I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 16 March 2022

5.00pm

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Deputy Chairperson

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Members

Makalita Kolo

 

 

Christine O'Brien

 

 

Papaliitele Peo

 

 

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacqueline Robinson

Democracy Advisor

 

10 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 262 5283

Email: jacqui.robinson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Deputation - Youthline                                5

8.2     Deputation - Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum                                 6

8.3     Deputation - Māngere Mountain Education Centre                                        6

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       6

11        Governing Body Member Update                       9

12        Local Board Leads and Appointments Report                                                                              11

13        Chairpersons Report and Announcements     15

14        Reserve revocation of 5R Ferguson Street, Māngere East, 31R Killington Crescent, Māngere and 1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu        19

15        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan 45

16        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021-22                           49

17        Governance Forward Work Calendar               77

18        Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes                                                                    81

19        David Lange Park - destination playground concept plan approval                                       89

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

21        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                         113

19        David Lange Park - destination playground concept plan approval

b.      Attachment B Te Riri o Mataaoho Cultural Narrative March 22                                  113

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 16 February 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

·       Farewell to our friend and staff member Janette McKain who has retired from Auckland Council.  We wish her the very best in her retirement.  Thank you Janette for all your service to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board!

·       Thank you to the community partners who have been assisting various Auckland Council project teams in helping members from the community to participate in the various online discussions.

·       Cook Islands Outriggers Club Tatamariki – Letter of Thanks received

·       Counties Manukau Junior Sports Awards

·       Auckland Voucher programme

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Youthline

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Geoff Lawson and Elizabeth Maddison from Youthline will be in attendance to provide an update to the local board on use of funding provided.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Geoff Lawson and Elizabeth Maddison from Youthline for their presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Youthline Presentation March 7th 2022............................................................ 117

 

8.2       Deputation - Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Julie Chambers from the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum will be in attendance to present their annual report to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Julie Chambers from the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum for her presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum Annual Report presentation............... 127

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Māngere Mountain Education Centre

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Heather Ruru from Māngere Mountain Education Centre will be in attendance to present the Māngere Mountain Education Centre Performance report to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      thank Heather Ruru from Māngere Mountain Education Centre for her presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

File No.: CP2022/00261

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 Minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from Cr Alf Filipaina and Cr Efeso Collins.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Local Board Leads and Appointments Report

File No.: CP2022/00262

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allow the local board members an opportunity to present verbal and written updates on their lead roles, such as relevant actions, appointments and meetings.

2.       To make any appointments to vacant positions.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Members have an opportunity to update the board on their activities as topic area leads.

4.       The table below outlines the current leads and alternates for topic areas of local board business meetings and organisations on which the board is represented through a formal appointment.

Topic Area

Lead

Alternate

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Arts, Community and Events (including libraries)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community Facilities

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Christine O’Brien

Local planning, housing, and heritage – includes responding to resource consent applications on behalf of board

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

1st Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

2nd Harry Fatu Toleafoa

Transport

Makalita Kolo

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Economic development

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Christine O’Brien

2nd Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Youth, Children, Seniors and Uniquely Abled   

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

1st Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

2nd Christine O’Brien

Landowner Consents (excluding filming)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Landowner Consents Filming

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Events (receive staff notifications of areas that may involve reputational, financial, performance or political risk)

Christine O’Brien

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Liquor Licences Hearings

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Resource Consent (proceed as a non-notified, limited notified or fully notified application)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Resource Consents (notified hearings)

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

Area Plan Working Group

MOLB

All board members

OPLB

Apulu Reece Autagavaia,

Dawn Trenberth

 

LGNZ (Local Government New Zealand

Chairperson

Deputy Chairperson

 

 

 

 

Organisation / Initiative

Lead

Alternate

Community Impact Forum for Kohuora Corrections Facility

Makalita Kolo

 

Māngere Bridge BID

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

 

Māngere Town Centre BID

Makalita Kolo

 

Māngere East Village BID

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Ōtāhuhu Business Association

Christine O’Brien

 

South Harbour Business Association BID

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Auckland Airport Community Trust for

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Tauanu’u Nanai Nick Bakulich

 

Te Pukaki Tapu O Poutukeka Historic Reserve & Associated Lands Co-Management Committee

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

 

Ambury Park Centre

Papaliitele Lafulafu Peo

Christine O’Brien

Māngere Mountain Education Trust             

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Tamaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Māori input into local board decision-making political steering group

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Ōtāhuhu Portage Project Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

The Southern Initiative (TSI) Steering Group

Lemauga Lydia Sosene

Togiatolu Walter Togiamua

Ōtāhuhu Town Hall Community Centre Incorporated Society

Makalita Kolo

 

Harry Fatu Toleafoa

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written reports from local board members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Lead Board Member Report - Nick Bakulich

13

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Chairpersons Report and Announcements

File No.: CP2022/00263

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To give the Chairperson an opportunity to update the local board on any announcements and for the local board to receive the Chairperson’s written report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal update and written reports from the local board Chair.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairs Report Local Board Business Meeting March 2022

17

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Reserve revocation of 5R Ferguson Street, Māngere East, 31R Killington Crescent, Māngere and 1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu

File No.: CP2022/02284

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks the views of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board on the proposal to revoke the reserve status of three reserves in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Finance and Performance Committee approved in principle the disposal of 5R Ferguson Street, Māngere East, 31R Killington Crescent, Māngere and 1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu as part of the Emergency Budget asset recycling programme in 2020. The three sites are reserves subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       The committee’s approval of the disposals is conditional upon the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes. Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) is undertaking the required statutory processes on behalf of the council, including the reserve revocation process.

4.       Council departments have assessed 5R Ferguson Street, 31R Killington Crescent and 1-5 Lippiatt Road against the provisions for recreation reserves in s17 and road reserves in s111 Reserves Act 1977 and against council’s Open Space policies. The assessments confirm that the sites are no longer required by council as recreation reserves or for open space network purposes. Auckland Transport (AT) has assessed 5R Ferguson Street as not required for transport infrastructure purposes.

5.       Eke Panuku publicly advertised the proposed reserve revocations and invited public submissions. The public submissions process for the proposal to revoke the reserve status of the three sites commenced in February 2021. Independent Commissioners were appointed to consider the public submissions. A hearing was held in August 2021 to Independent Commissioners to hear and consider submissions. The local board Chair and Deputy Chair attended the hearing and presented the board’s views.

6.       Eke Panuku has provided the board with relevant property information, open space assessments and copies of public submissions received for the three sites and now seeks the board’s formal views regarding the proposed reserve revocations.

7.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee will consider the board’s views regarding the three sites, in addition to any recommendations made by the Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions in April 2022. The PACE Committee will decide if the proposal to revoke the reserve status for the three sites should be forwarded to the Department of Conservation (DOC).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      endorse reserve revocation of the following sites as they are no longer required by Auckland Council as reserves:

i)       5R Ferguson Street, Māngere East;

ii)       31R Killington Crescent, Māngere; and

iii)      1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu

b)      note the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider the board’s views and any recommendations made by Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       In 2020 the Finance and Performance Committee approved in principle the disposal of 5R Ferguson Street, Māngere East, 31R Killington Crescent, Māngere, 1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu and 3R Taylor Road, Māngere Bridge as part of the Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. This approval is subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes. Eke Panuku, on behalf of the council, has subsequently commenced work on completing the required statutory processes.

9.       As the sites are classified as reserves under the Reserves Act 1977, a process for the revocation of reserve status, including public and iwi notification, is necessary before they may be sold.

10.     Public notices for the proposal to revoke the reserve status of the subject reserves were published in newspapers in February 2021. Letters were also sent to adjoining landowners and the proposal listed on the Auckland Council website. Public notices were also placed on the reserves. The public notice that was published and placed on reserves, letters and information on the council website, advised of council’s proposal to revoke the reserve status, explaining the reason for the proposal and seeking public submissions.

11.     Following receipt of a submission from the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and legal advice, the reserve revocation process for 3R Taylor Road has been suspended. Eke Panuku and Council’s Value for Money team will recommend to the Finance and Performance Committee that it be retained in council ownership.

12.     Council appointed Independent Commissioners to consider the public submissions received for the proposed revocation of 5R Ferguson Street, 31R Killington Crescent and 1-5 Lippiatt Road and hearings were held in August 2021.

13.     At the request of council’s Local Board Services department, copies of the public submissions received for regarding the proposed revocation of the subject reserves have been extracted from the report to the Independent Commissioners and are included as Attachment B to this report.

14.     The board was represented at the hearing by Chair Lemauga Sosene and Deputy Chair Tauanu’u Nick Bakulich, who provided feedback on the proposed reserve revocation of the three sites.

15.     The PACE Committee will consider the board’s views regarding the proposed reserve revocation of the three sites and any recommendations made by the Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions at its 7 April 2022 meeting. The PACE Committee will decide if the proposal to revoke the reserve status should be forwarded to the DOC.

16.     The board has been consulted by Council’s Plans and Places team on the separate plan change process to change the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) Open Space zoning of the three reserves before a disposal can proceed.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property information - 5R Ferguson Street, Māngere East

17.     5R Ferguson Street is an 885m2 vacant site vested upon subdivision with the Crown in 1927 as road reserve. It was subsequently transferred to the former Manukau City Council in 1971. The site is a road reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

18.     Transpower has established a driveway across 5R Ferguson Street to access their adjacent power substation and another adjoining landowner has encroached on the site.

19.     AT has assessed the site and confirmed that while the site is a road reserve, it is not legal road or required for transport infrastructure purposes.

20.     Council’s Community Investment team (formerly the Parks and Recreation Policy team) assessed the site in January 2019 against council’s Open Space Provision and Open Space Acquisition policies. The assessment also considered the provisions for a road reserve outlined in s111 Reserves Act 1977. This assessment confirmed 5R Ferguson Street is not required by council as a recreation reserve or for open space network purposes. This is on the basis the site does not provide any recreational provision and does not improve the configuration, size or function of existing open space. There is adequate open space provision in close proximity with Massey Homestead and Walter-Massey Park. The site does not connect existing parks and is unlikely to do so in the future due to the adjacent electricity substation. It has no ecological, historic heritage, cultural, geological or landscape features.

21.     Council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department provided input into the open space assessments and support the Community Investment team’s recommendations given the site does not provide any recreational provision and is near to other areas of open space.

Property information - 31R Killington Crescent, Māngere

22.     31R Killington Crescent is a vacant 329m2 triangular site adjacent to the Kirkbridge Road motorway off ramp. It is the remainder of land taken for State Housing purposes by the Crown in 1967 and subsequently vested with the former Manukau City Council in 1981. 31R Killington Crescent is a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

23.     Council’s Community Investment team assessed the site in January 2019 against council’s Open Space Provision and Open Space Acquisition policies. The assessment also considered the provisions for a recreation reserve outlined in s17 Reserves Act 1977. This assessment confirmed 31R Killington Crescent is not required by council as a recreation reserve or for open space network purposes. This is on the basis that its location and configuration limit its use for passive recreation purposes. There are alternative open spaces nearby to meet the recreation needs of the community. The land does not connect to existing parks and open space. The site does not have any ecological, historic heritage, cultural, geological or landscape features. The site does not improve the configuration, size and function of existing parks and open space.

24.     Council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department provided input into the open space assessments and support the Community Investment team’s recommendations given the site has low recreational value and limited future development potential.

Property information - 1-5 Lippiatt Road, Ōtāhuhu

25.     1-5 Lippiatt Road is an undeveloped reserve comprising 1369m2. It is residual land from a larger site originally acquired by the former Ōtāhuhu Borough Council for the purpose of a public reserve in 1927. Approximately 440m2 was later formed into road.

26.     In 1997, 457m2 of the site had its reserve status revoked and was sold to an adjoining landowner by the former Auckland City Council. The residual land has remained as undeveloped open space. 1-5 Lippiatt Road is a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

27.     Council’s Community Investment team assessed the site in February 2019 against council’s Open Space Provision and Open Space Acquisition policies. The assessment also considered the provisions for a recreation reserve outlined in s17 Reserves Act 1977. This assessment confirmed 1-5 Lippiatt Road is not required by council as a recreation reserve or for open space network purposes. This is on the basis that the small site does not provide access to recreational opportunities. It does not physically and visually connect to any other parks and open space. The site has no ecological, historic heritage, cultural, geological or landscape features. The property does not improve the configuration, size or function of existing open space.

28.     Council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department provided input into the open space assessments and support the Community Investment team’s recommendations given the site is not located in an area where there is a gap in the provision of open space. It is in close proximity to Sturges Park and Fairburn Reserve which provide a wide range of active recreation, playground, civic space, community facility and leisure centre amenities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     Part of 1-5 Lippiatt Road is located in a flood prone area. The three sites are not coastal properties and are not likely to be impacted in the future by rising sea levels. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

30.     Council’s Community Investment team, with input from council’s Parks operational staff, assessed 5R Ferguson Street, 31R Killington Crescent and 1-5 Lippiatt Road against council’s Open Space policies and the provisions for recreation reserves in accordance with s17 Reserves Act 1977. AT has assessed 5R Ferguson Street for future roading purposes.

31.     Additional consultation with council’s Heritage team has been undertaken regarding historic or archaeological values associated with the sites. It was confirmed that council’s heritage records and Geomaps overlays hold no known heritage values associated with the sites.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     Eke Panuku and council’s Value for Money team has provided the board with an information memorandum regarding the proposed reserve revocations of 5R Ferguson Street, 31R Killington Crescent and 1-5 Lippiatt Road.

33.     As part of its feedback on council’s Emergency Budget 2020/2021, the board resolved (resolution MO/2020/93) in July 2020 that it supports in principle the divestment of assets, with the understanding that the board will be provided with information relating to sites in the local board area.

34.     The board subsequently resolved (resolution MO/2021/69) in May 2021 to receive a notice of motion to retain 5R Ferguson Street in council ownership for community use, and to request the Finance and Performance Committee rescind its July 2020 resolution to dispose of 5R Ferguson Street.

35.     5R Ferguson Street is included in the board co-funded Māngere East Streets for People project, part of the Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency’s Innovating Streets for People programme. Auckland Transport is managing the project and has confirmed the project involves the installation of footpath art and furniture adjacent to this site.

36.     This report provides the board with an opportunity to formalise its views regarding the proposed reserve revocations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Nineteen mana whenua iwi authorities were consulted in 2020 regarding any issues of cultural significance associated with 5R Ferguson Street, 31R Killington Crescent and 1-5 Lippiatt Road.

38.     Through the engagement undertaken Te Ākitai – Waiohua advised that it has a cultural interest in 31R Killington Crescent due its proximity to the 17 Killington Crescent Mataatua Marae site.

39.     Te Ākitai Waiohua also advised that 1-5 Lippiatt Road is located near the base of a maunga of cultural significance –Te Tapuwae o Mataaoho (Sturges Park or Mount Robertson). Te Ākitai Waiohua would prefer to see 1-5 Lippiatt Road remain as a public reserve given the nature of the cultural interest in the land and its historical importance as former pa and place for gathering resources. 1-5 Lippiatt Road was part of the Tamaki Block or Fairburn land transaction of 1836 with the church missionary society and government.

40.     Eke Panuku has acknowledged the notifications from Te Ākitai Waiohua and confirmed its interests have been noted on the property files and will be considered as part of the decision-making process.

41.     Site specific mana whenua engagement was also undertaken regarding the proposed reserve revocations. A submission from Ngāti Paoa was received that objected to all the proposed reserve revocations across Auckland. The objection has been referred to the Independent Commissioners for consideration and for reporting to the PACE Committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     Should the reserve status be revoked and the site disposed of by council, the proceeds of sale will contribute to the 2020 Emergency Budget and 10-year Recovery Budget by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its planned activities and projects.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     There is a risk that the Minister of Conservation may not approve the proposed reserve revocations. In such a circumstance 5R Ferguson Street, 31R Killington Crescent and 1-5 Lippiatt Road would remain as reserves subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     The board’s feedback and the Independent Commissioner’s recommendations on the proposal to revoke the reserve status will be reported to the PACE Committee. The report to the committee will also seek approval to submit a request to the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status for the three sites.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images

25

b

Public submissions received

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor, Portfolio Review, Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Matt Casey - Team Leader Portfolio Review

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation (Acting)

Ross Chirnside - General Manager Value For Money

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/02509

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.       Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport (AT) to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.       In December 2021, AT advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-26. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.       Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, AT is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.       The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       AT has made speed limit changes covering 11% of the road network, with changes to a further 27% of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.       The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

9.       Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late-2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

11.     The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

12.     ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

13.     The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

14.     Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

16.     The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

17.     Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

18.     Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

19.     The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

21.     Auckland Transport plays a key role in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that 19% of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·    reduce 40% of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·    include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming ten years into speed management plans

·    implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

25.     The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

26.     Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

27.     In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

29.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/Māori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by mana whenua.

31.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

34.     There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing the final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

36.     Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

37.     Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

38.     In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

39.     The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021-22

File No.: CP2022/02573

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021-22 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2021.

3.       Updates are made to the engagement plan throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

4.       An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Report for Quarter Two 2021-22

b)      approve updates to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·        additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·        proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·        proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.     These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

13.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment B.

Changes to the Auckland Transport work programme

14.     No changes have been made.  

Auckland Unlimited

15.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment C.

Changes to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

16.     No changes have been made.   

Additional activities

17.     These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·        government COVID-19 support packages (Activate and Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau)

·        sustainability Initiatives

·        skills and workforce: Pacific Skills Shift

·        Auckland Unlimited venues (Auckland Live, Zoo, Maritime Museum Stadiums and Auckland Art Gallery)

·        Auckland Stadium Venue Development Strategy

·        delivered Events (Diwali, Lantern, Pasifika, Tāmaki Herenga Waka)

·        sponsored Events (Elemental).

Proposed change to engagement approach

18.     These activities were included in the engagement plan, and a different approach to engagement is now being proposed:

·        Landowner Approval - Screen production (Collaborate): Auckland Unlimited is required to advise delegated local board members of any screen activity, film permitting or major events activity taking place on local parks and reserves, seek feedback from the delegated member, and provide the opportunity to revoke the delegation to approve these events that sits with Community Facilities.

·        Local Economic Development (Inform): Changed status from pending to inform

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

19.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment D.

Changes to the Eke Panuku work programme

20.     No changes have been made.   

Watercare

21.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment E.

Changes to the Watercare work programme

22.     No changes have been made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

24.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

26.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

28.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

30.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

32.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Three in June 2022.

35.     A workshop will be held in April to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2022-23.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

53

b

Auckland Transport 2021-22 Q2 Report - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

67

c

Auckland Unlimited 2021-22 Q2 Report - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

69

d

Eke Panuku Development Auckland 2021-22 Q2 Report - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

73

e

Watercare work programme 2021-22 Q2 Report - Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/02507

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2022/02508

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board workshops held on 2 February, 9 February, 23 February 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      receive the workshop notes from the workshops held on 2 February, 9 February, 23 February 2022.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

MOLB Workshop Notes 2 February 2022

83

b

MOLB Workshop Notes 9 February 2022

85

c

MOLB Workshop Notes 23 February 2022

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacqueline Robinson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

David Lange Park - destination playground concept plan approval

File No.: CP2022/02816

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of the concept plan for a destination playground at David Lange Park in Māngere, and to progress stage one of the project to detailed design and construction.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The development of David Lange Park was identified through 2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Play Network Analysis. The analysis identified that there is low play provision in general across the local board area for youth and preschoolers.

3.       There is also a significant, intensive housing development and population growth across the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area that will require a high level of quality play provision to cater for a wide range of age groups and abilities. Council Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) conducted a strategic assessment identifying David Lange Park as a priority site for future development.

4.       The Community Facilities financial year 2019/2020 Work Programme (MO/2021/82) identified park asset renewal projects within the proposed project area.

5.       The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board considered it timely to look at developing a concept plan to ensure community use and ongoing park sustainability is managed and maintained. The concept plan validates both renewal and development opportunities.

6.       Variety, the Children’s Charity, has partnered with the local board in the development and upgrade of the playground at David Lange to provide a destination play experience.

7.       A concept design for the destination park has been developed in collaboration with the council, the local board, mana whenua and Variety. The proposed concept design has incorporated feedback from stakeholders and public consultations and will deliver a safe, inclusive, community open space that reflects the local heritage and culture.

8.       The concept design was presented to the local board on 24 November 2021. The local board indicated their support in principle. Staff now seek formal approval for the concept design before progressing the project to detailed design, consenting and construction.

9.       This is a co-design project with mana whenua who have provided the cultural narrative to theme the concept plan.

10.     The project will be delivered in three stages based on the cultural narrative and available funding in future years.

11.     The local board has allocated $1,610,997.81 of local renewal and locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding towards the destination playground development for stage one only as part of the work programme (resolution MO/2021/82). Variety has agreed to contribute a further $400,000 towards the project.

12.     This report presents a design for David Lange Park, that is responsive to the community’s needs and desires, and identifies opportunities to increase park activation.

13.     Subject to the local board approval, staff will progress the detailed design and progress updates will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board:

a)      approve the concept design for a destination playground at David Lange Park provided in Attachment A of the agenda report and request staff to progress stage one of the project to detailed design and construction

b)      agree, to support mana whenua’s request for the cultural narrative in Attachment B to remain confidential, while mana whenua continue planning storytelling initiatives for the community prior and during construction.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     David Lange Park, 98R Bader Drive, Māngere is a sports park and main hub for Netball in Māngere. The park is located across the road from the Māngere town centre, library, arts centre, and Moana-Nui-a Kiwa Leisure Centre pools. Council’s Park, Sport and Recreation Acitivation and Civic Events utilise the park to provide programmes and events.

15.     Supporting park infrastructure has been minimal in recent years and park assets are expected to reach the end of their functional life.

16.     The park has capacity to accommodate high levels of visitation with existing supporting infrastructure including toilets, carpark, basketball, netball, volleyball, and open grass areas.

17.     The playground infrastructure in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area requires further development to meet the requirements identified in a 2019 Play Network Analysis and cater for predicted population growth. The analysis found:  

·    There are no destination playgrounds in the local board area or in South Auckland.

·    There is low provision of accessible play and facilities for the very young and youth.

·    There is low provision of wheeled play facilities, progressive experiences from learn to bike/trike/scooter to skate, mountain bike and skills courses.

·    The lack of equipment variation in playgrounds has resulted in a network with a low appeal and little activation.

Partnership with Variety Children’s Charity (Variety)

18.     Variety has partnered with the local board to support the destination playground development at the David Lange Park.

19.     A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) has been agreed noting that Variety will contribute $400,000 towards the development of the playground once the concept plan is formerly adopted by the local board.

20.     Variety supports and focuses on improving the wellbeing of children and young people across New Zealand (variety.org.nz, 2021).

21.     In 2021, Variety sponsored 6336 young New Zealanders, providing basic essentials including grocery cards, mobility and medical equipment, uniforms, digital learning devices, clothing grants, bed and bedding packs as well as sports equipment and grants to promote physical activity and play.

22.     Playgrounds are vital for the health and wellbeing of all children. Variety believes in an Aotearoa New Zealand where all children and young people can realise their hopes and dreams (variety.org.nz).

Destination Playground

23.     The following outcomes are sought in the destination playground:

·    play provision for all ages from zero-18 years

·    accessible play provision to cater for a wide range of physical and mental needs 

·    opportunities to experience risk and challenge – design play spaces to be as safe as necessary, not as safe as possible

·    nature play/creative play, tactile stimuli, and musical play

·    wheeled play facilities, progressive experiences from learn to bike/trike/scooter to skate, mountain bike and skills courses

·    cultural themes that reflect the identity and history of the land

·    shade - natural and structural

·    inclusion of accessible seating and picnicking space to accommodate large groups

·    accessible car parking, pathway networks, drinking fountains and toilets

·    open grassed areas for temporary play activation initiatives.

Cultural Narrative - Playground Theme

24.     The cultural narrative “Te riri o Mataaoho” (The Wrath of Mataaoho) has been gifted by mana whenua, Te Ākitai Waiohua and Te Āhiwaru Waiohua. The narrative will be incorporated in the landscape and play equipment and is provided in Attachment B.

25.     The concept plan has different zones for different age groups. The zones will be tightly clustered together for passive surveillance. Each zone is described as follows:

·    Mataaoho - Guardian of earthquakes and volcanoes

Location: central area

Zone: all ages with various types of play value.

Themes: Explosive burst of energy, disruption, breaking through the earth, new volcanic landscape. Appearance of equipment on top of landform to relate to explosion in the form of smoke, steam, lava flow, ash loud — the “act” of eruption.

·    Hopukina - Dark run 

Location: central area

Zone: all ages with various types of play value.

Theme: connected portion linking Kāinga, and broken sections disturbed/ displaced by Mataaoho. Forest floor, partly flat, partly undulating with Mataaoho’s earthquakes.

·    Patupairehe Kāinga – West Village 

Location: Placed in close proximity to the new toilet facilities and car park

Zone: zero - five years with various play value to stimulate imagination, physical cognitive and emotional strength.

·    Tuurehu Kāinga - South Village 

Location: Placed in close proximity to the skate park, basketball, volleyball courts and grassed area currently used for activation events.

Zone: youth chill out zone.

26.     Each kāinga (village) will have picnic tables, seats, BBQ, shade, and a drinking fountain to encourage users to utilise the park for extended periods.

27.     The outputs of the concept plan will be delivered in three stages as shown in attachment E. Stage one is proposed to be delivered in financial year 2022/2023. Stage two and three will be planned for delivery in future years once funding becomes available.

28.     Stage one has been scoped to meet the project outcomes whilst maintaining integrity of the design narrative until further funding is available to progress stage two and three (refer to attachment C). Stage one is proposed to include:

·    Mataaoho (tower)

·    play equipment range from sensory, agility, balance and coordination, teamwork, imaginative/creative and inclusive play

·    play surface to include a mix of cushion fall, turf, and wet pour to meet safety and accessibility requirements

·    the grassed area in the center of the play space will be maintained as lawn until funding is available for future development

·    new Exeloo accessible toilets to replace the existing concrete toilet blocks (funded separately as detailed in the financial section of this report)

·    partial fencing.

29.     Stage two will include:

·    Patupairehe Kāinga (village) to provide play for tamariki under five years within a fenced area

·    furniture, rubbish bins, communications boards and signage

·    planting

30.     Stage three will include:

·    Turehu Kainga (village)

·    Hopukina

·    pump track and bike racks

·    shared connecting paths and lighting

·    improvements to the existing skatepark

·    relocation and upgrade of the fitness hub and volleyball court away from the playground into the activation zone

·    opportunity for specialised play (water, sound, sand, tactile, wheeled, creative, imaginative, nature play and play for neuro diverse children)

·    creation of more sheltered spaces for resting and outdoor activities i.e., tai chi, outdoor Zumba for educational purposes 

·    further planting areas

·    shade, furniture, and recycling bins throughout the park.

31.     Further consultation will be required to measure and review the service needs once funding to progress stage three is made available.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

32.     The current provision of community facilities within the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area is below provision guidelines and levels of service for both existing and projected population numbers.

33.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area has a population of over 78,450. Over fifty-nine percent (59.4%) identify as Pacific and over sixteen percent as Māori. Over forty percent (43.2%) of the population is under the age of 25 years and over twenty percent (26.6%) of residents are children under 15 years (Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan, 2020).

Reason for Investment based on 2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Play Network Analysis findings:

34.     The findings of the 2019 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Play Network Analysis identified that the current play network in the local board area provides limited access to nature and imaginative play spaces; and lacks accessible play facilities and supporting infrastructure to facilitate park visitation for a wide range of users.

The findings also identified wide-ranging gaps in:

·          youth play (other than courts)

·          play provision for nine years upwards

·          destination play experiences – unique play spaces that reflect the community

·          accessible play – including accessible supporting infrastructure (pathways, seating, toilets etc.)

·          specialised play (water, sound, sand, tactile, wheeled, creative, imaginative, nature play and play for neuro diverse children)

·          wheeled – progressive experiences from learn to bike/trike/scooter to skate, mountain bike and skills courses

·          communal play

·          sheltered gathering spaces – to provide for large groups with a range of needs.

35.     The quality of playgrounds in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area is comparatively poor and do not reach the standard of play provided in other areas of the city. The majority of playgrounds in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area caters for the zero - eight age range with very low play provision for youth (13+ years).

Age ranges identified by the council are as below:

·    early childhood (zero - four years)

·    junior (five - eight years)

·    senior (nine - 12 years)

·    youth (13+ years).

Play provision across Māngere-Ōtāhuhu’s 36 playgrounds is as follows:

·    nine (25%) provide for only the zero – eight age range

·    twenty-four (66%) provide for senior (nine – 12 years)

·    thirteen (36%) provide for youth with ball courts being the main provision.

36.     Across the local board area, the existing equipment in playgrounds is standard modular play facilities providing similar play experiences that target a narrow age range. There are significant network gaps in the provision of play experiences across the network with the following notable findings:

·    Nine playgrounds (25%) provide four or fewer standard play experiences.

·    Seven playgrounds (20%) provide zero specialist play experiences.

·    Twenty-seven playgrounds (72%) provide four or fewer specialised play experiences.

·    Nine playgrounds (25%) provide all abilities play.

37.     The 2019 play network analysis findings identified David Lange Park as a priority development area due to the current poor-quality play experience provided at the site, its existing park infrastructure, its proximity to transport connections and Māngere Town Centre.

Reasons for investment related to population growth:

38.     Auckland Council’s Tākaro – investing in play document (2018) is a strategic investment plan to guide the council’s investment approach and priorities for play. The document acknowledges that Auckland is currently undergoing a period of unprecedented growth and Auckland’s population is changing more rapidly than ever before.

39.     There are over 900 playgrounds in Auckland and only 36 playgrounds in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area.

40.     Kainga Ora (HLC/HNZ) is delivering a housing intensification project in the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area. The project is located in close proximity to the David Lange Park and will result in triple the number of houses and residents over the five to ten years period, increasing demand on recreational facilities.

41.     Development of David Lange Park will assist to fill a gap in the playground network which is supported in the recent Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Play Network Analysis undertaken by PSR and provide recreational opportunities in an area currently experiencing rapid growth and significant increase in population.

Consultation / Engagement

42.     The consultation process has driven the development of this renewals design to ensure the service and needs of the community were captured. This insight was gained from 2019-2021 through face-to-face consultation with local tamariki, community leaders and members of the local board. Staff also conducted an online survey through the council’s “Have your say” website which was advertised on local libraries and swimming pools notice boards and the local board’s Facebook page.

43.     During Auckland’s COVID lockdowns in 2020 and 2021 the project was placed on hold. To comply with government guidelines all further face to face consultation was cancelled.

44.     Consultation dates are listed below:

·    Local school visits – November 2019 – March 2020

·    Mana whenua South Parks Hui – February 2020

·    “Have your say” online survey – October – November 2020

·    Variety story telling event at “Te Pane o Mataaoho” – April 2021

·    Revisit local schools – April 2021.

45.     The local schools who participated include:

·    Sir Keith Park School – (Māngere)

·    Mount Richmond School – (Ōtāhuhu)

·    Te Kura Kaupapa o Māori o Māngere – (Māngere)

·    Māngere Central School – (Māngere)

·    Nga Iwi Primary School – (Māngere)

·    Al-Madinah School – (Māngere).

46.     Outcomes from the community consultation include feedback on the type of preferred play equipment pieces and supporting facilities. Stakeholder comments from the consultation are noted in attachment D.

47.     The majority of feedback indicated a preference for the following new facilities:

·    shade

·    shared pathways

·    drinking fountains

·    furniture – seats and picnic tables.

48.     The majority of feedback received indicated a preference for the following play equipment:

·    flying fox

·    jumping – trampoline

·    slides and mounds

·    large play module or tower with more than one slide.

49.     The proposed concept plan has been developed in collaboration with the local board, Variety and mana whenua. It includes key aspects highlighted through community engagement process. Staff recommend that the local board approve the concept design in Attachment A, to allow the project to continue to detailed design, procurement and construction.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

51.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options including sourcing materials locally and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

52.     The overall design has considered sustainability and climate change at a conceptual stage, and more possibilities are likely to evolve through each stage of developed and detailed design as the project progresses. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

53.     As part of the strategic assessment phase, the project team reached out to various council departments and Auckland Transport, requesting input on services they currently and potentially will be providing in the space. Council Parks, Sports and Recreation Activation team and Community Facilities Operations team responded and have remained involved providing input to improve the quality of the park and ways to reduce the cost of maintenance.

54.     Community Facilities Operations staff noted that destination playgrounds are larger than standard playgrounds and David Lange Park will require more attention to ensure the upkeep is being monitored frequently after delivery. Collaboration with staff will continue to ensure that the development is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

55.     Staff referenced the following documents for guidance to form the concept plan and this report: Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan (2020), Tākaro – investing in play analysis (2018), PSR business plan (2020/21), Auckland Council Pasifika Strategy – Ara Moana (2020) and Māori Responsiveness Framework - Whiria te Muka Tangata.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

56.     The David Lange concept plan will contribute towards the delivery of the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes as below:

 

Table 1: 2020 Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board Plan outcome/s and objective/s

Outcome

Objective and project response

Outcome 2: We are building well connected, engaged and active communities

Great neighbourhoods are well connected, have accessible local transport, high quality facilities that meet diverse needs, and safe environments to support local wellbeing, lifestyles, and prosperity.

The David Lange Park is a well-connected sports park. It is adjacent to the Māngere Town Centre, pools, library, and Arts Centre.

It is also within walking distance for local schools and residents.

Outcome 4: Celebrating our unique Tangata Whenua and Pasifika identities as a vibrant, whānau-oriented community we value our cultures, connectedness, and creative expression.

 

We will elevate our Māori and Pasifika identities while working to improve outcomes for all.

Story telling is an important part of Māori and Pacifica cultures. The gift of a cultural narrative from mana whenua will resonate with the local community. Through story telling iwi will share their history to educate and connect the community to the identity and history of the land.

Outcome 5: Our children and young people grow and succeed Thriving children and young people are connected in their communities.

Their voices are heard, and they lead healthy, active lives, knowing they have positive prospects for the future.

The design has been led by the feedback received during consultation from local schools. Local tamariki highlighted activities and equipment they would like to see in their local playground.

Outcome 6: We thrive and belong in safe, healthy communities.

We want to see you living happy, healthy, and actively engaged lives in safe neighbourhoods and public spaces, where your contribution makes Māngere-Ōtāhuhu an even better place to live, work and play.

The David Lange Park concept plan aims to increase utilisation of the park by providing a range of recreational opportunities. It also seeks to create and increase the reserve’s safety for the local community and families in the area while meeting the increased level of service for that area.

 

57.     At the start of the project the local board highlighted their goal to honour te Tiriti o Waitangi and the importance of having mana whenua’s input and presence throughout the project.

58.     Throughout the project staff, iwi and Variety have attended various workshops and meetings from September 2020 – September 2021, to provide the local board with design and consultation updates and estimate costs.

59.     The proposed concept design has been developed incorporating feedback from the local board and stakeholders. The local board indicated their support in principle for the proposed concept plan on 29 September 2021.The project was placed on hold to allow time for the local board to continue discussions for future funding. This report serves to formalise decision from the local board regarding the concept design which is proposed for staged delivery.

60.     Staff will progress detailed design and construction subject to approval from the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata - Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

62.     The Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area has a population of over 78,450. Over fifty-nine percent (59.4%) identify as Pacific and over sixteen percent (16%) as Māori.

63.     In February 2020, staff attended the mana whenua south parks hui, to introduce the idea of the project and to ask for expressions of interest to be involved and join the project journey. After the hui, staff also reached out to wider mana whenua.

64.     Staff received two expressions of interests from Te Ākitai Waiohua and Te Āhiwaru Waiohua. One member from each iwi joined the project team to provide a cultural narrative to theme the concept plan design. Iwi have attended all design and the local board workshops with council and Variety,

65.     The cultural narrative is a fairy tale story known by the Waiohua iwi’s, gifted to the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu community. The story highlights important landscape features in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board area providing a part of Māori history to identify with and pass on to future generations.

66.     Iwi led the Variety story telling event held in April 2021. This involved taking a group of local children for a walk-up Te Pane o Mataaoho (Māngere Mountain) to tell the story of Mataaoho. After the walk we returned to Māngere Arts Centre to discuss and draw ideas now incorporated in the concept plan.

67.     Delivering the concept plan in three stages will allow iwi to learn how the narrative and assets are received by the community. It would be helpful to monitor feedback from park users after stage one to address any gaps in future stages.

68.     Engagement with mana whenua will be ongoing throughout the project to steer the cultural narrative in detailed design, at storytelling events and further knowledge sharing discussions.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

69.     In April 2021 after the Variety story event, the local board gave staff direction for the final concept plan design to anticipate population growth and future service needs regardless of the approved budget. This will enable the board to carry out discussions for potential growth funding.

70.     At the September 2021 local board workshop staff indicated the high-level costs to deliver a quality design for a quality narrative is $6.5 million for all three stages.

71.     Staff highlighted this is a high-level estimate only factoring in the uncertainty of cost increases in the industry as a result of covid. As funding becomes available for future stages, staff will look at the costs in more detail to find sustainable options including alternative materials to reduce costs.

72.     A total budget of $2,010,997.81 has been approved for the project for stage one in the following financial years:

Budget source

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

Total ($)

Renewals

$582,586.81

$428,940

 

 

LDI capex

$167,000.00

$167,000

$149,952

 

LDI Opex

$115,519.00

 

 

 

Variety contribution

$400,000.00

 

 

 

Total allocated budget

$1,265,105.81

$595,940

$149,952

$2,010,997.81

 

73.     Subject to detailed design and estimates being completed, staff believe the budget allocated is sufficient to complete stage one.

74.     In preparation for an expected influx of visitors to the area due to the development of the destination playground. The toilet facilities have been identified for renewal and the project has been approved as part of current community facilities work programme (David Lange Park - demolish and rebuild toilet block (MO/2021/82)). The new toilets will be accessible toilet cubicles, gender neutral and provide baby changing facilities for parents and caregivers to enter bathrooms where needed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

75.     Project progression and delivery is dependent on a decision from the local board. The following risks and mitigations have been considered:

Risks identified

Mitigation

No progression

·    An identified service level gap will remain unfilled resulting in continued recreational under provision for the community.

·    The quality of play facilities in Māngere-Ōtāhuhu would continue to fall well below the standard provided in other parts of Auckland.

·    Communities in low decile areas that are in most need, including the large population of under 24-year-olds would continue to be the most poorly provided for.

·    Missed opportunity to secure $400,000 from an external funder.

 

Local board to adopt the concept plan.

Risks identified

Mitigation

Resource consent

·    Preparation and processing of the consent may have an impact on construction time frames.

 

Staff will endeavour to meet the deadlines and provide updates to the local board.

Local board direction

·    Support to progress the design was given on 24 November 2021.

·    The time required to complete the design and gain consenting approvals will see physical works start in FY23.

 

Local board to provide timely responses to meet project milestones and avoid further delays.

Budget

·       Funding for stage one delivery has been approved (MO/2021/82).

 

Funding for stages two and three have not been confirmed and will be addressed during future community facilities work programme planning.

COVID interruptions to the work programme

·       Unforeseen delays as a result of COVID have followed us since March 2020. We anticipate this will continue.

 

·       Consultation has been challenging to engage a community who prefer face to face interaction.

 

·       Supply and importation of play equipment from overseas is proving to be challenging. Suppliers have advised up to 6 months of wait on delivery.

 

Staff will manage each situation as they arise and keep the local board updated.

Instead, we have utilised online channels where necessary as well as referred to completed feedback from 2019 – 2021.

It is anticipated that the equipment will arrive in Auckland July/August. Staff will plan start of physical work in August/September 2022.

Reputational

·       Public expectation has been raised to see improvements according to the feedback provided during consultation. If the plans are not supported by the local board, it could cause disappointment for community and mana whenua, as well as contribute to a drop in consultation and engagement of future projects.

 

Local board to adopt the concept plan.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

76.     Subject to the local board approval, staff will progress the detailed design in preparation to lodge resource consent. Times frames for delivery in financial year 2023 will be confirmed once detailed design is complete.

77.     Council, mana whenua and variety will continue to discuss ways to share the story of “Te Riri o Mataaoho” with the community while following the government’s covid guidelines.

78.     The local board will receive monthly updates on progress of the project through regular community facilities reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a)

Attachment A David Lange Concept Plan March 22

101

b)

Attachment B Te Riri o Mataaoho Cultural Narrative March 22 - Confidential

 

c)

Attachment C David Lange Stage One March 22

103

d)

Attachment D David Lange Consultation Feedback March 22

107

e)

Attachment E David Lange Potential Stages March 22

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jasmine Samuel - Community Led & LDI Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Attachment C: David  Lange Park Consultation Feedback 2019-2021

Channel

Feedback

Have your say

“Please upgrade the toilets and consider a good fitness area. It would be good to have a Playground like Royal Reserve with clean toilets a bbq/picnic spaces where you can stay a few hours”

Have your say

“Kia Ora, please would love to see Te Reo Māori used in numbers/ colours/ animal names / signage/ directions etc. Also, maybe one if two play areas suited for different age groups. Please no sand as it gets everywhere( if possible. Bark yes”

Have your say

“I would love to have a water playground for our tamariki. I always see these types of playgrounds in the "richer" areas of Auckland, so if we ever wanted to take our children we would have to travel out there. It would be amazing for David Lange to have the first of it's kind in the Māngere area. Thank you”

Have your say

“Please make sure our basketball court gets lights. Kids are here till late every sunset. It can be dangerous if this isn't factored in”

Have your say

“Toilets need to be busted down they are disgusting and need new ones needs lights so that people aren't hanging around in the park damaging it, what would be cool is also having a little water play area as well like the park on dominion road 😍 will attract more people and with it being by the town centre it will give the businesses there more customers 😉”

Have your say

“Please think of our toddlers and our smaller children and ensure they have a safe but exciting area to play in. I struggle to find anything suitable like the likes of playgrounds in the north shore which are inundated with awesome toddler friendly parks! Also have a bike/scooter area would be awesome. It would definitely make me reconsider using a park in my own area”

Have your say

‘Please don’t put bark on the ground its too hard for the kids to walk on. Cant wait fornit to be upgraded as its very run down”

Have your say

“Toilet facilities need to be upgraded and hopefully it’s part of the new plans. Lighting would be great for activations in the evening”

Channel

Feedback

Have your say

“Please make the driveway wider”

Have your say

Please include water play !!

Have your say

“This has been a long time coming”

Have your say

”Nice, clean toilets and a good path from the netball courts to the main park would be nice”

Have your say

“I ask that Covid and events occurring in 2020 do not affect this development or reduce the dollars originally intended to be spent on this project.  Māngere youth need a destination park which can be used by them and their whānau”

Have your say

“Looking forward to it”

Have your say

“Can we have a gym to exercise with its own space away from the playground and night lighting for exercising at nights and to have a couple of swings for exercising your legs.”

Have your say

“Please add recycling bins”

Have your say

'I grew up in Māngere, living only 5-10 minutes away from David Lange Park, so I can proudly say I grew up playing at that park. I strongly think for future re-development the following things should be taken into consideration:

- Rubbish Bins (There is currently only 1 and it gets full very fast, the location is also not very convenient, I think there should be at least 3 spread across the park. This is not including the netball courts bins)

- Water fountains (There is also only 1 fountain there and it can quickly become crowded.)

- Lights (Light would be nice when playing but I believe this is to avoid people staying for till unreasonable hours?)

- Wipes/Sanitisors (With the work out equipment that is available to the public it can get dirty very easily for multiple reasons. It would be nice to have something to clean it and helps us keep our hands clean)

- Public toilets (I cannot stress enough how disgusting the David Lange Park toilet is. The toilet rolls do not come out properly, it rarely flushes, the seats are uncomfortable and not all stalls lock. It is extremely unhygienic and as a kid, I never felt comfortable using them. It would be nice if there were icer toilets like the ones at the bus stop across from the park.)

Other feedback from local school children and Variety event

·    Mataaoho needs to be the largest feature in the Park, a big tower like the maunga to represent his status as a guardian/God who looks after the land and you can see him from all over the park.

·    They also told us when you visit the Maunga there are mini maunga’s you can walk from one to the other and complete a full circuit.

·    Make the Tuurehu (south village) bigger than the Patupaiarehe (west village) because the south is the best.

·    A mixture of bright and earthy tones

·    Improve the stake park, make it more challenging.

·    Can we have a place to ride our bikes, scooters and skateboards as well.

·    Have more than one piece of play equipment type for big families and groups to play together and not have to wait or line up to use. We want to play together and have races.

·    New toilets with lights – the existing ones are ‘paru’ I don’t want to go in there.

·    Quiet space to read books or to sit and talk with my friends where I can still see my siblings play and they can see me

·    Think about how a child might process what they see when they first arrive at your playground. Even if a child feels excited to get to a playground, they can become anxious and want to leave if there is too much to take in at the entrance. Create a calming environment by avoiding harsh colour palettes, intense changes of light, loud sounds or smells at the beginning.

 

Feedback from Mount Richmond and Sir Keith Park Therapists:

·    Try not to create spaces where crowds of people can gather at the entrance, like a food kiosk or seating area. Use minimal detail and pattern at the beginning by choosing larger, chunkier play structures, paving slabs or signage.

 

·    Materials which have cleaner, more straightforward lines will all help to avoid sensory overload. Once the child is inside the playground and having fun, you can introduce more detail gradually.

 

·    Due to their sensory processing difficulties, an autistic child’s mind can become overloaded very quickly. If they are non-verbal, they are not always able to explain if something is wrong or why. It’s difficult to predict when or why a child might become overwhelmed in a public place, even if they know the area well and have visited many times. Nooks and crannies, where an autistic child can hide in for a bit of peace and quiet, are essential. Anything that makes them feel cocooned is also ideal, such as pods, spinning seats or suspended hammocks. Often, after they have settled, they can get back outside and carry on playing.

·    Consider including helpful signs around the playground, pointing to the quieter areas to help direct parents.

·    Include Balance Activities. Children with autism often have trouble with balance. Provide a wide range of balancing challenges

·    Children with autism may be anywhere on Parten’s stages of play. Some may only be interested in on-looker play, while others want to play alone or side-by-side with other children. The highest stage of social play is cooperative play, which is often more difficult for children with autism. By ensuring there are places for all these types of play, from solitary play to parallel play to cooperative play, we’re meeting the child where they are.

·    Speech therapists suggest a core board or visual picture communication system

 

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

 

19        David Lange Park - destination playground concept plan approval - Attachment b - Attachment B Te Riri o Mataaoho Cultural Narrative March 22

 

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to prejudice the supply of similar information or information from the same source and it is in the public interest that such information should continue to be supplied.

Mana whenua request the story remains confidential to allow them to plan how to better share the story with the community pre and post construction..

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Youthline Presentation March 7th 2022    Page 117

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum Annual Report presentation  Page 127


Māngere-Ōtāhuhu Local Board

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