I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 22 March 2022

9.30am

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams

videoconference. Either a recording or written

summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council

website

 

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

11 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update:  Quarter Two, 2021-22        7

12        Approval for a new private road name at 41 Monument Road, Clevedon            41

13        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan                                                                                                        47

14        Proposed Plan Change - Rezoning of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat  53

15        Governance Forward Work Calendar March 2022                                                   63

16        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                  69

17        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

18        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                                 87

C1       Local Board views on Notice of Requirement for a Counties Energy substation at 8 Whangapouri Road, Karaka                                                                                        87

C2       Disposal of Land to Watercare - Rear of 148 Seddon Street, Pukekohe               87


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 22 February 2022, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update:  Quarter Two, 2021-22

File No.: CP2022/02804

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with updates to the Franklin Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021-22 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2021.

3.       Updates are made to the engagement plan throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

4.       An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Report for Quarter Two 2021-22

b)      approve updates to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.     Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.     These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Papakura Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

13.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment B.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

Additional activities

14.     These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·        Clevedon Welcome and Slow/Gateway treatments proposal

·        Otau Mountain Road logging operation mitigations  

Auckland Unlimited

15.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment C.

Updates to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

Additional activities

16.     These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·        Government COVID-19 support packages (Activate and Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau)

·        Sustainability Initiatives

·        Skills and workforce: Pacific Skills Shift

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

17.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment D.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

18.     No updates have been made.   

Watercare

19.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

20.     Pukekohe water upgrades has been added to the programme.   


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

22.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

24.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

26.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

30.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Three in June 2022.

33.     A workshop will be held in April to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2022-23.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

11

b

Auckland Transport Quarter Two 2021-2022 report - Franklin Local Board

29

c

Auckland Unlimited Quarter Two 2021-2022 report - Franklin Local Board

33

d

Eke Panuku Quarter Two 2021-2022 report - Franklin Local Board

37

e

Watercare Quarter Two 2021-2022 report- Franklin Local Board

39

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 41 Monument Road, Clevedon

File No.: CP2022/01632

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 41 Monument Road, Clevedon.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Malcolm Quarrie, agent David Clouston of CivilPlan Consultants Limited has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 41 Monument Road are:

·    Renee Wyn Place (Applicant Preferred)

·    Malcolm Gifford Place (Alternative 1)

·    Gifford Quarrie Place (Alternative 2)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name Renee Wyn Place (applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 41 Monument Road, Clevedon, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90096733, and resource consent references BUN60372683 and SUB60371628).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60372683 (subdivision reference number SUB60371628) was issued in May 2021 for the construction of 10 new residential freehold units and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Scheme and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The proposed names hold historical linkages to Clevedon. The applicant’s father and grandmother lived in the Clevedon area for most of their lives and Renee Wyn was an early settler in the area.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Renee Wyn Place

(Applicant preferred)

Renee Wyn was the applicant’s grandmother who passed away 15 years ago. Renee Wyn spent most of her life living in the Clevedon area, and the applicant would like to honour her by naming the private road after her. Renee was also an early settler in the area.

Malcolm Gifford Place

(Alternative 1)

Gifford is the applicant’s father’s first name, who passed away. Malcolm is the first name of the applicant. Seeing that the proposed name does not reference a particular person, this name is considered acceptable.

Gifford Quarrie Place

(Alternative 2)

Gifford Quarrie is the applicant’s father’s name, who passed away. Gifford Quarrie lived in the Clevedon area for most of his life. The applicant would like to honour his father by naming the road after him.

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Place’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 4 November 2022, the agent Mr Clouston contacted mana whenua. Only one response was received. On 6 November, a representative of Ngati Te Ata replied saying “refer to Ngai Tai ki Tamaki”. No other responses were received. It is noted that the proposed names have amended since the original consultation to full names and the preferred name is a new introduction. However, the names proposed are of a similar nature (i.e., names of settlers).

22.     On 21 December 2021 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant with the updated names, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Paoa

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamaterā

·    Waikato-Tainui

·    Ngāti Whanaunga

23.     By the close of the consultation period, no responses, comments, or feedback were received including from Ngai Tai ki Tamaki. Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

24.     The applicant has made further attempts to contact Ngai Tai ki Tamaki, by phone and email on 28 January 2022, however by 8 February 2022 no response was received and the applicant has requested that the local board proceed to a decision.

25.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and no Te Reo Māori names are proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

27.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site & Location Plans

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/02433

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.       Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport (AT) to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.       In December 2021, AT advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-26. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.       Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, AT is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.       The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       AT has made speed limit changes covering 11% of the road network, with changes to a further 27% of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.       The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

9.       Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late 2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

11.     The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

12.     ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

13.     The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

14.     Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

16.     The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

17.     Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

18.     Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

19.     The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

21.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that 19% of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·    reduce 40% of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·    include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming ten years into speed management plans

·    implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

25.     The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

26.     Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

27.     In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

29.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

31.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

34.     There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing their final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

36.     Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

37.     Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

38.     In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

39.     The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.  


 

  

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Stephen Rainbow, Head of Community Engagement - Central Hub, Auckland Transport

 

 


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

Proposed Plan Change - Rezoning of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat

File No.: CP2022/00009

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To obtain the Franklin Local Board’s views on the potential plan change to rezone 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat from Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation zone to Residential – Single House zone.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat are privately owned but currently have an Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation zoning under the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP).

3.       Auckland Council officers have advised that council does not wish to acquire any additional open space land adjoining council’s existing three hectare suburb park. The provision of formal sports fields for current and future residents of the Kingseat area will be catered for at the nearby Karaka Recreation Reserve. The front lot – Sec 2 SO 404282 is owned by Auckland Council and retains its open space zoning.

4.       Privately owned land is not typically zoned open space, unless there is agreement with the land owner. A Residential – Single House zone is the most logical zoning of the land.

5.       Auckland Transport has expressed concern that the rezoning of the two properties would result in adverse effects on the transport network and that an Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) was required to support the plan change.

6.       Flow Transportation Specialists (Flow) have assessed the transport and traffic effects of rezoning the two properties to Residential – Single House zone. Two reports have been prepared:

1.   An Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) to assess a potential plan change

2.   A wider transport review/assessment of the Kingseat precinct.

7.       In the ITA, Flow considers that additional development provided by the plan change could be accommodated by the local transport network and that the existing Kingseat Precinct provisions are adequate to ensure that any development within the plan change area would provide appropriate improvements to the local transport network to support development.

8.       In terms of the wider area, Flow considers that the currently anticipated land use development will increase the level of morning peak period traffic congestion on both Linwood Road and Hingaia Road; and increase pressure on Papakura interchange.

9.       There is little ability to increase the capacity of the general traffic network in this area, so residents living in Kingseat and Karaka North will instead need to be given better choices to ‘opt out’ of peak period congestion. The Flow report identifies options which include:

·    Travel Demand Management measures that reduce the need for travel

·    a land use development pattern that provides local destinations, such as local schools, shops and community facilities within Kingseat

·    a significantly improved public transport offering, relative to the existing peak direction bus service on Linwood Road.

10.     The Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply) Amendment Act 2021 does not apply to the Kingseat area. The Kingseat – Karaka statistical area (see map below) had a 2018 usually resident population of 2904 people. Areas predominantly urban in character that the 2018 census recorded as having a resident population of less than 5,000 do not qualify.

11.     On 26 May 2021, a panel of Independent Hearing Commissioners appointed by Auckland Council issued its recommendation to Minister of Education that the Notice of Requirement for a new primary school be confirmed. The Minister has accepted the recommendation. The proposed primary school and existing reserve are separated by an access strip to 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat.

12.     The future subdivision of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road will be the appropriate time to address the issue of the proposed primary school and existing park being separated by the access to 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat. Any required changes in zoning can be addressed at a later date via the council’s annual open space zoning plan change.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      support the rezoning of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat from Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation zone to Residential – Single House zone;

b)      note that the future subdivision of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road will be the appropriate time to address the issue of the proposed primary school and existing park being separated by the access leg to 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat.

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat are owned by Kingseat Village Limited and are currently zoned Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation under the AUP.

 

Existing Council reserve10231039Chart

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14.     The two properties have had an open space zoning (or equivalent) since the Auckland Council District Plan – Operative Franklin Section 2000. The open space zoning was with the agreement of the landowner.

15.     On 29 October 2019, Paul Marriott – Lloyd, Senior Policy Manager, Community and Social Policy confirmed that Auckland Council does not wish to acquire any additional open space land adjoining council’s existing three hectare suburb park in accordance with the Open Space Provision Policy. The provision of formal sports fields for current and future residents of the Kingseat Precinct will be catered for at the nearby Karaka Recreation Reserve.

16.     It was also confirmed that council would initiate a plan change to remove the open space zoning of the land at Linwood Road and to replace it with an appropriate zoning that will facilitate development in accordance with the Unitary Plan.

17.     1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat were originally proposed to be included in Plan Change 60 – Open Space and Other Rezoning Matters. However, Auckland Transport expressed concern that the rezoning of the two properties would result in adverse traffic effects and that an Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) was required to support the plan change. The properties were subsequently withdrawn from Proposed Plan Change 60.

18.     Flow Transportation Specialists (Flow) have assessed the transport and traffic effects of rezoning the two properties to Residential – Single House zone. Two reports have been prepared:

i)        An Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) to assess a potential plan change

ii)       A wider transport review/assessment of the Kingseat precinct.

19.     The findings of the two studies are considered under the Analysis and Advice Section below.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Open Space Caselaw

20.     Privately owned land is not typically zoned open space, unless there is agreement with the land owner.

21.     There is relevant caselaw on the zoning of private land as open space (or equivalent). They are:

1. Dilworth Trust Board v Dunholme Lawn Tennis Club  & Auckland City (1980) A142/80

2. Golf (2012) Ltd v Thames-Coromandel District Council [2019] NZEnvC 112

22.     In the Dilworth case, the Environment Court found that it was unreasonable to apply Recreation D zoning to private land used for recreation purposes, without the consent or acquiescence of the owner of that land. In the case of the present appellants, they oppose that form of zoning for their land. The appeals must therefore be allowed.

23.     In the Golf (2012) Ltd case, the Environment Court found that there is no general principle that private land cannot be zoned as open space against the owner’s wishes and that the planning history of an area is relevant to determining the appropriateness of zoning for a particular site. However, each case will be determined on its own merits. The particular factors that were determinative in this case were that the site had been open space for a number of years and this was known to the Appellant when it was purchased, and the site and surrounding area also had high amenity value which required protection. It should be noted that in the court’s decision, they recommended that the Council and Matarangi Community Board make it a priority to formally acquire the land of the golf course which was zoned open space. Therefore, this case could be distinguished from others where such extreme factors are not present.

24.     There are no special or unusual factors applying to 1023 & 1039 Linwood Road that would warrant the retention of the open space zoning.

Integrated Transport Assessment & Wider Area Effects

25.     In the ITA, Flow considers that additional development provided by the plan change could be accommodated by the local transport network and that the existing Kingseat Precinct provisions were adequate to ensure that any development within the plan change area would provide appropriate improvements to the local transport network to support development.

26.     In terms of the wider area, Flow considers that the currently anticipated land use development will increase the level of morning peak period traffic congestion on both Linwood Road and Hingaia Road, and increase pressure on Papakura interchange. The effects of this increasing congestion have not previously been fully considered, through for example the Supporting Growth programme of work.

27.     Demands for private car travel on the Linwood Road/Hingaia Road corridor are predicted to exceed capacity in the future, as will demand for travel through Papakura interchange. This is to be expected through growth anticipated about the wider South Auckland area. Waka Kotahi will continue their role of managing demand on the motorway network through ramp metering, and prioritising high productivity vehicles through T2/truck lanes at Papakura interchange. However, there is little ability to increase the capacity of the general traffic network in this area, so residents living in Kingseat and Karaka North will instead need to be given better choices to ‘opt out’ of peak period congestion. Options would include:

·    Travel Demand Management measures that reduce the need for travel

·    a land use development pattern that provides local destinations, such as local schools, shops and community facilities within Kingseat

·    significantly improved public transport offering, relative to the existing peak direction bus service on Linwood Road. This may include:

·    more frequent bus services to Waiuku and Papakura

·    new bus services such as to Drury, and proposed new train stations at Drury West and Paerata

·    interventions to make the proposed new train stations at Drury West and Paerata more attractive. We understand that these stations will include park and ride facilities that may well attract commuters from Kingseat and Karaka North

·    interventions to prioritise high productivity vehicles, such as transit lanes on Hingaia Road

Appropriate Alternative Zone

28.     Typically, when land is no longer required as open space, the most appropriate alternative zone is the zoning of the adjacent land. 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat is adjacent to the Residential – Single House zone. 1023 Linwood Road is adjacent to the Rural – Rural Production zone. However, it is logically rezoned to Residential – Single House zone so that there is a consistent zone boundary between residential and rural zones.

National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020

29.     Plans and Places are currently responding to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020. A number of workstreams are underway. These include:

·        Identifying qualifying matters (i.e. exceptions to the increase in height & density - sites of significance, special character areas, volcanic viewshafts)

·        Enabling 6+ storeys in walkable catchments

·        Developing standards to manage the transition between 6+ storey development and adjacent lower development

·        Implementing the Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters Amendment Act 2021

·        Addressing issues relating to the removal of parking minimums

·        Addressing issues relating to private ways

 

30.     The above matters are to be addressed via a plan change (and other methods) to be notified in August 2022. Consultation will occur with local boards, iwi, key stakeholders and the community throughout 2022.

31.     Policy 3(d) of the NPS:UD, as amended by the  Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply) Amendment Act 2021 states:

 

Policy 3: In relation to tier 1 urban environments, regional policy statements and district plans enable:

“d) Within and adjacent to neighbourhood centres zones, local centre zones, and town centre zones (or equivalent), building heights and density or urban form commensurate with the level of commercial activity and community services”.

32.     Kingseat village is zoned as a Business – Local Centre zone. Advice from Central and South Plans and Places team is that Kingseat is a local centre with low accessibility and therefore does require any additional policy 3(d) intensification.

Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply) Amendment Act 2021

33.     Under section 77F Duty of specified territorial authorities to incorporate MDRS and give effect to policy 3 or 5 in residential zones

 

(1)  Every relevant residential zone of a specified territorial authority must have the MDRS incorporated into that zone

(2)  Every residential zone in an urban environment of a specified territorial authority must give effect to policy 3 or policy 5, as the case requires, in that zone

34.     Section 2 – Interpretation, contains the following definitions:

 

Relevant Residential zone

a)    means all residential zones; but

b)    does not include –

(i)    a large lot residential zone;

(ia) an area predominantly urban in character that the 2018 census recorded as having a resident population of less than 5,000, unless a local authority intends the area to become part of an urban environment

 

Specified territorial authority means any of the following

(a)          every tier 1 territorial authority

Tier 1 territorial authority means any of the following

(a)          Auckland Council

35.     The Kingseat – Karaka statistical area (see map below) had a 2018 usually resident population of 2904 people. Kingseat – Karaka also lies outside the RUB.

 

 

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36.     Therefore, Kingseat is not subject to the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply) Amendment Act 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     The rezoning of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat from open space to residential will enable additional residential development in close proximity to the future Kingseat Village. This will assist in achieving a quality compact urban form.

38.     The front lot – Sec 2 SO 404282 is owned by Auckland Council and retains its open space zoning. Sports fields are located at Karaka Sports Park - 372 Blackbridge Road, Karaka and the Drury Sports Complex – 20 Victoria Street, Drury.

39.     The rezoning of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat to a residential zone will enable the efficient use and development of natural and physical resources. The land is in close proximity to Kingseat Village centre and the rezoning and subsequent development will result in additional housing in close proximity to the village centre. This will contribute to the efficiency of the end use of energy and assist in mitigating the effects of climate change as some local trips will be in walking/cycling distance.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The proposed plan change is in response to advice from Auckland Council Parks Policy who have advised that 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat are no longer required as open space.

41.     Auckland Transport expressed concern that the rezoning of the two properties would result in adverse traffic effects and that an Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) was required to support the plan change.

42.     Flow Transportation Specialists (Flow) have assessed the transport and traffic effects of rezoning the two properties to Residential – Single House zone. Two reports have been prepared:

i) An Integrated Transport Assessment (ITA) to assess a potential plan change

ii) A wider transport review/assessment of the Kingseat precinct.

43.     Auckland Transport officers have reviewed both reports and are in agreement with the findings.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

44.     The front lot – Sec 2 SO 404282 is owned by Auckland Council and retains its open space zoning.  The local community has access to sports fields located at Karaka Sports Park - 372 Blackbridge Road, Karaka and the Drury Sports Complex – 20 Victoria Street, Drury.

45.     Initial consultation occurred with the Franklin Local Board in 2019 when 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat was initially included in Plan Change 60. It was subsequently withdrawn from that plan change due to concerns over traffic/transport issues arising from its development for residential purposes.

46.     The Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board had raised an issue relating to a park and school that will be divided by an access road to a new residential development. He was concerned this was a poor design and safety outcome. He expressed his view that it would be appropriate if Auckland Council could work with MOE to suggest that the school and park land are contiguous meaning the access road to the rear residential area is on the outside of the western and southern sides of the MOE land.

47.     Since the withdrawal of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat from Plan Change 60, the designation for a new primary school has advanced.

48.     The Franklin Local Board views on the proposed designation included:

i)        support the Ministry of Education acquisition of land for a school at Kingseat, noting that a school will be an important centre of this growing community

ii)       recommend that the design of the space is reviewed so that the designated reserve adjacent to the proposed school property is adjoined with the school and separation by road avoided

49.     Item ii) is noted and relates to an area zoned as Open Space [Sport and Active Recreation] outside the proposed designation.  The MoE’s comments on this are summarised below: -

“As part of the negotiations to purchase the land the seller (Kingseat Village Limited - KVL) needed to retain access to the only existing road – Linwood Road.   Therefore, KVL retained a strip from Linwood Road to the rear of the site to ensure they have practical road access for future use of that site.  Other indictive roads cross land they do not own so there is no guarantee of the timing or alignment of those roads……… 

Whilst the matter raised by the Board is acknowledged, the Ministry have settled on the land purchase subject to the NoR and does not own the strip separating it from the Council reserve.  The matter raised by the Board as part of the NOR consultation was after the purchase of the land had been completed, so it is not a matter that the Ministry is in a position to change. The land at the rear is still zoned reserve so would require a plan change to be developed for residential use.

If a future road is developed to serve land at the rear, we envisage that a pedestrian crossing(s) with traffic calming measures such as speed bumps or a raised table could be implemented to ensure safe and suitable connections between the school and the park.  Further, advice from Abley [MoE’s traffic expert] is that any side road at this location would likely to be designed to a 30km/h speed limit (as per AT’s TDM recommendations) and would also be beneficial for providing alternative road access from Linwood Road to the school”.

50.     On 26 May 2021, a panel of Independent Hearing Commissioners appointed by Auckland Council issued its recommendation to Minister of Education that the Notice of Requirement be confirmed.

51.     On the 4 June 2021, pursuant to s172(1) of the Resource Management Act 1991 (“the Act”), the Minister advised that the Council’s recommendation was accepted in full.

 

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52.     The future subdivision of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road will be the appropriate time to address the issue of the proposed primary school and existing park being separated by the access to 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat. Any required changes in zoning can be addressed at a later date via the council’s annual open space zoning plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     Both 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat were originally included in Proposed Plan Change 60. A copy of the draft plan change was forwarded to all Auckland’s 19 iwi as required under Section 4A of the first schedule above. The properties were subsequently withdrawn from PC60, but the feedback received from iwi still remains relevant.

54.     Feedback on the plan change as a whole was received from:

 

·        Ngāti Manuhiri – who wished to reserve their rights for cultural engagement and to be notified of the plan change;

·        Waikato Tainui – who support mana whenua to take the lead role in this plan change.

55.     There was no feedback specifically on 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     The costs of the plan change process are within the Plans and Places Department’s operating budget.  Costs associated with the plan change hearing are covered by the Democracy Services budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.     The following risks and mitigation measures are associated with the proposed rezoning of 1023 and 1039 Linwood Road, Kingseat from Open Space – Sport and Active Recreation zone to Residential – Single House zone:

Risks

Mitigation Measures

Rezoning is appealed

Consent order negotiations

Environment Court hearing

Adverse effects of increased traffic

Travel Demand Management measures that reduce the need for travel

A land use development pattern that provides local destinations, such as local schools, shops and community facilities within Kingseat

Significantly improved public transport offering, relative to the existing peak direction bus service on Linwood Road. This may include:

More frequent bus services to Waiuku and Papakura

New bus services such as to Drury, and to proposed new train stations at Drury West and Paerata

Interventions to make the proposed new train stations at Drury West and Paerata more attractive. We understand that these stations will include park and ride facilities that may well attract commutes from Kingseat and Karaka North

Interventions to prioritise high productivity vehicles, such as transit lanes on Hingaia Road

Safety issues between the primary school and adjacent park – which is transversed by the access leg to 1039 Linwood Road

Alternative road access is developed to 1039 Linwood Road when the land and adjacent land is subdivided

If a future road does pass between the school and park:

·   a pedestrian crossing(s) with traffic calming measures such as speed bumps or a raised table could be implemented to ensure safe and suitable connections between the school and the park;

·   any side road at this location would likely to be designed to a 30km/h speed limit (as per AT’s TDM recommendations)

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     The proposed plan change, along with the Franklin Local Board views will be considered by the Planning Committee at its 31 March 2022 meeting.

59.     If the committee approves notification, the plan change will be publicly notified in April 2022.

60.     The plan change would then follow the normal plan change process with submissions, summary of submissions, further submissions, appointment of hearing commissioners, preparation of the section 42A hearing report, the plan change hearing and release of the decision, appeal period, resolution of any appeals either via consent order or Environment Court hearing, formal adoption of the plan change and updating of the Unitary Plan.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - CPO Plans and Places; Manager Planning – Regional, North, West & Islands; on behalf of John Duguid, General Manager - Plans and Places

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar March 2022

File No.: CP2022/02154

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated March 2022 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work calendar Franklin Local Board - March 2022

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/02153

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 8, 15 and 22 February, and 1 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight of projects in their work programme or on matters that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops. Workshops are not open to the public, but a record of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

4.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 8, 15 and 22 February, and 1 March 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 8, 15 and 22 February, and 1 March, 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record February 8 2022

71

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record February 15 2022

75

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record 22 February 2022

79

d

Franklin Local Board workshop record 1 March 2022

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

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Franklin Local Board

22 March 2022

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Franklin Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Local Board views on Notice of Requirement for a Counties Energy substation at 8 Whangapouri Road, Karaka

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains details regarding negotiations not yet finalised

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 

C2       Disposal of Land to Watercare - Rear of 148 Seddon Street, Pukekohe

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains details regarding negotations not yet finalised

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.