I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 16 March 2022

10.00am

This meeting will proceed via Microsoft Teams. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant, JP

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley, QSO

 

 

Melanie Kenrick

 

 

Cindy Schmidt

 

 

Andrew Shaw

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Short

Democracy Advisor

 

10 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 6

8          Deputations                                                           6

8.1     Hearts and Minds                                        6

8.2     Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated                                   6

8.3     Ares Artifex - Jesse Jensen                       7

8.4     Northcote Birkenhead Yacht Club            7

9          Public Forum                                                                            8

10        Extraordinary Business                                       8

11        Assessment of Chelsea Estate Heritage Park designation                                                            9

12        Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan 2022 - 2032                                                                      29

13        Beach Haven renewal of coastal connections - detailed design for stage two                            79

14        New community lease to Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoa, at Drome View Reserve, Beach Haven and Tamahere Reserve, Windy Ridge                   115

15        Marlborough Park, Glenfield - approval of concept design for accessible play equipment                                                                            129

16        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan                                                                            143

17        Northcote town square location                     147

18        Members' Reports                                            155

19        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report 157

20        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update                 159

21        Governance Forward Work Calendar             161

22        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - February 2022                                                   167

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

24        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                         179

C1       Alternative Commercial Opportunities          179


1          Welcome

 

Text

Description automatically generated

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)       A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 16 February 2022, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.


 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Hearts and Minds

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Hearts and Minds.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Carol Ryan, Chief Executive and Amberlee Wharton, Manager, will be in attendance via Microsoft Teams to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Hearts and Minds.

b)      thank Carol Ryan and Amberlee Wharton for their attendance and presentation.

Attachments

a          16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Hearts and Minds presentation....................................... 183

 

 

8.2       Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project Incorporated

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Rusalka Munsi, Chairperson and Carla van Walen, Manager – Community Engagement, will be in attendance via Microsoft Teams to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project. 

b)      thank Rusalka Munsi and Carla van Walen for their attendance and presentation.

Attachments

a          16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkdale Beach Haven Communtiy Project presentation............................................................ 187

 

 

8.3       Ares Artifex - Jesse Jensen

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to address the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding painting street art on a retaining wall on Kaipātiki Road.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Jesse Jensen, Street Artist – Ares Artifex, will be in attendance via Microsoft Teams to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation.

b)      thank Jesse Jensen for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.4       Northcote Birkenhead Yacht Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Northcote Birkenhead Yacht Club.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Chris Bowman, Commodore – Northcote Birkenhead Yacht Club will be in attendance via Microsoft Teams to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Northcote Birkenhead Yacht Club.

b)      thank Chris Bowman for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Assessment of Chelsea Estate Heritage Park designation

File No.: CP2022/01845

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the assessment findings of designating Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding reserves as a regional park ahead of a decision by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has requested that staff assess the merits of Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and adjacent Kauri Point Centennial Park and Chatswood Reserve becoming a regional park. All three parks are governed by the Kaipātiki Local Board.

3.       The local board and several members of the public have expressed the following concerns in relation to Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and adjacent reserves: 

·    unsatisfactory maintenance standards;

·    inadequate heritage protection;

·    deteriorating ecosystem;

·    insufficient resources to address concerns;

·    lack of management plan for the park; and

·    lack of public awareness of the park.

4.       Staff assessed the merits of designating Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding parks as a regional park, as well as the merits of designating the reserves as a regional asset as an alternative option by applying the following three factors:

·    values: through the Regional Park Management Plan 2010;

·    outcomes: against the identified issues; and

·    decision-making allocation principles: through the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

5.       Using these three factors, staff have reached the conclusion that:

·    Chelsea Estate Heritage Park has some of the values typically found in regional parks, such as natural and heritage features. It lacks some other values common to regional parks, as the reserve is impacted by ongoing operations at the Chelsea Sugar factory and has limited recreation opportunities. 

·    Designation as a regional park or asset would not address the identified concerns facing Chelsea Estate Heritage Park. Becoming a regional park or asset does not guarantee that maintenance of the parks would be better resourced or that different service standards would be applied.

·    Governance is best aligned with the Kaipātiki Local Board as decisions for the reserve mostly impact local residents.   

6.       Staff recommend that Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and adjacent reserves remain designated as local reserves governed by the Kaipātiki Local Board (the status quo).

7.       There are community expectations that the reported concerns with Chelsea Estate Heritage Park’s maintenance can only be resolved by designating the reserve as a regional park. If the reserve is not designated a regional park, there is potential reputational risk for Auckland Council. This can be mitigated by communicating that designation as a regional park does not necessarily address concerns which can be considered a as part of the development of the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan.  

8.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider designation for Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and adjacent reserves on its meeting on 7 April 2022. The report will incorporate the local board’s resolutions. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      tūtohi / receive the assessment of the change of designation of Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and adjacent Kauri Point Centennial Park and Chatswood Reserve to a regional park, which found that:

i)       Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and adjacent reserves align with some values typically found in regional parks, such as natural and heritage features, although they lack some other values common to regional parks, due to impacts of ongoing operations at the Chelsea Sugar factory and limited recreation opportunities. 

ii)       Designation as a regional park or asset would not address the identified concerns facing the reserves since resource for maintenance, protection of heritage and ecosystems, development of a management plan, and a public awareness campaign are not impacted by a regional park or asset designation.

iii)      Governance is best aligned with the Kaipātiki Local Board, as decisions for the Chelsea Estate Heritage Park mostly impact local residents.   

b)      tautoko / support the recommendation that Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding reserves remain designated as local reserves under local-board decision making, i.e. the status quo.

c)       tuhi / note that staff are considering how best to address the issues identified for Chelsea Estate Heritage Park, Kauri Point Centennial Park and Chatswood Reserve in the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan, which is due for completion at the end of 2022.

Horopaki

Context

Request to consider Chelsea Estate Heritage Park being designated as a regional park

9.       The Kaipātiki Local Board has requested that Chelsea Estate Heritage Park, along with Kauri Point Centennial Park and Chatswood Reserve, be considered for regional park designation. The local board requested for this designation to be publicly consulted on as part of the current review of the Regional Parks Management Plan 2010.

10.     Chelsea Regional Park Association, a volunteer group formed 25 years ago, has also requested regional park designation for the reserves to be considered.

11.     Both the local board and the Chelsea Regional Park Association are advocating for better protection and management of the heritage assets, lakes, and parkland. They view the park as having potential to deliver benefits to all Aucklanders as it provides unique heritage, history, and ecology. 

12.     Concerns in relation to Chelsea Estate Heritage Park’s maintenance can be summarised as follows:

·    declining maintenance standards;

·    inadequate heritage protection;

·    deteriorating ecosystem;

·    insufficient resources to address the concerns;

·    lack of management plan for the park; and

·    and lack of public awareness of the park.

13.     A full list of concerns identified through public engagement is provided in Attachment A.1.

14.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee has decision-making power to designate a park a regional park or asset. Regional parks and assets are governed by the governing body and listed in Schedule 1 of the Auckland Council Long-term Plan.

Decision-making allocation

15.     Legislation requires that decision-making responsibilities for the non-regulatory activities of council are exercised by either the governing body or the local board in accordance with principles contained in section 17(2) of the Local Government Auckland Council Act 2009 (the Act).

16.     Non-regulatory decision-making responsibilities for all parks are allocated to local boards unless the park is listed in Schedule 1 of the Auckland Council Long-term Plan.

17.     The general principle is that non-regulatory decisions will be made by local boards unless the activity is such that the decision-making on an Auckland-wide basis will better promote the well-being of the communities across Auckland.

18.     The decision-making responsibilities for parks are set out in the Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2021-2031: Volume 2 listed in Table 1 below.

Table 1: Decision-making responsibilities for parks and open spaces

(Long-term Plan 2021-2031: Volume 2)

 

 

Group of activities

Local Board non-regulatory responsibilities

Local boards are allocated decision-making responsibility for the following non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council

Governing body non-regulatory responsibilities

The governing body is allocated decision-making responsibility for the following non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council

Local council services

 

and

 

Regionally delivered council services

Parks including:

·    the specific location of new local parks (including the prioritisation for acquisition)

·    reserve management plans for local parks

·    local parks improvements and place shaping

·    the use of and activities within local parks, such as community events and community planting programmes

·    cemeteries that are no longer in regular active use and are functioning as local parks.

Parks including:

·     any new parks acquired for an Auckland-wide purpose or function

·     regional open space strategy and policy, including open space network plan and volcanic cones strategy

·     reserve management plans for regional parks

·     the number and general location of all new parks and the prioritisation of major upgrades

·     the use of and activities within regional parks

·     coordination of the use of all sports fields on a regional basis

·     open cemeteries.

 

Reserves for assessment

19.     The following three reserves, located on the shore of the Waitematā Harbour in Birkenhead, are the subject of this assessment:

·        Chelsea Estate Heritage Park (~36 hectares), a historic reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and a suburb park under the council’s Open Space Provision Policy

·        Chatswood Reserve (~14 hectares), a scenic reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and a suburb park under the council’s Open Space Provision Policy

·        Kauri Point Centennial Park (~25 hectares), a scenic reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and a suburb park under the council’s Open Space Provision Policy.

20.     The reserve status, in accordance with Section 18 of the Reserves Act, and open space typology from the council’s Open Space Provision Policy are detailed below:

·    Historic Reserve - purpose is to protect and preserve in perpetuity such places, objects, and natural features, and such things thereon or therein contained as are of historic, archaeological, cultural, educational, and other special interest.

·    Scenic Reserve – purpose is to protect and preserve in perpetuity their intrinsic worth and public benefit, enjoyment and use, and such qualities of scenic interest or beauty or natural features worthy of protection in the public interest.

·    Suburb Park - In accordance with open space typologies in the Open Space Provision Policy 2016, suburb parks are located in prominent locations and help form the identity of a suburb. Suburb parks provide a variety of informal recreation and social experiences for residents across a suburb.

21.     These reserves are shown in Figure 1, and all are under the Kaipātiki Local Board’s decision-making.

Figure 1: Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding reserves

Chatswood ReserveKauri Point DomainNew Zealand Defence ForceKauri Point Centennial ParkChelsea Sugar LtdChelsea Estate
Heritage Park
Map

Description automatically generated

 

22.     As detailed in Attachment A.2, Chelsea Estate Heritage Park was bought from Chelsea Estates in 2005/2006 with funding from the then North Shore City Council, ASB Charitable Trust, Auckland Regional Council, central government, and individuals. It surrounds the privately-owned Chelsea Sugar factory and Sugar Café. The factory and café are in operation.

23.     The New Zealand Defence Force currently occupies approximately 85 hectares of coastal land adjacent to Kauri Point Centennial Park. Staff are not aware of any plan for the New Zealand Defence Force to vacate the site. The New Zealand Defence Force land is out of scope for this assessment.  Similarly, Kauri Point Domain is out of scope.

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Assessment methodology

24.     Staff assessed the merits of designating Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding parks as a regional park (governed by the governing body, added to the Long-Term Plan Schedule 1.1 Governance of parks – Regional Parks).

25.     Staff also assessed the merits of designating Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding parks as a regional asset (governed by the governing body, added to the Long-Term Plan Schedule 1.5 Governance of parks – other parks of regional significance).

26.     The regional asset designation differs from a regional park in that it does not meet the criteria for a regional park but meets the threshold for regional decision-making. Reserves under this special arrangement include the Auckland Domain and Colin Dale Park.

27.     Auckland Council does not have a policy providing a framework to assess whether a local reserve should be designated a regional park.  The assessment of Colin Dale Park’s designation in March 2021, summarised in Attachment A.3, provides an example of a previous assessment.

28.     Staff have developed the following three factors to guide the assessment for Chelsea Estate Heritage Park designation:

·    Values: compared to values in the Regional Park Management Plan 2010.

·    Outcomes: against identified issues currently facing Chelsea Estate Heritage Park.  

·    Decision-making allocation principles: through the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

29.     A detailed assessment is provided in Attachment A.4 of the agenda report.

Values

30.     The Regional Park Management Plan 2010 (currently under review) states that regional parks are managed for their intrinsic, natural, cultural and landscape values and to provide outdoor recreational opportunities for the enjoyment and benefit of Aucklanders.

31.     Staff used the values listed in the current Regional Park Management Plan 2010 to assess how Chelsea Estate Heritage Park measures against them.

Findings 

32.     Chelsea Estate Heritage Park has some of the values typically found in regional parks, such as natural and heritage features. However, it lacks some other values common to regional parks as the reserve is impacted by ongoing operations at the Chelsea Sugar factory and has limited recreation opportunities.

33.     A People’s Panel survey in May 2021 (refer to Attachment A.5 of the agenda report for details) established that the reserve was predominantly used by the local board’s residents. This would suggest that the reserve is not regional in reach and does not constitute a regional asset.

34.     Based on the values assessment, staff advise that the reserves do not meet all of the values of a regional park. The reserves have some values of a regional park, and do not have a regional reach that would constitute a regional asset. 


 

Outcomes

35.     Staff considered whether designating Chelsea Estate Heritage Park as a regional park or asset would alleviate the concerns identified by the local board and some members of the public.

Findings

36.     None of the concerns identified at Chelsea Estate Heritage Park would be impacted by a regional park or regional asset designation:

·    a regional park or asset designation does not in itself improve the maintenance standards, heritage protection or environmental protection for reserves

·    both local reserves and regional parks are required to have long-term management plans under the Reserves Act 1977

·    the local board prioritises budget for local reserves, and the governing body prioritises budget for regional parks and assets, neither guarantee more resource

·    public awareness campaigns for reserves operate regardless of reserve designation.

37.     Based on the outcomes assessment, staff could not identify additional benefits from a change in designation.

Decision-making allocation principles

38.     This assessment is guided by the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 Section 17 which provides criteria on allocation of decision-making responsibilities for Auckland Council.

39.     The legislation states that decision-making responsibility for any non-regulatory activity of the Auckland Council must be allocated by the governing body:

·    to either the governing body or the local board

·    in accordance with the principles set out in Section 17(2)(b)

·    after considering the views and preferences expressed by each local board.

40.     The Section 17(2)(b) principles state that decision-making responsibility for a non-regulatory activity of the Auckland Council should be exercised by its local boards unless the nature of the activity is such that decision making on an Auckland-wide basis will better promote the well-being of the communities across Auckland (detailed further in Attachment A.4).

Findings

41.     The parks are predominately visited by local board residents suggesting that decision-making over the Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding reserves is best to remain aligned with local interest. A recent survey found that 62 per cent of respondents residing in the Kaipātiki Local Board area visited Chelsea Estate Heritage Park in the previous 12 months. It also found that 60 per cent of visitors lived in either the Kaipātiki (40 per cent), Devonport-Takapuna (11 per cent), or Waitematā (9 per cent) Local Board areas.   

42.     The heritage, natural and cultural values of the park may not be better managed or protected if decision-making moves from the local board to the governing body. The local board is best placed to ensure the park’s management and development meets the needs and aspirations of the local communities.

43.     Based on the decision-making allocation principles assessment, staff concluded that decision-making over the Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding reserves is best to remain under the local board.


 

Overall recommendation

44.     Based on the three assessments above, staff recommend that Chelsea Estate Heritage Park remains designated a local reserve governed by the Kaipātiki Local Board to best achieve local outcomes.

45.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires local parks management plans to provide for and ensure the use, enjoyment, maintenance, protection, and preservation of reserves. Concerns reported for the reserve can be considered in the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan. This plan is under development and is expected to be finalised during the second half of 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.     The report considers the designation and governance of the Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and adjacent reserves. There are no climate impacts arising from this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     Parks, Sports and Recreation staff, including specialists in the regional parks and local parks teams, provided input into this assessment. They jointly presented to the Kaipātiki Local Board at the 4 August 2021 workshop.

48.     Parks, Sports and Recreation staff noted that:

·    maintenance issues at Chelsea Estate Heritage Park are improving through better contract management and working with volunteer groups

·    sufficient budget for maintaining Chelsea Estate Heritage Park to its original “English style estate” is unlikely to be allocated whether at a local or regional level 

·    designation as a regional park would not address the identified maintenance, heritage, environmental, budget, public awareness, and long-term planning issues.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     The Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020 includes “investigate Chelsea Estate Heritage Park becoming a regional park due to its heritage status and structures, unique history, natural environment and the legal obligations undertaken by the council when the land was purchased through local, regional and government funding.” 

50.     The Kaipātiki Local Board and some residents reported concerns related to Chelsea Estate Heritage Park through engagement on the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (August 2019) which are captured in this report.

51.     The Kaipātiki Local Board provided a formal submission on consideration for designating Chelsea Estate Heritage Park and surrounding reserves as a regional park through the Regional Parks Management Plan Review (October 2020).

52.     Council staff held a workshop with the Kaipātiki Local Board on 10 February 2021 to discuss drivers for the park redesignation request. Staff held another workshop with the local board on 4 August 2021 to present People’s Panel findings on utilisation and seek informal views on the assessment provided in this report.

53.     There is strong local interest from Chelsea Regional Park Association for the reserve to become a regional park. Their views, expressed through previous submissions, have been considered in this report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Historical documents indicate two pā sites (Te Matarae ō Mana and Onewa Pā) and other archaeological evidence associated with early Māori occupation in Kauri Point Centennial Point and Kauri Point Domain which form part of the Uruamo Headland.

55.     There are no iwi currently identified as involved with the management of Chelsea Estate Heritage Park.

56.     Iwi with an affiliation to the area are:

·    Ngāti Whātua

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Paoa

·    Ngaati Whanaunga

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamaterā

·    Te Patukirikiri

57.     Staff attended the council’s North/West Mana Whenua Forum on 9 December 2021 to present and seek views. Te Kawerau ā Maki were not able to attend the forum and staff followed up separately.

58.     Informal discussions with Ngaati Whanaunga and Te Ākitai Waiohua at the forum indicated no strong preference for Chelsea Estate Heritage Park being designated as a local or a regional park. Instead, the members present expressed support for whichever designation gives the parks the most protection and care of Te Taiao. 

59.     Staff sent follow up emails to the affiliated iwi after the forum to seek further input. Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki provided views that:

·    the local board is better suited to provide specialised, focused management of the park

·    it is simpler to have a strong relationship between mana whenua operations and a local board than with the governing body

·    management of cultural values can be implemented through management plans, and it is a simpler process to act with the local board

·    support of the view for whichever provides more protection for Te Taiao.

60.     Te Kawerau a Maki are yet to submit on the matter of a change of designation. They previously submitted through engagement on the Kaipātiki Local Park Management Plan in June 2021 which highlighted the following support for:

·    change of park name (Kauri Point Centennial Park to Te Matarae o Mana (Manaoterangi))

·    change of park classification to reflect the Māori cultural values present

·    opportunity for Te Kawerau a Maki to provide more specific korero into the local parks management plans

·    seeking co-management opportunities of Te Matarae o Mana-o-terangi (Kauri Point Centennial Park)

·    protection and proper acknowledgment of pā sites.

61.     This report supports the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan key direction of kaitiakitanga in terms of the local board’s governance, concern and care as kaitiaki for the reserves. It does not specifically contribute to specific actions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Schedule of Issues.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

62.     There are no financial impacts arising from this report.

63.     The Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (under development) will consider how best to address the reported concerns at Chelsea Estate Heritage Park. The financial implications of the management intentions for the park will be considered when the plan is adopted.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     There are community expectations that the reported concerns with Chelsea Estate Heritage Park’s maintenance can only be resolved by designating the reserve as a regional park.

65.     This perception creates reputational risk for Auckland Council if the reserve is not designated as a regional park, which can be mitigated once a final decision is made, through:

·    clear communication that maintenance, heritage, environmental, budget, long-term planning and public awareness issues will not necessarily be solved through designation as a regional park

·    development of the Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan (under development) can consider concerns expressed about the reserve.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider the designation at its 7 April 2022 meeting. The committee report will include the local board’s formal resolution.

67.     The Kaipātiki Local Parks Management Plan is currently under development with completion expected by the end of 2022. Concerns expressed about the reserve can be considered as part of the development of the plan.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

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16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Additional information on concerns, background, previous assessments, current assessment, and park utilisation and visitation

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Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Maclean Grindell - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan 2022 - 2032

File No.: CP2021/19637

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To tango / adopt the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan 2022 - 2032.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan 2022 – 2032 outlines the Kaipātiki Local Board’s aspirations and priorities for the future development of local parks and open spaces in the local board area.

3.       Its purpose is to provide a framework for the development of open space over the next ten years that will guide the Kaipātiki Local Board in its future planning and budgeting.

4.       The plan sets out actions to deliver a high quality, safe and well-used open space network that enables a range of activities, uses and experiences for people of all ages and abilities.

5.       Staff have worked with the local board to develop this plan which includes:

·    the current state of the network and its challenges

·    four key moves that provide the framework to deliver a sustainable quality open space network

·    prioritised actions that contribute to the delivery of the four key moves.

6.       Actions will be implemented by the Kaipātiki Local Board over the next ten years as budgets and priorities allow. Implementation of the actions will improve community access to a range of recreational, social, cultural and environmental experiences.

7.       There is a reputational risk to Auckland Council if there is a high level of community expectation of action from adopting the plan. This can be mitigated by clearly stating the purpose of the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan and explaining the resource constraints.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

8.       That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      tango / adopt the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan 2022 – 2032 included in Attachment A of this agenda report

b)      whakamana / endorse the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan key moves as follows:

·    provide equitable access to open space across Kaipātiki

·    enhance and broaden the visitor experience

·    treasure the natural and cultural environment

·    enhance walking, cycling and green corridors to connect communities

c)      whakaae / agree to the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan’s priority actions detailed in Attachment A of this agenda report to be delivered as budget allows

d)      tuku mana / delegate the approval of any minor amendments to Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan to the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Open space network plans are one of the key tools to implement the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan.

10.     Many local boards have developed open space network plans as a way to identify and prioritise actions to improve local parks and open spaces in response to evolving needs and preferences of the local communities.

11.    
Belonging and Participation – Focus area 1
Create safe opportunities for people to meet, connect, participate in and enjoy community and civic life
Belonging and Participation – Focus area 7
Recognise the values of arts, culture, sport and recreation to quality of life
Homes and Places – Focus area 5
Create urban place for the future

Auckland Council’s Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 sets out how parks and open spaces contribute to the outcomes of the Auckland Plan. The Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013 primarily contributes to the following three Auckland Plan focus areas:

12.     Staff have assisted the Kaipātiki Local Board in preparing the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan (the plan). The local board set out key moves and priority actions during a number of workshops held over several months. Staff also canvassed the views of mana whenua as part of the development of the plan.

13.      The development of the plan is undertaken by following three key steps:

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Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Current state of the Kaipātiki Open Space Network

14.     When developing the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan for approval by the local board, staff identified the main strengths and challenges of the open space network.

15.     The strengths of the network include:

·    good open space provision in most areas

·    a community that treasures the environment and is engaged in working to protect and enhance it

·    prominent environmental, cultural and heritage features throughout the network.

16.     The challenges of the network include:

·    increased use due to population growth and limited capacity for expansion in some areas to meet growing needs

·    park amenities and facilities in need of upgrading

·    kauri dieback threatening native flora and disrupting the use of tracks and connections between parks.

Key moves

17.     Staff assisted the local board to develop key moves that respond to the strengths and challenges identified through the current state analysis.

18.     The key moves that follow provide the framework for actions to develop and manage Kaipātiki’s open space network:

·    provide equitable access to open space across Kaipātiki

·    enhance and broaden the visitor experience

·    treasure the natural and cultural environment

·    enhance walking, cycling and green corridors to connect communities.

19.     The key moves are linked to the key focus areas of Treasure, Enjoy, Connect and Utilise identified in the Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan.

Prioritised actions

20.     The Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan prioritises actions to improve the open space network. These actions will be delivered as budget allows.

21.     Staff assisted the Kaipātiki Local Board in setting priorities against the key moves by developing a set of criteria. The criteria include consideration of:

·    existing capital works programmes and contractual commitments

·    areas zoned for high growth (metropolitan centre, town centres, local centres, mixed use, terrace housing and apartments) and areas where is a gap in provision has been identified

·    areas of deficiency and/or poor-quality open space are prioritised over areas of good provision and/or good quality open space

·    alternative options that still deliver high benefits for the community

·    planning and funding cycles and other influences such as land acquisitions, large infrastructure projects, integrated planning with neighbouring local boards and other stakeholders.

22.     Actions fall into three categories:

·    high priority – to be delivered in one to three years

·    medium priority – to be delivered in three to five years

·    low priority – to be delivered in six to 10 years.

23.     Staff engaged with mana whenua and received their views on the actions. Mana whenua feedback, along with the high priority actions are listed under each key move below.

Key move one – Provide equitable access to open space across Kaipātiki

Key move two – Enhance and broaden the visitor experience

Key move three – Treasure the natural and cultural environment

Key move four – Enhance walking, cycling and green corridors to connect communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Parks and open space serve as ecological and biodiversity corridors. They promote and protect native plants and animals.

25.     Reducing carbon emissions and increasing carbon sequestration can be achieved through supporting the use of sustainable transport to parks, naturalisation of parks and helping vegetation and woodland to flourish.

26.     Grassed areas help reduce maximum temperature ranges in urban and suburban areas.

27.     The Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan reflects the effects of predicted climate change. The plan considers such impacts as increasing temperatures, rising sea levels and changing rainfall patterns on the open space network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan has been developed in consultation with relevant council departments, and local parks specialists - in particular the team developing the Kaipātiki Local Park Management Plan in order to ensure alignment between the documents.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Local communities will benefit from the actions in the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan. Benefits include increased sport and recreation opportunities, leading to improved health and well-being.

30.     Staff engaged with the Kaipātiki Local Board over the course of the development of the plan. Workshops took place on:

·    2 May 2018

·    4 July 2018

·    17 October 2018

·    1 September 2021

·    1 December 2021.

31.     There is no statutory requirement to involve the public in the development of open space network plans.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     The plan has relevance to Māori as kaitiaki of Papatūānuku. The plan supports three key directions in the Independent Māori Statutory Board’s Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau:

·    manaakitanga (improving quality of life), in relation to enhancing the mauri of Te Taiao

·    wairuatanga (promoting distinctive identity), in relation to valuing and protecting Māori heritage and Taonga Māori

·    kaitiakitanga (ensuring sustainable futures), in relation to cultural and environmental protection.

33.     The plan also supports the Māori Statutory Board’s Schedule of Issues of Significance by ensuring Māori retain a distinctive cultural identity. This is reflected in the actions that support Māori cultural values, history and heritage being reflected within the built environment.

34.     Mana whenua were invited to provide feedback via the North-West Mana Whenua Forum on two occasions:

·    the developmental stage of the plan to provide feedback on the current state and key moves

·    the final stages of the plan to provide feedback on the priority actions.

35.     There was also a follow up engagement session with Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki to further discuss the key moves and actions.

36.     Feedback from these engagements included a desire for a more mana whenua focussed narrative, Māori place naming, cultural uses and design of open space, and protection of the waterways and forests.

37.     The key aspirations raised by iwi have informed the development of the key moves and actions outlined in the plan.

38.     Mana whenua would like to be engaged with in the early stages of any projects or actions prioritised in the plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There are no immediate financial implications when approving the plan. Actions will be delivered using existing budgets and prioritising locally driven initiative capital (LDI Capex) budget.

40.     If required, the local board may advocate for additional budget as part of the annual and long-term planning processes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     A potential reputational risk exists to Auckland Council if members of the community misunderstand the purpose of the plan, and if there is a high level of community expectation of action from adopting the plan. This can be mitigated by clearly stating the purpose of the Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan which is to guide the local board in its future development of open space when budget is available.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     The plan will be implemented over the next ten years as budgets and priorities allow.

43.     It is anticipated that the delivery of specific projects will draw on a wide range of potential partners who can contribute advice, assistance, funding and support. Mana whenua has expressed their desire to be involved in supporting the delivery of a number of actions in the plan, notably those related to key move three: Treasure the natural and cultural environment.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

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16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Open Space Network Plan

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Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Chelsea Majoor - Graduate Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Heather Skinner – Senior Local Board Advisor

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Beach Haven renewal of coastal connections - detailed design for stage two

File No.: CP2022/02122

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of detailed designs for stage two of the Beach Haven - coastal connections renewal project and progress to consent and construction. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board resolved to consult the public on options to improve coastal connections in the Beach Haven area in September 2019 (resolution number KT/2019/168). Public consultation was undertaken from 11 November to 2 December 2019 as per the local board resolution.

3.       Four hundred and thirty submissions were received, with mixed results. Seventy-two per cent of the respondents supported improving the linkage options for the Beach Haven coastal connection. Feedback received from the community indicated the desire to upgrade the existing paths before creating any new connections. 

4.       The local board approved a project to improve coastal connections in the Beach Haven area as part of the financial year 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (resolution number KT/2021/86) and allocated $2.4 million of renewals funding towards the Beach Haven renew coastal connections project.

5.       The project will deliver on the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 3: Places and spaces – “Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs”. This project is identified as a risk adjusted programme (RAP) project. RAP projects may be delivered in advance of the expected delivery year. 

6.       A workshop was held with the local board on 4 August 2021 to discuss a staged delivery of the project to renew existing pathways to current standards. The local board gave in principle support to the proposal for a three-stage project delivery plan.

7.       On 20 October 2021, the local board approved stage one of the Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project (resolution number KT/2021/179), noting that the viewing platform to the north of the carpark by the football club is part of stage one physical works. Stage one works commenced on 21 February 2022 with a two-month completion date.

8.       The consenting process for the viewing platform required additional time, and construction needed to be pushed out to be part of stage two physical works. The local board requested that the detailed design for stage two come back for formal approval.

9.       Stage two – renewal of pathways will require a consent with physical works planned to start in May 2022 and completed in June 2023. 

10.     A workshop was held with the local board on 24 November 2021 to discuss the detailed design for stage two prior to commencing the consents process. The local board was supportive in principle of the design, and requested staff to inform key stakeholders of the design for stage two and then present a separate report to approve stage two (refer to Attachment A of this agenda report).

11.     Stage three – new connections: This stage is currently on hold until funding is made available in future years. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic recovery budget constraints, funding for stage three has been postponed and will be investigated in future years when funding is made available. This will be brought back to the local board for further discussion when appropriate.

12.     Staff will engage with the local board, community groups and iwi on the installation of story boards and signage for the completion of stage two.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the detailed design for stage two of the Beach Haven renew coastal connections project, as per Attachment A of this agenda report.

b)      delegate to the Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson authority to approve minor amendments to the Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project, following receipt of written advice from staff.

c)       note that stage 3 (new connections) of the project is currently on hold until funding is made available in future years as a result of COVID-19 pandemic recovery budget constraints.

Horopaki

Context

13.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan (KCNP) in 2012 as the guiding document for expanding and enhancing the walking and cycling network within the Kaipātiki local board area.

14.     The plan was updated in 2016 to reflect relevant completed and planned network connection projects, stakeholder feedback and budget availability for planned projects.

15.     At the time of adopting the KCNP, the local board also approved progressing the planning of the connection between Shepherds Park and Tui Park, along with 22 other projects (resolution number KT/2016/120).

16.     The local board resolved to undertake community consultation on the proposed options (resolution number KT/2019/173).

17.     Consultation on the proposed options for the extension of the track network to Tui Park was undertaken between 11 November – 2 December 2019.

18.     As part of the adopted financial year 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (resolution number KT/2021/86), the project name was changed from Shepherds Park to Tui Park Coastal Connections to the Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project. Stage three of the work will be discussed with the local board and reviewed in future years, as there was some concern raised with regards to building new walkways from some residents that have riparian rights through the boardwalk section.

19.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved stage one of the Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project at their business meeting held on 20 October 2021 (resolution number KT/2021/179), noting that the viewing platform to the north of the carpark by the football club is included in stage one. The platform required consenting and will be delivered as part of stage two physical works. The local board requested that the detailed design for stage two come back for formal approval.

20.     The approved project budget of $4,551,762 is spread over multiple years. Of the $4,551,762 (see paragraph 56, table 1) available, $2,435,533 available for the renewal of stages one and two. Future funding of $2,116,229 is allocated in outer years for stage three - new connections. The Beach Haven renew coastal connections project has funding identified within the FY21/22 of $535,533 and the contract for stage one is $220,000.  FY22/23 has a budget of $1,900,000, rough order costs for stage two has been priced at $1.85m which is dependent on the local board approving stage two detailed designs. Stage three has been identified in FY23/24 and FY24/25 of $2,146,000 as new connections will be investigated in outer years and brought back to the local board for further discussions.

21.     The project will deliver on the Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 3: Places and spaces – “Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs”.

22.     Workshops were held with the local board on 4 August 2021 and 24 November 2021 to discuss the staged delivery of the project to renew existing pathways to current standards.  The local board supported the proposal for a three-stage delivery of the project. This includes renewal of existing paths and some realignment of other paths to create a step free environment for all ability access:

a)   Stage one – renewal of pathways as shown in Figure 1 below in blue, yellow and black lines do not require consents. The viewing platform and S22 footpath (identified in Figure 1) have now been moved for delivery as part of stage two due to requiring consents.  Stage one construction has been awarded ($220,000) and physical works start on 21 February 2022

b)   Stage two – renewal of pathways as shown in Figure2 below in green lines will require consents (rough order costs of $1,850,000).

c)   Stage three – new connections will be investigated for outer years and brought back to the local board for further discussions.

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Figure 1: Approved Stage One for Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project.

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Figure 2: Proposed Stage Two for Beach Haven – renew coastal connections project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     The consultation requested feedback on the Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project options for Shepherds Park to Tui Park, and Hellyers Creek Reserve to Kahika Point Reserve. There were 430 submissions received on the proposed five options, which were identified in the report dated 21 October 2021.

24.     In summary, there was significant interest from the community, both individuals and groups. There was general support for renewals of the existing tracks in Shepherds Park and Hellyers Creek Reserve. The feedback indicated that priority should be given to the renewals work to improve the condition of existing pathways.

25.     Feedback supported making the existing network more accessible. This would also help deliver some of the other benefits identified, for example improved recreational activity and user experience.

26.     Due to the nation-wide lockdown period in March 2020 resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic, a memo summarising the community feedback was circulated to the local board members on 25 March 2020 via email.

27.     A letter has been sent through to the identified key stakeholders as approved to the Kaipātiki Local Board.  The letter identified stage one physical works, including the start and completion dates for stage one.  The letter also advised on stage two and that staff were seeking feedback on the design to inform the local board decision at the March 2022 business meeting.

28.     An online meeting was held on 16 February 2022 (as requested by the local board at the 20 October 2021 business meeting) and the stakeholders listed below were invited to attend. Letters were also sent through to the below stakeholders advising them of stage two detailed design. Staff requested that the groups forward the meeting invitation to any other interested parties:

Friends of Shepherds Park *

Bike Kaipātiki and Bike Auckland *

Uruamao Maranga Ake Marae 

Friends of Shepherds Park *

Scout Group

Cedar Centre

Neighbours to Shepherds Park *

Kaipātiki Projects

Beach Haven Guides

Beach Haven Bowl Club

Kaipātiki Facilities Trust

Birkenhead United Football Club

Beach Haven Placemaking group

Beach Haven Residents Association

29.     Representation was made by the above groups (marked in the table above with an (asterisk) to the consultation meeting for stage two for Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project.  Staff discussed the detailed design document for stage two including the goal of providing a step free reserve which will enable all ability access. The following feedback was provided, and responses made by staff to questions:

Friends of Shepherds Park

·      Why was the platform and S22 walkway connection from platform down to the Shepherds carpark (see figure 1) pushed out to stage two?

Response: Staff advised that both the platform and S22 would require consents due to the walkway realignments and the need to work over roots of trees. Consent could not be lodged until the Kaipātiki Local Board approved the detailed design.

·      Concerned about the realignment of the coastal walkway and why this was pushed out and not kept within the current alignment. 

Response: Staff advised that the original boardwalk sits within the salt marsh which is one of the most threatened environments within Auckland. To ensure consent approval, the design was modified to push the low boardwalk out further to preserve the salt marsh.

·      Is the viewing platform going to be a concrete or wood structure?

Response: The platform itself is wood and the path leading up to the structure will be concrete.

·      How do staff deal with the archaeological sites identified on detailed design? (refer Attachment A)?

Response: An archaeological report has been completed and whenever any work is completed within or near an identified site is handled according to the report – where possible the route of the walkway goes around sites, but were unable to divert, then all the precautions are in place to build over and protect the archaeological site.

·      Supported the stage two detailed design and requested to be kept informed.

Neighbours to Shepherds Park

·      Viewing platform – will this be fenced off around the sides?

Response: Yes it will be.

·      Will people be able to view the water from the current seat? Response: The seat can be raised to ensure that a view is still possible.

·      Viewing platform – will you still be able to have a good view of the water? 

Response: Yes, the platform will be built out, but must be stepped back at least two metres from the cliff but will be built up a bit higher than the current site.  The platform will have rails to lean on.

·      Will the platform be accessible to all?

Response: Yes, the concrete path up to the platform will enable everyone to be able to take in the view at this beautiful spot overlooking Hellyers Bay.

·      The community groups would like to work with iwi and local board on signage and telling the stories of the area that have been collected over time.  Staff advised that signage is developed at the end of the programme of works and needs to be discussed with all parties before confirming signage.

·      Will the stump at the front of the ‘new’ platform stay?

Response: Yes it will. This log has been cut down but also provides roots that secure this part of the ledge and will not be removed.

·      The realignment of the coastal boardwalk - really like the idea of being able to enjoy walking over the water and like the design. 

·      New bridges and whether access can be maintained to the old steps and boardwalks for volunteer groups to help with removal of pest plants and replanting of native plants.

·      Glow worms are under the old bridges and would like to see these retained. 

·      Supported the stage two detailed design and requested to be kept informed.

Bike Kaipātiki and Bike Auckland

·      Will this be a bike path?

Response: The width of the path has been pushed out from 1.2 to 1.5 metres which is the widest it is able to go, due to the bush reserve.

·      Would like the local board to consider what this path will be used for by the community and ensure that it is advertised carefully as to the use.

·      Will bikes be allowed on this path?

Response: It will be listed as a fully accessible path. Supported the stage two detailed design and requested to be kept informed.

 

Renewals Work Programme

30.     Stage two - renewal of the existing tracks includes an accessible path to the Shepherds Park look-out area, some realignment of paths and the provision of a step free track by creating new bridges and removing the old stairs.

31.     There is sufficient renewals budget available to complete physical works for stage one and stage two as this project is a RAP project (as identified in the table under the financial implications section of this report). The Beach Haven renew coastal connections project has funding identified within the FY21/22 of $535,533 and the contract for stage one is priced at $220,000.  FY22/23 has a budget of $1,900,000, rough order costs for stage two has been priced at $1.85m which is dependent on the local board approving stage two detailed designs. Stage three has been identified in outer years for FY23/24 and FY24/25 of $2,146,000 as new connections will be investigated in outer years and brought back to the local board for further discussions.

32.     The local board requested to include a viewing platform (identified as a pink dot in Figure 1 above) as part of stage one. Inclusion of the platform as part of stage one was not possible due to detailed design not being approved at the 16 June 2021 business meeting, as the local board wanted to review the full detailed design package including stage two and subsequently requested a separate report to be submitted to approve stage two.  The platform and S22 walkway will require building consent and has now been included into the stage two work programme.

33.     The Kaipātiki Connection Network Plan has clear goals to provide where possible step free opportunities in line with Auckland Council track standards by allowing pedestrian and pram passing.  The detailed design for stage two includes the following outcomes identified in Attachment A of the agenda report:

a)    Increasing the width of the current walkway from 1.2m to 1.5m wide.

b)    Removing all box stairs (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) from S22 through to S39C and replacing with two new bridges, except for the stairs that go from the new coastal boardwalk through to S12 and onto the only stairs from the beach up onto the main tracks. This will enable a step free track.

c)    Removing the existing coastal boardwalk and replacing it with 73m long by 1.5m wide low coastal boardwalk within the mangroves to ensure boardwalk is not within the salt marsh environment. This will provide one entry in as a step free option.

d)    Installation in places (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) of a 1.5m wide timber boardwalk.

e)    Aggregate path for remaining pathway of 1.5m wide.

f)     Decommissioning of all paths to make way for new bridges and/or realignments to ensure the best healthy outcome for the forest.

g)    Melba Street pedestrian access to Shepherds Park will have upgraded 1.5m wide concrete steps and provides a 1.5m wide aggregate ‘step free’ path. 

34.     The original concrete path surfaces will remain as concrete where they currently reside, except for the new concrete path that connects from the existing concrete pathway that links to the platform. The remaining paths will be compacted aggregate built, boardwalks and bridges where possible, at a 1.5m width that allows for pedestrian and pram passing.

35.     The community will be informed about the continuation of the renewals portion of the work and the postponement of the new connections project. This will be done through social media and direct emails prior to commencement of physical delivery, including signage for stage two physical works outlining the project with QR codes.

36.     The new connections that were part of the original design and consultation will be investigated in outer years and will be bought back to the local board for further discussion as part of stage three.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

·     to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050; and 

·     to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change. 

38.     The proposed walkway will have a positive impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The provision of additional walkway connections contributes towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

39.     The pathway contributes to a low carbon, safe transport system that delivers social, economic and health benefits.

40.     The pathway and structures are planned to be located above the predicted increase in sea levels along the coastline, as determined by a council coastal specialist.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate (Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance and Parks, Sport and Recreation), have been consulted and are supportive of the proposed project, as it will improve the tracks and provide an accessible, step free walking track for the community.

42.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing throughout the life of the project to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems for this park.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     There is general support from the community for the renewal of the existing tracks as part of the Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project. 

44.     A memo was provided to the local board on the Beach Haven Connection on the proposals and the feedback for Beach Haven renew coastal connections project dated 14 March 2021.

45.     Workshops were held with the local board on 4 August 2021 and 24 November 2021 to discuss staged renewals of existing pathways and bringing them up to Auckland Council Track standards.

46.     The local board gave in principle support to the proposal for a three-stage project delivery plan.  At a business meeting on 20 October 2021, the local board approved (resolution number KT/2021/179) stage one of the Beach Haven - renew coastal connections project, noting that the viewing platform to the north of the carpark by the football club is part of stage one physical works but will be delivered as part of stage two. The platform required consenting and had to be pushed out to stage two physical works (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report). 

47.     Stage two – renewal of pathways includes the delivery of the viewing platform and the realigned coastal boardwalk as identified in Attachment A. Stage two requires a consent with physical works planned to start in May 2022 and completed in June 2023. 

48.     A workshop was held with the local board on 24 November 2021 to discuss in more detail stage two design for approval to commence consent reports. The local board supported the design in principle and requested staff to inform key stakeholders of the stage two design and then report back with a separate report to approve the stage two detailed design.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

49.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

50.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2018-2028, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework and the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020.

51.     Engagement with Te Kawerau ā Maki on 6 October 2021 was undertaken on the proposed detailed design for Beach Haven coastal connections project for stage one and two.

52.     Representatives from Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara and Te Kawerau a Maki attended site walkovers and supported the project in principle.

53.     Story boards and signage will be installed as part of the project to provide all visitors to the park with the history of the area.  This will be discussed with iwi, community groups and the local board for further discussion in the future once the whole project has been completed.

54.     Uruamo Maranga Ake Marae submitted additional information as part of the memo dated 25 March 2020 presented at the 20 October 2021 business meeting providing feedback on consultation of the Beach Haven renew coastal connections project.

55.     Uruamo Maranga Ake Marae supported the Glulam bridge link connecting Hellyers Creek Reserve from behind 53 Paragon Avenue to behind 161 Lancaster Road and a boardwalk connection from behind 14 Odonn Avenue to behind 28 Bay Park Place bridge connecting Hellyers to enhance the existing network and to improve accessibility.

56.     The renewal of the Beach Haven coastal walkways will benefit Māori and the wider community by providing increased access to recreational opportunities and improved connections between local communities. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     A total budget of $4,551,762 has been approved by the local board for this project, the details of which are detailed below:

Table 1: Approved funding allocation for the project

Budget source

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

FY24/25

Total ($)

Renewals

535,533

$1,900,000

 

 

$2,435,533

Network Plan Connections (New Structures)

 

 

$150,000

$1,966,229

$2,116,229

Total allocated budget

 

 

 

 

$4,551,762

 

58.     The focus of stage two will now be on completing the renewal of the Beach Haven Coastal Connections Pathway (Shepherds Park) to provide a step free track with the renewals funding of $2,435,533. Stage one is underway with physical works of $220,000 starting in early February 2022. Subject to local board approval of the detailed design for stage two would see physical works starting around April/May 2022 depending on consent approvals and weather conditions. FY22/23 has a budget of $1,900,000 and rough order costs for stage two has been priced at $1.85m which is dependent on the local board approving stage two detailed designs.

59.     The financial year 2020/2021 changes to funding resulting from the recovery budget, have meant the anticipated Kaipātiki Connections Network Plan development funding for the delivery of stage three has been postponed for several years.

60.     Therefore, the design work (stage three) on the connection options for Shepherds Park to Tui Park and Hellyers Creek Reserve to Kahika Point Reserve has been postponed until the funding is confirmed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     There were some concerns raised with regards to building new walkways from some residents that have riparian rights through the boardwalk section. Additional consultation and design are recommended when this part of the work is reviewed in future years as part of stage three.

62.     Several stakeholder groups support the project and request that the walkway is widened to 3.0m. This width is not achievable along the whole length, due to land and tree constraints. However, the renewed tracks will be made as wide as possible to allow for passing areas.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     Construction of the renewals of existing tracks (stage one) has been awarded and physical works will start in early February 2022.  Stage two (which will require consents) is likely to start in financial year 2021/2022 through to financial years 2022/2023 and possibly 2023/2024. Staff will provide updates to the local board at workshops and/or quarterly reports on each of the stages identified in this report.

64.     Staff will engage with the local board and iwi in future to discuss the installation of story boards and signage on completion of all three stages.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Beach Haven - renewal of coastal connections - detailed design for stage two

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Leigh Radovan - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

New community lease to Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoa, at Drome View Reserve, Beach Haven and Tamahere Reserve, Windy Ridge

File No.: CP2022/02233

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant new community ground leases to Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoaat Drome View Reserve, Beach Haven and Tamahere Reserve, Windy Ridge.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoa (playcentre) hold community ground leases for their buildings at Drome View Reserve, Beach Haven and Tamahere Reserve, Windy Ridge.

3.       The current lease at Beach Haven expired on 29 September 2021. However, the lease remains operative on a month-by-month basis until a new lease is granted.

4.       The current lease at Windy Ridge expired on 31 August 2020. However, the lease remains operative on a month-by-month basis until a new lease is granted.

5.       Playcentre, Beach Haven and Windy Ridge sought new community ground leases for their tenant owned buildings at Drome View Reserve, Beach Haven and Tamahere Drive, Windy Ridge.

6.       The consideration of new leases were identified and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their 16 June 2021 local board meeting (resolution number KT/2021/86).

7.       The purpose of the playcentre is to provide the community with a hub for families where parents as first educators are welcomed and supported. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 Outcome 1: Te whai wāhitanga me te oranga | Belonging and wellbeing and Outcome 3: Ngā wāhi me ngā takiwā | Places and spaces.

8.       Playcentre has provided all required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds and that it is being managed appropriately. Playcentre has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

9.       Staff conducted site visits where it was found both sites and improvements are well maintained and utilized. Community outcomes plans were also negotiated with each playcentre site.

10.     Staff engaged with Iwi identified as having an interest in the land. No objections were received from any Iwi groups.

11.     Staff recommend two new community ground leases be granted to Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoa at Beach Haven and Windy Ridge for a term of ten years commencing 1 April 2022 with one right of renewal for a further ten years.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      grant a new community ground lease to Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoa at Drome View Reserve, Beach Haven described as Part Lot 8 DP 42517 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) on the following terms and conditions:

i)    term - ten (10) years commencing 1 April 2022 plus one right of renewal for five (10) years

ii)   rent – $1.00 plus GST if demanded.

b)      approve the community outcomes plan (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report) that will be attached as a schedule to the lease.

c)       grant a new community lease to Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoa at Tamahere Reserve, Windy Ridge Lot 2 DP 83037 (refer to Attachment C of the agenda report) on the following terms and conditions:

i)    term - ten (10) years commencing 1 April 2022 plus one right of renewal for five (10) years

ii)   rent – $1.00 plus GST if demanded.

d)      approve the community outcomes plan (refer to Attachment D of the agenda report) that will be attached as a schedule to the lease.

e)      note that all other terms and conditions will be accordance with the Auckland Council Community Guidelines July 2012 and The Reserves Act 1977.

Horopaki

Context

12.     Local boards have the allocated decision-making authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

13.     The consideration of a new lease to playcentre at Tamahere Reserve, Windy Ridge and Drome View Reserve, Beach Haven are part of the approved work programme. This report considers these new community leases.

14.     Playcentre Beach Haven and Windy Ridge are in tenant owned buildings suitable for their needs as playcentres.

15.     The previous leases commenced respectfully in 2000 and 2001 for an initial term of 10 years plus one 10 year right of renewal. Both leases have now fully expired, and new leases have been requested by the Playcentre.

16.     This report recommends granting new ground leases to the Playcentre at both Beach Haven and Windy Ridge.

Land and building

17.     The Playcentre at Beach Haven occupies part of the land parcel legally described as Part Lot 8 DP 42517 - 1146 m2 - NA1610/100 and is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve. The classification aligns with the activity of the playcentre.

18.     The playcentre owns the building and all improvements at Beach Haven. A site visit was made on 16 December 2021 and the building and improvements were found to be well maintained and well used.

19.     The converted house and grounds provide a playcentre for the local community. The building has a large open plan space for the families to learn and play. The grounds have been well landscaped to provide multiple areas for play.

20.     The playcentre at Windy Ridge occupies part of the land parcel legally described as Lot 2 DP 83037 contained in Record of Title NA39C/324 is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve. The classification aligns with the activity of the playcentre.

21.     Playcentre owns the purpose-built facility and all improvements at Windy Ridge. A site visit was made on 8 December 2021 and the facility and improvements were found to be well maintained and well used.

22.     The purpose-built facility and grounds provide a playcentre for the local community. The building has a large open plan space for the families to learn and play. The grounds have been well landscaped to provide multiple areas for play.

23.     Both playcentres have maintenance plans to ensure their facilities and grounds are well maintained and replaced when needed.

Playcentre

24.     Te Whānau Tupu Ngātahi o Aotearoa, Playcentre Aotearoa is an amalgamation of playcentres that promote and encourage the development of Playcentre activities throughout Aotearoa New Zealand.

25.     The purpose of playcentre is to provide the community with a hub for families where parents as first educators are welcomed and supported.

26.     The playcentre assist and foster innovation and research in the fields of early childhood education, adult education and young children.

27.     The programmes provide practical help, inform and support, and where necessary, link families to more specialised help within the community.

28.     They also assist families to provide quality play experiences for all children in an inclusive environment which acknowledges and incorporates the dual heritage of Aotearoa New Zealand.

29.     They offer and nurture sustainable services and practices at all levels of Playcentre Aotearoa.

30.     The playcentres are open to all children up to five-years of age and requires parents and caregivers to be involved.

31.     The playcentres are licensed early childhood providers and its curriculum incorporates Te Reo. Many learning stories are in Te Reo and all sessions encourage the use of Te Reo.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

32.     Playcentre’s applications were assessed against the criteria contained in Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the priorities set by the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020.

33.     Under the guidelines, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term, a right which the trust is exercising.

34.     It is recommended that two new leases be granted to Playcentre for a term of 10 years, with one right of renewal for a further term of 10 years, giving a total term of 20-years. This is the standard term for group-owned buildings in accordance with the guidelines.

Assessment of the application

35.     Playcentre satisfies the requirements specified in the Community Occupancy Guidelines in the following ways:

i)          it is a registered society

ii)    it has a history of delivering quality services to the local community

iii)   Playcentre has provided a copy of its financial accounts which indicate that its funds are sufficient to meets its liabilities and that it possesses adequate financial reserves

iv)   Playcentre is manged appropriately, evidenced by its longevity and extent of programmes offered.

36.     A community outcomes plan has been negotiated and agreed with the playcentre. This identifies the benefits the playcentre will provide to the local community. This is provided in Attachment B and D of the agenda report and will be attached as the third schedule to the lease documents.

Public notification and engagement 

37.     Both playcentres are situated on land classified as classified local purpose (community buildings) reserve. There is no statutory requirement for public notification on these classified reserves.

38.     Iwi engagement is required under the terms of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987. None of the identified 12 Iwi groups in the area raised any concerns over the proposed new leases.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals, to:

i)   reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050, and

ii)  prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

40.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

i)   use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

ii)  use eco labelled products and services

iii) seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

41.     The designated impact level of the recommended decision on greenhouse gas emissions has “no impact” because the proposal continues an existing activity and does not introduce any new sources of emissions.

42.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease as the sites do not sit near the coast nor are they in a flood plain.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed leases as it will include positive outcomes.

44.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     Consideration of a new lease to Playcentre is in the Kaipātiki Community Lease Work Programme 2021/2022.

46.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated decision-making authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities.

47.     The proposed leases will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote a hub for families where parents as first educators are welcomed and supported for the Kaipātiki Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

48.     The assessment of the application was socialised with the Kaipātiki Local Board via a memo sent to the board members on 19 January 2021. No objections or concerns were raised.

49.     Playcentre’s activities align with the Kaipātiki Local Board 2020-23 Plan outcome of “Outcome 1 Te Whai Wāhitanga me te Oranga | Belonging and Wellbeing

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

50.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

51.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development projects.

52.     Iwi engagement has been undertaken relating to granting a new lease and involved:

i)    A virtual presentation to Mana Whenua was emailed 2 February 2022.

ii)   Formal iwi engagement under Section 4 of the Conservation Act was initiated on 2 February 2022 and concluded on 1 March 2022.

iii)  No objections or requests for hui or for a kaitiaki site visits were received from any of the iwi groups responding.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     The current rents are the same as the proposed rents therefore there is no cost implications for the local board approving a new lease to playcentre at both locations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     Should the Kaipātiki Local Board resolve not to grant a new community lease to both playcentres this decision will materially affect the group’s ability to undertake its core activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Subject to the grant of a new community lease, council staff will work with the groups to finalise the lease documentation

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A Site Plan Beach Haven

121

b

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment B Community Outcomes Plan- Beach Haven Playcentre

123

c

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment C Site Plan Windy Ridge

125

d

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment D Community Outcomes Plan Windy Ridge Playcentre

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Phillipa Carroll – Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Heather Skinner – Senior Local Board Advisor

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Marlborough Park, Glenfield - approval of concept design for accessible play equipment

File No.: CP2022/02632

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the concept design for accessible play equipment at Marlborough Park, R13 Chartwell Avenue, Glenfield.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community Facilities is currently undertaking a project to include accessible play equipment within one park in Kaipātiki as part of the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme approved by the local board on 16 June 2021 (resolution number KT/2021/86).

3.       The local board allocated $45,000 to the project and identified it as a priority. The project will achieve the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome 3: “Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs”.

4.       Two concept designs (options 1 and 2) have been developed for Marlborough Park as requested by the Kaipātiki Local Board, and were discussed at a workshop with the board held on 27 October 2021. The local board indicated their support for Marlborough Park as the preferred location for accessible play (refer to Attachment A to this agenda report).

5.       Option 1 includes a single inclusive carousel and option 2 provides two accessible play items, being an inclusive carousel and interactive bridge with sound.

6.       The Kaipātiki Local Board indicated a preference for option 2 at a workshop held on 2 February 2022 (refer to Attachment B of this agenda report).

7.       The project will span the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years.

8.       An additional budget of $49,000 is required to deliver the preferred concept (option2).

9.       Staff have identified changes required to the approved 2021/2022 work programme to ensure the delivery of this project.

10.     Elliott Avenue Reserve - renew park assets (ID15487) is now complete. A savings of $65,000 has been identified and is available for reallocation. It is recommended that $29,000 of ABS: Capex - Renewals be reallocated to the accessible play equipment project (ID31036) to address the storm water reticulation requirements, relocation of the seat and pathway renewal.

11.     Staff recommend the allocation of $20,000 Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) capex in the draft 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme to the accessible play equipment project. This is to be confirmed through the work programme prioritisation process, with the first workshop in March 2022.   

12.     Once the concept design and additional budget is approved by the local board, the detailed design phase can begin. Construction is forecast to commence in April 2022, if ground conditions are suitable, following completion of the landscape and drainage designs. 

13.     Completion will depend on the lead time of the play equipment and the ground conditions, so may be as late as spring 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design (option 2) for Marlborough Park which includes two new accessible play items and incorporates soft landscape to soften the play space and help with drainage around the playground, as per Attachment B to this agenda report, and request staff to progress the project to detailed design and construction.

b)      approve in principle an additional budget of $20,000 of Local Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) capex from financial year 2022/2023, noting that this will be confirmed through the work programme prioritisation process.

c)       approve the reallocation of $29,000 of ABS: Capex – Renewals budget from Elliott Avenue Reserve – renew parks assets (ID:31036) to the Accessible play equipment - one location in Kaipātiki (ID:31036) in 2021/2022.

Horopaki

Context

14.     As part of the Kaipātiki Local Board 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services Work Programme, the local board approved a project to develop accessible play at one location in Kaipātiki (resolution number KT/2021/86). Additional accessible play provision within an existing park creates an inclusive environment where all children with or without disabilities can integrate in one space.

15.     The Auckland Council - Auckland Design Manual recommends ensuring every play space has at least one component which can be accessed by those with disabilities, and to choose surfaces that encourage universal access. 

16.     Two locations were identified as possible for new accessible play equipment within the Kaipātiki Local Board area:

a)   Marlborough Park, R13 Chartwell Avenue, Glenfield; and

b)   Onepoto Domain, R24 Tarahanga Street, Northcote (located in the south-east of the local board area).

17.     Staff undertook a feasibility study of the two sites which was presented to the local board during a workshop in October 2021. The feasibility study identified the current provision of accessible play as limited at both sites. 

18.     Marlborough Park is located centrally within the Kaipātiki Local Board area. The park has areas of undulating landform, with steep topography to the north of the park. Level accessible areas exist around the community hub, basketball courts and existing junior play area.

19.     Marlborough Park is preferred because it has more inclusive play elements available, less significant storm water issues and the existing safety surface facilitates inclusive play. 

20.     Marlborough Park has a large existing junior playground, youth play space zone, flying fox, basketball court and skatepark. The addition of more accessible play creates a destination park that is suitable for all ages and abilities. 

21.     The Kaipātiki Play and SunSmart provision audit (2018) notes that all play activity attributes are covered at Marlborough Park except for spinning / rocking. 

22.     The local board indicated a preference towards an inclusive carousel and interactive two-metre bridge being installed at Marlborough Park, but requested two concept designs, one with a single inclusive carousel and the second design with an inclusive carousel and an interactive bridge.

23.     An engineer’s estimate was required for both options to form a clear understanding of the playground extension.

24.     The proposed accessible play space at Marlborough Park is to be located near the existing play equipment to create an integrated play space and provide opportunities for social interaction (refer to Attachment A).

Figure 1: Location for accessible play
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25.     The proposed play area sits between a group of existing, mature, deciduous oak trees and a single semi-mature tree adjacent to a park seat. All installation work within this area will require an arborist report and tree owner approval from Auckland Council.

26.     Two play concepts were requested by the Kaipātiki Local Board. These were developed by a landscape architect and presented at a workshop on 2 February 2022.

27.     Option 1 includes a single inclusive carousel and ‘wet pour’ safety surfacing. The play space is enclosed by low level planting and a swale to assist in storm water management. An existing park seat requires relocation as part of this work. A cost of $83,000 is estimated for this option, with a budget shortfall of $38,000.

28.     Option 2 provides two accessible play items, being an inclusive carousel and interactive bridge with sound, and ‘wet pour’ safety surfacing. The play space is enclosed by low level planting and a swale to assist in storm water management. An existing park seat requires relocation as part of this work. A cost of $94,000 is estimated for this concept, with a budget shortfall of $49,000.

Figure 2: Accessible and inclusive play items

Play item

Play attribute

Safe use of equipment

 

Inclusive carousel

Spinning


 

Wheelchair inclusive, sitting, standing

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Interactive bridge with sound (2m)

Sound, creative play

Wheelchair inclusive, walking

Text

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29.     The concept design proposals were presented at the February 2022 workshop and the local board members indicated support of option 2 which includes two items of play.

30.     This project links to the following regional and local board objectives:

Figure 3: Strategic alignment

Strategic alignment

Objective

Direction

Auckland Plan 2050

Belonging and participation

1. Foster an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs

2. Improve health and wellbeing for all Aucklanders by    reducing harm and disparities in opportunities

Auckland Plan 2050

Homes and Places

4. Provide sufficient public places and spaces that are inclusive accessible and contribute to urban living

Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020

1. Belonging and wellbeing

Our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy.

Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020

3. Places and spaces

Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs.

Open space provision policy

Make safe and welcoming places

Apply Universal design principles to ensure parks and open spaces are accessible to everyone.

 

Budget Variation

31      One project in the current work programme (Elliott Avenue Reserve - renew park assets (ID15487) is complete. Surplus budget for this project in 2021/2022 is available for reallocation. The proposal is to reallocate $29,000 of this budget to cover stormwater reticulation issues which exist on site, the seat re-location, arborist services and path renewals at Marlborough Park.  

32      The Kaipātiki Local Board have $162,522 of Locally Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) available for allocation in the next three financial years, 2022/2023 to 2024/2025. The local board have discretion to allocate their LDI capex to any project in their area. The proposal is to allocate $20,000 of this budget to the ‘Accessible play equipment – one location in Kaipātiki’ project which will help to fund new accessible play equipment, safety surface and soft landscape.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

33      The existing play space at Marlborough Park caters for Early Childhood (1-4 years), Childhood (5-9 years), Junior (10 -12 years) and Senior (13+) age groups and has several play items which are inclusive, these include the talking tubes, basket swing and interactive posts. The interactive carousel and interactive bridge would provide additional play experience for all levels of ability.

34      The concept plan has been produced based on site constraints and the requirement to incorporate accessible play into the existing play space, matching colour palettes materials and ensuring children feel included into the wider play space while using accessible play equipment. Staff recommend that this concept is the best mix of play and social items, given the site constraints and budget. The play safety surfacing is rubber safety surface, which is a flush surface allowing for easy access from adjacent footpaths. 

35      The proposed location for the accessible play equipment is beneath large established oak trees. These will provide some sun protection through summer months.

36      One existing timber park seat will need to be relocated due to the positioning of the new accessible play space. An existing specimen tree will provide some natural shade provision, to the south of the junior play space.

37      Two design options were presented to the local board at a workshop on 2 February 2022. An assessment of each option considering constraints, risks and estimated cost was tabled and discussed.

Options assessment

38      A summary of all options is outlined in the table below.

Figure 4: Options assessment for the development of accessible play

Options

Criteria

Finance/Budget

Comments

Local board outcome alignment/ Strategic alignment

Risk

Implementation

CAPEX

(Preliminary estimate only)

OPEX

(Preliminary estimate only)

Option 1 - Install one piece of accessible play equipment

Contributes to multiple Auckland Plan and local board objectives / outcomes as detailed below.

Increased carbon emissions caused by the construction process.

Install one piece of accessible play equipment in Marlborough Park, along with safety surface, soft landscape, and natural storm water management.

$83,000

$0

This option is not recommended as adding only one piece of play equipment in the space allocated is limiting the play potential.

Option 2 -

Install two pieces of accessible play equipment

Contributes to multiple Auckland Plan and Local board objectives/outcomes as detailed below.

Increased carbon emissions caused by the construction process. A second piece of equipment is an additional $11,000.

Install two pieces of accessible play equipment in Marlborough Park along with soft landscape, safety surface and natural storm water management.

$94,000

$0

This option is recommended as it will provide more inclusive and integrated play opportunities for those with accessibility needs in the community.

Preferred option

39.     It is recommended that the local board approve the design for option 2 (refer Attachment B), to allow the project to continue to detail design, procurement, and construction.

40.     Staff recommend variations to the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme for financial year 2021/2022 as outlined in the table below to cover the budget shortfall:

Figure 5: Variation to the work programme for financial year 2021/2022

Project ID

Name

Budget change

Description

15487

Elliott Avenue Reserve - renew park assets

· Budget reallocation

· Approved ABS: Capex renewal budget in 2021/2022: $200,300Deferral 2021/2022: $78,459

· Total ABS: Capex renewal budget 2021/2022: $278,459

· $100,000 was transferred to Kauri Glen Reserve - Stage 3 renewals as per resolution number KT/2021/180.

· Final ABS: Capex renewal budget 2021/2022: $178,459

 

·   The construction of this project is complete. A small amount of additional expenditure is expected.

·   A saving of $65,000 is being declared at this stage. These funds are therefore available for re-allocation this financial year.

·   It is recommended that $29,000 is reallocated from this project to Accessible play equipment - one location in Kaipātiki (ID31036).

·   The re-allocated renewals funding will cover items such as the additional storm water reticulation requirements, seat re-location, arborist services and path renewals.

·   Staff will initiate a separate discussion with the local board to consider reallocation of the remaining budget.

313036

Accessible play equipment - one location in Kaipātiki

·    Increase project budget

·    Approved LDI Capex in 2021/2022: $45,000

· The original budget was insufficient to deliver Option 2.

· An additional $49,000 is required.

· The proposal is to reallocate $29,000 of ABS: Capex renewal budget from Elliott Avenue Reserve to cover some of the shortfall.

· Additional LDI Capex of $20,000 is requested from the next financial year 2022/2023 LDI Capex budget allocation.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    To reduce greenhouse gas emissions and to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    To prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change

42.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions. This includes embodied emissions from construction materials and vehicle fuel. Auckland Council’s sustainability guidelines will be implemented throughout the procurement processes to minimise the carbon impact including recycling materials where possible.

43.     The proposed concept design incorporates low level planting which will aid in the stormwater management of the new play space.

44.     The existing vegetation will provide some natural shade provision for park users and potential further reduction in greenhouse gas emission. A relocated park seat will also benefit from natural shade provision within the wider play space.

45.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services (Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance teams) support the project as there will be stormwater improvements, and this will reduce the cost of maintenance.

47.     Increasing accessible play items in our local parks provides for more inclusive and integrate play opportunities for those with accessibility needs.

48.     This supports the Auckland Plan 2050:

·    Outcome: Belonging and Participation.

Direction 1: Foster an inclusive Auckland where everyone belongs and
Direction 2: Improve health and wellbeing for all Aucklanders by reducing harm and disparities in opportunities.

·    Outcome: Homes and places.

Direction 4: Provide sufficient public places and spaces that are inclusive accessible and contribute to urban living.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     The new play space will enable families from Kaipātiki and the wider community to have access to inclusive play options and allow recreation opportunities for children with more complex access requirements.

50.     This project was approved as part of the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme on 16 June 2021 (resolution number KT/2021/86). The project aligns with the following Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020 outcome/ and objectives:

Figure 6: 2020 Kaipātiki Local Board Plan outcome/s and objective/s

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 1: Belonging and wellbeing.
Our people are involved in the community, socially connected to one another, and supported to be active, creative, resilient, and healthy.

Our diversity is a strength that we nurture and celebrate as we come together:
Encourage and support a range of accessible and affordable initiatives that celebrate our diverse community and promote our identity

Outcome 3: Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs.

Our parks, playgrounds and public spaces are SunSmart, high quality, accessible, and well maintained

 

51.     A key initiative from this objective is to ‘implement the actions and priorities identified in the Kaipātiki Play and SunSmart Provision Audit.’ The audit identified that all activity category attributes were covered withing Marlborough Park apart from spinning / rocking. The selection of an interactive carousel has fulfilled this requirement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

53.     The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through increased opportunity for well-being. Accessible play equipment can be used by all families, children with accessibility requirements and those without. Approximately 8.5 percent of the population within the Kaipātiki Local Board area identify as Māori.

54.     As the project is only a minor change to the existing play facility, with materials and colours matching the existing play space, no iwi consultation has been undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     The 2021-2023 work programme allocated LDI funds of $45,000 for this project.

56.     An additional $49,000 will be required to complete the construction of the preferred option 2.

57.     Construction is planned to take place over the 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 financial years due to the long lead time on these items of play equipment.

58.     The proposed variations are within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

59.     The proposed budget changes can be achieved by realignment of budget within the work programme as outlined in the table below:

           Figure 7: Variations required for financial year 2021/2022.

Project ID

Project Name

Approved budget 2021/2022

Budget variation

Revised budget

313031036

 

AcceAccessible play equipment - one locatilocation in Kaipātiki

$45,000 (LDI)

·  $20,0000 LDI increase

·  $29,000 renewal increase

$94,000

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

60.     The following risks and mitigations have been considered:

Risks identified

Mitigation

Timeframe

 

Local board do not support the concept plan.

The scope would need to be redefined, but this will subsequently delay and extend the timeframes to deliver the project

Health & Safety

 

The public are exposed to unsafe conditions during construction phase

Note health and safety measures that will be put in place to manage any risks

Budget

 

Budget is not adequate

Additional budget required - $20,000 of Local Discretionary Initiatives (LDI) capex from financial year 2022/2023. This is to be confirmed through the work programme prioritisation process.

 

Reallocation of $29,000 of ABS: Capex – Renewals budget from Elliott Avenue Reserve – renew parks assets (ID:31036) to the Accessible play equipment - one location in Kaipātiki (ID:31036) in 2021/2022.

Current cost estimate is at concept level only

Costs may change as the project progresses through detailed design. The budget required for the physical works phase will be confirmed once the project is tendered. Should the cost required for physical works come in significantly higher than the budget, then the local board will be consulted to discuss a way forward.

Construction

 

Poor weather during construction may hold up delivery

Construction methodology and programme to allow for wet weather.

Damage to existing paths due to construction works

Jak mats or similar will be used to minimise the impact of machinery on the path. If damage were to occur, this would have to be remedied at a cost to the contractor.

Reputational

If the plans are not supported, it may lead to community disappointment, as well as contribute to a drop in consultation and engagement of future projects

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     The table below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step. Unforeseen delays in the procurement of a design or build partner have the potential to delay completion of the project beyond the identified timeframe. 

Figure 8: Project phasing and timelines

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Detailed design

Once the concept design option is approved by the local board, the development of the detailed design can be progressed.

March 2022

Procure physical works contractor/build partner

The tender will be submitted to our Full Facilities Contractor as per the procurement guidelines.

May 2022

Physical works

Accurate commencement and duration of the physical works is not known at this time and will be confirmed at a later stage but is envisaged between the dates specified.

May 2022 – September 2022

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Marlborough Park Accessible play Location

139

b

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Marlborough Park Accessible play Concept Design

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Keren Alleyne – Senior Project Manager, Community Facilities  

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

A picture containing diagram

Description automatically generated


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Diagram

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/02388

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.       Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport (AT) to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.       In December 2021, AT advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-26. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.       Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, AT is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.       The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

Horopaki

Context

7.       AT has made speed limit changes covering 11% of the road network, with changes to a further 27% of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.       The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

9.       Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late-2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

11.     The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

12.     ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

13.     The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

14.     Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

16.     The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

17.     Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

18.     Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

19.     The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

21.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that 19% of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·     reduce 40% of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·     include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming ten years into speed management plans

·     implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

25.     The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

26.     Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

27.     In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

29.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

31.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

34.     There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing their final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

36.     Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

37.     Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

38.     In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

39.     The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Stephen Rainbow – Head of Community Engagement – Central Hub, Auckland Transport

Heather Skinner – Senior Local Board Advisor

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Northcote town square location

File No.: CP2022/02054

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the location of the new Northcote town square to be co-located with the new multi-purpose community hub adjacent to Cadness Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The creation of a sunny, sheltered town square is a key strategic move of the urban renewal of the Northcote town centre.

3.       A proposed location for the town square was identified in the 2019 Eke Panuku Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan. The proposed location was adjacent to the proposed location of the community hub building in the benchmark masterplan.

4.       In October 2021 the Kaipātiki Local Board approved the location of the new community hub building to be developed adjacent to Cadness Reserve. As a result of this decision, it was requested that the location of the town square be re-considered.

5.       Following expert consideration, it has been identified that the option to co-locate the town square with the new community hub and Cadness Reserve is optimal.

6.       The option to co-locate the town square with the community hub is preferred because it:

·        places the community hub and town square next to each other, which means a wider range of activities in the town square and community hub (as the intention in the 2019 masterplan option)

·        creates a stronger connection to Te Ara Awataha 

·        reinforces the civic core by being located adjacent to the community hub

·        creates synergies between community facility and town square providing greater flexibility and operational efficiencies (as the intention in the 2019 masterplan option)

·        enhances the visibility of the hub and creates clear connections to Lake Road along Pearn Place, which will be improved with new shops, and along Ernie Mays Street which will include wide footpaths, trees and planting and connections to Te Ara Awataha

·        is adjacent to the proposed public transport links making it more accessible to the community

·        will allow for Ernie Mays Street to be closed for infrequent large events such as Chinese/Korean New Year

·        will place the square away from any shading or winds that may be created by higher development within the town centre redevelopment

·        enables streets and open spaces to be designed with the buildings to focus on providing a busy, active, pedestrian focused area and a vibrant shopping centre

·        allows the town square and community hub to be designed and built at the same time and delivered for the community in a quicker timeframe than if in the town centre.

7.       At a workshop with the local board on 23 February, some concerns were raised about the level of open space and visible connections through the town centre if the town square was located adjacent to the new community hub.

8.       The town centre development will still have sufficient and high-quality open space, pedestrian priority and visible connections. These will be ensured through design and development requirements to be delivered by potential developer(s).

9.       Following approval of the location of the town square, the town square will be included as part of the scope of the project to develop a new community hub and upgrade of Cadness Reserve.

10.     The next steps for the project will be:

·    procure a design team;

·    engage with key stakeholders and the local board to develop a design brief;

·    approval of the design brief by the local board;

·    develop the concept design for the community hub, town square and Cadness Reserve upgrade; and

·    approval of the concept design by the local board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the location of the new Northcote town square to be adjacent to the new community hub building and Cadness Reserve, off Ernie Mays Street.

Horopaki

Context

11.     Northcote represents a major renewal opportunity for Auckland. Residents have a long-held desire to see the town centre revitalised.

12.     Strategic development objectives for Northcote are identified and set out in Eke Panuku’s Unlock Northcote High Level Project Plan 2016, and further distilled through the Unlock Northcote Framework Plan 2016.

13.     In 2019, Eke Panuku developed the Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan 2019 (benchmark masterplan). The benchmark masterplan was endorsed by the Kaipātiki Local Board in resolution number KT/2019/41. The benchmark masterplan is comprised of three key components:

·    criteria for the town centre’s successful regeneration

·    overarching principles

·    a preliminary spatial plan showing how the principles and criteria could be achieved.

Diagram, map

Description automatically generated

Northcote Town Centre Benchmark Masterplan 2019 preliminary spatial plan

14.     The development of a sunny, sheltered town square is identified as one of the ten criteria for success in the benchmark masterplan.

Timeline

Description automatically generated

15.     The benchmark masterplan identified that the town square should:

·    be in excess of 1,500sqm with flexibility to extend for larger events (i.e. temporary road closure);

·    optimally co-located with other community assets (the hub building and/or adjacent reserves);

·    be a balance of soft and hard landscape finishes for year-round and multi-purpose use; and

·    have proportions to suit market and community event space uses.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     The location for the town square, as shown spatially in the 2019 benchmark masterplan, was the middle of the town centre at the south end of Pearn Place. In 2019 this was also adjacent to the new community hub. 

17.     With the community hub being located adjacent to Cadness Reserve, the town square would still be in the middle of the town centre at the south end of Pearn Place, however it would be surrounded by commercial buildings.

18.     An alternative location is adjacent to the community hub which is adjacent to Cadness Reserve.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

19.     The option to co-locate the town square with the community hub is preferred because it:

·    places the community hub and town square next to each other, which means a wider range of activities in the town square and community hub (as the intention in the 2019 masterplan option)

·    creates a stronger connection to Te Ara Awataha 

·    reinforces the civic core by being located adjacent to the community hub

·    creates synergies between community facility and town square providing greater flexibility and operational efficiencies (as the intention in the 2019 masterplan option)

·    enhances the visibility of the hub and creates clear connections to Lake Road along Pearn Place, which will be improved with new shops, and along Ernie Mays Street which will include wide footpaths, trees and planting and connections to Te Ara Awataha

·    is adjacent to the proposed public transport links making it more accessible to the community

·    will allow for Ernie Mays Street to be closed for infrequent large events such as Chinese/Korean New Year

·    will place the square away from any shading or winds that may be created by higher development within the town centre redevelopment

·    enables streets and open spaces to be designed with the buildings to focus on providing a busy, active, pedestrian focused area and a vibrant shopping centre

·    allows the town square and community hub to be designed and built at the same time and delivered for the community in a quicker timeframe than if in the town centre.

20.     The town centre will still have plenty of high quality, extensive public space and connections.

21.     There will be a set of essential requirements that a potential developer(s) will need to adhere to when developing the Northcote town centre. These include:

·    a legible and connected movement / street network, prioritising active modes;

·    a clearly identifiable retail ‘main street’ (Pearn Place) with pedestrian priority;

·    high amenity town centre green streets and public spaces; and

·    building height and massing focused in areas so retail street and public spaces are not overly shaded.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     Sustainability and climate change is a key theme in the projects Eke Panuku delivers. Eke Panuku’s Climate Change Strategy states that action will be taken to ensure new communities in priority locations are designed and developed to be low carbon and climate resilient.

23.     Climate change is likely to impact Northcote with flooding already a problem for the town centre. ‘Green & Sustainable’ is one of the ten criteria for success identified in the benchmark masterplan which underpins the urban renewal of the town centre.

24.     The development of Ernie Mays Street will be an integral component of the new town centre’s public transport network, with a bus stop envisaged close to the community hub and town square location. This will increase use of public transport and contribute to a reduction in transport emissions.

25.     The co-location of the community hub and town square will minimise the duplication of supporting infrastructure.

26.     As detailed within the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020, the local board is committed to quality and sustainable urban development that has a low impact on the climate.

27.     The design of the town square would support the Para Kore objectives for the Northcote town centre. The design details to align with Para Kore will be considered as the design of the project progresses.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     Eke Panuku and Auckland Council teams are working in collaboration on the Northcote community hub and town square project. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     The Kaipātiki Local Board requested the location of the town square be reconsidered at the October business meeting when the new community hub location was approved.

30.     A workshop was held with the local board on 23 February 2022 to discuss the analysis and preferred option as presented in this report.

31.     The Kaipātiki Local Board holds delegated authority to approve the specific location of the new Northcote town square.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     Eke Panuku has worked closely with mana whenua from the outset of the Northcote programme. The principles underpinning the benchmark masterplan comprise of celebrating Māori communities, with Te Aranga values and principles embedded within the benchmark masterplan.

33.     Eke Panuku and council will continue to work with mana whenua throughout the delivery of the new town square. In working together, Eke Panuku seeks to ensure that the project can produce outcomes that better reflect Māori in Auckland and the Māori cultural narrative that exists for Northcote.

34.     Mana whenua input will be sought during the concept design for the community hub, town square and Cadness Reserve upgrade.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

35.     Funding of $1.8m for the new town square has been secured through Eke Panuku’s Long-term Plan budget allocation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Identified risks and mitigations associated with the town square project are:

Risk

Mitigation

Challenges in logistical and design integration with other public realm projects such as Ernie Mays Street extension, Te Ara Awataha, the new community hub and Cadness Reserve upgrade.

This risk can be more easily mitigated by the town square being co-located with the community hub.

Design options and analysis through concept design will be able to mitigate this risk further.

The local board not approving the town square be co-located with the community hub and thereby the operation and management of the completed town square is difficult and not cohesive with community uses.

Workshop the design analysis and benefits with the local board – done on 23 February 2022.

The town centre does not deliver sufficient public space to create a well-connected and vibrant Northcote town centre.

Set design and development requirements for the potential developers to adhere to when developing the town centre.

Have independent design reviews of the developers’ masterplan for the Northcote town centre.

Put development agreements in place that ensure the delivery of the developers’ masterplan as agreed following design review.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Procure a design consultant team for the community hub, town square and Cadness Reserve upgrade.

38.     Undertake a programme of engagement with the local board and key stakeholders to develop a design brief which will set out the required functions, uses and key design features of the town square. Approval of the final design brief will be sought from the local board before concept design commences.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kate Cumberpatch - Priority Location Director

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2022/00240

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2022/00232

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2022/00248

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Maori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/02902

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2022 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The April - June 2022 governance forward work calendar for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       The March – April 2022 workshop forward work plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board April - June 2022 governance forward work calendar and March – April 2022 workshop forward work plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - April to June 2022 Governance Forward Work Calendar

165

b

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - March to April 2022 Workshop Forward Work Plan

167

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - February 2022

File No.: CP2022/02906

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 2 February 2022, Wednesday 9 February 2022 and Wednesday 23 February 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 2 February 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Community Facilities

-     Marlborough Park accessible play equipment

·     New Freedom Camping Bylaw

·     Northcote

-     Eke Panuku update / Kāinga Ora

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 9 February 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Watercare

-     North Shore 3: Waitematā Crossing Project

·     LFA briefing for members on financials prior to Q2 performance report (PUBLIC EXCLUDED)

·     Review Grants Programme and Transitional Grants for 2021/2022

·     NPS UD – Residential – private ways and five issues

-     National Policy Statement on Urban Development: removal of car minimums

-     AUP: Shared residential driveway access provisions

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 23 February 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Northcote redevelopment

-     Northcote town square

·     Auckland Transport Speed Management Plans

·     Auckland Transport Remote Monitoring item

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 2 February 2022, Wednesday 9 February 2022 and Wednesday 23 February 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 2 February 2022 workshop record

171

b

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 9 February 2022 workshop record

173

c

16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 23 February 2022 workshop record

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Kaipātiki Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       Alternative Commercial Opportunities

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

In particular, the report contains information covered in confidential Finance and Performance workshops and information relating to commercial activities that affect private landowners and negotiations associated with Auckland Council’s Own Your Own Home Scheme portfolio which has not been finalised or released publicly. The report, attachments, and resolution remain confidential until the reasons for confidentiality no longer exist.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Hearts and Minds presentation  Page 181

Item 8.2      Attachment a    16 March 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Birkdale Beach Haven Communtiy Project presentation  Page 185


Kaipātiki Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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