to develop a mātauranga-led benchmarking framework. The Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum endorsed the next steps proposed for the Framework at its hui on the 17th of February 2022.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

80.    The Water Strategy sets out a range of actions to be implemented over time for the council group. The actions fall within two broad timeframes: near term (year one and years one – three) and medium term (years four – ten). All actions require further scoping, however, near term actions are prescriptive and specific. Medium term actions are more illustrative and require further development to implement successfully.

81.    Implementing the proposed Water Strategy actions will have budgetary implications in time.  Cost scenarios have not been undertaken for the actions as this is work that is required as the group works through the implementation of the strategy.  Most actions do not commit the council group to a singular solution, but rather to investigate options and their associated cost within the action, for subsequent decision making.  From a cost perspective it is expected that the actions associated with each strategic shift will be possible through:

i)        providing clear strategic direction to improve current processes (no new spend)

ii)       redirecting current spend to higher priority activity aligned to strategic direction

iii)      new spend, prioritised through council processes (i.e. Annual Budget and Long-term Plan).

82.    Over the next 30 years, the council expects to spend approximately $85 billion on infrastructure for three waters alone (capital and operational expenditure). There is considerable scope to align that spend to the vision of the water strategy.

83.    Where actions do require additional spend, such spend must be considered through council’s Annual Plan and Long-term Plan processes. Additional spend would not be limited to three waters infrastructure and services and would include all council group functions related to water outcomes.


 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation/Control measures

Insufficient or inconsistent implementation of the strategy

Staff with responsibilities for shifts and actions have been engaged in the development of the strategy.

 

An executive lead for water (Chief of Strategy).

 

A Water Strategy programme implementation coordinator will provide support to implementation.

Responding to central government reform impacts resources available for delivery of planned actions

Oversight of Water Strategy will be important to carefully manage resources across the council group through the transition period of the reform and into its implementation to ensure Water Strategy actions are delivered. The executive lead for water (Chief of Strategy) will have a key role in this.

 

Central government reform: if established, a new three waters entity disregards strategic intent of Water Strategy

The council should use the Water Strategy to assist in articulating the long-term aims for water in Auckland. The Strategy may also be useful to guide discussions during any transition process.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Publication

84.    If adopted, the Water Strategy and supporting documents will be made publicly available on the council’s website. Internal and external communications (including an ‘Our Auckland’ article) are planned.

85.    A summary version of the Water Strategy will also be made available. It will retain the core structure of the full document and shortens explanations for each element of the framework as well as removes actions. The audience for the summary version is an interested Aucklander who does not need large amounts of detail. The summary version will be roughly half the length of the full Water Strategy document. It will also be available in Te Reo Māori.  Making the document available in Te Reo Māori reflects the vision and spirit of the strategy and signals ongoing engagement on the topics and intent of the strategy with Māori.


 

 

Continued development of the Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework

86.    As of the time of writing, the council is supporting the development of the Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework. The next steps were endorsed by the Forum at its February hui. These include further sessions with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Pūkenga (expert) sessions to finalise the framework before a collective scoring session, likely in May 2022. Auckland mana whenua groups will be invited to participate in a scoring session for the Mātauranga Māori Benchmarking Framework in 2022. A report will then be produced and used alongside the Water-Sensitive Cities results to guide ongoing action. This report will be made available online alongside the Water Strategy and supporting documents once it is complete.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Water Strategy

29

b

Minor changes in final Water Strategy from text endorsed December 2021

73

c

Local board feedback on Dec 2021 adopted Water Strategy Framework and endorsed text

75

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Toby Shephard – Lead Strategist

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

Too Much Water - A statement of Auckland Council's current role and direction

File No.: CP2022/01396

 

  

 

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To whakaae / approve the too much water statement as an accurate representation of Auckland Council’s current role and direction in response to the water-related impacts of climate change.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Risks of too much water events, such as flooding and coastal inundation, are increasing due to climate change.

3.      Aucklanders have expressed confusion over the roles and responsibilities of public and private interests.

4.      Clearly articulating Auckland Council’s current approach better prepares the council and Aucklanders for when too much water events occur.

5.      The statement of current direction affirms that the council:

·    focusses on Auckland’s long-term future without locking us into unsustainable commitments

·    fulfils its leadership role and responsibility as a unitary authority in response to too much water events

·    takes a consistent, planned, and equitable response to too much water risks and events.

6.      The statement was developed using the council’s commitment to existing strategies such as the Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, as well as our legislative requirements as a unitary authority.

7.      The statement of current direction, although not new policy, responds to significant public policy issues and as such committee approval is being sought.

8.      The statement is an iteration of the council’s current approach and is intended to guide decision-making until new policy is made. Staff will continue to develop an adaptive pathways blueprint that will outline a regional too much water response. This will be reported to the relevant committee in April-May 2023.

9.      There is a risk that Aucklanders may interpret the statement of current direction as new council policy. This risk will be mitigated through a communications plan that clearly describes the current state direction and how it links to existing policy and legislative requirements.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      whakaae / approve the “Too Much Water – A statement of Auckland Council’s current role and direction” outlined in Attachment A of the agenda report, as an accurate representation of council’s current response to the water-related impacts of climate change.

b)      whakaae / agree that staff, as delegated by the Chief Executive, report back to the relevant committee with a draft adaptive pathways blueprint that will outline a regional too much water response, by May 2022

Horopaki

Context

Why does the council need a statement of current direction?

10.    Climate change is increasing the frequency and scale of too much water events. Such events include local and regional floods, coastal inundation, and coastal erosion. Auckland Council has prepared detailed risk assessments and response planning, but significant unexpected events may occur.

11.    The statement of current direction affirms keeping the focus on Auckland’s long-term future without locking us into unsustainable commitments.

12.    Past engagement on too much water events shows there is public confusion about the roles and responsibilities of council, other public sector agencies, and private interests. The statement of current direction provides clarity on the council’s leadership role as a unitary authority in response to these events.

13.    Improving understanding of alignment of roles and responsibilities between central and local government, insurers, social service providers and private individuals provides certainty and increases confidence.

How was the statement of current direction developed?

14.    The council already supports response strategies that are precautionary and have long-term adaptive pathways. This method provides an equitable response across generations, prevents uninformed ad-hoc decision making, and increases resilience for Aucklanders.

15.    The Environment and Climate Change Committee approved a scope of work[9] in July 2020 [ECC/2020/31 refers]  which included developing “key policy principles” to guide the council’s response to hazards caused by too much water while a long-term policy is developed.

16.    The statement of current direction is not intended as new public policy. It will guide policy advice and decision-making in the short-term regarding how Auckland Council takes a consistent, planned, and equitable response to too much water events.

17.    The policy statements were developed using guidance from, amongst others:

·    Ministry for the Environment’s 2017 report - “Coastal Hazards and Climate Change – Guidance for Local Government in New Zealand”

·    New Zealand Productivity Commission’s 2019 report - “Local Government Funding and Financing”

·    Auckland Council’s 2018 Piha flooding policy response work

·    a legislative review, especially the Resource Management Act 1991, Building Act 2004 and Local Government Act 2002

·    strategic direction from existing plans such as the Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

·    a workshop with Environment and Climate Change Committee on 9 February 2022. 

How does the statement of current direction align to existing strategies?

18.    Natural hazard from too much water is not a unique or new challenge for Auckland, and there are current council plans and strategies that address the issue. Such plans include Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, shoreline adaptation plans, and the Auckland Water Strategy (seeking adoption).

19.    The Auckland Plan 2050 sets the overall direction for Auckland identifying that:

·    more extreme weather events, as a result of climate change, mean that at times there will be too much water in some places. Parts of Auckland may experience flooding and coastal inundation. 

·    Auckland needs to proactively adapt to this changing water future, develop long-term solutions and improve our ability to manage and respond to the water-related impacts of climate change.

20.    The statement of current direction works alongside existing plans and is intended to provide clear statements on public policy for how Auckland Council will mitigate climate change impacts from too much water.

21.    Central government is also reviewing legislation to adapt and build resilience to climate change. This includes the Three Waters Reform Programme and repealing and replacing the Resource Management Act 1991. Auckland Council will need to adapt to these legislative changes if or when enacted.

22.    The statement of current direction is intended to guide decision-making in the short-term until new policy is made.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.    Staff analysed factors which are contributing to Auckland’s future vulnerability to too much water when developing the statement of current direction. These factors include:

·    climate change

·    moral hazard behaviour[10]

·    limitations of insurance

·    public assumptions and expectations

·    constraints on local government

·    lack of central government guidance.

24.    Failure to recognise these factors can lead to an Auckland which lacks community preparedness and resilience, puts off costs to future generations, and makes ad-hoc decisions which may create precedents that are unsustainable over time.

25.    Auckland Council responds to mitigate these factors through its role as a unitary authority which includes a leadership role and responsibilities as a regulator, emergency responder, information and service provider, landowner, and advocate for legislative reform.


 

 

26.    These current responsibilities form the basis of the statement of council’s current role and in particular three directions:

·    the council commits to long-term solutions that improve our ability to respond to the water-related impacts of climate change

·    the council fulfils its leadership role as a unitary authority, alongside the shared responsibility between the government and Aucklanders to respond to the water-related impacts of climate change

·    the council follows a financially prudent and equitable approach to the investment of public funds to respond to the water-related impacts of climate change.

27.    Articulating the council’s current approach better prepares the council and Aucklanders for when too much water events occur.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

28.    The statement of current direction responds to the approach set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, including:

·    developing long-term, strategic approaches to change that keep options open (dynamic adaptive policy pathways)

·    focusing on those impacted the most through community and business engagement and empowerment

·    ensuring climate change is a key consideration in decisions that have the potential to lock the council into poor resilience outcomes in the long-term 

·    addressing immediate, known risks that are affecting Aucklanders today.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.    Feedback on the current state of direction was sought from the council’s Public Law team, Healthy Waters, Plans and Places, Chief Economist, Mayoral Office staff, Auckland Plan Strategy and Research, and Resilient Land and Coasts team.

30.    Engagement highlighted a broad range of views. Feedback highlighted the need to clearly articulate:

·    that Auckland Council currently responds to the needs of Aucklanders when too much water events happen

·    sometimes the scale and nature of events will require ad-hoc decisions

·    what the next steps are for development of a long-term policy.

31.    The statement of current direction recognises the council commits to its leadership role and responsibility to Aucklanders as a unitary authority. Decisions, although may be made in a constrained environment, are developed with options and assessment of alignment to the council’s current role and responsibilities. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.    The statement of current direction is an iteration of existing public policy from the council’s fulfilment as a unitary authority and its commitment to the Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

33.    Any recommendation to change council policy through development of a long-term policy will include consultation with Aucklanders and local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.    The statement of current direction reflects existing policy and legislative requirements that were the subject of engagement with Māori. Building from these foundations will be critical in future work. The council will continue to contribute to key values, issues and actions of the Independent Māori Statutory Board, Schedule of Issues of Significance. Specifically:

·    support Māori communities to plan and adapt to climate change effects

·    infrastructure in Māori communities is made more resilient to the effects of climate change.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.    The current state of direction captures the existing role and responsibilities of Auckland Council to respond to the impacts of too much water as a unitary authority. There are no financial implications arising from this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.    There is a risk that some Aucklanders will perceive the statement of current direction on the council’s response to too much water as new public policy. This risk will be mitigated through development of a communications plan that clearly describes the statement of current direction and how it links to existing policy and legislative requirements.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.    A public communications plan will clearly describe the statement of current direction and how it links to existing policy and legislative requirements.

38.    Staff will continue to develop an adaptive pathways blueprint that will outline a regional too much water response. This includes long-term approaches to decision making, risk and liability, social change, and mātauranga Māori. It will identify specific responses for communities at high risk and those who are vulnerable. The development of adaptive pathways will build on the insights from previous public engagement and New Zealand and overseas experiences. 

39.      Pieces of work currently underway include:

·    establishment of an advisory panel with experts from a variety of fields to provide input and feedback. This will ensure that our work is consistent with the latest knowledge

·    commissioning research to understand the underlying mindsets of Aucklanders in relation to issues including risk, liability and effective ways to communicate these

·    identification and analysis of the range of potential interventions, including an assessment of pros and cons, and high-level costs. This will be used to identify a suite of interventions to engage with communities to understand their values and preferences.

40.    Staff will report back on the adaptive pathways blueprint in April-May 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Too Much Water - A statement of Auckland Council's current role and direction Attachment A

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Maclean Grindell - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 



Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Whangaparāoa Pilot

File No.: CP2021/01384

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve the Shoreline Adaptation Plan – Whangaparāoa Pilot report (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Shoreline Adaptation Plans are being developed across Auckland to provide a long-term adaptation strategy for council-owned land and assets in response to the impacts of coastal hazards and climate change (including sea-level rise). The plans are developed in the spirit of partnership with mana whenua and take into account the needs and values of the local communities that live near the coast.

3.      The need for Shoreline Adaptation Plans was outlined in the Coastal Management Framework adopted by the council in 2017, which aimed to develop a best practice, holistic, operational coastal management framework for the region.

4.      At this stage, Auckland’s Shoreline Adaptation Plans are limited to council-owned coastal land and assets. Reforms to the Resource Management Act currently underway in central government are anticipated to set a framework for adaptation of privately-owned land in the future, and the Auckland Shoreline Adaptation Plans may need to be updated once this new legislative framework is in place.

5.      To support the development of Shoreline Adaptation Plans, the shoreline of Auckland was broken up into coastal cells. Each coastal cell will have its own Shoreline Adaptation Plan informed by local iwi, local boards, infrastructure providers, and local community engagement. A project report template has been developed to ensure consistency across all Shoreline Adaptation Plans. Delivery of all Shoreline Adaptation Plans is expected to take five years, with delivery across the entire region expected to be completed by the 2026 financial year.

6.      The Shoreline Adaptation Plan programme is funded as part of the climate package in the Recovery Budget 2021-2031 and is a core climate adaptation workstream under Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which highlights the importance of planning for and adapting to the impacts of climate change in coastal areas under the ‘Community and Coast’ theme.

7.      Engagement on the Whangaparāoa pilot commenced in early 2021. Development of the pilot has included engagement with mana whenua, the local community and relevant internal infrastructure providers (Community Facilities, Parks, Sports, and Recreation, and Healthy Waters) and CCO partners (Auckland Transport and Watercare). The engagement process helped identify specific values and objectives for shoreline management of the Whangaparāoa Peninsula. In combination with the technical results of a coastal hazards exposure assessment, these objectives were used to determine a series of shoreline adaptation strategies.

8.      Most of Whangaparāoa’s shoreline areas can be managed over the next 100 years with little to no active intervention.

9.      For some of the low-lying shoreline areas, the escalating risk of coastal inundation and rainfall flooding will require managed realignment of assets in the medium or long-term. The need to setback assets out of the areas susceptible to coastal erosion and instability, where possible, has also been signalled.

10.    The Whangaparāoa Shoreline Adaptation Plan was developed in partnership with mana whenua and included three different levels of engagement with mana whenua:

·        governance discussions via hui with Ngāti Manuhiri governance and presentation of the plan to Te Pou Taiao of the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum on 2 March 2022

·        regional guidance via regular hui with the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Forum

·        local iwi engagement via seven joint hui with representatives from Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki.

11.    Decision-making throughout the plan aligns to the Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau Wellbeing Framework and is informed by the themes and values developed during the hui with local iwi. Particular focus has been placed on acknowledging Whakapapa (Ancestry), Taiao (Environment), and Tangata Hononga (Connecting People) and considering Te Tātai, the interconnectivity of all things.

12.    The Whangaparāoa Shoreline Adaptation Plan was endorsed by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on 17 February 2022 (resolution HB/2022/6).

13.    To implement Shoreline Adaptation Plans, recommended adaptation strategies will need to be integrated into all relevant council Asset Management Plans. This will inform the appropriate monitoring, maintenance and renewal of assets. Implementation of the plans will be a collaborative effort across Auckland Council directorates and relevant council-controlled organisations.

14.    Where strategies can be implemented through existing budgets, this will be integrated from now. Strategies that require additional budget will be subject to a regional prioritisation process for funding once all Shoreline Adaptation Plans have been completed and we have a regional understanding of changing coastal hazard risk and future funding requirements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      whakaae /approve the Whangaparāoa Pilot Shoreline Adaptation Plan

b)      tuhi/note that the Whangaparāoa Pilot Shoreline Adaptation Plan provides site-specific adaptive strategies that outline the preferred coastal management response for each site over time

c)      tuhi/note that to implement the Whangaparāoa Shoreline Adaptation Plan, adaptive strategies will need to be integrated into relevant Asset Management Plans to inform the maintenance and renewal of assets:

i)        where strategies can be implemented through existing budgets, this will be integrated from now;

ii)       where strategies require additional budget, this will be subject to a regional prioritisation process for funding once all Shoreline Adaptation Plans have been completed.

 


 

 

Horopaki

Context

15.    The Shoreline Adaptation Plan work programme is focused on how we can adapt Auckland Council-owned land and assets to the impacts of coastal hazards and climate change over time. The programme is led by the Resilient Land and Coasts department and is developed collaboratively across Auckland Council including Auckland Transport and Watercare.

16.    The need for Shoreline Adaptation Plans was set out in the Coastal Management Framework adopted by Auckland Council in 2017 (ENV/2017/116). The Shoreline Adaptation Plans also give effect to the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement, which directs councils to identify areas that may be affected by coastal hazards over a timeframe of at least 100 years. The approach aligns with guidance from the Ministry for the Environment, in particular through the establishment of mana whenua and community values and objectives and the development of a coastal hazards risk assessment.

17.    Shoreline Adaptation Plans assess the potential future impacts of three key natural hazards: coastal erosion, coastal inundation, and rainfall flooding. The hazard modelling used to inform Shoreline Adaptation Plans takes into account how climate change will alter the frequency, magnitude and extent of these natural hazards.

18.    The potential exposure of Auckland Council-owned land and assets on the coast to these hazards will be modelled for each Shoreline Adaptation Plan area over three timescales (short [1-20 years], medium [20-60 years], and long term [60 years and onwards]) to quantify the risk and inform decision-making.

19.    Using input from engagement with local communities, local iwi, local boards and infrastructure providers, adaptation strategies have been recommended for each area of coast, across the three timescales. The strategies provide high-level guidance on how coastal areas can be adapted over time to sustainably manage the escalating impacts of coastal hazards and climate change. Strategies include ‘No Active Intervention’, ‘Limited Intervention’, ‘Hold the Line’, and ‘Managed Realignment’.

·        No Active Intervention: allow natural processes and evolution of the coast to continue. This includes no investment in the provision or maintenance of any coastal defenses.

·        Limited Intervention: acknowledges that the coastline’s position will not be fixed into the future and may include limited work to extend existing asset life and small-scale nature-based measures (such as dune planting).

·        Hold the Line: maintain the coastal edge at a fixed location, using nature-based options (such as beach nourishment) or hard structures (such as sea walls or revetments).

·        Managed Realignment: assets and activities are moved away from hazard-prone areas in a controlled way over time. Managed realignment allows greater space for natural buffers and reduces asset exposure to natural hazards.

20.    The programme launched in February 2021 with a pilot study across Whangaparāoa Peninsula. This area was selected for its diverse coastline, the portfolio of council-owned land and assets, and their exposure to coastal hazards and climate change impacts.

21.    The process of developing the pilot, the resulting recommendations of the Shoreline Adaptation Plan, and the lessons learned to be applied to future Shoreline Adaptation Plans are further discussed below.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The need to adapt to climate change

22.    Global temperatures are rising due to greenhouse gas emissions, causing a range of impacts from higher sea levels to increasing rainfall intensity. In 2020, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and published Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

23.    Modelling undertaken by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicates that current levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have ‘locked-in’ a temperature increase of 1.2°C above pre-industrial levels and at least 1.7m of sea level rise. While the timeframe for this increase remains uncertain, Auckland will need to adapt to the impacts of increasing temperatures and rising sea levels. As decisions made today will have implications reaching far into the future, strategic planning is more important than ever.

Scope and limitations of Shoreline Adaptation Plans

24.    Starting this planning process with a pilot on council-owned land and assets has enabled the development and testing of best practice methods for developing Dynamic Adaptive Policy Pathways (as recommended by the Ministry for the Environment) which we can roll out across the region.

25.    The Dynamic Adaptive Pathways Planning approach develops a series of actions over time. It is based on the idea of making decisions as conditions change and assists in planning for future events when timelines are uncertain.

26.    At this stage, Auckland’s Shoreline Adaptation Plans are limited to council-owned coastal land and assets. Reforms to the Resource Management Act currently underway in central government are anticipated to set a framework for adaptation of privately-owned land in the future, and the Auckland Shoreline Adaptation Plans may need to be updated once this new legislative framework is in place.

27.    Auckland Council-owned assets in the shoreline area generally fall into three major categories: parks and community facility assets, stormwater assets, and environmental assets.

28.    Shoreline Adaptation Plans are strategic guidance documents, which outline the preferred adaptive strategy for each site over time. The implementation process of these plans will require collaboration from across Auckland Council directorates. Within the plans themselves, no financial investment decisions are made.

29.    Signals and triggers related to the timing of adaptation responses have to be identified at the individual asset level in future asset management plans, and therefore are not included in these Shoreline Adaptation Plans.

30.    Adaptation decisions depend strongly on risk analysis and acceptable levels of risk. Changes to Auckland Council’s risk framework, which is currently under review by the Risk and Assurance department, may require Shoreline Adaptation Plan strategy recommendations to be reviewed in light of defined tolerable risk levels.

Whangaparāoa pilot

Whangaparāoa coastal hazard exposure assessment

31.    An assessment of Whangaparāoa’s exposure to coastal hazards (including coastal inundation, coastal erosion, and rainfall flooding) and future climate change impacts was completed across the short (20-year), medium (60-year) and long (100-year) term. See Attachment B for the coastal hazard exposure assessment.

 


 

 

32.    The assessment indicates that council-owned land and assets, including cultural heritage sites, across the peninsula typically have low exposure to coastal hazards in the short-term. This provides time to respond and adapt to longer term changes. In the long-term, the most significant impact is related to the potential erosion of coastal land and its associated impacts on infrastructure. Coastal inundation and rainfall flooding will be exacerbated by the long-term impacts of climate change, increasing the magnitude and frequency of flood events and their impact on low-lying areas.

33.    The results were used to inform discussions of the changing coastal environment with local iwi, infrastructure providers (Community Facilities, Healthy Waters, Auckland Transport and Watercare), amenity and open space specialists (Parks Sports and Recreation, Community Facilities) and the local community.

Community engagement

34.    Community engagement on the pilot started in late-March and closed mid-July 2021. A combination of approaches to community engagement have been trialed, including:

·        three interactive public presentations that were also livestreamed to YouTube and recorded for future reference

·        two public open days following the initial public presentations and at completion of the draft adaptation strategies for community feedback

·        digital engagement through ‘AK Have Your Say’ and ‘Social Pinpoint’, an online interactive mapping platform

·        establishment of a Community Reference Group (CRG) for focused workshops and discussions.

35.    The Social Pinpoint map (see Figure 1) was open for feedback between March and July 2021 and identified over 580 unique users. Community feedback from the ‘AK Have Your Say’ page included 219 comments and 316 survey responses.

36.    With the support of the community reference group, the data collected via Social Pinpoint was collated into high level objectives that capture the values of the local community. These objectives were used to guide the development of the adaptation strategies.

P243#yIS1

Figure 1. Social Pinpoint map

Map A displays locations of specific comments, Map B is a heatmap highlighting the areas most commented on.

Mana whenua values

37.    For the Whangaparāoa Pilot, local iwi Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki partnered in the development of the plan. A series of seven hui with both local iwi were undertaken to understand the cultural values of Whangaparāoa. During those hui, iwi provided three specific themes related to shoreline management: Whakapapa (Ancestry), Taiao (Environment) and Tangata Hononga (Connecting People).

38.    The themes and objectives gifted by mana whenua informed the development of the adaptation strategies and are a core foundation of the Whangaparāoa pilot plan report.

39.    To further honour these themes, we have recommended that all future shoreline projects on the peninsula:

·        value Whakapapa (Ancestry) by acknowledging and supporting the cultural and spiritual values of mana whenua and giving effect to the views of mana whenua regarding culturally significant sites or areas in any coastal management or engineering options

·        value Taiao (Environment) by prioritising naturalisation of the shoreline and working to enhance and protect the natural environment. This includes restoration of the natural environment in areas where managed realignment has been recommended and considering nature-based options in areas of hold the line

·        value Tangata Hononga (Connecting People) by recognising and supporting the interdependence of people and their environment, providing mana whenua with kaitiaki opportunities, and working with the local community on volunteering opportunities.

Adaptation strategies

40.    The Whangaparāoa coast was divided into 35 discrete coastal sections, defined by the driving coastal processes and geomorphology. By aligning the results of the exposure assessment with local iwi feedback, infrastructure and community objectives, a series of adaptation strategies were developed across the short, medium and long-term.

41.    Most of Whangaparāoa’s shoreline areas can be managed over the next 100 years with little to no active intervention.

42.    For some low-lying shoreline areas (such as Stanmore Bay Park, Big Manly Beach, northern Red Beach, Matakatia, and Arkles Bay), the escalating risk of coastal inundation and rainfall flooding will require managed realignment of assets in the medium or long-term (60 years and onwards from now).

43.    The need to setback assets out of the areas susceptible to coastal erosion and instability, where practicable, has also been signaled. This strategy does not signal abandonment of ‘at risk areas’ but identifies a process to reduce risk by moving council assets out of exposed areas to accommodate natural coastal processes and build a more resilient shoreline.

44.    Coastal stretches identified as ‘hold the line’ in the medium to long-term have a strong link to critical infrastructure or high amenity value and have no option for landward movement.

45.    Areas of importance either due to their landscape or heritage value have also been considered, and a separate adaptation plan for managing the shoreline response for cultural heritage sites may also be required as part of a wider cultural heritage plan.

Learnings for future Shoreline Adaptation Plans

46.    The Whangaparāoa Pilot was the first major project focused on adaptation of Auckland’s coastline to the impacts of climate change. A number of important learnings which will inform the roll out of the wider programme have come out of the process, including:

·        Public awareness of the potential impacts of climate change and the need to adapt is low. Significant work is required to educate the general public about this topic and prepare them for the future with climate change.

·        Community engagement on climate change takes significant time and requires staff to be knowledgeable and well-versed in the topic. The engagement process for each plan needs to be open for feedback for a minimum of three to four months.

·        To adequately capture community values and objectives, multiple methods of community engagement, including digital tools and in-person events, are required.

·        Community reference groups, such as the one used in Whangaparāoa, will only be viable in small, delineated shoreline areas.

·        Mana whenua partnerships are a critical piece of building a resilient shoreline and engagement should be undertaken early.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.    The Shoreline Adaptations Plans programme is funded as part of the Climate Action Package and is a core climate adaptation workstream.

48.    To prepare for the future with climate change, we need to plan adaptively. Shoreline Adaptation Plans will help reduce asset exposure and signal the need to work with nature by developing natural systems (such as wide beaches, well-vegetated dunes and tidal marshes) that can help buffer the impacts of climate change alongside engineered structures.

49.    Shoreline Adaptation Plans also assist in educating the public about the impacts of climate change and the need to adapt. Building awareness and signaling the need to be prepared for coastal hazard events is an important part of long-term resilience. For that reason, Shoreline Adaptation Plans report under the Community and Coast priority area of Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

50.    The Whangaparāoa Pilot report outlines how Auckland Council owned land and assets in the shoreline area can be managed to mitigate the impacts of coastal hazards and climate change. Implementation of the plan will increase the resilience of the shoreline by decreasing the number of assets in hazards zones. The implementation of the plan will also support the development of natural systems that can act as a future buffer.

51.    The potential impacts of coastal hazards and climate change on communities will need to be considered as part of the update of the Auckland Unitary Plan. However to support risk based decision-making, plan changes to incorporate new hazard information into the current Unitary Plan are being considered.

52.    The management of greenhouse gas emissions is not addressed in the report as the programme focuses on the strategic goal of adapting the shoreline to build long-term resilience.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.    Considering the broad extent of council owned coastal land and assets and the non-statutory nature of the Shoreline Adaptation Plans, implementation of the plan will be a collaborative effort across Auckland Council directorates, and the Shoreline Adaptation Planproject team has worked in partnership with relevant departments to co-develop the Whangaparāoa Pilot.

54.    Strategies will be given effect to and integrated into all relevant council Asset Management Plans, Reserve Management Plans and Regional Parks Management Plans and associated decision-making (such as landowner and leasehold approvals). To assist in this process, Shoreline Adaptation Plans are developed via a collaborative approach, with members of the relevant council directorates involved in the community engagement and decision-making processes.

55.    Adaptation strategies will be integrated into relevant council Asset Management Plans to inform appropriate monitoring, maintenance and renewal. Where strategies can be implemented through existing budgets, this will be integrated from now. Strategies that require additional budget will be subject to a regional prioritisation process for funding once all Shoreline Adaptation Plans have been completed and we have a regional understanding of changing coastal hazard risk and future funding requirements. This will be supported where appropriate by site-specific assessments of coastal processes, option feasibility and costings to identify a preferred solution that aligns with the overarching adaptation strategy of the Shoreline Adaptation Plan.

56.    Watercare and Auckland Transport were involved in the development of the Whangaparāoa Pilot and provided insight into infrastructure considerations around the peninsula. These considerations were taken into account in the selection of adaptation strategies.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

57.    A workshop with the Hibiscus and Bays local board to introduce the Shoreline Adaptation Plan process and the need to adapt was held in March 2021. Local board members, Janet Fitzgerald and Chair Gary Brown, were included in the community engagement process for the Whangaparāoa Pilot. The community objectives were considered in the development of the adaptation strategies and will inform future projects in the shoreline area including coastal local board and renewals work programmes.

58.    The results of the Whangaparāoa Pilot were workshopped with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on 18 November 2021, and the final plan was endorsed by the local board on 17 February 2022 (resolution HB/2022/6).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.    As a core adaptation workstream within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, Shoreline Adaptation Plans are guided by the Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau Wellbeing Framework.

60.    The programme is designed in the spirit of partnership with mana whenua, and the project team meets regularly with the Infrastructure and Environmental Services mana whenua forum. For the Whangaparāoa Pilot, local iwi Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki partnered in the development of the plan. Between late March and early October 2021, a series of seven hui with both local iwi were undertaken to understand the cultural values of Whangaparāoa. During those hui, iwi provided three specific themes related to shoreline management: Whakapapa (Ancestry), Taiao (Environment) and Tangata Hononga (Connecting People).

61.    The themes and objectives gifted by mana whenua informed the development of the adaptation strategies and are a core foundation of the Whangaparāoa pilot plan report.

62.    During the report review phase, governance level discussions were requested by Ngāti Manuhiri and took place between November and January 2022. Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki deferred to Ngāti Manuhiri through this process. Based on the hui, a te ao Māori section that addressed the alignment of the plan with governance frameworks developed by mana whenua was added to the Whangaparāoa Report. The Whangaparāoa Pilot Shoreline Adaptation Plan was subsequently presented at Te Pou Taiao on 2 March 2022.

63.    Shoreline Adaptation Plans align with the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau: Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework. The plans contribute to Kia Ora Te Tātai by considering the long-term impacts of climate change on Auckland’s shoreline and developing adaptive plans for sustainable management of public land and assets within coastal areas. The outcome of Shoreline Adaptation Plans can be specifically measured under the Kia Ora Te Taiao and Kia Ora Te Hononga priorities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.    Management of Auckland Council’s existing coastal protection structures is currently managed through the ‘coastal assets renewal programme’. This currently provides $10 million each financial year, with prioritisation and delivery managed by Resilient Land and Coasts. A smaller quantity (approximately $0.6 million) of operational funding provides for targeted maintenance of coastal structures and associated coastal management practices (including sand transfers).


 

 

65.    Mitigating coastal hazards will become increasingly expensive for Auckland and New Zealand. It will not be affordable or feasible to defend everywhere. Implementation of the Whangaparāoa Shoreline Adaptation Plan and wider regional programme will ensure that shoreline projects consider the escalating future risk of climate change and respond in both an environmentally and economically sustainable manner.

66.    The adaptation strategies of the Whangaparāoa Shoreline Adaptation Plans and future Shoreline Adaptation Plans will be given effect to across relevant council decision-making. Over time, this will result in cost savings as an awareness of coastal hazard and climate change risk is embedded across council plans and exposed assets are moved out of coastal hazard areas and incur less damage due to coastal erosion and flooding. It is envisaged this will reduce future pressure for ‘hold the line’ management responses that typically entail high construction and ongoing maintenance costs.

67.    Once all Shoreline Adaptation Plans across Auckland are completed across the region, combined with the regional coastal hazards vulnerability assessment, a regional funding schema will be developed. This will assist in identifying budgetary requirements and the associated prioritisation for implementing management strategies. In particular, at high risk areas where ‘hold the line’ has been recommended as the preferred long term management response or areas where managed realignment works are to be initiated. Having a full picture of the regional issues will allow the council to make targeted decisions that will over time build resilience.

68.    In combination, the above information will help assess and more accurately quantify potential future funding requirements related to climate change and shoreline adaptation. This will more accurately inform future iterations of the Long-term Plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

69.    Without strategic guidance, coastal asset management decisions can be made on an ad-hoc basis and may not take the escalating risk of climate change into account. The Shoreline Adaptation Plan provides the strategic long-term vision for Whangaparāoa’s coastal areas.

70.    Implementation of the plan will require multiple departments across Auckland Council to work together to ensure that Shoreline Adaptation Plan strategies are integrated into appropriate workstreams, and that decision-making is consistent with national policy directives.

71.    Key risks and mitigations associated with the Whangaparāoa Shoreline Adaptation Plan are shown in Table 1.

Table 1. Risks and mitigations relating to the Whangaparāoa Shoreline Adaptation Plan

Risk

Mitigation

Public opposition to the proposed adaptation strategies

The Shoreline Adaptation Plan has been developed in the spirit of partnership with mana whenua and with extensive engagement with the local community, wider public and infrastructure providers.

 

Coastal hazards may increase in frequency and intensity earlier than expected

 

 

The Shoreline Adaptation Plan has been developed using a conservative climate change scenario (RCP 8.5).

Plan may not be applied across all business areas

Shoreline Adaptation Plan project team has worked in collaboration across council to develop the plan.

A Coastal Governance Group has also been established to oversee the development and delivery of the Shoreline Adaptation Plans work programme.

Insufficient budget to implement Shoreline Adaptation Plan strategies

Development of Shoreline Adaptation Plans is guided by the Coastal Management Framework for the Auckland region, promoting a sustainable long-term approach from both a risk, environmental and economic perspective. However, the full cost of implementing shoreline adaptation plan strategies will not be fully known until all the plans are complete and implementation into council business has been trialed. This is because the cost of implementation is a function of other activities such as asset management planning, some of which are currently being improved and updated.

Noting the diversity of Auckland’s coastal environment and associated coastal assets, implementation costs will be shared across various Auckland Council departments. Where adaptive strategies can be implemented through existing budgets, this will be integrated from now. Strategies that require additional budget will be subject to a regional prioritisation process for funding once all Shoreline Adaptation Plans have been completed and we have a regional understanding of changing coastal hazard risk and future funding requirements. 

 

72.    There is a high level of public interest in the management of the coast, including council-owned land and assets. Potential opposition to the proposed adaptation strategies has been mitigated through the development of the plans in the spirit of partnership with mana whenua and with extensive engagement with the local community, wider public and infrastructure providers.

73.    Due to uncertainty in emission reductions, there is a risk that coastal hazards may increase in frequency and intensity earlier than expected. However, the Shoreline Adaptation Plan was developed using a conservative climate change scenario (RCP 8.5) in the long term, and we consider this risk to be low.

74.    As multiple directorates are required to work together the implement the Shoreline Adaptation Plan, there is potential that the plan is not applied across all business areas. To mitigate this, the Shoreline Adaptation Plan project team has worked in collaboration across council to develop the plan. A Coastal Governance Group has also been established to oversee the development and delivery of the Shoreline Adaptation Plans work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

75.    Once approved, the adaptation strategies will be integrated into council Asset Management Plans for implementation.

76.    The second Shoreline Adaptation Plan Pilot, Beachlands and East, covers the shoreline area between Pine Harbour and Whakatīwai Regional Park, and was open for public consultation from October 2021 to February 2022. This Shoreline Adaptation Plan has incorporated the lessons learned from Whangaparāoa.

77.    A mini-Shoreline Adaptation Plan for Wai Manawa / Little Shoal Bay is also underway, with public consultation open between January 2022 and March 2022.

78.    Two further Shoreline Adaptation Plans, Manukau South and Āwhitu Peninsula, are currently in the planning phase, expected to launch in May 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Whangaparāoa Pilot

135

b

Shoreline Adaptation Plan: Whangaparāoa Pilot Exposure Assessment

191

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracy Howe – Principal Natural Hazards Specialist

Natasha Carpenter – Coastal Management Practice Lead

Ross Roberts – Head of Engineering Resilience

Authorisers

Paul Klinac – General Manager Resilient Land & Coasts

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

Regional Streets for People Programme

File No.: CP2022/01697

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To endorse the proposed Regional Streets for People programme and projects for delivery by Auckland Transport on behalf of Auckland Council.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The $3 million Regional Streets for People (RSfP) programme is part of Auckland Council’s ten-year climate action package. The programme aims to deliver trials and tactical urbanism interventions across the region, outside the city centre, to reduce emissions through encouraging mode shift to walking, cycling and micromobility.

3.      The programme was developed by Auckland Council staff to be managed and delivered by  Auckland Transport (AT), with oversight from Council’s Sustainability Office. Expressions of interest to access this contestable fund were received from Auckland Council, Local Boards and other CCOs by end-November 2021.

4.      Using the assessment criteria previously shared with Committee members for feedback (memo from September 2021), a cross-organisational team from AT, Auckland Council and Eke Panuku evaluated the expressions of interest for eligibility and reviewed them against the assessment criteria.

5.      AT received nineteen expressions of interest and proposes that the programme incorporates the following seven projects:

Project Name

Submitter

Project Description

Puketāpapa: he Taunga Pahikara/ a cycling haven

Local Board

A community based non-infrastructure project to support children and families to access current cycling infrastructure and support services.

Mangere ebike Trial - Stage 2

Local Board

To trial and evaluate the use of e-bikes in multiple settings in Māngere. Providing access, skills training and support to Māngere residents who are novice ebike riders.

Safe Riding Programme - Otara

Local Board

A Safe Riding Programme that targets tamariki and rangatahi to provide safe riding opportunities in Ōtara and sets them on a path to becoming “bike safe”.

Bayswater Ave Cycleway

AT

Bringing forward the benefits of this future permanent project by delivering a bi-directional cycleway through the use of trial and semi-permanent infrastructure.

Building Better Bike Hubs

AT

A new AT-owned concept for community-run Bike Hubs.

Konini School - Safer Streets

Local Board

A partnership with Konini School (Glen Eden) and community to test out aspects of the school transport plan, including wayfinding options, possible pop-up cycleways and creating safer crossing points.

Avondale Open Streets Activation

Local Board

Avondale Open Streets Activation will deliver a series of events, activations and night markets with an 'open streets' element by making part(s) of the Avondale town centre temporarily car-free. 

 

6.      These seven projects are proposed to be allocated the full project fund of $3 million and delivered over the three year period. Through the application process, submitters provided early indicative cost estimates, from which the assessment panel quantified the total cost of the nineteen applications. Upon review, a judgement was made with regards to the affordability risk of each project. The total estimated cost of the seven proposed projects was considered within programme budget tolerances. Further work as part of the investigation and planning phase is required to provide firm estimates. Decisions on scale and scope may be required to keep the costs within the agreed programme level budget.

7.      The seven proposed projects constitute all of the work proposed in this first round of the 3-year RSfP contestable fund. No additional funding rounds are anticipated within this 3-year period.

8.      The recommended fund is to be endorsed by the committee to ensure transparency and oversight of this action and investment as part of the climate package.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)           whakamana /endorse the proposed Regional Streets for People projects for management and delivery by Auckland Transport, on behalf of Auckland Council.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.      A commitment to tackling the long-term challenge of climate change is at the forefront of Auckland Council’s long-term plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. Council allocated $152 million of new spending over ten years for climate action initiatives in its 2021-31 Long-term Plan. The Regional Streets for People programme is one such initiative.  It is a newly established 3-year, $3 million contestable fund, to be managed and delivered by AT as part of the climate action package.

10.    This new programme aims to deliver trials, tactical urbanism interventions and complementary initiatives across the region, outside of the city centre, to reduce transport emissions by encouraging mode shift to active modes. This is aligned to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which seeks to improve active modes access and infrastructure as a part of reducing transport emissions.


 

 

11.    The Auckland-specific RSfP programme is different from Waka Kotahi’s national funding rounds “Innovating Streets for People 2019 – 2021” and “Streets for People 2021-2024”, however the programmes have similar objectives and support similar types of projects:

·    Innovating Streets for People 2019–2021 - This programme was established by Waka Kotahi in 2018 to trial a new way of designing and delivering transportation infrastructure. The programme was the first in New Zealand targeted at building capability in the rapid reallocation of street space using the technique called Tactical Urbanism. The programme aimed to make it easier for councils to deliver temporary, or semi-permanent, physical changes to streets, improvements that test a permanent fix and prototype a street design or activations that help communities re-imagine their streets. Under the programme, councils and community groups across Aotearoa have delivered 89kms of dynamic street changes in 32 towns and cities, that included more cycleways, parklets, low traffic streets, community spaces, and safer school crossings.

·    Waka Kotahi – Streets for People 2021–2024 – This 3-year, $30m programme is built on the learnings and experiences from the Innovating Streets for People Programme in 2020. This funding round creates opportunities for councils to accelerate street change projects that will help Aotearoa achieve its emissions reduction goals, while creating vibrant, people-friendly places for thriving communities. EOIs for this programme closed on 22 February 2022 and an EOI was submitted by the AT programme team on behalf of the council family.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.    AT is responsible for the management and delivery of the RSfP fund. The assessment criteria have been developed by the AT programme team with input from Council staff. Committee members have also had the opportunity to provide feedback on the assessment criteria following a memo from September 2021. The following assessment criteria have been endorsed by the Chief Sustainability Office as the project owners: Reduce transport emissions and improve air quality co-benefits (50%); Local enthusiasm (30%); Tactical Urbanism opportunities (10%) and Supporting Māori outcomes (10%). The full list of assessment criteria is in attachment B.

13.    Project proposals submitted through the RSfP expressions of interest (EOI) were received from an Auckland Council Governing Body member, Local Boards, and AT for both semi-permanent and tactical infrastructure and non-infrastructure projects. Attachment A provides the full list of projects received and their assessment.

14.    These proposals were evaluated for eligibility and reviewed against the assessment criteria. The evaluation panel included a technical review from AT, Eke Panuku and Auckland Council staff.  This included members with experience from Waka Kotahi’s Innovating Streets programme delivered last year and a range of cross-functional departments were represented on the panel.

15.    Nineteen EOIs were received. Of these, 13 were from Local Boards (Waitakere Ranges, Otara-Papatoetoe, Aotea Great Barrier, Waiheke, Kaipatiki, Franklin, Whau, Henderson-Massey, Waitemata, Orakei, Puketāpapa, Mangere-Otahuhu); 5 from AT and 1 from an Auckland Council Governing Body member on behalf of the Devonport Business Association.

16.    Of the nineteen applications, 6 projects were non-infrastructure-based such as events, training, education, support for local community groups and loan schemes. The other 13 applications were infrastructure projects, commonly focused on providing cycle infrastructure – trial cycleways, bike hubs, safer school streets projects, walkability improvements, reprioritisation of road space for walking and cycling paths, town centre speed reduction, shared paths and parking facilities.

17.    From this assessment, 7 projects are proposed to move forward to the next stage of co-design and engagement (Attachment 1). Five of these projects are Local Board initiatives and the remaining two are AT projects.

18.    The seven proposed projects have wide ranging benefits that link to multiple plans, strategies and programme business cases currently in use or in development. Some wider benefits include, but are not limited to:

·    An increase in young children, youth and young adults accessing cycling education and experiences across the region, resulting in increased awareness of safety for this group participating in active mode transport.

·    A decrease in the number of cars at school gates and used for short journeys to and from school. This will lead to reduced emissions at a local level, which can have real impact across the Auckland region if scaled up as intended in the future.

·    Increased awareness, school skill levels, safety and maintenance opportunities and access to bikes and E bikes.

·    Communities are empowered and resourced to be safe and experience the joy of active modes with decreased costs and increased enthusiasm.

·    Tamariki and rangatahi are engaged, trust is built and there is a shift to active modes across the region.

·    An increase in local, community run initiatives and an increase in awareness of safe local walking and cycling routes.

·    Normalisation of walking, cycling and public transport as an option to access schools, community facilities, town centres and exploring nature.

19.    12 applications were unsuccessful, the key reasons for applications being marked down against the weighted criteria were identified in the following areas: Note: this is not an exhaustive list and represents common threads.

·     Lack of information - Did not fully complete the application form, sections missing information or vague/confusing details provided against the weighted criteria sections.

·     No confirmed Pathway to Permanence – projects without a long-term commitment to delivering a permanent outcome.

·     Affordability risks – Estimates either at risk of exceeding the funding cap identified in the application documentation or not well understood.

·     Deliverability risks – applications that interacted with major intersections, large loss of parking, high speed roads, private land, overlapped with other planned permanent activities that would provide a similar outcome and complexity that indicated the application would be better suited to a permanent project outcome.

·     Lack of Local Enthusiasm – Little to no buy-in identified from the community.

·     No innovation or supplementing a commercial enterprise – No shift in thinking or delivery of a novel idea.

20.    Endorsement of the proposed projects would move projects to the implementation phase and confirm elected member support for implementation. The implementation phase will detail and design all elements of the projects by using co-design and community engagement methodologies. If at any point in this phase a project is deemed to no longer fit within the thresholds set for time, cost, quality, risk or outcome, it will be paused and reassessed. If this assessment deems it no longer appropriate to continue in the implementation phase, the required steps will be taken by the project team and applicant to close out any commitments and close the project.

 

 

 

21.    If the Committee chooses not to endorse the proposed projects, the implementation of projects will be delayed, as

a)      The AT programme team would have to reconsider how the criteria are applied to the applicant projects, and

b)      Political approval would have to be pushed back as the Committee does not meet again until May 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    The objective of this programme is part of the climate action package to reduce transport emissions for locations outside the city centre.

23.    Auckland Council declared a climate emergency, committing to deliver action consistent with the objectives of the Paris Agreement and play its part in limiting the increase in temperature from climate change. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan (2020), has a modelled target of a 64% reduction in Auckland’s transport emissions by 2030.

24.    AC and AT are jointly developing a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) that sets out pathways to achieve the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri target. The RSfP responds to this challenge by proposing to deliver 7 very different and novel projects, enabling mode shift and catering for planned intensification around town centres, employment hubs and public transport stations, with a focus on improving knowledge and access to opportunities via public transport and active modes for these areas. The programme aims to contribute to long-term emissions reductions, by building capacity within AT for programme and project roll-out using rapid tactical urbanism techniques, increasing understanding and learnings through these projects and the potential for upscaling projects through future schemes.

25.    Due to the nature of these initiatives, it is not viable to estimate actual emission reductions that will be a direct result of the initiatives (because of uncertainty of the level of initial and ongoing uptake).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.    AT manages and delivers the programme on behalf of Auckland Council, with support from Council and Eke Panuku staff and oversight from the Auckland Council Chief Sustainability Office. The Chief Sustainability Office has endorsed the evaluation criteria, and the project assessment panel included representatives from Auckland Council and Eke Panuku.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.    Local Boards were informed of the programme and assessment criteria through updates. This included a webinar and presentation to the Local Board Chairs forum. Some Local Boards submitted projects for the RSfP programme.

28.    The original timeframe for EOI’s was extended from 31 October 2021 to 30 November 2021 on request of elected members. This was to enable time for applicants to fully review proposals, gain endorsement from their Local Board members and gain additional support/feedback on their proposal from the AT programme team.

29.    If endorsed by committee, a resolution from the relevant Local Board will subsequently be sought to confirm their support going forward, and to secure the 10% Local Board contribution required for RSfP projects. There will be ongoing reporting to Local Boards about the rollout of projects.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.    Supporting Māori outcomes, in particular encouraging active Māori participation, and improving low carbon access to marae, kura, kohanga, employment and services is a part of the evaluation criteria, and projects were assessed against these criteria. Successful projects will include community engagement for delivery success.

31.    AT, the wider council family and agency partners have relationships with all Auckland iwi through our Māori and Engagement Policy and Te Ara Haepapa Teams.  Auckland Council have an obligation to Te Tiriti o Waitangi and understand that an enduring relationship is bigger than any individual project and are committed to such thriving partnerships. There are regular opportunities to engage with iwi on a project basis by way of regular monthly hui and community led meetings.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.    This regional fund was established by Auckland Council under its Climate Change programme and is overseen by the Chief Sustainability Office. A total fund of $3million is available from 2021/22 – 2023/24, consisting of $2.5 million opex funding and $0.5 million capital funding.

33.    Auckland Council delegated management and delivery of the programme to AT. Programme management costs have been included in the programme costs, based on learnings from Innovating Streets and a programme manager has been allocated.

34.    Eligible RSfP projects have a budget limit of $700,000 for semi-permanent/temporary infrastructure and $300,000 for non-infrastructure-based projects, with the submitting organisation funding 10% of budget or equivalent through time costs. Projects must have a pathway to permanence through the Regional Land Transport Programme, Long-term Plan or Local Board plan. This was an explicit part of the application form and criteria for RSfP, acting as a gateway

35.    The seven proposed projects constitute all of the work proposed in this first round of the 3-year RSfP contestable fund. No additional funding rounds are anticipated within this 3-year period.

36.    The RSfP augments what has already been laid out in AT’s RLTP. It aims to build on existing programmes or deliver early benefits of larger initiatives, which is a key strategy moving forward for AT. RSfP acts as a first step for many of the projects and programmes that are planned across council, aimed towards accelerating mode shift, reducing carbon emissions from private vehicles and improving safety. A relevant list of programmes from which RSfP could build upon are:

·        Ongoing cycling programme (Cycling and Micromobility PBC)

·        Active Modes Programme (minor cycling, micromobility, parking initiatives and footpaths)

·        Safety Programme incl schools, town centres and residential areas

·        Regional & minor improvement Programmes incl Local Board initiatives

·        Waka Kotahi Streets for People programme

·        Eke Panuku town centre development programme

·        Network Optimisation programme in partnership with Waka Kotahi.

37.    The programme delivery team will draw upon the objectives across all of the above programmes in delivering RSfP, and RSfP will thus bring forward benefits of Auckland’s long-term aspirations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.    Identified risks at this stage of the programme have been identified, key risks and mitigations are outlined below:

Key risk

Mitigation

Financial: There is a risk that project costs escalate as costs submitted are initial estimates.

 

Costs have been reviewed as part of the assessment. This is a careful balance of costs to ensure that efficiency of the $3million fund is maximised. Budgets will be actively managed for escalation costs. Because these projects have pathway to permanence funding allocated in future years, funding may need to be brought forward if costs escalate. Submitting organisations are required to support projects at 10% of costs.

Reputational: This programme has the potential to become highly publicised, potentially skewing the climate benefits achieved and/or impacting the council family reputation.

There are varied views within the community of the appropriate mitigation of transport impacts on climate and how this is weighed against other motivators, potentially impacting the council family reputation.

Robust and objective assessment criteria and governance roles and responsibilities.

Clear roles and responsibilities with local boards and delivery partners defined before the programme is confirmed for delivery.

Clear programme messaging and strategic alignment with existing plans required.

Use the lessons learnt from Innovating Streets for engagement and design that is self-explaining for all users.

 

Delivery risk: Construction timelines and engagement with the community could be delayed by further Covid restrictions and any moratoriums related to local body elections.

Projects have been assessed for deliverability within the timeframe of the programme.

39.    Through the Innovating Streets 1.0 lesson learned process, the team is continually seeking improvement and will implement the recently refreshed AT Enterprise Project Management Framework (ePMF) to deliver the fundamentals of project management (time, cost, quality and risk management), facilitating accelerated administrative processes and enabling quick implementation of projects.

40.    AT undertook an evaluation of the Innovating Streets programme. These learnings together with those gained through Waka Kotahi’s national review. will be applied to ensure successful delivery.

41.    A key learning was the need for a multi-disciplinary programme team. This team, involving a wide range of specialists from across organisations, is already established and will support this programme. The programme team will also use the successes of the Innovating Streets projects for adopting changes in design and delivery such as fast-tracked design review, traffic resolutions and procurement models.

42.    The weighted criteria for the RSfP also addressed other key findings from the evaluation. These include the need for a pathway to permanence to secure a permanent outcome as part of the planning phase and identifying local enthusiasm to gain local support and buy-in for the project goals and outcomes early. By writing these into the application process, the proposed 7 projects will have greatly reduced risks in these areas.

43.    AT established a Programme Control Group to oversee the ongoing RSfP programme. In addition, the programme has been incorporated into AT’s internal programme management system for executive oversight and alignment with strategic direction, with regular reporting to AT Board. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.    Following endorsement of the RSfP proposed projects by the committee, individual responses will be sent to successful and unsuccessful applicants informing them of the outcome, with commentary provided as to why their application was accepted or not.

45.    There will also be a confirmation announcement at the time of endorsement.

46.    A resolution from the relevant Local Board will be sought to confirm support for the RSfP project in their area.

47.    Project initiation meetings will commence, where schedules will be developed, budgets allocated, and implementation steps initiated.

48.    An evaluation report will be provided at the end of each trial to confirm outcomes.

49.    An update will be provided to the committee at the last meeting of this committee’s term.

50.    Council will investigate a name change before public announcement of the programme due to a number of similarly named programs currently active or in development (e.g., Waka Kotahi – Streets for People, MoT - Accessible Streets, MoT - Reshaping Streets for People).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Regional Streets for People Programme - Description and benefits of shortlisted projects

263

b

Regional Streets for People Programme - Assessment criteria and weightings

265

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Allyn Sims – Project Manager Regional Streets for People, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

Proposed Auckland Council submission on Hākaimangō-Matiatia Marine Reserve application, northwest Waiheke Island

File No.: CP2022/01785

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve a council submission to the Department of Conservation (DOC) on a proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application, northwest Waiheke Island, and to seek delegated authority for committee members to approve council’s final submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Friends of the Hauraki Gulf Incorporated (FoHG) have made an application to DOC on a proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application, northwest Waiheke Island. Submissions on the proposal close on 20 March 2022 following a two month submission period.

3.      Auckland Council supports the protection and enhancement of marine biodiversity outcomes around Waiheke Island and the broader Hauraki Gulf. Auckland Council’s submission aims to assist central government in their statutory evaluation of the proposal from different perspectives, including mana whenua, elected members including local boards, and staff across council. The proposed council submission supports in principle the marine reserve application, noting that there are a few areas requiring further clarification and assessment by DOC in reaching a decision to progress the application.

4.      Auckland Council’s submission focuses on whether the proposed area is ecologically significant, identifies any planning constraints regionally or locally, and any other constraints or impacts from other activities in the proposed marine reserve area.

5.      The proposed marine reserve area contains important marine habitats of biological value. This is true of much of the northern coast of Waiheke and surrounds, and further DOC evaluation of available technical information would be helpful.

6.      The application presents no significant constraints on rights to navigation, aquaculture, or commercial fishing, as they currently exist.

7.      Staff have identified gaps that require further investigation by DOC including: the ecological suitability of the proposed area, working with both the Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust and the Ngāti Paoa Trust Board to determine their aspirations for marine protection, and assessing how this application aligns with other central government strategies and significant initiatives underway in the wider Hauraki Gulf.

8.      Further assessment on the potential displacement of recreational fishing activities from the proposed area in conjunction with other High Protection Areas proposed nearby through Revitalising the Gulf: Government Action on the Sea Change Plan (Government Response Strategy) should be carried out.

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      whakaae/approve the Auckland Council submission (Attachment C of the agenda report) to the Department of Conservation on the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application, northwest Waiheke Island, subject to minor editorial changes.

b)      tuku mana/delegate authority to the Chair and Deputy Chair of the Environment and Climate Change Committee, and a member of the Independent Māori Statutory Board, to approve the final Auckland Council submission on the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application, northwest Waiheke Island.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.      Auckland Council has a role and interest in improving marine protection in the Hauraki Gulf, with statutory responsibilities for this purpose primarily held by DOC and Fisheries New Zealand. Achieving appropriate marine protection outcomes requires a strategic and regional approach as well as working with local interests.

10.    This report is before the Environment and Climate Change Committee for several reasons, including:

·        the council’s involvement, over many years, with other significant approaches to integrated management of the Hauraki Gulf, including marine protection initiatives currently being advanced by central government through the Government Response Strategy

·        the need to consider this marine reserve application in light of other adjacent initiatives, to provide some context for those interests who could be affected by other inter-related tools progressing, and

·        the need for Auckland Council’s governing body to consider how such initiatives might be integrated across the east Auckland coast. This is so that a marine reserve network is in the best place, rather than as a function of other localised dynamics, and that it is cognisant of other responsibilities that council holds for managing and allocating marine space (e.g., aquaculture, shipping lanes, sand extraction, explosive anchorage sites etc.).

11.    The purpose of the Marine Reserves Act 1971 is ‘to provide for the setting up and management of areas of the sea and foreshore as marine reserves for the purpose of preserving them in their natural state as the habitat of marine life for scientific study.’ This Act is administered by DOC. While marine reserves are almost always ‘no take’, there is some very limited provision that can be made for recreational and / or customary fishing (section 3(3) of the Act) following Ministerial notice in the Gazette. In northern waters, this was last used at the Poor Knights Islands, but was phased out following a regulatory review in 1998.

12.    The Waiheke Local Board have been working with their community since 2013 to develop their aspirations for marine protection initiatives around Waiheke Island. This has included identification of a potential marine reserve site, at the northern area off Waiheke Island (WHK/2013/222). Further, the Draft Waiheke Island Area Plan (as of July 2021) has identified protecting marine biodiversity as one of its key outcomes, noting that area plans are non-statutory documents for land-based resource management activities, which nevertheless are likely to be relevant to receiving environments in an island setting.

13.    FoHG (the applicant) gave formal notice to DOC of their intention to apply for an Order in Council to establish a new marine reserve at the northwestern end of Waiheke Island on 23 April 2021. The first formal public notification of its application occurred on 20 January 2022 following an application adequacy assessment by DOC, as distinct from a merits assessment. Further information on the application can be found on the DOC website here.

14.   

The proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve is 2,350 ha in size, with land-based boundary limits between Hākaimangō Point to Matiatia Point (see Figure 1).

 

15.    Strategic direction already exists for marine protection within the non-statutory Sea Change – Tai Timu Tai Pari Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan (Sea Change), which was publicly released in December 2016. The Sea Change plan included numerous objectives to improve the waiora (health) and mauri (life force) of the Hauraki Gulf.

16.    The State of Our Gulf report (Hauraki Gulf Forum, 2020), Sea Change (2016) and the Government Response Strategy (2021) note the environmental decline of the Hauraki Gulf. These reports recommend the establishment of marine reserves as part of an overall strategy to restore the ecological health in the Hauraki Gulf.

17.    Following a central government technical review on the Sea Change proposals, the Government Response Strategy (June 2021) identified (i.e., mostly confirmed) eleven potential new High Protection Areas, two additional areas to extend marine protection adjacent to existing marine reserves (Leigh, Cathedral Cove) and five proposed seafloor protection areas to help restore the Hauraki Gulf from seafloor distributing activities.

18.    Staff understand that DOC and Fisheries New Zealand intend to publicly consult on these areas in the second half of 2022, introduce legislation in 2023, with successful sites recognised in law in 2024. Initial engagement by central government with mana whenua is currently underway. The Government Response Strategy also includes initiatives for fisheries management (being further developed in parallel during 2022), aquaculture, habitat restoration, protected species, marine biosecurity, and localised management.

 

 

19.    The proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application is distinct and additional to these proposed marine protected areas in the Government Response Strategy. Although the Government Response Strategy did not include proposed marine protection adjacent to Waiheke Island within this wider proposed marine protection network, it did explicitly recognise that there were other community-driven initiatives on the island seeking greater protection in the Hauraki Gulf.

20.    Near Waiheke Island, there are High Protection Areas now proposed for Rangitoto / Motutapu and Rotoroa Island. Further, within the Government Response Strategy, the Noises Islands is acknowledged as a proposal under development through a community-led initiative. The Government Response Strategy did technically assess the Noises Islands site as warranting some form of marine protection but did not support the proposed marine reserve configured option included in Sea Change.

21.    The Hauraki Gulf Forum has adopted a 30% target for marine protection in the Hauraki Gulf. Currently, 6.6% of the Gulf has some form of marine protection (including the existing cable protection zone). Should the additional marine protected areas within the Government Response Strategy proceed as proposed, the total area of the Hauraki Gulf with some form of marine protection (including seafloor protection) would increase to 17.6%. This figure does not include the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application.

22.    In addition to existing marine protection initiatives, Ngāti Pāoa declared a rāhui on Waiheke Island on 13 January 2021 imposing no take restrictions on four species of kaimoana (koura / crayfish, tīpa / scallops, pāua and kūtai / mussel) within 1 nautical mile from Waiheke’s coastline. This is to enable these stocks to recover. The Waiheke Local Board passed a Notice of Motion (WHK/2021/8) supporting the rāhui and commended the application to Fisheries New Zealand.

23.    The Governing Body unanimously resolved to support Ngāti Pāoa’s rāhui (CP2021/01123). Giving effect to this resolution, the Mayor wrote to the Minister for Oceans and Fisheries in support of the temporary closure application. This was formally recognised through a temporary fishery closure on those four species groups from 1 December 2021 to 30 November 2023. Ngāti Pāoa are currently introducing a management plan, which includes signage, boundary markings and marine monitoring.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Broad approach proposed

24.    Auckland Council is not obliged to make a submission on any marine reserve application so notified. Nevertheless, staff are aware of the high public interest in such applications, and the desire of Auckland Council’s Governing Body to advocate for improved coastal marine environmental outcomes. In that light, the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) notes that ‘Auckland’s coastal environment is a fundamental part of the region’s identity’. Similarly, the AUP has a policy that seeks to ‘encourage and support the restoration and enhancement of the Hauraki Gulf’s ecosystems, its islands and catchments.’

25.    The proposed council submission draws on the views of local boards, mana whenua and technical staff, with the intent that this will assist DOC’s assessment of the application.


 

 

26.    Although it is not council’s formal role to assess the merits of a marine reserve application against the statutory requirements of the Marine Reserves Act (1971), the submission focuses on matters relevant to the criteria within the Act to assist DOC in their assessment. Relevant matters for consideration include:

·        marine reserves may be established to preserve areas for scientific study, that contain underwater scenery, natural features, or marine life of distinctive quality, or so typical, beautiful, or unique that their continued preservation is in the national interest

·        any regional and local planning constraints and any impacts on adjacent land areas or structures in the marine area

·        any constraints or issues on right to navigation, aquaculture, commercial fishing, and existing recreational use in the area

·        mana whenua views on the engagement process and the content of the application (see Māori Impact Statement section)

·        any gaps in the application identified with a view that these are considered by DOC in their assessment.

Significance of the area proposed

27.    The Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act (2000) recognises the Hauraki Gulf, its islands, and catchments as nationally significant.

28.    Beyond the fundamental regional issues, objectives, and policy narrative in the AUP, the creation of marine reserves or other similar management tools can also align with Auckland Council's Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy (2012) goal to encourage community involvement with protection and management of biodiversity. It specifically supports the indicator, ‘increases in area of land and sea actively managed in partnership with the community’ under Objective 5 (Achieve greater understanding, valuing stewardship and guardianship of biodiversity with our community).

29.    A baseline ecological survey that included the proposed marine reserve was undertaken by Haggitt (2016)[11]. It concluded the proposed area contains a range of physical habitats; high macroalgal biodiversity; complex subtidal rocky reefs; high sessile invertebrate diversity; and a range of biogenic habitats. However, reef fish biodiversity in the area is low.

30.    Staff agree that the proposed area contains important marine habitats of biological value and note that this is true of much of the northern coast of Waiheke Island and surrounds. Further DOC evaluation of more recent comprehensive technical reports on the ecological values of the broader area will be useful.

31.    The proposal has the potential to increase the protection of high-quality habitats within the Hauraki Gulf which may become a refuge for the recovery of highly fished species. These include rock lobster, scallop, and snapper. Rock lobster was not sighted in the baseline ecological survey by Haggitt (2016), although they are likely to be present in low numbers.


 

32.    The proposed area would ultimately add to the network of marine protection in the Hauraki Gulf. However, it does not fall within the identified areas for high protection, seafloor protection, or marine protected areas adjacent to existing no-take reserves identified by the Government Response Strategy. The candidate sites in the Government Response Strategy followed a thorough technical review[12][13] of the Sea Change proposed marine protection sites against a broader and updated range of information assessing environmental values across the Hauraki Gulf.

33.    Further central government analysis is required to identify the potential role of the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve with the network of marine reserves proposed by the Government Response Strategy.

Planning constraints and any impacts from adjacent land areas or structures in marine area

34.    The proposed marine reserve location includes part of two Outstanding Natural Features (i.e., marine fossil in Double U Bay and Island Bay submarine volcanics) and an Outstanding Natural Landscape (i.e., Hākaimangō Point and surrounding Coastal Marine Area) scheduled for protection in the Auckland Unitary Plan. While the marine reserve may not provide additional legal protection for these sites, it would allow greater protection for adjoining areas and improvement in the state of the surrounding environment.

35.    The proposal has no anticipated impact on current activities within the coastal marine area in relation to the regional coastal plan component of the Auckland Unitary Plan. The area of the proposed marine reserve is zoned General Coastal Marine Zone. It does not include any other coastal zones such as the Mooring Zone or Marina Zone. It includes an area used as an anchorage, but this activity could continue if the area was a marine reserve.

36.    The proposal has no anticipated impact on adjacent land uses in relation to the Auckland Council District Plan: Hauraki Gulf Island section or regional provisions of the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part).

37.    There is a public park (Owhanake Reserve) and coastal walking track adjacent to the proposed area. Owhanake Reserve and council's Owhanake-Matiatia Walkway provides excellent public access directly to most of the northwestern coast adjoining the proposed marine reserve.

Other constraints and impacts from other activities in the marine area

38.    There is high recreational fishing in the proposed area so there will be an impact on this existing recreational use which is not addressed in the application. Protecting this area (or any other inner Hauraki Gulf area) will likely shift this fishing effort to other adjacent areas and an assessment of these impacts requires further consideration by Fisheries New Zealand.

39.    It is unlikely to have significant impact on commercial fishing. There is no existing aquaculture or known aquaculture proposals in the proposed reserve area.

40.    The purpose of marine reserves is to maintain an area in its natural state for the purpose of scientific study, typically over the longer term. Community activities that seek to alter the relative abundance of one marine species (e.g., kina) to support the transition to a more natural state are unlikely to qualify as an authorised activity within a marine reserve. In any case, the ecological assessment at this site suggests that macroalgal (kelp) abundance is relatively robust and healthy.

41.    The proposal has no impact on rights of navigation. Staff acknowledge that boundary buoys, where required, may represent a navigational safety issue in high marine traffic areas. The Minister of Transport may be able to offer perspectives on this issue should a concurrence request eventuate. Harbourmaster input could be sought at that stage given their interest, among others (e.g., Coast Guard), in minimising potential navigation hazards.

Identified gaps in the application

42.    Staff have identified several matters for further consideration by DOC, including:

·        whether the size and extent of the proposed area is sufficient to meet the biodiversity outcomes sought, including how best to protect mobile species. One approach is to consider whether other complementary marine protection / fisheries management measures could be used adjacent to the proposed marine reserve area for increased protection. Depending on the rationale for various species, the proposed area may be too small thus limiting the overall effectiveness of the reserve. Consideration of the reserve boundaries as they relate to the proposed placement of adjacent candidate sites for marine protection, like Rangitoto / Motutapu High Protection Area, or the Noises Islands, could be considered in terms of outcomes for both protected and less restricted areas

·        applying fit for purpose management measures for more mobile species in the Hauraki Gulf or across wider fisheries management boundaries, including either more conservative harvest levels under the Fisheries Act 1996, and / or through a network of marine protection measures and/or one or two large marine reserves. An international example showing what is possible with a large marine reserve of 7,111 ha (in Cabo Pulmo, Mexico) has shown a 463% increase in absolute biomass within a short timeframe (15 years) and the biomass of top predators and carnivores increased by 11 and 4 times, respectively. Various case studies on marine reserve size and extent would be worth evaluating, particularly if relevant to the New Zealand context.

·        more clarity around how the proposed area contributes and integrates into the network of other marine protection measures proposed under Sea Change (2016), and the Government Response Strategy (2021). Specifically, how the proposed marine reserve connects to other areas proposed as High Protection Areas or other categories and whether this represents a particular ecosystem type.

·        further assessment on whether mana whenua support a permanent measure (marine protection), or whether the breadth of fisheries management tools offer a more tailored approach, including a temporary measure such as a rāhui, as able to be supported in law under the Fisheries Act 1996.

·        whether the placement of a marine reserve in the northwestern Waiheke Island area would affect other known customary Māori claims under Treaty settlements, customary title legislation, or aquaculture settlement legislation.

·        other pressures on the ecology of the proposed area, for instance, there is some evidence of sedimentation having an impact within the proposed marine reserve area, but the source of sediments is not well understood. DOC should consider the broad range of pressures on the area and if a marine reserve is the correct tool to address these.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.    The decision to submit on the proposed marine reserve application will not alter emissions or alter our adaptation to the impacts of climate change.

44.    Climate change will result in impacts on marine environments and coastlines. Managing the environment through protection measures like marine reserves may help support some species (e.g., increase their abundance, less stressors) although this may change over time.

 

 

45.    Assessment of marine reserve applications do not explicitly require an evaluation of climate change impacts. However, protecting biodiverse habitats such as reefs, kelp beds and the species that live there will help absorb carbon and remove it from the atmosphere. Up to a quarter of global carbon emissions are absorbed by the ocean. Well-developed biogenic habitat structure may also, to a small degree, negate the effect of storm events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.    Internal staff views were sought from across the following council divisions:

·        Chief Planning Office (Plans and Places, Auckland Plan Strategy and Research)

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services (Environmental Services).

47.    Staff recognise that the application supports achieving local aspirations for increasing marine protection around Waiheke Island.

48.    No significant impacts to council activities and responsibilities have been identified by staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.    Marine reserves have a specific purpose defined under the Marine Reserves Act 1971. Any placement of a marine reserve in the Hauraki Gulf is likely to lead to different outcomes and uses for the wider Hauraki Gulf.

50.    In evaluating this application, staff were cognisant of the prior May 2021 Waiheke Local Board passed resolutions (resolution number WHK/2021/84) which state that the Waiheke Local Board:

·    will consider marine protection proposals for the board’s endorsement if sought prior to an application being lodged with the relevant Minister.

·    will consider endorsing any marine proposals based upon the following factors:

tangata whenua views

alignment with endorsed local board policies and plans

specialist supporting advice

level of wider community involvement and support.

·    will seek to understand progress on the ministerial proposal on which the local board and community may respond with respect to Sea Change and proposed protections for the waters of the Hauraki Gulf.

51.    Local board feedback was sought specifically on the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application and used to inform the council-wide submission. Input was received from the following eleven local boards: Aotea/Great Barrier, Henderson-Massey, Hibiscus and Bays, Howick, Kaipātiki, Waiheke, Waitemata, Orākei, Papakura, Waitākere Ranges, Whau (Attachment A).


 

 

52.    Most of the local boards that provided feedback stated they support increasing marine protection in the Hauraki Gulf. Further, most local boards note support or qualified support for the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve, with some noting the need for further consideration of customary fishing practices, navigation issues, and boundary placement. Specific comments of potential interest are:

·        Aotea/Great Barrier Local Board supports any marine protection proposals that involve mana whenua and provide opportunity for involvement in direction setting and decision making, in addition to awaiting implementation of the Government Response Strategy that includes eleven High Protection Areas across the Hauraki Gulf (resolution GBI/2020/24).

·        Henderson-Massey Local Board supports the creation of the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve as it is a significant contribution and important step to achieving the strategic objective of a representative marine reserve network in the Hauraki Gulf, which includes Motu Manawa-Pollen Island in the Henderson-Massey area (resolution HM/2020/50).

·        Howick Local Board, while supportive of the need for marine protection generally, has concerns about the proposed positioning of the marine reserve as it may create navigation hazards (boundary buoys), inadvertent non-compliance by boats in a high traffic area offshore, suitability of the specific area for diving and snorkelling, and allowance of customary harvest in an area where regeneration is the aim (resolution HW/2022/19).

·        Kaipātiki Local Board supports in principle the proposal to establish the Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve. The board suggests that the reserve boundaries are extended to the eastern coast of Motutapu Island, aligning with geographical features such as natural headlands. This would allow for easy identification for boat users and coastal fishers, and to include more coastline and protect more coastal ecology (resolution KT/2022/33).

·        Waiheke Local Board supports marine protected areas (including marine reserves) in the Hauraki Gulf, and unanimously supports this marine reserve application subject to mana whenua views, scientific review and community support, while also noting some conditions (resolution WHK/2022/12). Committee members are encouraged to refer to this local board’s February 2022 resolutions in full when discussing this report and proposed submission.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.    The Marine Reserves Act (1971) does not include any references to Te Tiriti o Waitangi or any specific requirements for consultation with mana whenua. However, the Director-General must have particular regard to the views of affected iwi, hapū and whānau in considering a proposal to create a marine reserve, by virtue of sections 47 to 49 of the Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Act 2011. In addition, the Marine Reserves Act is listed in Schedule 1 of the Conservation Act as an enactment to be administered by DOC. The Conservation Act (1987) must be interpreted and administered as to give effect to the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

54.    Council staff sought mana whenua feedback on the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia Marine Reserve application on 8 February 2022. Ngāti Manuhiri have deferred to Ngāti Pāoa’s response. Apart from the Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board and Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust attending the Waiheke Local Board meeting, no other mana whenua provided feedback to council staff. Auckland Council presently engages with both the Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust and the Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board.

55.    Staff discussed their intended approach with a staff member of the IMSB Secretariat. Feedback from the Secretariat highlighted the importance of distinguishing between Auckland Council’s role as a submitter, and the statutory responsibilities of DOC in assessing the application and engaging with mana whenua. A further observation was the recognition of the two Ngāti Pāoa iwi groups that DOC would need to formally engage.

56.    On 22 February 2022, Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board sent correspondence (Attachment B) to FoHG, in support of the application, stating that the proposed marine reserve aligned with their aspirations for the Hauraki Gulf. The correspondence concluded with the Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board agreeing to walk alongside FoHG to establish the Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve, and that the mana of Ngāti Pāoa Iwi/hapu support will help to make their joint aspirations a reality.

57.    At the Waiheke Local Board hui on 23 February 2022, the Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust provided verbal feedback on the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve application and indicated that they are likely to oppose the application for various reasons. A formal position from the Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust has not yet been received at the time of completing this report.

58.    The expressed Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust position was to support a rāhui as a better marine protection measure than a marine reserve, however, only in a place that is agreed with them through formal consultation. The Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust representative appeared to remain open to further discussions with the applicant.

59.    FoHG note in their application the results of the Hauraki Gulf Forum polls, that showed strong support from Māori to allocate 30% of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park to be protected. There are several ways that marine protection can be achieved, and the poll would be more informative for this current evaluation if it was targeted at a particular localised geographic area rather than the Hauraki Gulf in general. A further consideration is that not all Māori poll respondents would whakapapa to Waiheke Island.

60.    The applicant has undertaken some initial pre-engagement and consultation with mana whenua. The application notes dispatch of the application to Ngāi Tai ki Tamaki, discussions with ‘whānau with important Waiheke rangatira links and landowning whānau of the Te Huruhi 12B block Matarau Point’, as well as discussions with the Piritahi Marae Committee. However, the applicant has not identified any impacts of a marine reserve on customary practices. The applicant has not discussed any potential impacts on Treaty claims, Customary Marine Title claims and the Māori Commercial Aquaculture Claims Settlement Act 2004 (including the New Space Plan, which is in progress with Fisheries New Zealand). The FoHG spokesperson was present at the Waiheke Local Board meeting of 23 February 2022, and spoke during Public Input, to clarify what mana whenua engagement FoHG had undertaken.

61.    Despite some contact with mana whenua, the nature and extent of customary fishing is not described in the application, which would aid DOC in the first instance given the statutory assessment criteria. Such an assessment would also be of importance for Fisheries New Zealand when the Minister of Oceans and Fisheries considers his concurrence to the Minister of Conservation’s decision if initially approved. The ability to enable customary or recreational fishing is very low and should not be expected under current marine reserve legislation given the preservation aims that it seeks to achieve.

62.    Auckland Council staff consider that FoHG and DOC will need to further engage and consider mana whenua perspectives, including gaining a better understanding of any customary fishing practices and other tikanga. Recent correspondence between the Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board and FoHG indicates that this is occurring through DOC with the Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board. Further engagement with Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust will also be required, and there is a willingness for that to occur from the applicant.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

63.    The proposed reserve is not expected to generate extra direct costs (e.g., signage) to Auckland Council as marine reserves are administered by DOC. Indirect costs may arise should signage be required on council administered reserves, although any consenting costs can be cost-recovered.

64.    No assessment of impacts has been undertaken regarding potential additional costs associated with increased use of council’s facilities adjacent to the proposed marine reserve, for example parking, track maintenance, or other amenities etc. Facilities in nearby focal points such as Oneroa and Matiatia are likely to cater for some of these needs, including private facilities such as cafes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.    Staff have been cognisant of the need to understand the views of mana whenua on this application prior to providing advice to the Environment and Climate Change Committee. Attendance at the Waiheke Local Board meeting on 23 February 2022 enabled staff to hear the views of Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust and Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board representatives, in addition to the applicant’s efforts to engage mana whenua on the island prior to and after lodging the marine reserve application. A formal position from the Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust was not available prior to this report being finalised. Council staff consider that further dialogue between the applicant, mana whenua and DOC would be beneficial. Auckland Council need not get ahead of such discussions given DOC’s statutory responsibilities when assessing applications and the submissions it will receive on such applications.

66.    The placement of marine reserves can generate public expectations around future access and public amenities provided by the local authority (e.g., beach access, toilets, boat ramps). In this case, some of those facilities are not immediately adjacent to the proposed marine reserve, nor is there space for them, other than perhaps Owhanake (Recreation) Reserve (~1.9 ha) at the western end of the proposed marine reserve. Facilities at Oneroa and Matiatia may address some of the amenity needs over the longer term, without the need for further investments. Part of the attraction of the local area in question is the natural landscape and its preservation in its natural state.

67.    The Waiheke Local Board is currently consulting on its draft Waiheke Island Local Parks Management Plan, encompassing policies for 125 parks on the island, with submissions closing in late March 2022. The finalised plan will be available around July 2022 following any hearings. This local board review provides an opportunity to consider the management intent for reserves near the proposed marine reserve, and whether any priority could be accorded to funding appropriate facilities at adjacent reserves (e.g., drinking water fountain).

68.    There is a potential risk that a new marine reserve will displace current recreational fishing activities to surrounding areas not under marine protection. Fisheries New Zealand have a responsibility to manage this issue especially over broader geographic scales. Much of the known recreational fishing in the northwestern Waiheke Island is likely to be from boats rather than the less mobile land-based fishing along the shoreline.

69.    Providing a council submission that is supportive in principle while identifying matters where some further evaluation is required should aid DOC in its decision-making process and engagement.


 

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

70.    Consultation on the proposed Hākaimangō-Matiatia marine reserve closes on 20 March 2022. Delegated members of the Environment and Climate Change Committee will be provided a completed submission for their approval. Staff will dispatch to DOC once approval has been received.

71.    DOC may reach out to some submitters in coming months where any further consideration of submission points is required, prior to making a recommendation to the Minister of Conservation on whether the application should be approved or declined. Council staff are available to contribute to such requests should they materialise.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local Board Feedback

281

b

Ngāti Paoa Trust Board correspondence

297

c

Proposed submission on marine reserve Waiheke Island

299

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacquie Reed - Senior Analyst NES

Dave Allen - Manager Natural Environment Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

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10 March 2022

 

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Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

Review of the Forward Work Programme - Environment and Climate Change Committee

File No.: CP2022/02471

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To arotake / review and tuhi / note progress on the 2022 Environment and Climate Change Committee forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.      The forward work programme for the Environment and Climate Change Committee adopted by the committee at its meeting held on 12 March 2020 (Resolution Number ECC/2020/20).  It was agreed that the forward work programme would be reported for information and reviewed on a six-monthly basis.

2.      The Environment and Climate Change Committee work programme was reviewed in August 2021 (Resolution Number ECC/2021/34).

3.      All committees have been requested to review their forward work programme, by the end of March 2022.

4.      Following approval, all committee forward work programmes will be reported to the Governing Body in April and October each year, for oversight as per the Terms of Reference.

5.      The current forward work programme for the Environment and Climate Change Committee is appended as Attachment A.

6.      Specific amendments have been made [since the last review in [Date of Last Review], as follows:

          reporting on the Long-term plan and adopted policies have been moved to the “completed” section of the document.

          any new additions will be highlighted in red text

          any deletions will be shown in strikethrough.

2.      Following the approval of the forward work programme, it will be reported to the Governing Body, for oversight as per the Terms of Reference.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      riro / receive and arotake / review the progress on the 2022 forward work programme as appended in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      whakaae / approve the forward work programme as agreed to at the meeting, to October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Environment and Climate Change Committee Forward Work Programme for Review

315

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 

 


Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

 

Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te Taiao / Environment and Climate Change] Committee
Forward Work Programme 2021/2022

This committee deals with the development and monitoring of strategy, policy and action plans associated with environmental and climate change activities. The full terms of reference can be found here:[i Terms of reference].

This committee will meet bi-monthly commencing March 2022

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected decision timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee

2 Dec 21

10 Mar 22

12 May 22

07 Jul 22

08 Sep 22

Workshops / Memo

Strategic approach to Climate Change: - Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Chief Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019] Link to decision

 

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to develop a plan to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

Consultation on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to government

 

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to deliver on targets set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

 

To oversee and implementation of the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

 

Progress to date:

Annual update received: December 2021
Link to decision

 

Upcoming decision: September 2022 – Annual progress report 21/22

 

 

 

 

Annual progress report

 

Climate change adaptation targets

 

Consideration of climate change adaptation targets

 

 

For committee consideration

 

 

 

Decision tbc

 

 

Transport Emissions

Transport Emissions Reduction Plan for Auckland

 

Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri models a 64% reduction in transport emissions as part of its interim target of a 50% reduction in Auckland’s overall emissions by 2030.  The TERP will set out a pathway to this 64% reduction. 

 

To approve Transport Emissions Reduction Plan for Auckland

 

Progress to date:

Approach - August 2021
Link to decision

Progress update – December 2021
Link to decision

 

Progress update – March 2022 (via memo and workshop)

Decision

Update

 

Decision

 

16 March 2022

Regional Streets for People Programme

AT on behalf of the Chief Planning Office 

The Regional Streets for People $3 million programme is part of Auckland Council’s ten-year climate action package. It aims to contribute to the targets in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri by delivering trials and tactical urbanism interventions across the region, outside the city centre, that reduce emissions through encouraging mode shift to walking, cycling and micromobility.

 

To endorse the list of proposed projects to be implemented.

 

 

Endorsement

 

 

Update

 

Natural hazards coastal renewals, slips and remediation

Coastal Management Framework and delivery of Shoreline Adaptation Plans

Resilient Land and Coast

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019)

Shorelines adaptation plans apply a long term, sustainable approach to management of our coast over the next 100 years. Adaptive management plans will be developed in collaboration with mana whenua and communities. Plans will consider the experiences and values we place on the coast and how these may change over time due to coastal hazards and climate change.

ECC to approve the Whangaparaoa Pilot and note regional programme early 2024.

ECC then to approve completed plans following endorsement via the respective the Local Boards as they progress 

 

Progress to date:

Adoption of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan – June 2021
Link to decision

 

Progress to date: Report – March 2022

 

Decision report Whangaparaoa pilot.

 

 

Decision report approve

Beachlands and East and Regional Risk Assessment

 

Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan (NHRMAP)

NHRMAP is reporting tool that collates all of the work programmes across Auckland Council that mitigate long term natural hazard risk, outside of emergency management. As natural hazard events are expected to escalate in size and frequency due to climate change, this work is an important step to ensure that the council is appropriately managing risk.

Receive 6 monthly reporting updates.

 

Progress to date:

Adoption of the Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan – June 2021
Link to decision

 

Memo

 

 

Decision

 

December 2021 memo on reporting framework

 

July 2022 – workshop on NHRMAP year one including any recommended changes to the plan

Waste Minimisation

Waste Political Advisory Group

Waste Solutions

To provide feedback and guidance on implementation of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018

Waste Political Advisory Group meetings

 

A memo will be prepared on the mid-term progress against the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan actions and targets.

Morrison Low has been engaged to assess future servicing options for high density housing as Auckland housing intensifies.

 

 

Memo

 

 

Ongoing – quarterly meetings

Consultation on key national waste proposals

 e.g. container return scheme design

Waste Solutions

Ministry for the Environment consultation on design for national container return scheme design – Auckland Council submission

To approve the Auckland Council submission on Ministry for the Environment consultation on container return scheme design

Council submission to be confirmed pending central government consultation dates TBC

 

Approve submission -  MFE consultation on a regulated scheme for beverage containers. Waste Solutions will prepare a submission for sign off by the ECCC.

 

 

Decision TBC

 

 

 

 

Kerbside refuse policy charging review

Review of PAYT model to assess whether PAYT is still the best solution for achieving the objectives of the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

Finance and Performance and Governing Body to consider and determine to deviate, or not, from current Waste Management and Minimisation Plan policy.

Any deviation will require a special consultative procedure likely as part of the Annual Plan 2022/2023 process.

 

Upcoming decision: regarding current policy outlined in the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018.

 

ECC Committee report in mid 2022

 

 

 

 

Decision

 

Water

Auckland Water Strategy

Chief Planning Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

*ENV/2019/75

The health of Auckland’s waters is a critical issue. Both freshwater and marine environments in Auckland are under pressure from historic under-investment, climate change and rapid growth. The draft Auckland Plan 2050 identifies the need to proactively adapt to a changing water future and develop long-term solutions.

Series of workshops scheduled for 2021

Workshops to be held to seek feedback and guidance on strategic direction of proposed Water Strategy ahead of decision making in December 2021 and final decision making in March 2022.

 

Progress to date:

Water Consumption targets report 15 April 2021
Link to decision

 

Upcoming Decision: Adoption of strategy – March 2022

 

Decision

Decision

 

 

 

Series of workshops held in October and November 2021

National Environment Standards for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy Infrastructure Strategy

Further detailed opportunity to provide Auckland Council input on specific regulatory proposals, probably through Planning Committee, awaiting advice from MFE, likely in 2021.  Not linked to release of Water Services Bill in mid-2020.

Dates for the release of these Nes are anticipated to be in the second half of 2021 at earliest.

Note:   Overlap with Planning Committee

For information:  Decision to provide feedback on the Water Services Bill and other reforms noted at Planning Committee in early 2020.  The Natural Environment Strategy Unit (APRSR) provided proposed council submission on the Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill to Environment and Climate Change Committee in March 2020.  Status of proposed NES for human drinking water and wastewater discharges and overflows will be provided to relevant committees when more is known about central government process.

 

Progress to date:

Waters Strategy and Long-term Plan update 10 September 2020
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management (NPSFM)

Plans and Places

Healthy Waters

Natural Environment Strategy

 

The NPSFM being implemented, with periodic reporting to council committees on progress, and responding to ongoing central government refinement of the framework for achieving water outcomes. Decision making for this area of work will be split between the Planning Committee (for planning decisions such as Plan Changes) and Environment and Climate Change for non-statutory functions

To provide guidance on the council’s implementation of non-statutory functions under the National Policy Statement.

For Information: Planning Committee agenda report scheduled for March 2021 setting out proposed Auckland Council approach to implement the NPSFM 2020, as driven from a planning approach.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Quality Targeted Rate Programme

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Healthy waters and streams projects supported by the water quality targeted rate for projects that will ensure cleaner beaches, streams and harbours across the region

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the Finance and Performance Committee.

End of year report to Governing Body in October 2022.

 

Progress to date:

End of year report 10 September 2020
Link to decision

End of year report October 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

Annual report

 

Too Much Water Policy

To develop an adaptive approach to protecting Aucklanders from harms as a result of a future with’ too much’ water.

For decision: Position Statements to guide future responses while policy is further developed and update on programme approach to be provided in March 2022.

 

A draft adaptive pathways blueprint that will outline a regional too much water response, by May 2023.

 

 

Update

 

 

 

Workshops on draft adaptive pathways blue print workshops on strategic direction in March and April 2023

Harbours

Manukau Harbour

Natural Environment Strategy

 

To achieve better outcomes for the Manukau Harbour including:

·    increased visibility of Auckland Council initiatives through updates on work programmes to the committee

·    greater E&CC oversight, and

work to strengthening relationships with mana whenua and other parties

Annual work programme update to be provided in July 2022.  To be confirmed whether any committee decisions will be required.

 

Annual update provided through 30 June 2021 closed workshop which included overview of synthesis report of findings from the council’s 2020 State of the Environment report, current and future operational programmes, and strategic direction

Memo

 

 

Update to be provided

 

 

Hauraki Gulf

Natural Environment Strategy

 

Work to ensure that the outcomes that Auckland Council intends to achieve in the Hauraki Gulf under its statutory responsibilities are clearly articulated. 

To ensure that the central government work programme is complementary to council’s aspirations for the Hauraki Gul

i)     matters that need greater internal synergies within council’s statutory responsibilities to give effect to improved Hauraki Gulf outcomes (i.e., resource management)

ii)     matters that Auckland Council wishes to contribute to the central government work programme encompassed by ‘Revitalising Our Gulf: Government Action on the Sea Change plan’, as it relates to complementary activities within Auckland Council’s mandate

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kaipara Harbour

Governance

Provides a report back function for the Auckland Council interest in the Kaipara Moana Remediation Programme

To receive the annual report and other progress updates as required

Memo

 

 

 

 

 

Grants

Allocation of the Regional Natural Heritage Grant

Environmental Services

 

Decision-making over regional environment fund as per the grants funding policy and fund guidelines. Funds to contribute to the council’s goals related to protecting our natural environment.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021

Decision

 

 

 

 

 

Establishment of a Climate Action Fund

Environmental Services

To approve establishment of a contestable fund to support community climate action.

To approve establishment of a new climate action fund. Decision report in July 2022

 

 

 

Decision

 

 

Review of the Regional Environment & Natural Heritage Fund

Environmental Services

To review the fund to better align community environmental funding. 

To approve any significant changes to the RENH grant framework arising from the review.

Decision report in July 2022

 

 

 

Decision

 

 

Allocation of Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021

Waste Solutions

Decision making over medium and large funds from the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund in line with the fund’s adopted policy. Funds to contribute towards the council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040.

 

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021.

 

Progress to date:

Update on guidelines - Report to June 2021
Link to decision

 

Decision

 

 

 

 

 

Natural Heritage

National / Inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan

Environmental Services

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

A Pathway Management Plan is a statutory plan under the Biosecurity Act.  Council is working with MPI, DOC and neighbouring councils (a group known as Top of the North) to develop one to manage the spread of marine pests to avoid or minimise their negative impacts on the environment. Initially proposed as aligned regional plans, this is now proposed to be a national plan, with the Minister of Biosecurity as the decision maker.

 

To approve formal council feedback on the proposed national plan and consider council’s budget implications if any.

 

Progress to date:

Memorandum regarding shift to national plan sent in November 2021.

 

 

 

 

Decision (timing uncertain as relies on CG  consultation is TBC)

 

 

Natural Environment Targeted Rate Programme

 

Environmental Services

Natural environment projects supported by the natural environment targeted rate will help protect the environment and tackle the pests, weeds and diseases that are threatening the native species

 

For information: Currently providing quarterly updates to the F&P Committee. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in October.

 

Progress to date:

End of year report 10 September 2020
Link to decision

End of year report October 2021
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

Decision

 

Annual report on the council’s operational plan for implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030

Environmental Services

Under section 100B of the Biosecurity Act, the council is required to report annually on its operational plan for implementing the Regional Pest Management Plan.

For information:. End of year report will be provided to this Committee in September 2022.

 

Progress to date:

Report October 2021 as part of the annual report on the water and environment targeted rates
Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

Decision

 

 

Kauri dieback work programme update

Environmental Services

 

The natural environment targeted rate included a $100m package to improve the protection of kauri in Auckland.  The work programme includes a significant track upgrade package to reduce the spread of kauri dieback, as well as funding for education, enforcement, monitoring, treatment and research.

To update the committee on ongoing regional kauri dieback management work programme.

 

Progress to date:

Memo sent November 2020, link found here

Memo: annual update for 2021/2022 will be sent December February 2022.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Update and oversight role

National Biodiversity Strategy and National Policy Statement for Indigenous Biodiversity

Natural Environment Strategy and Environmental Services

Government is launching these two programmes and they will guide council activity

To endorse council’s approach to responding to the strategy and policy

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weed Management Political Advisory Group

 

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/13. Implementing this resolution will include engagement with local boards from September – November

Oversee the implementation and delivery of the Weed Management Policy, taking into account both community and technical considerations.

This year will have a focus on providing oversight over the implementation Resolution number ECC/2020/55 relating to the standardisation of funding for weed management within the urban road corridor.

 

Progress to date:

Link to decision

 

 

 

 

 

Next WMPAG meeting to be scheduled for May 2022

Project Streetscapes – Regional Review of Weed Management in the Road Corridor

 

Community Facilities

Resolution number ECC/2020/55 f)

Consideration of engagement of with mana whenua, the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and the IMSB

 

 

 

 

 

Memo, December 2021

Memo, July 2022

Berm Planting Guidelines

 

Community Facilities

 

For the Committee to consider berm planting guidelines following discussions and advice from staff

 

 

To be confirmed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Planning Committee items of relevance to this committee – watching brief

(These items fall within Planning Committee terms of reference due to being part of the resource management framework and are of high interest to this committee.  On occasion items will come to the Environment and Climate Change Committee)

Status

Proposed National Policy Statement on Indigenous Biodiversity

Chief Planning Office

The finalisation of the proposed NPS-IB is due to be considered by central government after May 2022. If adopted, this will have implications for how biodiversity outcomes are managed in the Auckland region, particularly through planning frameworks. 

Decision required: to consider council’s approach to implementation of any finalised NPS-IB in the Auckland region.

National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 – implementation approach

Chief Planning Office

 

The NPS-FM was adopted by central government in September 2020. A high -level implementation plan has been approved; preceding plan changes required before the end of 2024.

Decision required: to approve key policy responses developed with Mana Whenua to enable next steps, including broader engagement. Due June 2022.

 

National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water

Chief Planning Office

 

To approve council’s submission on the proposed amendments to the Resource Management (National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water) Regulations 2007 and a package of related technical drinking water standards.

Authority delegated to approve council’s submission March 2022 PLA/2022/10

 

 

 


 

Completed

Lead Department

Area of work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Strategic approach to Climate Change: - Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

Chief Sustainability Office

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019] Link to decision

 

To provide a pathway to zero emissions by 2050 and ensure the region is prepared for the impacts of climate change.  This addresses Council’s commitments to develop a plan to keep within 1.5 degrees of warming and the Climate Emergency declaration.

 

Consultation on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice to government

 

 

Committee to oversee and implement Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan ongoing

 

C40 Update 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Consultation on the Climate Commission draft advice to Government 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Kia mauri ora ai te iwi: Transport Emissions: Pathways to Net Zero by 2050 – June 2021
Link to decision

C40 Divest/Invest Declaration – August 2021
Link to decision

Sustainability Asset Standards/Corporate Emissions October 2021
Link to decision

 

Council Controlled Organisation’s Climate Change Update

Climate Change

To give elected member’s visibility of the work undertaken by CCOs to adapt & mitigate the impacts of climate change

Auckland Transport Update 11 February 2021
Link to decision

Auckland Unlimited Update 15 April 2021
Link to decision

Eke Panuku Update 15 April 2021

Link to decision

Auckland Unlimited – Zoo – 10 June 2021
Link to decision

Watercare – 12 August 2021
Link to decision

 

 

Allocation of the Regional Natural Heritage Grant

Environmental Services

 

Decision-making over regional environment fund as per the grants funding policy and fund guidelines. Funds to contribute to the council’s goals related to protecting our natural environment.

 

Confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round.

 

Grant decision – 2 December 2021

Link to decision

Review of the Waste Minimisation and Innovation fund

Waste Solutions

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

Review the Fund, in line with the recommendations of the S17A Value for Money review.

 

 

To approve any significant changes to the grant framework

arising from the review.

 

Update on guidelines - Report to June 2021
Link to decision

Allocation of Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund 2021

Waste Solutions

Decision making over medium and large funds from the Waste Minimisation and Innovation Fund in line with the fund’s adopted policy. Funds to contribute towards the council’s aspirational goal of zero waste to landfill by 2040

Decision to confirm allocation of grants for the 2021/2022 funding round. Decision report December 2021.

 

Update on guidelines - Report to June 2021
Link to decision

 

Review of Auckland Council’s Regional Pest Management Plan

Environmental Services

Council has statutory obligations under the Biosecurity Act to control weeds and animal pests. The purpose of work in 2020 will be to resolve any remaining appeals against the plan and complete final steps required for it to become operative.

To update the committee when the plan becomes operative.

Memorandum regarding operative in part as part of items for information in February 2021.

No further decisions for the rest of term

Decision can be found here

National / Inter-regional marine pest pathway management plan

Environmental Services

[From the Environment and Community Committee 2016-2019]

A Pathway Management Plan is a statutory plan under the Biosecurity Act.  Council is working with MPI, DOC and neighbouring councils (a group known as Top of the North) to develop one to manage the spread of marine pests to avoid or minimise their negative impacts on the environment. Initially proposed as aligned regional plans, this is now proposed to be a national plan, with the Minister of Biosecurity as the decision maker.

 

Approved formal council feedback on the proposed national plan and consider council’s budget implications if any.

Memorandum regarding shift to national plan sent in November 2021.

 

Proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill

 

Auckland Plan, Strategy and Research (Natural Environment Strategy)

Auckland Council made submission on Taumata Arowai Water Regulator Bill in March 2020. Subsequent Bill extends regulatory regime to all drinking water suppliers (other than domestic self-supply) and increased requirements to manage risks to drinking water sources. Implications for council roles in being a drinking water supplier, and planning and regulatory functions.

To approve substance of proposed Auckland Council submission on Water Services Bill, with final approval delegated to Chair and other members of ECC Committee prior to 2 March 2021 central government deadline.

 

 

Decision can be found here

 



Environment and Climate Change Committee

10 March 2022

 

Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information memoranda and briefings - 10 March 2022

File No.: CP2022/02538

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To receive a summary and provide a public record of memos or briefing papers that have been held or been distributed to committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to the Environment and Climate Change Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

3.      The following memos were circulated to members of the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

Date

Memo

20211130

Emissions Reduction Plan Submission

20211203

Safeswim

20211223

Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan (NHRMAP) progress

20220119

Auckland Council’s response to Waste Strategy

20220126

Project Hunua

20220223

Update on kauri dieback management programme

20220228

Road Corridor Weed Management Update

 

4.      The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Workshop/Briefing

20220209

Update on Too Much Water Work Programme - confidential

 

5.      These documents can be found on the Auckland Council website, at the following link:

http://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/

at the top left of the page, select meeting/ Kōmiti Mō Te Hurihanga Āhuarangi me Te TaiaoEnvironment and Climate Change” from the drop-down tab and click “View”.

under ‘Attachments’, select either the HTML or PDF version of the document entitled ‘Extra Attachments’.

6.      Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Governing Body members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Environment and Climate Change Committee:

a)      riro / receive the Summary of Environment and Climate Change Committee information items and briefings – 2 December 2021.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Emissions Reduction Plan Submission (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Safeswim (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Natural Hazards Risk Management Action Plan (NHRMAP) progress (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Auckland Council's response to Water Strategy (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Project Hunua (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Update on kauri dieback management programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Road Corridor Weed Management Update (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Suad Allie - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere Matua / Senior Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Megan Tyler - Chief of Strategy

 



[1] Central government has recently indicated that participation in the proposed Three Waters Reforms will be mandated in the planned enabling legislation.

[2] Three waters refers to drinking water, wastewater, and storm water.

[3] One of the seven challenges identified as part of the Strategy is ‘improving how council organizes itself’ to deliver water outcomes for Auckland and Aucklanders. The Pooling Knowledge Strategic Shift and implementation changes listed above (para 35) in particular are designed to address this challenge.

[4] The form and use of the framework will be decided by the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum.

[5] http://www.knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=1747&DocumentType=1&

[6] http://knowledgeauckland.org.nz/publication/?mid=2807

[7] Streams, springs, rivers, lakes, wetlands, groundwater, estuaries, harbours.

[8] These include Section 33 and 36 of the Resource Management Act and provisions for Te Mana Whakahono a Rohe agreements.

[9] “Scoping report: Adaptative management of too much water”

[10] Moral hazard behaviour can occur when safety nets motivate individuals to take on more risk than they would otherwise.

[11] Haggitt, T. 2016 Ecological survey of Waiheke Island north-west coastline – December 2016. A report prepared for Waiheke Island Local Board and Hauraki Gulf Conservation Trust. Draft version 3.

[12] Department of Conservation and Fisheries New Zealand 2021: Sea Change – Tai Timu Tai Pari marine protected area (MPA) proposals: agency analysis and advice on selection of MPAs towards development of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park MPA network. 166 p.

[13] Evaluation of Biodiversity Protected by Sea Change Tai Timu Tai Pari 2020 – Marine Protected Area Proposals. Prepared for Department of Conservation. National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research Ltd, 145 p.