I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 22 March 2022

10.00am

MS Teams

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN ADDENDUM AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Debbie Burrows

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Lisa Amoa

Democracy Advisor

 

18 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027 222 8206

Email: Lisa.Amoa@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

 

20        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan                                                                                                          5

 


Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/03408

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.       Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport (AT) to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.       In December 2021, AT advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-26. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.       Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, AT is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.       The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       AT has made speed limit changes covering 11% of the road network, with changes to a further 27% of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.       The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

9.       Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late-2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

11.     The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

12.     ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

13.     The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

14.     Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

16.     The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

17.     Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

18.     Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

19.     The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

21.     Auckland Transport’s plays a key role in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that 19% of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·    reduce 40% of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·    include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming ten years into speed management plans

·    implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

25.     The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

26.     Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

27.     In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

29.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

31.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

34.     There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing a final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

36.     Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

37.     Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

38.     In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

39.     The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Stephen Rainbow – Head of Community Engagement – Central Hub, Auckland Transport