I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 17 March 2022

6.00pm

This meeting will proceed via Microsoft Teams. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Joseph Allan

 

Deputy Chairperson

Melissa Moore

 

Members

Anne Candy

 

 

Tabetha Gorrie

 

 

Rangi McLean

 

 

Glenn Murphy

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Dave Pizzini

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rohin Patel

Democracy Advisor

 

9 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 914 618

Email: rohin.patel@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

8.1    Deputation - Ngati Tamaoho                                                5

8.2    Deputation - Greenmeadows Neighbourhood Road Safety                                                                                     6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 6

11        Manurewa Youth Council Quarterly Update                               9

12        Governing Body Members' Update                                            19

13        Members' Update                                                                         21

14        Chairperson's Update                                                                  23

15        Auckland Transport Report March  2022                                  25

16        Auckland Transport – Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022                                                                                                29

17        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan                                               49

18        Adoption of scope to develop the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan                                                           55

19        Manurewa Local Board Work Programme Reallocations 2021/2022                                                                                       67

20        Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee - establish a local board joint committee to make appointments                          73

21        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update:  Quarter Two, 2021-22                                                                                 79

22        For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board                                                                                           107

23        Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2022                                                                                  145

24        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records                           149

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 17 February 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Ngati Tamaoho

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   Matekino Marshal, CEO of Ngāti Tamaoho, will speak to the board about their aspirations for the year and what their priorities are.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Matekino Marshal, CEO of Ngāti Tamaoho, for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Greenmeadows Neighbourhood Road Safety

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   Jermaine Nikara will speak to the board about some safety concerns in the Greenmeadows Avenue area such as antisocial behaviour, speeding vehicles and property development increasing congestion.      

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Jermaine Nikara for his attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          17 March 2022, Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - Greenmeadows Neighbourhood Road Safety presentation................................................................. 165

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Manurewa Youth Council Quarterly Update

File No.: CP2022/02043

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the opportunity for the Manurewa Youth Council to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Manurewa Youth Council will provide a written update on their actions and achievements from the past three months.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Manurewa Youth Council quarterly update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Youth Council Quarterly Update

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

File No.: CP2022/02045

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for the ward area Governing Body members to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive verbal updates from Councillors Angela Dalton and Daniel Newman.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Members' Update

File No.: CP2022/02046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for members to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      An opportunity for members of the Manurewa Local Board to give a written or verbal update on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the update from members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2022/02047

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on issues he has been involved in.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      An opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on his activities over the last month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport Report March  2022

File No.: CP2022/02643

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To update the Manurewa Local Board about transport related matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The purpose of the report is to provide an update on transport related items including:

·    Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

·    Auckland Transport (AT) and COVID-19

·    Safety improvement projects

·    Waiata Shores bridge.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the March 2022 report from Auckland Transport.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.      AT is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports on a regular basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

4.      This section of the report contains information about relevant projects, issues and initiatives. It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings.

Local Board Transport Capital Fund

5.      The Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a capital budget established by the Governing Body to allow Local Boards to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

6.      Projects must be safe, not impede network efficiency and be in the road corridor, although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

7.      The Long-Term Plan 2021-2031 re-established the LBTCF at its’ pre-Covid level of $20 million. There has been a minor adjustment in local boards’ funding, based on the agreed allocation formula. Manurewa’s allocation for 2021/22 and 2022/23 is $1,177,506 per annum.

8.      At the local board’s August and September meetings in 2021 the first two tranches of projects were approved for funding.

9.      In a separate report in this agenda the final funds available are recommended for funding.

10.    The first two tranches of projects have now been assigned project managers and are progressing through the investigation and design phases. The next report will commence reporting progress of the projects.

AT and COVID-19

11.    It is just over two years since the COVID-19 pandemic hit New Zealand. Subsequent lockdowns impacted on delivery times for projects, as well as revenues from passenger transport and enforcement activities.

12.    Consequential impacts have been observed more recently. In particular, costs in specific areas have increased significantly and well above the general rate of inflation. Impacting ATs’ delivery projects are the costs of bitumen and labour. Labour includes both contractors on construction projects and recruitment of staff. It is estimated projects have been delayed between six and 12 weeks.

13.    Omicron, as it builds to peak infection rates is having further impacts, as staff become unavailable because of infection or isolating as close contacts. As of 7th March, passenger transport service frequency has been reduced and some routes cancelled. In addition, specific services are having to be cancelled almost at random because of driver or crew unavailability.

Safety improvement projects

14.    There are currently three safety improvement projects underway in the road corridor running between Grand Vue Road and Alfriston Road. They are at different stages of their implementation, and these are summarised below.

15.    Listed below is the latest update. With regard to Grand Vue/Hill Road, the monitoring of traffic was delayed because of the New Year recess and low traffic volumes due to COVID-19. However, this February with schools reopening there was some data gathered that will be useful.

Location

Project

Status

Grand Vue/Hill Roads intersection

Intersection improvements

Investigation – traffic monitoring

Hill/Claude Roads

Signalisation

About to go to consultation.

Claude/Alfriston Roads

Signalisation

Pre-construction planning with utilities.

Waiata Shores bridge     

16.    After review of offer of services (OoS) received for the feasibility study, AT has now selected a chosen consultant to undertake this work. AT is currently finalising a memo to request  additional funding required to appoint this consultant as the OoS has come in higher than the allocated budget towards this project.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.    AT engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

18.    AT’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

19.    There is a growing global, national and local need to urgently address the threats posed by climate change through reducing greenhouse gas (GHG emissions). The scientific evidence is compelling. In New Zealand the Climate Change Response (Zero-Carbon) Act was enacted in 2019, which requires national GHG emissions to be net-zero by 2050. In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency, followed by the endorsement in July 2020 of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

20.    Tackling climate change will require a very significant change to the way we travel around our region although the timing and the detail of how this change might unfold are still to become obvious. Climate change targets in development of the Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) show a strong awareness of central government climate change legislation and Auckland Council climate change targets. Auckland Council through its Auckland Climate Plan has committed to a 50 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, the amount required to keep the planet within 1.5°C of warming by 2100.

21.    Roughly five percent of Auckland’s road and rail strategic networks are found in areas susceptible to coastal inundation, including parts of the state highway network which are crucial links for freight movements and access to key regional destinations. Over 1,000km (or about 13 per cent) of AT’s local road network has recently been identified as vulnerable to a 1-in-100-year flood event. AT is currently identifying and prioritising the risks of climate change to the transport system (assets, services, customers and staff) to permit a more strategic approach to designing and managing our assets in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.    The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.    The purpose of this report is to inform the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.    There are no impacts specific to Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi-and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

25.    Our Maori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi/hapū in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them.

26.    This plan in full is available on the AT’s website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.    There are no direct financial implications as this is an information report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.    Risks are managed as part of each AT project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.    A report will be prepared for the May business meeting.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Members Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Ioane Afoa – Southern Hub Manager, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport – Local Board Transport Capital Fund 2022

File No.: CP2022/02618

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek local board approval of further projects for Auckland Transport (AT) to deliver from the Local Board Transport Capital fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report covers:

·    A summary of the LBTCF

·    A summary of Auckland Transport’s advice on potential LBTCF projects

·    Advice on the financial implications of any decisions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund report March 2022

b)      request that Auckland Transport commits $195,011.00 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to the following:

i)        CCTV (closed circuit TV/video surveillance cameras) system equipment as follows:

Manurewa Town Centre - VMS (video management system) upgrade $15,000.00

Manurewa Town Centre - camera coverage expansion:

A)      Beatty Avenue $7,908.00

B)      Manurewa Library and Manurewa Business Association Office $23,159.00

C)      Weymouth Road Intersection $13,713.00 

D)      Selwyn Road and Lupton Road $16,796.00

E)      Clendon Business Association (new site) $71,947.00

Total for CCTV $148,523.00

ii)       A sum of $47,486.00 for two driver feedback signs

c)      request AT report back on the proposed sites for the location and relocations of the driver feedback signs.

Horopaki

Context

3.      The LBTCF is a capital budget established by the Governing Body to allow Local Boards to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

4.      Projects must be safe, not impede network efficiency and be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

5.      The 2021/31 Long Term Plan re-established the Local Board Capital Fund (LBCF) at its’ pre-Covid Level of $20 million. There has been a minor adjustment in boards funding, based on the agreed allocation formula. Manurewa Local Board’s allocation for 2021/22 and 2022/23 is $1,177,506.00 per annum.

6.      Following a workshop, the board at its 19 August 2021 meeting resolved as follows:

15

Auckland Transport – Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report August 2021

 

Resolution number MR/2021/1

MOVED by Chairperson J Allan, seconded by Member K Penney: 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport local board transport capital fund report August 2021

b)      request that Auckland Transport commits $1,128,000 from the Local Board’s Transport Capital fund to the following:

·    Te Mahia Amenity Upgrade - $728,000

·    Great South Road Crossing - $390,000

·    Real Time Display - $10,000

c)      defer any decision on budget for bus shelters until Auckland Transport provides further information

d)      request Auckland Transport report to the September meeting of the board on the following:

·    Roys Road Traffic Calming Measures

·    Dennis Avenue and David Road Pedestrian safety

·    Clayton Park School Pedestrian Crossing

·    Investigate a Pedestrian Crossing on Finlayson Avenue outside Manurewa Marae

e)      request Auckland Transport provide an update on the Waiata Shores Bridge project at the September meeting of the local board.

CARRIED

7.      The board further resolved at its 16 September 2021 meeting as follows:

16

Auckland Transport – Local Board Transport Capital Fund Report September 2021

 

Resolution number MR/2021/2

MOVED by Member K Penney, seconded by Member R McLean: 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      request that Auckland Transport commits $880,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to the following:

i)       Roys Road traffic calming measures $170,000

ii)      Dennis Avenue and David Avenue pedestrian safety $450,000

iii)     Finlayson Avenue traffic calming $260,000

b)      defer the remainder of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund allocation for consideration at a further workshop and business meeting.

CARRIED

8.      As advised, it is recommended that the board allocate all its remaining funds as specified in the table below.

LOCAL BOARD

TOTAL FUNDS FOR ALLOCATION 2021-23

TOTAL FUNDS ALLOCATED August 2021

TOTAL FUNDS ALLOCATED September

2021

TOTAL REMAINING FUNDS TO BE ALLOCATED IN TERM

Manurewa

$2,355,011

$ 1,128,000

$880,000

195,011

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Decision Making

9.      Since the 16 September 2021 meeting no further workshops have been held on the matter due to the other workshop issues, COVID-19 and the new year recess.

10.    However, two matters have arisen that could be considered candidates for the remaining LBTCF. It is understood that these have been discussed informally by board members. In terms of expediting these matters, they have been brought straight to this business meeting.

CCTV systems

11.    The Manurewa Local Board together with the Manurewa and Clendon Business Association, as part of its’ safer cities programme, commissioned an inventory and strategic review of the CCTV (closed circuit TV/video surveillance cameras) network on and near parking facilities supporting retail and commercial areas. The report is appended as Attachment A.

12.    The improvement in the network should enable people to park in a centre and feel safer about moving to the commercial and retail areas, improving the connectivity of the community.

13.    Ideally, this initiative may also reduce micro-journeys. This means parking in one spot and making three or four retail visits on foot. This is a concept that is being encouraged in retail areas where passenger transport is less frequent than some inner-city retail areas.

14.    The high-level cost estimate as outlined on page two of Attachment A is $148,523.00 for:

Manurewa Town Centre - VMS (video management system) upgrade 15,000.00 

Manurewa Town Centre - camera coverage expansion

1)   Beatty Avenue $7,908.00

2)   Manurewa Library and Manurewa Business Association Office $23,159.00

3)   Weymouth Road Intersection $13,713.00 

4)   Selwyn Road and Lupton Road $16,796.00

5)   Clendon Business Association (new site) $71,947.00.

15.    It is therefore recommended that the Manurewa Local Board allocate $148,523.00 to CCTV equipment.

Drive feedback signs

16.    There are a number of driver feedback signs in the Manurewa Local Board area.

17.    The function of the feedback signs is to indicate to drivers the speed they are travelling. This is informative and educative to drivers that may be over the speed limit to slow down. They are often located near areas with high pedestrian volumes, schools, playing fields etc.

18.    As the Coxhead quadrant residential speed management areas progresses toward completion, there is increasing public support for speed reduction measures, including physical works speed restrictions, lower speed limits and feedback signs.

19.    In anticipation of two further quadrants funded and delivered in future years, it is suggested that repositioning existing signs be investigated and two additional signs be added. These would be added to roads near the existing quadrants and temporarily in the future quadrants. Beattie Avenue, is one such site being investigated.

20.    While this report has not identified sites, it is recommended two extra signs be funded. These are approximately $25,000.00 each. Therefore, the remaining $47,486 be allocated.

21.    A later report to the local board can seek confirmation of new and relocated sites.

Funding consideration

22.    The board had $195,011.00 to allocate for the remainder of the electoral term.

23.    The total of the CCTV upgrade and two further driver feedback signs would fully allocate budget available.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.    Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

25.    The above projects would all contribute towards improving outcomes for active transport and therefore reducing Auckland’s carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.    Auckland Transport will follow established processes where decisions in this report impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.    The local board are the decision makers with regards to the LBTCF. Auckland Transport administers the fund and provides technical advice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.    The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.    This report recommends allocation of the balance of the LBTCF.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.    Auckland Transport will put risk management strategies in place on a project-by-project basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.    Following approval of the recommendations Auckland Transport proceed to delivery of the projects.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

CCTV System Review – December 2021

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas - Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Ioane Afoa - Area Manager South, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/02373

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.      Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport (AT) to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.      In December 2021, AT advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-26. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.      Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, AT is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.      The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.      AT has made speed limit changes covering eleven per cent of the road network, with changes to a further twenty seven per cent of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.      The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

9.      Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late-2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.    Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

11.    The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

12.    ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

13.    The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

14.    Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.    Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

16.    The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

17.    Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

18.    Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

19.    The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.    Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

21.    Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.    Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that nineteen per cent of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.    Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.    The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·    reduce forty per cent of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·    include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming ten years into speed management plans

·    implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

25.    The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

26.    Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

27.    In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.    Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

29.    AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.    Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

31.    Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.    Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.    Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

34.    There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing their final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.    Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

36.    Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

37.    Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

38.    In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

39.    The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.   


 

 Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Stephen Rainbow, Head of Community Engagement - Central Hub, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Adoption of scope to develop the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

File No.: CP2022/02016

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To adopt the scope of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Sport and active recreation plays an important role in enhancing Manurewa by providing an avenue for a more inclusive, vibrant, healthy and connected community.

3.      Manurewa Local Board supports a variety of sport and active recreation organisations annually through the investment into their respective facilities and infrastructure.

4.      Manurewa Local Board have commissioned the development of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan (Work programme item #1668).

5.      Staff present three options for adoption of the scope to develop the plan, as per the 25 November 2021 workshop.

·    Option 1 – Full facilities network – This is the recommended option

·    Option 2 – Council related facilities network

·    Option 3 – Core sport and active recreation facilities network.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      adopt the full facilities network scope for the development of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan as follows:

Geographic area

i)        The plan will focus on facilities within the Manurewa Local Board area whilst also considering participation trends for sub-regional facilities and neighbouring communities.

Type of activity

ii)       The plan will address sport and active recreation as defined in

Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

 

Facility model

iii)      The plan will examine sport and active recreation facilities of varying ownership and operational models, including, but not limited to:

A)      Council land; council owned and operated facilities

B)      Council land; council owned facilities; community operated facilities

C)      Council land; community owned and operated facilities

D)      Ministry of Education owned and operated facilities

E)      Council owned community facilities with potential for sport and active recreation

F)      Facilities of cultural significance providing community outcomes

G)     Places of worship and education providers where there is community access

H)      Privately or commercially owned and operated facilities where there is community access.

 

Horopaki

Context

Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

6.      With population growth, societal change, budgetary and land supply constraints, it is integral to adopt a more strategic method of investment into the community sport sector.

7.      Sport and active recreation facilities plans provide strategic guidance to inform decision-making regarding investment, advocacy, partnerships, and opportunities within the facility network.

8.      Key outputs of sport and active recreation facilities plans include:

·    evaluation and prioritisation of investment opportunities aligned to local outcomes

·    inventory and mapping of local facilities and user-groups

·    overview of facility utilisation, needs, and opportunities

·    overview of sport and active recreation needs and aspirations specific to mana whenua and mataawaka

·    analysis of options for implementation of the plan.

 

Manurewa Local Board - Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021/2022

9.      Manurewa Local Board supports sport and active recreation facilities through operational funding, capital funding and community leases within the Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021/2022.

10.    On 17 June 2021 Manurewa Local Board approved the Customer and Community Work Programme containing # 1668 Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan FY22 [Resolution number MR/2021/93].

11.    The activity description for # 1668 is:

“Develop a Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan to prioritise future sport and active recreation facility developments and inform potential investment decisions to ensure maximum community impact. This is joint funded with Sport NZ.”

12.    Manurewa Local Board have allocated $25,000 from the 2021/2022 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget for this item.

13.    Sport New Zealand has contributed a further $25,000 through their regional partner Aktive, for the development of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

14.    Staff present this report with scope options for local board adoption to progress development of the plan.

Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020

15.    The development and effective implementation of the plan relates to:

Outcome 3: Our people enjoy a choice of quality community spaces and use them often.


 

Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport – Investment Plan 2019 – 2039

16.    In July 2019, council adopted a strategic plan to guide investment into sport: Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport – Investment Plan 2019 – 2039”. The Investment plan identifies three key current challenges:

·    the demand for sport in Auckland is growing and changing, while the existing facilities are ageing

·    not all Aucklanders have the same access and opportunities for sport

·    Auckland Council needs a more structured and strategic approach to invest in sport.

17.    The Investment Plan will be utilised as a key strategic guiding document in the development of the Manurewa Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.    There are three scope options presented for adoption, all of which have been evaluated for strategic alignment in relation to facility outcomes and objectives identified in the following sources:

·    Auckland Sport & Recreation: Strategic Action Plan 2014-2024

·    Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

·    Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020

·    Mana Whenua Forum – Iwi input

 

19.    The scope of the plan can be divided into three sub-categories; geographic area, type of activity and facility model, which are further detailed below.

20.    The options for consideration are differentiated by the facility model sub-category as illustrated in the tables below.

Geographic area

21.    The plan will focus on facilities the Manurewa Local Board area whilst also considering participation trends for sub-regional facilities and neighbouring communities.

Sub-regional and/or bespoke geographic scope will include the following local boards:

·    Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

·    Ōtara-Papatoetoe

·    Howick

·    Franklin

·    Papakura. 

22.    The geographic area of focus will not change across the three options for consideration.

Type of activity

23.    The plan will examine the provision of sport and active recreation in relation to the definitions provided in the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

·    Sport

Physical activity that is competitive, organised and involves the observation of rules. It may be participated in either individually or as a team. 

 

·    Active Recreation

Physical activity that is informal and done for wellbeing, health and/or enjoyment. It may be participated in either individually or with a group. 

24.    The provision of ‘play’ will not be specifically addressed however findings will complement existing strategic council plans and policies such as:

·    Parks and Open Spaces Strategic Action Plan 2013

·    Open Space Provision Policy 2016

·    I Am Auckland – Children and Young People’s Strategic Action Plan 2014

·    Manurewa Open Space Network Plan 2018

25.    The scope of activity will include consideration for non-affiliate and/or casual sport and recreation facility use.

26.    The type of activity to be investigated will not change across the three options for consideration.

Option 1: Full facilities network

27.    A full facilities network scope provides the most holistic overview of community needs and offers the most flexibility for implementation options following the adoption of the plan.

28.    This option provides strong strategic alignment to facility outcomes across three of the four assessment sources.

29.    This option is recommended as the scope of work to develop the plan.

30.    The full facilities scope will examine sport and active recreation facilities of varying ownership and operational models, including, but not limited to: 

·     council land; council owned and operated facilities

·     council land; council owned facilities; community operated facilities

·     council land; community owned and operated facilities

·     Ministry of Education (MoE) owned and operated facilities

·     council owned community facilities with potential for sport and active recreation

·     facilities of cultural significance providing community outcomes

·     places of worship and education providers (non-MoE) where there is community access 

·     privately or commercially owned and operated facilities where there is community access.


 

 

Table 1: Full facilities network– scope analysis

 

Benefits

Disadvantages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facility model

Offers full sport and recreation facility network overview capturing the variety of community needs

The greater number of facilities examined the lesser degree of detail is able to be captured due to time and budget constraints

Provides insight into non-sport sectors and promotes cross-sector collaboration i.e. social enterprise groups delivering sport

Non-council ownership is less direct responsibility of the local board and provides less ability to influence outcomes

Enables opportunities to target a range of strategic outcomes i.e. multipurpose facility potential is greater than sport in isolation

May dilute focus on core sport and active recreation facility needs to accommodate broader community multipurpose use

Highlights new, innovative solutions for the provision of sport and active recreation. Opportunities outside traditional club network working in silos

More focus and analysis of new solutions means less time understanding existing ongoing facility issues

Identifies opportunities for future sport and active recreation provision considering sector change aligned to societal change

Minimal existing budget to address future need. Sector is constantly evolving and community need changes frequently

Provides the most holistic understanding of facility needs in relation to overall provision

Unpredictable needs may fall outside of local board remit or weak strategic alignment

 

31.    Although this option provides a broad scope the plan will focus on user-groups and facilities currently involved in the provision of sport and active recreation or with a realistic potential of providing future provision opportunities.

32.    The full facilities scope was recommended by staff and endorsed by the local board at the 25 November 2021 direction setting workshop.

Option 2: Council related facility network only

33.    The council facilities scope provides the opportunity to further understand the facility network which is directly influenced by local board and/or council budgets.

34.    This option provides moderate strategic alignment to facility outcomes across three of the four assessment sources.

35.    The council facilities scope will examine sport and active recreation facilities related to council by way of land and/or facility ownership, and/or a facility operated by council (or a council contractor).

·     council land; council owned and operated facilities

·     council land; council owned facilities; community operated facilities

·     council land; community owned and operated facilities

·     council owned community facilities with potential for sport and active recreation.

 

This option will not examine facilities which are:

 

·     Ministry of Education (MoE) owned and operated facilities

·     non-council facilities of cultural significance providing community outcomes

·     non-council places of worship and education providers (non-MoE) where there is community access 

·     privately or commercially owned and operated facilities where there is community access.

 

Table 2: Council related facilities network – scope analysis

 

Benefits

Disadvantages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facility model

Identifies opportunities to optimise the council portfolio of community facilities

Fails to account for diverse community facility use, non-council assets not captured

Affords greater control over investment and subsequent outcomes when utilising internal budgets

Minimises ability to leverage council funding due to lower funder interest in council assets

There are a range of budgets to address identified priority needs

Budgetary constraints and lack of accessibility to required scale of funding inhibit progress

Investment can be prioritised and targeted to achieve multiple or specific local board outcomes

Community groups become expectant or reliant on council funding which cannot match demand

Provides detailed analysis of facility and user-group needs

Only addresses a portion of the facility sector, negates broader more diverse needs

Priorities and investment can be aligned to council budgets and systems

Can discourage innovative solutions and creative partnership models that don’t fit

Addresses local board outcome 3: our people enjoy a choice of quality community spaces and use them often

Partnership approach is limited to like-minded funders or groups who share aligned objectives

Future opportunities can be identified and planned for within council strategy

Competing community needs may take precedence over sport and active recreation facility growth

 

36.    The council related facility scope was not recommended by staff at the 25 November 2021 direction setting workshop.

Option 3: Core sport and active recreation facilities network only

37.    The core sport and recreation facilities scope will examine facilities whose principal purpose is to deliver sport and/or recreation.

38.    This option provides a mix of strong, moderate, and weak strategic alignment to facility outcomes across three of the four assessment sources.

39.    The core sport and recreation facilities scope will include:

·     council land; council owned and operated facilities

·     council land; council owned facilities; community operated facilities

·     council land; community owned and operated facilities

·     private or commercial owned and operated facilities where there is community access. 


 

 

This option will not examine facilities which are:

·      council owned community facilities without current sport and active recreation

·      Ministry of Education (MoE) owned and operated facilities

·      non-council places of worship and education providers (non-MoE) where there is community access 

·      non-council facilities of cultural significance providing community outcomes.

 

Table 3: Core sport and active recreation facilities network – scope analysis

 

Benefits

Disadvantages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facility model

Offers detailed analysis of primary sport and active recreation user-groups and sport and recreation specific facilities

Excludes newer, innovative provision models and groups who provide a multi offering such as a social enterprise, youth group, or church.

Captures a variety of different facility models

                                           

Does not identify the potential of collaboration outside of the traditional sport sector

Ensures a targeted sport and active recreation focus supporting core sport and active recreation facilities/groups

Narrow scope limits addressing new, evolving, changing sport sector and community needs

Range of ownership and operating models offers a variety of potential funding sources for developments

 

Local board and council have a varying degree of control and influence over investment and outcomes

Helps to maintain or improve status quo and tradition within the local sport and recreation sector

Inhibits the evolution of the sector as societal change influences community needs

Identifies specific gaps in future provision

Limited capacity to understand future opportunities outside of sport and active recreation industry     

 

40.    The core sport and active recreation facilities scope was not recommended by staff at the 25 November 2021 direction setting workshop.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.    There will be no impact on direct greenhouse gas emissions from the adoption of the scope to develop the plan.

42.    Should future implementation address projects identified in the plan, individual projects would be assessed for impact on greenhouse gas emissions and overall climate change before recommendations were presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.    Eke Panuku’s Transform Manukau urban regeneration programme intersects the Wiri suburb in the northwest of the Manurewa Local Board area.

44.    There has been significant and recent investment from Eke Panuku into local sporting infrastructure.

45.    Eke Panuku will be consulted, and findings will be analysed before integration into the draft and final plans.

46.    Cross-department collaboration and consultation will be required particularly with the Community Facilities department irrespective of the preferred scope.

47.    The plan is intended to support the annual Community Facilities work programme and guide decision-making regarding existing budget lines across council, which effect the provision of sport and active recreation.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.    Staff presented three options at the 5 November 2021 direction setting workshop.

49.    Manurewa Local Board gave direction in support of the full facility network scope capturing the holistic sport and active recreation facility needs within the local area.

50.    Manurewa Local Board questions and comments were answered as follows:

a)   Will playgrounds be included in the scope? Not specifically however should they be at a location used for sport and/or active recreation, they would be accounted for in overall park provision. Using the Sport New Zealand definitions of ‘sport’, ‘active recreation’, and ‘play’, playgrounds would be categorised as ‘play’ and subsequently be addressed through the various existing council plans and policies.

b)   Who will develop the plan, will they have knowledge of the area and local groups? Staff will follow the council procurement process assessing proposals against strategic criteria including local knowledge as well as relevant experience. Staff are mindful Manurewa has a unique sport and recreation landscape with a variety of non-traditional delivery agents such as social enterprise groups.

c)   Great to see Te Ākitai Waiohua involved and we (Manurewa Local Board) would warmly welcome their attendance at any following presentations. Staff acknowledged this point and will endeavour to extend the invitation for further meetings.

51.    A full facility scope affords the most open, inclusive scope for community input irrespective of ownership or operational model.

52.    Future implementation of the plan should be considered a standalone item in relation to local impact.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.    Staff presented a project overview at the 27 October 2021 forum where iwi in attendance were offered the opportunity for further engagement.

54.    Te Ākitai Waiohua was supportive of the project favoured an inclusive partnership approach working alongside the local board, Auckland Council families and the consultant.

55.    Ngāti Tamaoho expressed an initial interest in the project and will be updated on developments as well as contributing to the consultation phase conducted by the consultant.

56.    Te Ākitai Waiohua partnered with staff in the evaluation and decision-making process to determine the preferred consultant.

57.    In general Te Ākitai Waiohua supported structured investment which understands local needs and focusses on inequalities, noting, it is important to understand what communities are not active/missing out.

58.    A key objective of the plan is to provide a high-level overview of sport and active recreation needs and aspirations specific to mana whenua and mataawaka.

59.    Future implementation of the plan should be considered a standalone item in relation to Māori impact.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

60.    There are no financial implications specifically related to the adoption of the scope to develop the plan.

61.    Manurewa Local Board have allocated $25,000 from the 2021/2022 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget for the development of the plan [Resolution number MR/2021/93].

62.    Sport New Zealand has contributed a further $25,000 through their regional partner Aktive, for the development of the plan.

63.    Staff will follow the Auckland Council procurement process to appoint the preferred consultant and put in place a Services Agreement outlining expectations, deliverables, and financial obligations. 

64.    Payments for the development of the plan will be administered through staff aligned to the Services Agreement payment schedule.

65.    The development of the plan will take place over two financial years and where necessary budgets committed for this project will be accrued and carried forward.

66.    Future implementation may have a standalone budget and subsequently offer an opportunity to analyse related financial implications. This will be considered as part of future work programmes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.    Option 2 – Council related facilities, and option 3 – Core sport and active recreation facilities, may exclude facilities and/or user-groups who provide greater sport and active recreation outcomes than the limited scope.

68.    Option 1 – Full facility network scope offers the flexibility to mitigate any risk of exclusion by definition of facility model.

69.    There is a risk that groups included or not included within the final plan may interpret it as an endorsement or commitment to fund project(s).

70.    During the consultation phase community groups will be given a sufficient overview of process for implementation to ensure expectations are accurate.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.    The following high-level stages will form the basis of the methodology used to develop the plan; engagement, analysis, plan development including a draft report to be workshopped with the local board.

72.    Implementation options will be workshopped with the local board as part of the review of the draft plan projected for June 2022.

73.    Staff will present the final plan for adoption at a July 2022 workshop before presenting a report to adopt the plan at the August 2022 business meeting.

74.    Following adoption of the plan the final plan will be shared with stakeholders who contributed to the development as well as sector partners and potential funders.

75.    Implementation of the plan will follow the adoption of the plan commencing in quarter two 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Full facility network

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kieran Nevey - Sport and Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Work Programme Reallocations 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/02570

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve reallocation of funding within the Manurewa Local Board’s 2021/2022 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Manurewa Local Board approved its work programme 2021/2022 on 17 June 2021 (resolutions MR/2021/93, MR/2021/94, MR/2021/95 and MR/2021/96).

3.      As projects progress through the delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change. As a result, variations are sought to the work programme to ensure the local board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget is optimised.

4.      The following activities within the work programme are tracking towards an underspend for the 2021/2022 financial year and have budget available for reallocation:

a)         ID 304: Support Māori-led aspirations Manurewa - $10,000

b)         ID 306: Local Board community safety initiatives investment 1 - $20,000

c)         ID 317: Local Civic events Manurewa - $4,000

d)         ID 318: Armistice Day Manurewa - $3,975

e)         ID 320: Event partnership fund Manurewa - $35,000

f)          ID 326: Movies in Parks Manurewa - $12,972

g)         ID 1418: Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together – Manurewa - $3,300

h)         ID 1474: Town Centre Steering Group - $15,000

5.      Underspend budget must be allocated to projects that can be completed by the end of the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.      It is recommended that the underspend budget from the above initiatives is reallocated to support the following activities:

a)         ID 316: Anzac services Manurewa - $6,000

b)         ID 321: Community grants Manurewa - $98,247.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      approve the reallocation of $104,274 underspend budget towards the following activities:

i)        Customer and Community Services - ID 316: Anzac services Manurewa - $6,000

ii)       Customer and Community Services - ID 321: Community grants Manurewa - $98,247.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.      The Manurewa Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management

·        Auckland Unlimited.

8.      The local board receives performance updates on the work programme throughout the year; the last report was presented at the February 2022 business meeting.

9.      As projects progress through the delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change. As a result, variations are sought to the work programme to ensure the local board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget is optimised

10.    Underspent operational expenditure can be reallocated across departments, but must remain as operational expenditure (i.e. it cannot not be used as capital expenditure) and should be reallocated on the basis that delivery can be achieved before the end of the financial year.

11.    Any budget reallocated in the current financial year must be spent by 30 June 2022 otherwise it will be offered up as savings.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.    Staff have identified eight activities within the operational work programme that will deliver an underspend for the 2021/2022 financial year. The total underspend amount to reallocate is $104,274.

13.    The following table provides a breakdown of the underspend against each activity.

  Table 1: Work programme underspend for reallocation by the local board

ID

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Reason for underspend

Underspend

amount

304

Customer and Community Services

Support Māori-led aspirations Manurewa

Budget allocated for whanaungatanga mana whenua has not been required due to in-person meetings not being held under COVID-19 restrictions.

$10,000

306

Customer and Community Services

Local Board community safety initiatives investment 1

Impact of COVID-19 restrictions on delivery of programme.

$20,000

317

Customer and Community Services

Local Civic events Manurewa

Two of the planned events, Gallaher Playground opening and Manurewa Recreation Centre playground opening, did not proceed due to COVID-19 restrictions on gatherings.

$4,000

318

Customer and Community Services

Armistice Day Manurewa

Event did not proceed due to COVID-19 Alert Level 3 restrictions on gatherings.

$3,975

320

Customer and Community Services

Event partnership fund Manurewa

Two planned events, Totara Park Family Fun Day and Run Rewa, did not proceed due to COVID-19 restrictions on gatherings.

$35,000

326

Customer and Community Services

Movies in Parks Manurewa

Event did not proceed due to COVID-19 Protection Framework red setting restrictions on attendance numbers.

$12,972

1418

Customer and Community Services

Tātou Belonging - we bring communities together - Manurewa

Impact of COVID-19 restrictions on delivery of programme.

$3300

1474

Auckland Unlimited

Town Centre Steering Group

No further projects identified by the steering group for use of these funds.

$15,000

 

 

 

TOTAL

$104,274

 

Activities to reallocate budget

14.    Staff have identified the following activities, which can be delivered by the end of the 2021/2022 financial year, to reallocate budget.

  Table 2: Activities to reallocate

ID

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Activity Description / how budget will be spent

Reallocation

amount

316

Customer and Community Services

Anzac services Manurewa

Provision of additional measures required to deliver this event within the COVID-19 Protection Framework

$6,000

321

Customer and Community Services

Community grants Manurewa

Increase available funds for the board’s remaining community grants rounds.

$98,247

 

 

 

TOTAL

$104,247

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.    The proposed work programme reallocation does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.    When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. There are no further impacts to be considered with this reallocation of funding.

17.    Relevant departments within Auckland Council have been consulted regarding the reallocations and no objections or concerns have been raised by delivery staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.    The reallocation of funding within the local board’s work programme supports strong delivery and optimisation of the local board’s available budget for 2021/2022.

19.    The nature of the reallocation aligns with the local board’s work programme and the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.    Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activities of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.    Reallocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise its locally driven initiatives (LDI) opex budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

22.    The activities recommended to receive funding align with the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020.

23.    Should the local board choose not to support the reallocation of the funding from the initiatives identified above, the funding would be offered up as budget savings.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.    There is a risk that despite the reallocation, some of the budget remains unspent at the end of the financial year. However, delivery staff from the believe it is feasible to deliver the activities within the timeframes required, and the risk of non-delivery is considered to be low.

25.    COVID-19 may interrupt the ability delivery work programme activities. Delivery departments will endeavour to adapt work programme activities for delivery where feasible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.    The funding will be reallocated according to the local board’s resolution, and the relevant department will progress with the delivery of the next steps.

27.    The Manurewa Local Board 2021/2022 work programme will be updated to reflect the board’s formal decisions and any variations will be reflected from the quarter three performance report onwards.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.   

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robert Boswell - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee - establish a local board joint committee to make appointments

File No.: CP2022/01849

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To request that the Manurewa Local Board amend its previous resolution which sought to impose conditions on the Governing Body delegation to the joint committee.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Governing Body has resolved that the appointment of Auckland Council representatives onto the Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee (SIFAC) should be made by a joint committee of the four southern urban local boards (Manurewa, Papakura, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe local boards). The Governing Body has passed a resolution delegating the power to make such appointments to the joint committee.

3.      The Local Government Act 2002 requires an agreement by the participating bodies when a joint committee is formed. Staff sought this agreement from the participating local boards.

4.      The Manurewa Local Board resolved to “agree to the terms of reference for a joint local board committee as set out in Attachment A, subject to confirmation that one of the Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee representatives be from the Manurewa Local Board area on the basis that the two correctional facilities are in the Manurewa Local Board area.”

5.      The Governing Body has delegated the ability to make the appointments to a joint committee of the four participating local boards with two conditions relating to the involvement of the southern ward councillors and Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB). The participating local boards cannot amend the delegation from the Governing Body. It is not possible for a local board to place additional conditions on the delegation from the Governing Body.

6.      This report requests the local board to amend its previous resolution such that:

(i)         It does not seek to amend the Governing Body delegation

(ii)        But instead makes clear that it is the board’s position that one of the representatives should be from the Manurewa Local Board area.

7.      The board’s representative on the joint committee would then be obliged to put the board’s position forward when the joint committee decides the representatives.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      amend its resolution, number MR/2021/178, part (b) by removing the words:

“…subject to confirmation that one of the Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee representatives be from the Manurewa Local Board area on the basis that the two correctional facilities are in the Manurewa Local Board area”

Such that part (b) states:

“(b) agree to the terms of reference for a joint local board committee as set out in Attachment A.”

b)      agree that the board’s position on the appointment of Auckland Council representatives onto the Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee is that one of the Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee representatives be from the Manurewa Local Board area, on the basis that the two correctional facilities are in the Manurewa Local Board area

c)      note the board’s expectation that its representative on the joint committee will present the board’s position to that committee.

Horopaki

Context

8.      The SIFAC was established under conditions set by the Board of Inquiry into the proposed Wiri Men’s Correctional Facility in 2011. The SIFAC and its associated processes are administered by the Department of Corrections. The social impact fund is made available through the Department of Corrections, and the SIFAC is able to allocate $250,000 each year.

9.      Auckland Council must make at least two appointments to the SIFAC.  In the previous term an ad-hoc sub-committee was established of the (then) Governing Body Environment and Community Committee, which met locally in Manurewa to make the appointments and was then discharged.

10.    Staff consider the appointments to the SIFAC are not a regional matter and should be made by local boards. This view is supported by the southern councillors and by the chairs of the affected local boards. The Governing Body has also supported that view. Because four local boards are affected it is preferable to make the appointments through a joint committee of those local boards. The Governing Body has delegated the power to make appointments to such a joint committee.

11.    At its meeting on 21 October 2021 the Manurewa Local Board resolved (resolution number MR/2021/178):

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a) note the delegation from the Governing Body:

That the Governing Body:

a)      delegate to a joint committee established by the Manurewa, Papakura, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe local boards, the power to make two Auckland Council appointments to the Wiri Prison Social Impact Fund Allocations Committee subject to:

i)       southern ward councillors having attendance and speaking rights

ii)       the Independent Māori Statutory Board having the ability to appoint two members.

b)      agree that this delegation continues until it is revoked or changed by the Governing Body.

b)      agree to the terms of reference for a joint local board committee as set out in Attachment A, subject to confirmation that one of the Social Impact Fund Allocation Committee representatives be from the Manurewa Local Board area on the basis that the two correctional facilities are in the Manurewa Local Board area

c)      delegate to the chair and deputy chair authority to agree to minor changes proposed by other participating local boards

d)      subject to the draft terms of reference, with any approved minor changes, being agreed by all participating local boards, appoint the chairperson to the joint committee.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.    The Governing Body has delegated the ability to make the appointments to a joint committee of the four participating local boards with two conditions relating to the involvement of the southern ward councillors and IMSB.

13.    The participating local boards cannot amend the delegation from the Governing Body. It is not possible for a local board to place additional conditions on the delegation from the Governing Body.

14.    In order to progress the establishment of the joint committee, staff are requesting that the board amend its previous resolution by removing the condition on the delegation to the joint committee that one of the appointees is from the Manurewa Local Board area.

15.    Instead it is suggested that the local board pass a resolution stating its position that one of the appointees should be from the Manurewa Local Board on the basis that the two correctional facilities are in the Manurewa Local Board area. The chairperson, or whoever else is the board’s representative on the joint committee, would then be obligated to present the board’s position to the joint committee and vote accordingly (but, as with any decision-making, not completely predetermine their vote but retain an open mind to other arguments).

16.    In terms of the area that is impacted it is noted that the Board of Inquiry and subsequent Social Impact Monitoring Plans[1] defined two areas of social impact:

(i)      a “local” area comprising the Manurewa Local Board area and Manukau Central (part of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area)

(ii)     a “wider” area comprising, in some social impact monitoring reports, the Manukau and Manurewa-Papakura wards, or, in other reports, the area known as Counties-Manukau.

17.    The Board of Inquiry’s actual statement referred to the “immediately impacted community” and the “wider impacted community”:

“We have generally accepted the definitions of the impacted geographic communities Dr Stewart identified in her evidence. As we noted above the site is located in Counties-Manukau, broadly within a 25 square kilometre block that includes Clendon North and South, Burbank, Rowandale, Homai West and East, Manurewa Central, Hillpark, Wiri and Manukau Central (“the immediately impacted community”). The “wider impacted community” follows the boundaries of the Council‟s Manukau and Manurewa–Papakura Wards (extending from Mangere Bridge and Otahuhu in the north, to Otara and Flat Bush in the east, and to Papakura and Hingaia in the south).”[2]

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.    This report relates to the process for making two Auckland Council appointments.  The issues around this process, as covered in this report, do not impact climate. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.    Making two Auckland Council appointments to the SIFAC does not impact the wider council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.    The scope of the SIFAC is not regional but is sub-regional, being relevant to the Manurewa, Papakura, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards. It is because of this that the power to make appointments to SIFAC has been delegated to a joint committee of local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.    Previously when appointments were made by an ad-hoc committee of the Governing Body (or sub-committee of a Governing Body committee), the Independent Māori Statutory Board was invited to make appointments to the ad-hoc committee. The proposed joint committee is deemed to be a committee of each participating local board and the proposal provides for two Independent Māori Statutory Board members

22.    The process itself does not impact on the Māori community however the SIFAC will be considering applications for funding for projects which will have an impact on the Māori community. Mana whenua take part in the Community Impact Forum. There is also a Tangata Whenua Committee comprising representatives of affected iwi, which advises impacts on Māori to the Minister and also makes recommendations on projects for funding by the SIFAC.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.    There are no financial implications for Auckland Council resulting from this decision.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.    There is a risk in delaying the process to establish the joint committee. The joint committee needs to be established in time to make appointments for the next meeting of SIFAC.  Corrections Department staff advise that funding proposals arise from impacts identified in a social impact report. The Community Impact Forum and Tangata Whenua Committee make submissions for funding proposed projects. The next report is due around June and the next meeting of SIFAC is expected to be in August 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.    The other three local boards have agreed to the terms of reference. Following agreement by the Manurewa Local Board a meeting of the joint committee will be called.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Warwick McNaughton - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Rose Leonard - Manager Governance Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update:  Quarter Two, 2021-22

File No.: CP2022/02525

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Manurewa Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with updates to the Manurewa Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The 2021-22 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2021.

3.      Updates are made to the engagement plan throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

4.      An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A.

5.      Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Report for Quarter Two 2021-22

b)      approve updates to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.      Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

7.      While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.      Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.      This report may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

10.    In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.    Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.    These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Manurewa Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

13.    Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment B.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

14.    No updates have been made.  

Auckland Unlimited

15.    Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment C.

Updates to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

16.    No updates have been made.   

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

17.    Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment D.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

18.    No updates have been made.   

Watercare

19.    Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

20.    No updates have been made

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.    Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

22.    Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.    Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

24.    These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.    Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

26.    Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.    Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.    While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.    The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

30.    Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.    It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.    The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Three in June 2022.

33.    A workshop will be held in April to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2022-23.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Manurewa Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

83

b

Attachment B - Auckland Transport Quarter Two 2021-2022 Report - Manurewa Local Board

99

c

Attachment C - Auckland Unlimited Quarter Two 2021-22 Report - Manurewa Local Board

101

d

Attachment D - Eke Panuku Quarter Two 2021-22 - Manurewa Local Board

103

e

Attachment E- Watercare Quarter Two 2021-22 Report

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

For Information: Reports referred to the Manurewa Local Board

File No.: CP2022/01898

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board to receive reports and resolutions that have been referred from the Governing Body committee meetings, Council Controlled Organisations, forums or other local boards for information.

2.      The following information was circulated to the local board:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Notice of Motion - Compliance and Bylaw Enforcement

12

16 February 2022

Kaipātiki Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

2

Auckland Council submission on the Hākaimangō-Matiatia Marine Reserve

29.1

16 February 2022

Kaipātiki Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

3

Notice of Motion - Chairperson Ruth Jackson - Compliance and Bylaw Enforcement

12

15 February 2022

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

4

Notice of Motion: Member J Rose to recommend that Auckland Council adopt the Waka Kotahi "Guidelines for restricting traffic for Play Streets events"

13

23 February 2022

Whau Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

5

Notice of Motion - Member Alexis Poppelbaum - Bylaw and legislative compliance enforcement

12

17 February 2022

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the following information from other local board meetings:

No.

Report Title

Item no.

Meeting Date

Governing Body Committee or Council Controlled Organisation or Forum or Local Board

1

Notice of Motion - Managed Notice of Motion - Compliance and Bylaw Enforcement

12

16 February 2022

Kaipātiki Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

2

Auckland Council submission on the Hākaimangō-Matiatia Marine Reserve

29.1

16 February 2022

Kaipātiki Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

3

Notice of Motion - Chairperson Ruth Jackson - Compliance and Bylaw Enforcement

12

15 February 2022

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

4

Notice of Motion: Member J Rose to recommend that Auckland Council adopt the Waka Kotahi "Guidelines for restricting traffic for Play Streets events"

13

23 February 2022

Whau Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

5

Notice of Motion - Member Alexis Poppelbaum - Bylaw and legislative compliance enforcement

12

17 February 2022

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolutions circulated to all local boards for their information

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kaipātiki Local Board: Notice of Motion - Compliance and Bylaw Enforcement

111

b

Kaipātiki Local Board: Auckland Council submission on the Hākaimangō-Matiatia Marine Reserve

113

c

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board: Notice of Motion - Chairperson Ruth Jackson - Compliance and Bylaw Enforcement

123

d

Whau Local Board: Notice of Motion: Member J Rose to recommend that Auckland Council adopt the Waka Kotahi "Guidelines for restricting traffic for Play Streets events"

139

e

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board: Notice of Motion - Member Alexis Poppelbaum - Bylaw and legislative compliance enforcement

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - March 2022

File No.: CP2022/02048

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present to the Manurewa Local Board the three months Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Manurewa Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.      The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)  clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.      The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

5.      The Governance Forward Work Calendar is also shared with mana whenua iwi organisations, along with an invitation to contact the local board through Local Board Services Department in liaison with Local Board Chair should mana whenua representatives wish to attend a business meeting or workshop on particular subjects of interest.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar March 2022

147

     


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/02049

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the Manurewa Local Board’s records for the workshops held on 3, 10 and 24 February 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Under Standing Order 12.1.1 the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.      Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

4.      This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Manurewa Local Board workshop records held on:

i)        3 February 2022

ii)       10 February 2022

iii)      24 February 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

3 February 2022, Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

151

b

10 February 2022, Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

155

c

24 February 2022, Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.2      Attachment a    17 March 2022, Manurewa Local Board - Deputation - Greenmeadows Neighbourhood Road Safety presentation           Page 165


Manurewa Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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[1] Available here: https://www.corrections.govt.nz/about_us/getting_in_touch/our_locations/auckland_south_corrections_facility/community_forums

[2] “Draft Report and Decision of the Board of Inquiry into the Proposed Men’s Correctional Facility At Wiri” paragraph 314, https://www.epa.govt.nz/assets/FileAPI/proposal/NSP000011/Boards-decision/0d8299eff3/Wiri-Draft-decision-volume-1-Report-and-decision.pdf