I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 15 March 2022

5.00pm

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Apulu Reece Autagavaia

 

Deputy Chairperson

Dawn Trenberth

 

Members

Dr Ashraf Choudhary, QSO, JP

 

 

Dr Ofa Dewes

 

 

Lotu Fuli

 

 

Swanie Nelson

 

 

Ross Robertson, QSO, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Carol McGarry

Democracy Advisor

 

7 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: +64 27 591 5024

Email: carol.mcgarry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum - Annual report            5

8.2     Deputation – Business Manukau - Strategic Plan                                            6

8.3     Deputation - Fix Up, Look Sharp                                                                        6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member Update                                                                                9

12        Board Members' Report                                                                                              11

13        Chairperson's Announcements                                                                                 13

14        Draft Manukau Sports Bowl master plan - approval of draft plan for public feedback                                                                                                                                       15

15        Reserve Revocation of 11R Birmingham Road, Otara                                            25

16        Unlock Old Papatoetoe: Spatial Delivery Masterplan                                             33

17        Papatoetoe Community Facility Provision Investigation                                        55

18        Classification of reserve at 20 Newbury Street, Otara                                            93

19        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021-22     101

20        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan                                                                                                      127

21        Local board resolution responses and information report                                  133

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      153

23        Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes                                 159

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 15 February 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum - Annual report

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Julie Chambers from the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum will be in attendance to present their Annual Report to the board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Julie Chambers from the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum for her attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum Annual Report................................ 171

 

 

8.2       Deputation – Business Manukau - Strategic Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Kerry Burridge, General Manager Business Manukau and Leigh Auton will be in attendance to present to the board on the Business Manukau Strategic Plan.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Kerry Burridge and Leigh Auton from Business Manukau for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Business Manukau Strategic Plan Review 2022-27.................................... 185

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Fix Up, Look Sharp

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Jane Treseder, the Director of Fix Up, Look Sharp will be in attendance to propose a new project to the board.

2.       Fix Up, Look Sharp is a not-for-profit charity service based in Ōtara,that styles male identified tāngata in appropriate clothing that they then keep, for important meetings and interviews.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      thank Jane Treseder from Fix Up, Look Sharp for her attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Fix Up, Look Sharp presentation.................................................................. 187

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Governing Body Member Update

 

File No.: CP2022/00331

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       A period of time (10 minutes) has been set aside for the Manukau Ward Councillors to have an opportunity to update the Otara-Papatoetoe Local Board on regional matters.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal reports from the Manukau Ward Councillors.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Board Members' Report

 

File No.: CP2022/00335

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board;

a)      receive the board members’ written and oral reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Chairperson's Announcements

 

File No.: CP2022/00339

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

This item gives the chairperson an opportunity to update the board on any announcements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the chairperson’s verbal update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

 

 

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Draft Manukau Sports Bowl master plan - approval of draft plan for public feedback

File No.: CP2022/02492

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the draft Manukau Sports Bowl master plan for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2019 the Ōtara - Papatoetoe Local Board approved development of a master plan for Manukau Sports Bowl to guide the future development of the park (OP/2020/134).

3.       The local board approved a vision for the park being ‘an accessible, inviting and inclusive destination park for everyone in our community’ (OP/2021/87).

4.       Subsequently, based on the needs analysis, the following priority sport and recreation opportunities were confirmed for inclusion in the masterplan at its December 2021 meeting (OP/2021/203):

·    Tennis courts

·    Play and informal recreation

·    Indoor courts

·    Walking

·    Sportsfields

·    Splash pad

·    Bike facilities

·    Athletics

·    Greyhound racing

5.       The local board also asked staff to “prepare an iteration of the master plan that includes future provision for an aquatic facility”.

6.       Staff have prepared a draft master plan for the park which provides for these opportunities. The master plan is a long-term vision for the park. It is divided into three implementation stages / scenarios based on the availability of funding and to respond to anticipated growth in the area. Staff have also prepared a plan which shows the potential locations for optimisation through potential land sale and/or transaction of development rights, and an aquatic facility.

7.       The draft plan is now ready for the community to provide feedback and to identify priority areas for investment.

Short term / low investment scenario

8.       The short-term scenario focuses on the upgrade and improvement of the existing facilities in their current locations and improvements to the cycling and walking network.

9.       This scenario could be delivered in the next ten years with the funding currently available from asset renewals and Eke Panuku’s Transform Manukau programme budget.

Medium term / medium investment scenario

10.     This scenario includes multi use indoor courts which were assessed as a high priority in the needs analysis. It also provides for the option of replacing the greyhound facility with a grassed athletics track if the space is no longer required for greyhound racing.

11.     To deliver all of the elements in this scenario more funding would be required than is currently allocated to the Manukau Sports Bowl. This scenario would require external funding and or asset optimisation.

Long term / high investment master plan scenario

12.     This scenario is the long-term aspirational vision for the park. It includes a number of new facilities that would cater for future expected population growth within the area in the next thirty years.

13.     To deliver all of the elements in this scenario significantly more funding would be required than is currently allocated to the Manukau Sports Bowl. It will require external funding and or asset optimisation, including land / development right sale.

Optimisation

14.     Optimisation has the potential to provide additional funding capacity to assist with implementing the master plan, in particular for the medium and long-term scenarios. Service property optimisation is a policy tool that aims to deliver improved community outcomes with no impact on rates. The aim is to release value from underperforming assets, through selling development rights or land, to reinvest in improved service delivery.

15.     Potential areas for optimisation are shown on page 51 of attachment A.

Aquatic facility

16.     The needs analysis prepared for the master plan found an aquatic facility is not recommended for Manukau Sports Bowl. At the request of the local board, staff have identified two potential locations for an aquatic facility in the master plan.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      approve the draft Manukau Sports Bowl master plan provided in Attachment A for community engagement during April 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background information

17.     Manukau Sports Bowl is a 21-hectare park strategically located adjacent to State Highway One and near Manukau City Centre.

18.     The Sports Bowl is a local park under the local board’s governance, located within the Transform Manukau programme area. Transform Manukau is a programme led by Eke Panuku to develop Manukau to serve future generations and significant population growth. 

19.     The park currently provides for a mix of passive and active recreation activities. The main user groups are the Manukau Velodrome, Tennis Auckland, The Roots Collective and the Auckland Greyhound Racing Club. There are a range of lease arrangements and terms, including the Auckland Greyhound Racing Club lease which has a conditional right of renewal in 2022 for a further term of 33 years.

20.     In September 2019, the local board approved a programme of work to support master planning for the medium and long-term future of the Sports Bowl (OP/2019/145).

21.     Subsequently, the local board approved the development of a masterplan including service property optimisation as a potential funding source for implementing the master plan (OP/2020/134).

22.     At its June 2021 meeting, the local board approved the following vision and objectives for the master plan (OP/2021/87):

Vision

An accessible, inviting and inclusive destination park for everyone in our community

Objectives

i)    foster stronger community ownership, and interactions with the park

ii)   design the park to be safe, vibrant, provide easy connections, and reflect the community

iii)  minimise the environmental impact of development and use of the park and enhance environmental outcomes

iv)  provide opportunities which meet local community needs to learn, develop, participate, and have fun

v)   maximise use of, and community benefits, arising from the park.

23.     At its December 2021 meeting, the local board passed the following resolutions to further guide development of the draft master plan (OP/2021/203):

a)      approve the following priority sport and recreation opportunities for inclusion in the Manukau Sports Bowl master plan:

i) Tennis courts

ii) Play and informal recreation

iii) Indoor courts

iv) Walking

v) Sportsfields

vi) Splash pad

vii) Bike facilities

viii) Athletics

ix) Greyhound racing.

b)      note that a master plan as a long term vision for the park needs to take into account the significant expected population growth, the higher rates of drowning amongst Pacific populations, and the board’s priority to ensure free and easy access to aquatic facilities for local residents (as evidenced by the swimming pool targeted rate) to plan for a new aquatic facility in the Manukau Sports Bowl

c)      request that staff prepare an iteration of the master plan that includes future provision for an aquatic facility as discussed and agreed to in workshops with staff

d)      supports community and mana whenua feedback raising concerns about greyhound racing on the park, attendant animal welfare issues of this activity, the lowest priority accorded to this activity in the master plan and looks forward to the results and recommendations of the current government review of the greyhound racing industry

e)      acknowledge the Auckland Greyhound Racing Club has a conditional right of renewal of the current lease in 2022 for a further term of 33 years, and notes that the board will seek further advice on how it can mitigate the concerns outlined in d) above while fulfilling the boards obligations to the lessee under the terms of the lease.

24.     Based on this direction staff have prepared a draft master plan for Manukau Sports Bowl for consultation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

25.     A master plan has been prepared to respond to the priority activities identified above. The master plan has been divided into three stages / levels of investment. The elements can be assessed for implementation as evidence of community need and budget becomes available.

26.     All scenarios contain the common elements of:

·        reopening the Boundary Road entrance to the park and creating a pedestrian / cycle zone in the centre of the park

·        a walking and cycling path network within the park

·        providing for a pump track and learn to ride facility

·        using the greyhound track infield for sports training

·        providing for a greater range of play opportunities

·        creating a wetland in the north of the park

·        planting an orchard

·        improving the interface with Te Irirangi Drive to provide increased visibility into the park and to connect with the proposed rapid transport route.

27.     Greyhound racing scored second lowest in the needs analysis for Manukau Sports Bowl. It has been included in the master plan as it is an existing facility on the park and the lease provides for the potential for the club to renew the lease provided amongst other things, Auckland Council is satisfied that:

·        there is sufficient need for greyhound racing at the Manukau Sports Bowl; and

·        in the public interest some other sport, game or recreational activity should not have priority over greyhound racing.

28.     The medium and long term master plan scenarios both show an athletics track where the greyhound track is currently located. Athletics was assessed as a higher priority than greyhound racing in the needs analysis. The needs analysis identified further analysis and data are required to confirm the needs for an athletic track. Preliminary conclusions are:

·        an additional synthetic track is required in the Auckland region in the next 10-15 years

·        Manukau Sports Bowl sits at a central point between current synthetic track provision and therefore potentially indicates a gap in provision although catchment and use analysis is needed to substantiate the potential need

·        if this opportunity was to be considered further in the master plan, it is recommended a detailed needs assessment and feasibility study along with consultation with athletic clubs is undertaken before making any decisions.

Short term / low investment scenario

29.     This the lowest intervention of the three masterplan scenarios. Its key focus is on the upgrade and improvement of the existing facilities in their current locations and improvements to the cycling and walking network. There are no proposed changes to the existing road layout and carparking, and all facilities currently located on the park are retained.

30.     The provision of informal recreation activities is the main feature in this scenario, it also provides for walking and cycling and tennis. It delivers on all the high priority elements identified in the needs analysis. The scenario includes:

·        renew and upgrade playground to provide for a wider age range

·        additional basketball court

·        volleyball court

·        petanque

·        pump track and learn to ride

·        splashpad.

31.     This scenario could likely be delivered with the funding allocated to Manukau Sports Bowl from Eke Panuku and the local board’s asset renewal programme.

32.     Greyhounds are included in this scenario as the needs analysis identified that further athletics provision would not be needed for 10 – 15 years.

Medium term / medium investment scenario

33.     This scenario includes the elements identified in paragraph 15 above, it also includes multi use indoor courts which were rated as a high priority in the needs analysis. It also provides for the option of replacing the greyhound facility with a grassed athletics track if the space is no longer required for greyhound racing.

34.     To deliver all of the elements in this scenario more funding would be required than is currently allocated to the Manukau Sports Bowl. Other potential funding mechanisms are optimisation, Auckland Council Sports and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund, and external funders.

35.     A grass athletics track on the greyhound site has been included in this scenario as it shows an option to informally provide for athletics if greyhounds are no longer in the sportsbowl.

Long term / high investment master plan scenario

36.     This scenario proposes a long term, aspirational vision for the park. It includes a number of new facilities that would cater to the expected population growth within the area in the next thirty years. These new facilities are located along the western edge of the park and include:

·        athletic facility - synthetic track and associated buildings

·        a pump track and a learn to ride track for bikes

·        multi-sport building, combined with existing tennis centre

·        upgraded sportsfields

·        a destination playspace.

37.     This scenario does not provide for greyhound racing as their lease expires in 2055 and an athletic facility was identified as a higher priority use in the park than greyhound racing. More work is required to understand the demand and timing of delivery for an athletics facility.

38.     To deliver all of the elements in this scenario more funding would be required than is currently allocated to the Manukau Sports Bowl. Other potential funding mechanisms are optimisation, Auckland Council Sports and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund and external funders.

Optimisation

39.     Optimisation has the potential to provide additional funding capacity for implementing the master plan. Service property optimisation is a policy tool that aims to deliver improved community outcomes with no impact on rates. The aim is to release value from underperforming assets, through selling development rights or land, to reinvest in improved service delivery.

40.     Optimisation requires a business case to investigate whether it fits with the overarching strategic framework and economic case evaluation which is subject to the Eke Panuku Board approval process. Investment of funds generated through optimisation need to be approved by the Eke Panuku Board which must be consistent with Auckland Council and Eke Panuku policies.

41.     Concurrently, Eke Panuku is undertaking an economic assessment to further understand the potential land use and value within the park in order to confirm assumptions made around the potential ‘optimisation areas’ as currently identified, also, to provide a more in-depth indicative analysis on potential funding gaps for the overall masterplan.

42.     An open space provision assessment completed for the area identified an over provision of open space. This presents the opportunity to consider selling some land to reinvest in the redevelopment of the Sports Bowl.

43.     Two potential areas for optimisation are shown on page 50 of attachment A. Both areas provide increased surveillance of the park and 24-hour use and activity. These areas would serve as a transition between the sports and recreational use and existing low intensity residential areas. The identified areas have high accessibility to existing road and public transport network, via Boundary Road and Te Irirangi Drive; where the latter is also on the proposed rapid transit route.

44.     The transit orientated development in the south-eastern corner of the park would require the removal of the mature trees in this area.

45.     The area marked ‘Residential development A’ has a good interface with the existing residential development on Sandrine Avenue. It would require moving the playground, learn to ride and pump track closer to the proposed youth play hub on the Boundary Road edge of the park.

Aquatic facility

46.     The needs analysis prepared for the master plan found an aquatic facility is not recommended for Manukau Sports Bowl for the following reasons:

·                The park is located inside the catchments of existing aquatic facilities, therefore aquatic development would have a negative impact on existing facilities.

·                There is no evidence to suggest improved aquatic provision is required in the immediate area.

·                While there is a need for improved aquatic provision in South Auckland, Manukau Sports Bowl is not the most appropriate site.

47.     The analysis found dedicated aquatic play provision is relatively low and there could be consideration for the development of a splashpad amenity. Development of a splashpad is supported by community feedback.

48.     At the request of the local board, we have identified two locations for an aquatic facility in the master plan.

49.     The location of an aquatic facility which would include a 50-metre pool, a learn to swim pool, a recreation pool and associated infrastructure in locations A and B shown on page 50 in attachment A would have good visibility from the motorway and main road. Being internally focused, the busy roads would not adversely impact on users of this facility. The locations also provide for clustering of the built recreational facilities on the park.

Consultation approach

50.     Staff will seek community feedback on the draft master plan for three weeks starting in April 2022. The overarching objective of the community engagement is for the community to provide feedback on the draft master plan and to identify priority investments to achieve the vision and objectives for the park.

51.     Staff will use the Have Your Say section on council’s website for feedback and provide feedback forms in local libraries. The Auckland region is currently in the ‘red’ setting in the Covid protection framework which creates challenges for face-to-face consultation with the community. However, we cannot expect the local community to only engage with us online and we are exploring additional ways to engage including as outlined below.

52.     Eke Panuku will install its portable pump track in Manukau Sports Bowl during the engagement period. Pump tracks can be used by bikes, scooters and skateboarders. The pump track will provide an opportunity to test the idea of a pump track, create interest in the master plan and for the community to provide feedback.

53.     Staff are also planning to work with a local community group to lead the community engagement to guide us in the best ways for people to be able to provide feedback both digitally and in person.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

54.     Consulting on the draft plan will not have a climate impact.  Climate impacts will be assessed in future work on the master plan and will be aligned with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

55.     The master plan implementation, design and development will include consideration of aspects such as water sensitive design, use of sustainable and ethical products, use of healthy products and construction waste. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

56.     Manukau Sports Bowl sits within the Transform Manukau programme area which is led by Eke Panuku. We are working closely with Eke Panuku on the development of the master plan to ensure that the master plan aligns with the other Transform Manukau programme activity. 

57.     The project has had input from various council departments including Parks Sport and Recreation, Community Facilities, Community and Social Policy, Local Board Services and Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships. Additional resource from other council departments such as Communication and Engagement and Legal have provided input as required. The roles and responsibilities of teams in the wider council group are outlined in Table 1 of the June 2021 report (File No. CP2021/07418).

58.     The master plan has been reviewed by staff from Parks, Sport and Recreation and Eke Panuku.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     Community engagement on the draft master plan is scheduled for April 2022. We have designed a programme to seek feedback from the local community on the draft master plan.

60.     The local board has been involved in the development of the vision and objectives for Manukau Sports Bowl at workshops on 23 March and 11 May 2021.

61.     The assessment criteria and their weightings were developed with the local board at a workshop on 29 June 2021.

62.     The draft findings of the needs analysis were shared with the local board at a workshop on the 14 September 2021.

63.     The draft master plan was presented to the local board at a workshop on the 22 February 2022. The local board provided the following feedback on the draft master plan scenarios:

·        support the feedback given by Mana Whenua, including not using materials such as astro-turf which could have a negative impact on the environment over the long term

·        support a staged approach, progressing from the short term scenario, to medium, to long term high investment

·        optimisation should be seriously contemplated, the options our community want will require more funding than proposed in the short term low investment scenario

·        take a flexible approach in the medium and long term scenarios to respond to community need and availability of funding. Including adding the aquatic centre (with optimisation) and support the indoor courts in the short term scenario, even if we have to push some of those things in the short term scenario back to the medium term scenario

·        need to emphasise the biking activities to ensure the park provides more than the velodrome

·        the local board would like to see more investment from Eke Panuku. Especially in the first phase of the park development.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

64.     The following mana whenua were invited to participate in the development of the master plan:

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·        Ngāti Tamaoho

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·        Te Ākitai Waiohua

·        Te Ahiwaru

·        Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board

·        Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust

·        Ngaati Whanaunga

·        Ngāti Maru

·        Ngāti Tamaterā

·        Waikato-Tainui.

65.     Workshops have been attended by representatives of Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngaati Whanunga and Ngāti Maru.

66.     Staff and the local board have worked closely with mana whenua to develop the vision and principles for Manukau Sports Bowl. At the two hui the key issues identified were the need for the park to:

·        reflect the local community

·        provide activities for the whole family

·        be more welcoming to the local community.

67.     Staff presented the draft master plan to mana whenua for feedback at a workshop on 25 February 2022. The following feedback was provided:

·        mana whenua don’t want to use artificial safety surfaces in play areas which shed and enter the stormwater system and have a desire to see natural or recycled materials such as ‘nike grind’ used in the park

·        don’t support greyhounds remaining on the park because of the negative impacts of gambling on the community

·        want to see a balance of formal and informal recreation activities on the park which encourage the participation of the local community in recreation

·        support a staged approach to the delivery of the master plan so assets can be delivered as funding becomes available.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     Eke Panuku has allocated approximately $80k opex to develop the master plan.

Financial viability assessed against Auckland Council’s sport and investment plan

69.     The financial viability and sustainability of the sport and recreation opportunities was considered as part of the needs analysis. This was guided by the investment principles outlined in the council’s sport investment plan - Increasing Aucklander’s Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039.

70.     The purpose of the plan is to guide the council’s sport investment over the next 20 years to respond to the changing needs of Aucklanders and deliver Auckland Plan outcomes.

Implementation funding

71.     Eke Panuku has identified approximately $15m CAPEX for implementation of the master plan at the Sports Bowl using Transform Manukau reinvestment. This investment funding will be subject to Eke Panuku Board approval of an indicative business case on the adoption of the master plan.

72.     Following the completion of the master plan Eke Panuku will investigate optimisation as a potential funding source to implement the medium and long term scenarios.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

73.     A risk assessment has been undertaken and four key risks have been identified at this stage of the project.

74.     Covid 19 Covid 19 presents a risk to our ability to engage with the community. Widespread community transmission of Covid-19 might affect the ability of the community to engage with us as well as our services, service delivery, our people and customers. Auckland Council departments have business continuity plans in place however delays may occur.

75.     Community Facilities Network Plan review and the review of the aquatics network. These reviews could indicate a gap in aquatic facility provision in the Manukau area. This is considered to be a low risk as the team preparing the aquatic facility plan have reviewed the needs analysis and have advised it is consistent with their preliminary findings.

76.     Greyhound racing industry. The Government reviewed the greyhound racing industry earlier this year and has advised the industry that it needs to improve on a number of areas relating to animal welfare, data recording and transparency of all activities. In September 2021 the Minister for Racing requested the Racing Integrity Board undertake an assessment to determine whether the industry has materially improved on the areas identified work over the next 12 months with a final report presented before the end of 2022. This assessment may impact on what happens on the site currently occupied by greyhound racing.

77.     Community and stakeholder expectations of opportunities. The development of a master plan has the potential to raise community and stakeholder expectations that the ideas in the master plan will be delivered. Any engagement on the master plan will need to clearly communicate the need for detailed needs assessment and feasibility studies, timeframes and budgets to deliver on the opportunities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

78.     Following the local board’s approval of the draft master plan, staff will begin community engagement and engagement with key stakeholders on the draft master plan scenarios.

79.     We will present feedback on the draft master plan to the local board at a workshop in May 2022.

80.     The master plan timeline is below:

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Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manukau Sports
Bowl master plan - draft for discussion (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shyrel Burt - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Reserve Revocation of 11R Birmingham Road, Otara

File No.: CP2021/14100

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report seeks the views of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on the proposal to revoke the reserve status of one reserve in the local board area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Finance and Performance Committee approved in principle the disposal of 11R Birmingham Road, Otara, as part of the Emergency Budget asset recycling programme in 2020. The site is a reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

3.       The committee’s approval for the disposal is conditional upon the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes. Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) is undertaking the required statutory processes on behalf of the council, including the reserve revocation process.

4.       Council departments have assessed 11R Birmingham Road against the provisions for recreation reserves in s17 Reserves Act 1977 and against council’s Open Space policies. The assessment confirms that the site is no longer required by council as a recreation reserve or for open space network purposes.

5.       Eke Panuku publicly advertised the proposed reserve revocation and invited public submissions. The public submissions process for the proposal to revoke the reserve status commenced in February 2021. Independent Commissioners were appointed to consider the public submissions. A hearing was held in February 2022 to allow for submitters to speak directly to the Independent Commissioners.

6.       Eke Panuku has provided the board with relevant property information, open space assessments and copies of public submissions received for the site and now seeks the board’s formal views regarding the proposed reserve revocation.

7.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee will consider the board’s views regarding the site, in addition to any recommendations made by the Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions. The PACE Committee will decide if the proposal to revoke the reserve status for the site should be forwarded to the Department of Conservation (DOC).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      endorse the proposed reserve revocation of 11R Birmingham Road, Otara as it is no longer required by Auckland Council as a recreation reserve

b)      note the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee will consider the board’s views and any recommendations made by Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       In 2020 the Finance and Performance Committee approved in principle the disposal of 11R Birmingham Road as part of the Emergency Budget asset recycling programme. This approval is subject to the satisfactory conclusion of any required statutory processes. Eke Panuku, on behalf of the council, has subsequently commenced work on completing the required statutory processes.

9.       As the site is classified as a reserve under the Reserves Act 1977, a process for the revocation of reserve status, including public and iwi notification, is necessary before it may be sold.

10.     Public notices for the proposal to revoke the reserve status were published in newspapers in February 2021. Letters were also sent to adjoining landowners and the proposal listed on the Auckland Council website. Public notices were also placed on the reserve. The public notice that was published and placed on the reserve, letters and information on the council website advised of council’s proposal to revoke the reserve status, explaining the reason for the proposal and seeking public submissions.

11.     Council appointed Independent Commissioners to consider the public submissions received for the proposed revocation and a hearing was held in February 2022.

12.     The board was represented at the hearing by Chairperson Apulu Reece Autagavaia who provided feedback on the proposed reserve revocation of the site.

13.     At the request of council’s Local Board Services department, copies of the public submissions received regarding the proposed revocation of the subject reserve have been extracted from the report to the Independent Commissioners and are included as Attachment B to this report.

14.     The PACE Committee will consider the board’s views regarding the proposed reserve revocation and any recommendations made by the Independent Commissioners regarding public submissions. The PACE Committee will decide if the proposal to revoke the reserve status should be forwarded to the DOC.

15.     The board has been consulted by council’s Plans and Places team on the separate plan change process to change the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) Open Space zoning of the site before a disposal can proceed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Property information

16.     11R Birmingham Road, Otara is a 2,527m² area of undeveloped open space that was vested upon subdivision in 1967 with the former Manukau City Council. The site is in an industrial area and is used primarily as staff car parking by adjacent businesses. 11R Birmingham Road is a recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

17.     Council’s Community Investment team (formerly the Parks and Recreation Policy team) assessed the site in September 2019 against council’s Open Space Provision and Open Space Acquisition policies. The assessment also considered the provisions for a recreation reserve outlined in s17 Reserves Act 1977. This assessment confirmed 11R Birmingham Road, Otara is not required by council as a recreation reserve or for open space network purposes. This is on the basis the surrounding area is zoned Business – Light Industry and council’s open space provision policy does not anticipate suburb and neighbourhood parks in business zoned areas. The site does not contribute to creating a visually and physically connected open space network. The site is not needed to improve or support the existing open space network.

18.     The council’s arborist assessment of the trees confirmed that none of the large non-native tree species are rated as noteworthy. The stands of native coprosma and the lone ash tree are rated as being of medium asset value.

19.     Council’s Parks, Sports and Recreation department provided input into the open space assessments and support the Community Investment team’s recommendations. This support is based on the fact the site provides very low recreational provision in a space that will attract low visitation and usage.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Part of 11R Birmingham Road is in a flood prone area. This site is not a coastal property and is not likely to be impacted in the future by rising sea levels. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     Council’s Community Investment team, with input from council’s Parks operational staff, has assessed 11R Birmingham Road against council’s Open Space policies and the provisions for recreation reserves in accordance with s17 Reserves Act 1977.

22.     Additional consultation with council’s Heritage team has been undertaken regarding historic or archaeological values associated with 11R Birmingham Road. It was confirmed that Council’s heritage records and Geomaps overlays hold no known heritage values associated with the site.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     Eke Panuku and council’s Value for Money team has provided the board with an information memorandum regarding the proposed reserve revocation of 11R Birmingham Road.

24.     As part of its feedback on council’s Emergency Budget 2020/2021, the board resolved (resolution OP/2020/90) in July 2020 approving its final submission on the Emergency Budget. The board’s feedback supported the sale of underperforming assets and assets not required for a council service use. In this regard, it supported the disposal of 11R Birmingham Road. The board also noted that it seeks a strategic approach to asset sales, not just a financial target, as the current approach does not support anticipated growth and community needs.

25.     The board subsequently resolved (resolution OP/2021/29) in April 2021, outlining its desire to retain the site in council ownership, that a petition received be forwarded to Auckland Council and Eke Panuku, and that the board’s concerns be communicated to council’s Governing Body, the Independent Māori Statutory Board and the PACE Committee.

26.     The board further resolved (resolution OP/2021/54) in May 2021, requesting that the Governing Body rescind its July 2020 decision to dispose of 11R Birmingham Road and that the PACE Committee not approve the proposed reserve revocation when it considers the matter.

27.     This report provides the board with an opportunity to formalise its views regarding the proposed reserve revocation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Nineteen mana whenua iwi authorities were consulted in 2020 regarding any issues of cultural significance associated with 11R Birmingham Road. No issues of cultural significance were received in response.

29.     Site specific mana whenua engagement was also undertaken regarding the proposed reserve revocation. A submission from Ngāti Paoa was received that objected to all the proposed reserve revocations across Auckland. The objection has been referred to the Independent Commissioners for consideration and will be included in the report to the PACE Committee.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     Should the reserve status be revoked and the site disposed of by council, the proceeds of sale will contribute to the 2020 Emergency Budget and 10-year Recovery Budget by providing the council with an efficient use of capital and prioritisation of funds to achieve its planned activities and projects.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There is a risk that the Minister of Conservation may not approve the proposed reserve revocation. In such a circumstance 11R Birmingham Road would remain as a reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The board’s feedback and the Independent Commissioner’s recommendations on the proposal to revoke the reserve status will be reported to the PACE Committee. The report to the committee will also seek approval to submit a request to the Minister of Conservation to uplift the reserve status for the site.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Images

31

b

Public submissions received (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Anthony Lewis - Senior Advisor, Portfolio Review, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Authorisers

Matt Casey – Team Leader, Portfolio Review, Eke Panuku Development

Letitia Edwards - Head of Strategic Asset Optimisation, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Ross Chirnside – General Manager, Value for Money

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Unlock Old Papatoetoe: Spatial Delivery Masterplan

File No.: CP2021/18812

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To endorse the updated Spatial Delivery Plan 2023 for the Unlock Old Papatoetoe area based on changes relating to feedback from community consultation undertaken in 2021.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Unlock Old Papatoetoe High Level Project Plan (HLPP) was endorsed by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board in May 2017 and then approved by the Planning Committee in July 2017 (FIN/2017/108).  The Finance and Performance Committee subsequently approved the divestment of properties located within the Unlock Old Papatoetoe HLPP boundary in August 2017 for urban renewal purposes.

3.       The Unlock Old Papatoetoe Spatial Delivery Plan 2021 was reviewed and discussed with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board in February 2021 with a plan to take it to community consultation later that year.

4.       In August 2021 Eke Panuku undertook a community consultation with over 145 people participating and providing feedback and input that helped to shape and update the plan.

5.       Following the consultation, Eke Panuku prepared an updated programme of development-based site sales, public works projects, and placemaking programme.

6.       Eke Panuku is seeking local board endorsement for the adjusted programme of work as shown in the updated Spatial Delivery Plan 2023 in Attachment A. Main changes include:

·        focusing the public works in relation to the Old Papatoetoe community hub fully or partially at Allan Brewster Centre or the Chambers Building

·        consolidating the Stadium Reserve improvement into one project, to ensure a more timely and consistent approach for the delivery of projects in the overall area

·        changes to several projects boundaries to ensure better project outcomes including intersection testing for Kolmar and St George Street

·        several new projects surrounding the Chambers Building and new integration work focused around the St George’s Lane development site which is located on the former Tavern Lane carpark land.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

7.       That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      endorse the updated Unlock Old Papatoetoe Spatial Delivery Plan 2023 provided as Attachment A.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Unlock Old Papatoetoe is an urban renewal programme of development site sales, public works and placemaking initiatives which seeks to achieve urban renewal within the Old Papatoetoe town centre. The detail of the Unlock Old Papatoetoe HLPP was first presented to the local board at a workshop in May 2017.

9.       Since this time some projects have progressed and have been completed, including a development at 89 Cambridge Terrace, the New World redevelopment, the Papatoetoe Mall redevelopment and upgraded carpark as phase one of the programme.

10.     In February 2021 Eke Panuku presented the first iteration of the Spatial Delivery Plan for Old Papatoetoe area to inform projects for phase two delivery. Staff also indicated that we wanted to consult on several items with the community.

11.     In August 2021 Eke Panuku started community consultation on this plan. A total of 148 people engaged in the workshops and provided feedback on the projects.

12.     Eke Panuku included an information session to explain to the community what is planned for the town centre area and asked specific questions regarding green spaces (Stadium Reserve), gathering and play spaces, community services, community hub and library and cultural identity.

13.     Key themes considered from the consultation are:

·        the community is interested in having a good integrated community hub in their town centre

·        a majority of people consulted wanted to consolidate recreation space with civic and cultural community services and indicated that Allan Brewster Leisure Centre was a good place to develop this kind of “all in one” service. Some also liked the expansion of the existing library space, and some indicated that Town Hall and Chambers area is also a potential location for a community hub. This has been incorporated into the new plan

·        the community also provided a very detailed list of items that would be beneficial for the upgrade the Stadium Reserve such as extending the scope of this project towards the south including seating areas with BBQs and shading, native and mature trees, with some indicating that non-native and flowering trees would be best to showcase the multiculturalism present in the community and build identity. This has been included in the scope of the relevant projects and funding allowances in the new plan

·        footpaths with lighting, cycling and exercise equipment as well as half basketball and netball courts, or a place to ‘kick the ball around’, were also mentioned as important for the future improved park space and this will be added to the scope and brief of the relevant projects in the new plan

The community also mentioned good connection to the main street from Stadium Reserve, and interest in how the new proposed development on 3 St George Street (tavern lane carpark site) would function. The community asked also about parking and congestion on the roads, especially regarding Kolmar and Wallace Rd and St George Street intersection. This has now been added to the overall project list and sequence of the new plan.

14.     In response to all the above, Eke Panuku has reviewed the Unlock Old Papatoetoe Spatial Delivery Plan and supporting programme and adjusted its focus on several items which were not in the programme before.

15.     Attachment A provides a set of maps showing the old Spatial Delivery Plan and the updated Plan, as well as explaining each project individually. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     As part of the response to the community consultation Eke Panuku has adjusted the programme to include:

·        St Georges Lanes Integration Works to ensure the new development fits within its surroundings and provides true connection from the main street to Allan Brewster Leisure Centre and Stadium Reserve

·        Chambers Laneway project – which will update the public laneway connection between Chambers and Stadium Reserve – this is an interim project to improve this space while investigating the community hub solutions

·        Community Hub Investigation – at Allan Brewster Leisure Centre building or the Chambers Building – through this project we will test the possibility of adjusting the available spaces within the existing building of Allan Brewster Leisure Centre and redesign it into a community hub or similar at the Chambers Building. This project will be informed by the upcoming Community Needs Assessment investigation and what could be included in Allan Brewster/Chambers building as part of a co-located community service offering.

17.     Additionally in response to community feedback, Eke Panuku has also adjusted boundaries of some of the already existing projects including:

·        Stadium Reserve is enlarged to include the entire area surrounding Allan Brewster Centre – this space will be developed in conjunction with Allan Brewster Leisure Centre and cater for the space as a community hub, or as existing leisure facility with an upgraded park surrounding that building

·        Cambridge Terrace Extension has a revised boundary to bring forward the new road and separate it from the playground and Reserve upgrade in order to ensure straightforward staged delivery

·        Library Optimisation project now includes RSA site in order to start negotiations with the RSA owners as an opportunity for a better outcome for both – the RSA and the potential new development at 107 and 109 St George Street, subject to the outcome of the Community Hub project investigation

·        98 St George St and 15 Kolmar Rd has a new boundary and includes the intersection. This project will include a potential design for the intersection and cost estimate which can be partially offset from the sale of the site or prioritised against other less critical projects.

18.     Eke Panuku will investigate the opportunities for the community hub, the Kolmar site and the library site and return to the local board to present the outcomes of the investigation to seek further direction and indication for the priority projects within the programme’s overall net site sales revenue budgets.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The programme focuses on retaining mature trees wherever possible in accordance with Auckland’s Urban Ngahere (Forest) Strategy.

20.     Emissions associated with any potential redevelopment can be reduced through development standards agreed through a future development agreement, application of Eke Panuku’s Homestar 6 policy and requirements to reduce carbon emissions in commercial developments.

21.     To mitigate Climate Change impacts, Eke Panuku recommends:

·                assessing sites in the Unlock Old Papatoetoe project area for the potential for green infrastructure initiatives to address climate adaptation – both public realm and development sites

·                engaging with Healthy Waters and Engineering and Technical Services at Auckland Council when undertaking development planning on all sites that have identified flood risk

·                ensuring specific engineering advice about flood risk is built into Development Agreements

·                ensuring potential overheating of residential developments is assessed through the design process; and

·                implementation of Environmental Management Plans for all developments.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Council departments and CCOs have been engaged by Eke Panuku through the development of the Unlock Old Papatoetoe Spatial Delivery Plan. Engagement is ongoing, especially with regards to the community hub and intersection or street upgrades. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The Ōtara -Papatoetoe Local Board has had an important role in the Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme. Engagement with the board has been ongoing since the approval of the HLPP. Monthly workshops are held with the board. 

24.     At a workshop held in February 2021, the masterplan for Old Papatoetoe was presented to the local board and there was overall support from the local board.

25.     The updated plan aligns with the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020 in particular with:

Outcome 2: Prosperous local economy; Outcome 4: Parks and facilities that meet our people’s needs; and Outcome 6: Connected area and easy to get around.

The key initiatives under Outcome 2 is specifically related to Unlock Old Papatoetoe area and it includes:

·                develop a plan to guide future investment in the development of the town centre

·                attract commercial investment for development behind shops at St George Lane

·                improve pedestrian access and connectivity to the recreation centre and stadium reserve

·                enhance linkages to open space

·                develop a community hub that will be the heart of the town centre.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Twelve Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua iwi and hapū have interests in the broader Old Papatoetoe area. Eke Panuku engagement with mana whenua through the Unlock Old Papatoetoe mana whenua project working group has been ongoing since 2016.

27.     Eke Panuku presented this Plan to Eke Panuku Mana Whenua forum last month and we will continue the engagement on project level in the next couple of months.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Eke Panuku has rearranged the financial implications for this programme. Where projects expanded – the budget has been adjusted to match the financial priorities and budget constraints. The development site sales net proceeds will contribute towards public works projects identified in Eke Panuku’s Unlock Old Papatoetoe Spatial Delivery Plan and its supporting programme, which will cover the costs of Stadium Reserve upgrades and Cambridge Terrace extension as key flagship public projects.

29.     The Unlock Papatoetoe programme is guided by the Eke Panuku Unlock Old Papatoetoe Programme Business Case which is approved annually by the board of Eke Panuku.

30.     All funding is subject to region wide site sales net revenue, business wide prioritisation and funding received from the council through the Long-term and Annual Plans.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The Programme for Unlock Old Papatoetoe is funded through the divestment of surplus and underutilised council group property, in agreement with the local board and the governing body of council. There is always ongoing risk due to land values and market conditions.

32.     The Eke Panuku programme to improve the public realm areas will increase the probability of sales and potential values of the sites for sale and attract new investment, residents, visitors and potentially businesses to revitalise the mainstreet of St George Street, over time.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Eke Panuku will continue investigations, planning and staged site development and public works projects listed in the attachment A.

34.     Eke Panuku will continue updates to the community and stakeholders when possible.

35.     Eke Panuku will work with Auckland Transport, and the council group to ensure an aligned approach.

36.     Eke Panuku will progress concept design for the Cambridge Terrace Extension project, the development of the St George’s Lanes Development at 3 St George Street (formerly the Tavern Lane carpark) and the Depot Development at 91 Cambridge Terrace.

37.     Ongoing activation and support of the Food Hub and related placemaking activations.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Unlock Old Papatoetoe: Spatial Delivery Plan FY2023 update

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard Davison - Senior Project Planning Leader, Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Papatoetoe Community Facility Provision Investigation

File No.: CP2022/02358

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To tautoko / endorse the findings of the community provision investigation for Papatoetoe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Action 79 of the Community Facilities Network Action Plan directed staff to investigate community provision in Papatoetoe. The purpose is to identify current and future gaps and duplications in services or facilities against the provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan.

3.       The key findings of the investigation are:

·        existing provision is sufficient to support current and future demand for library, arts and venues for hire services in Papatoetoe

·        condition issues at a number of library, arts and venues for hire service facilities that need addressing to maintain community service provision

·        there is a provision gap for community space. There is one non-council community centre space in Papatoetoe. Based on the population threshold in the provision guideline, additional community space is now required. Community spaces are best to be delivered as part of an integrated facility

·        existing provision is sufficient to support current and future demand for pool and leisure service in Papatoetoe

·        condition issues at Allan Brewster Centre need addressing to maintain leisure service provision.

4.       The recommended key move to address the findings is to:

·        investigate opportunities to optimise the ageing community facilities portfolio and to provide an integrated facility that provides library and arts and culture spaces as well as delivers additional community services space in Papatoetoe.

5.       In line with this key move, staff are progressing a service needs assessment to identify current and future community needs for library, community, arts and culture services amongst the Old Papatoetoe community. The findings from the service needs assessment, together with the work from Eke Panuku, will be reported to the local board later in 2022.

6.       This work will inform the Unlock Old Papatoetoe work programme. The Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme delivered by Eke Panuku offers an opportunity to better meet community needs by optimising existing facilities and providing an integrated facility.

7.       There is an implementation risk that if the current budgetary constraints impact staff’s ability to deliver the key move, then it will affect the ability of the local board to thoroughly explore all options before investment. To mitigate this risk, staff are considering all funding options, for example, Eke Panuku’s Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme, optimisation and funding sought through the next Long-term Plan.

8.       Staff aim for this report to be considered by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee at their April 2022 meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      tautoko / endorse the findings of the Auckland Council’s Papatoetoe community provision investigation 2021 as follows:

Library, arts and community services

i)        residents within Papatoetoe have access to library, arts and venues for hire services

ii)       there are no anticipated gaps in the current provision of library, arts or venues for hire services within Papatoetoe

iii)      there are condition issues at Papatoetoe Library, Spotlight Theatre, Papatoetoe Chambers and Papatoetoe Town Hall

iv)      there is a provision gap for community space. There is one non-council community centre space in Papatoetoe. Based on the population threshold in the provision guideline, additional community space is now required. Community spaces are best to be delivered as part of an integrated facility

Pool and leisure space

i)        residents in Papatoetoe have access to council-owned pool and leisure centre facilities, privately-owned recreation facility and community has access to neighbourhood school courts

ii)       there are no anticipated gaps in provision for pool and recreation services within the Papatoetoe

iii)      there are condition issues at Allan Brewster Centre that are being addressed as renewal budget allows

b)      tautoko / support the following key move as identified in the Papatoetoe community provision investigation 2021:

i)        investigate opportunities to optimise the ageing community facilities portfolio and to provide an integrated facility that provides library and arts and culture spaces as well as delivers additional community services space in Papatoetoe.

Horopaki

Context

Background to the investigation into community provision

9.       Community services, whether provided by Auckland Council or a third party, are an important part of delivering the outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050, notably Outcome 1: Belonging and participating. The Community Facilities Network Plan guides the council’s investment in the provision of community services.

10.     The community provision investigation for Papatoetoe responds to the following action in the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan:

 

Action 79: Investigate community facility provision to meet community needs in Papatoetoe.

 

11.     The purpose of the investigation is to identify current and future gaps and duplications in services or facilities against the provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan.

The Papatoetoe study area

12.     The Papatoetoe study area is approximately 31km2 and represents 0.63 per cent of Auckland’s geographic area. It comprises the suburbs of Papatoetoe, Middlemore, Puhinui and Manukau within the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board area (shown in red in Figure 1).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Methodology for investigation

13.     To complete the investigation, staff conducted the following four streams of work:

·        Community profile - provides an overview of the current state and likely future state of the study area using census data, growth data and other primary research.

·        Social research summary - summarises the findings from recent social research, surveys community engagement and public submission to show how residents perceive and feel about their environment and their concerns and aspirations for Papatoetoe.

·        Community facility stocktake - identifies the network of existing facilities (council and non-council) in the study area and analyses available data on the current state including what is on offer, how it is being used, who is using it, and its condition.

·        Gap analysis - analyses evidence from the community profile, social research and community facilities stocktake. It assesses if current provision is sufficient to support demand and how it aligns with provision guidelines and desired national, regional and local outcomes. It determines if demand for services and facilities is likely to exceed supply and where and when this might occur.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The high-level findings of the community provision investigation are provided below.

The population is young and diverse

15.     A total of 53,127 people reside in Papatoetoe (based on the NZ Census 2018), representing 3.2 per cent of Auckland’s total population. The characteristics of the population are summarised in Figure 2.

Figure 2. Characteristics of the population

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The resident population base is relatively young. Most residents fall between the ages of 0-24 years and 25-44 years.

 

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41 per cent of residents in Papatoetoe are in privately owned houses.

 

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More residents are born overseas and those born in New Zealand.

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Most residents identify as Asian and Pacific people.

 

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The median personal income is lower than the Auckland average.

 

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Residents work mostly in Health Care and Social Assistance.

Graduation cap with solid fill51 per cent of residents are with Level 3 Certificate or higher.

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Use of private vehicles in the study area is higher than in Auckland

Source: Census of Population 2018, Statistics New Zealand

The population in the study area is growing

16.     Over the next thirty years, population in the Papatoetoe study area is projected to grow, as shown in Figure 3, to:

·        56,873 by 2031 (or 2.9 per cent of Auckland population)

·        62,483 by 2051 (or 2.7 per cent of Auckland population).

17.     The Papatoetoe study area is growing, but at a slower rate than Auckland as a whole.

Figure 3: Projected population growth over the next 30 years 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Auckland Council’s population model i.11

The study area has planned urban development within and around the area

18.     The unitary plan indicates planned urban development and intensification in areas around Puhinui Road (in the study area), Ihumatao Road and Alfriston Road (near the study area). Figure 4 shows these areas circled in black.

 

 

Figure 4: Planning zones in and near Papatoetoe study area

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Based on Auckland Unitary Plan; Auckland Council, 2021

19.     Eke Panuku is currently delivering the Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme. Its objective is to “initiate and ultimately achieve urban renewal and housing development within the area”[1] with a particular focus on existing facilities including Old Papatoetoe Town Hall, Papatoetoe Chambers, Papatoetoe War Memorial Library and the Allan Brewster Centre. The area of focus for the programme is shown by a red circle in Figure 5.

Figure 5: Sequencing and timing of growth in Papatoetoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Eke Panuku, 2021

Social research provides insights as to behaviours and aspirations

20.     Recent relevant social research, surveys and engagement results provide useful insights as to the behaviours and aspirations of Papatoetoe residents and the broader local board community.

21.     Key sources used include:

·        Quality of life Survey, 2020,

·        Sport New Zealand Sports Insight Tool, Active NZ, 2020

·        New Zealanders and the Arts: Auckland report, 2020

·        public submissions on the community investment section of the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031

·        public submissions on Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020.

22.     The key findings of the relevant social research are outlined in Figures 6 and 7.

Figure 6: Key themes of community aspirations from public submissions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources: Public submissions on 10-year Long Term Plan 2021-2031 and
Public submissions on Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Plan 2020

 

Figure 7: Community behaviour

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Sources: Quality of life Survey, 2020 & Sport New Zealand Sports Insight Tool, Active NZ, 2020 and
New Zealanders and the Arts: Auckland report, 2020

 

Existing community facilities

23.     Communities within Papatoetoe can access community services through existing community facilities operated by Auckland Council and other providers.

24.     As outlined in the Community Facilities Network Plan, staff took an integrated investigation approach and looked across all types of facilities (both council and non-council) to consider a successful and affordable network that meets community needs and aspirations.[2]

25.     The community facilities within Papatoetoe are listed in Figure 8.

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Description automatically generatedFigure 8: Community facilities within Papatoetoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Gap analysis

26.     A gap analysis assessed current provision against the provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan. The provision guidelines, as well as provision approach for different types of spaces required in community facilities, are summarised in Table 1.

Table 1: Provision guidelines to support gaps identification

Types of community space

Provision guidelines

Library

·    Maintain level of 41m²/1000 population

·    Capacity of neighbouring library

·    Maximum distance of 30 minutes travel

·    Destination and regional spaces respond to population growth of 30,000 in metropolitan centres

Arts and culture

Based on evidence of sustainable community demand

Local community centre

Large facilities

·    service a catchment of up to 15-minute drive from metropolitan areas

·    target population of 20,000 and over

Small facilities

·    service a catchment of a 15-minute walk for town centres

·    target population of 5,000 to 10,000 people

Venues for hire

Access to a bookable space within a 15-minute walk from local town centres

Pool and leisure space

Local

·    Serve a catchment of five kilometres

·     Target population thresholds: for pools 35,000 to 50,000 – for leisure 18,000 to 40,000

Destination

·    Serve a catchment of 10 kilometres plus

·    Utilise existing facilities

·    Clear evidence of demand

·    Recognise national facility strategy

27.     Staff analysed service provision against the provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan, taking into account population projections, social research and community profiling. This assessment aims to highlight existing and future gap and duplication in provision.

28.     Table 2 summarises the key conclusions from the provision gap analysis.

Table 2: Provision gap analysis

Demand and provision

Likely future provision requirements

Library, community, and arts services

·   Residents expressed support for multi-purpose community space.

·   Residents have high participation in Pacific music, visual arts/craft, dance, events.

·   No provision gap for library, arts and culture and venue for hire spaces. Digital access to library services is growing.

·   Provision gap for community space. There is one non-council community centre for 53,127 residents (2018 Census). Based on the population threshold of 20,000 residents per large centre in the provision guideline, additional community space is now required.

·    The current provision of library, arts and culture, venue for hire spaces is likely to be sufficient to cater for future population growth.

·    Further investigation is required to assess whether the current arts and culture provision meets the needs of the Papatoetoe community.

·    Some facilities have condition issues that need addressing.

·    There is a need for an additional community centre or community space. Provision of community spaces are best co-located with other spaces in an integrated facility.

Pool and leisure space

·   Residents engage in physical activity at a comparative rate to Auckland.

·   Popular forms of exercise include walking, individual workouts and playing games.

·   No provision gap. Papatoetoe residents have access to Allan Brewster Leisure Centre, Papatoetoe Centennial Pools & Leisure Centre and Kolmar Centre Facility within 10 kilometres.

·   There are four schools with outdoor courts with community access. The community has access to these courts at varying levels. 

·   Residents also travel to facilities in other catchments to access services.

·    Residents in Papatoetoe have access to council-owned pools & leisure, privately-owned recreation facility and community access to neighbourhood school courts.

·    Allan Brewster Leisure Centre has condition issues that need addressing. A renewal programme is being delivered to address those as budget allows.

·    Auckland Council is currently reviewing provision guidelines for aquatic services. This work will provide further clarity as to network requirements.

 

Recommended key move

29.     Based on the gap analysis, the investigation concludes that the current provision of library, arts and culture, venue for hire spaces, pool and leisure spaces are likely to be sufficient to cater for future population growth.

30.     Provision investigation shows a gap for community space. Provision of community spaces are best co-located with other spaces in an integrated facility.

31.     Staff recommend the following key move:

·        investigate opportunities to optimise the ageing community facilities portfolio and to provide an integrated facility that provides library and arts and culture spaces as well as delivers additional community services space in Papatoetoe.

32.     The Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme delivered by Eke Panuku offers an opportunity to address service gaps by optimising existing facilities and potentially providing an integrated facility to better meet the Papatoetoe needs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     The Community Facilities Network Plan outlines that fit for purpose facilities aim to have sustainable quality: that is, they capitalise on opportunities to deliver value for money for the ratepayer and user, minimise environmental impact and balance the needs of present and future generations.

34.     The recommended key move focus on leveraging existing facilities and improving existing facilities. This would ensure a sustainable approach to the provision of community services.

35.     Auckland Council’s investment in walking and cycling infrastructure as well as in public transport foster opportunities to reduce reliance on private vehicle travel to access community services and facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     This community provision investigation was progressed in discussion with relevant council family departments, including:

·        Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

·        Parks Sport and Recreation

·        Community Facilities

·        Local Board Services

·        Eke Panuku.

37.     Their views are reflected in the findings and conclusions of the investigation.

38.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland is leading the renewal and revitalisation of the Old Papatoetoe town centre as part of its ‘unlock’ programme where the agency acts as a development facilitator. The “Unlock Old Papatoetoe” programme presents the opportunity to better meet service needs in the area through the optimisation of existing facilities.

39.     The Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships team is progressing a service needs assessment. This work aligns with the recommended key move of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     Staff held a workshop session with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board on 9 November 2021.

41.     In November 2021, staff presented the draft findings of the investigation. The local board provided the following feedback:

·        support for an arts and culture facility in Papatoetoe similar to Ōtara Music Arts Centre

·        need for a council-owned community centre in Papatoetoe similar to Te Puke ō Tara Community Centre

·        concern that existing community spaces that are third-party owned and operated do not meet the immediate and future needs of Papatoetoe

·        concern that the existing aquatics facility capacity will not meet future growth.

42.     The investigation considers the local board’s feedback.

43.     Local communities benefit from accessing community services. Local views, behaviours and preferences were considered in the development of this investigation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Māori identity and well-being is a key outcome in the Auckland Plan 2050.

45.     Approximately 11 per cent of the Papatoetoe resident population identify as Māori. The social research used to inform this investigation gathered views from a variety of residents in the study areas, including views from Māori.

46.     The provision of community facilities and services in Papatoetoe enable opportunities for residents who identify as Māori to participate in community and sport and recreation activities. This provision contributes towards Focus Area 1 of the Auckland Plan: “Māori identity and well-being” - Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whānau.

47.     Improved service provision would benefit Māori communities. The service needs assessment currently underway will identify the needs of the communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     There are no direct financial implications associated with this report.

49.     Funding is available through Eke Panuku to carry out a service needs assessment for Old Papatoetoe.

50.     Should an integrated community hub be supported, it would be funded through the Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme be a combination of funding committed through the existing Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme, optimisation and funding sought through the Long-Term Plan.

51.     The findings and recommendations of this investigation do not impact existing and planned projects in the local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

52.     The table below presents key risks and mitigations associated with this report.

Key risks

Consequence

Mitigation

There is insufficient data or a significant gap for robust analysis.

Project timeframes will be extended, and the quality of work will suffer.

Use the most up-to-date and available data and acknowledge the limitations of the data.

Emergent population creates limitations associated with knowing the future demographic and their needs, priorities and behaviours.

Findings and recommendations may not accurately reflect the needs of the population of the study area.

Use the most up-to-date information regarding future population growth and demographics.

Acknowledge the limitations of findings and recommendations based on the uncertainty of future population characteristics.

Current budgetary constraints impact the staff’s ability to deliver key move.

Affect the ability of the local board to thoroughly explore all options before investment.

Consider all funding options, for example, Eke Panuku’s Unlock Old Papatoetoe programme, optimisation and funding sought through the next Long-term Plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

53.     Staff aim for the report to be considered by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee at their April 2022 meeting. The report will include the local board’s resolutions.

54.     The Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships team will present the findings of the service needs assessment for Old Papatoetoe to the local board later in 2022. The findings will inform the “Unlock Old Papatoetoe” work programme led by Eke Panuku.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of findings from Papatoetoe community provision investigation

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katie Kim - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Classification of reserve at 20 Newbury Street, Otara

File No.: CP2022/02357

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 pursuant to Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977 as local purpose (community facilities) reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The redevelopment of Te Puke ō Tara, completed in July 2018, uncovered a legacy issue that had never been correctly resolved or classified.

3.       Ōtara Recreation Centre Grounds and Ōtara N Kirk Pool Grounds were found to be sited on land (Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 respectively) that is held as unclassified reserve subject to provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 (RA).

4.       Classification is a mandatory statutory process under section 16 of RA and if not undertaken would mean that Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations.

5.       The classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 was discussed with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board at its meetings held on 19 February 2019, 18 August 2020 and 17 August 2021.

6.       Due to a technical error contained in the resolution passed on 19 February 2019 (resolution OP/2019/00927) the resolution was deemed to be invalid and needed to be revoked. This was addressed by the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board at its meeting on 18 August 2020.  However, the resolution passed on 18 August 2020 (resolution OP/2020/113) also contained an error and needed to be revoked. This was rectified at the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board meeting on 18 August 2021 (resolution OP/2021/118). This resolution also approved public notification of the proposed classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 as local purpose (community facilities) reserves.

7.       The proposed classification of both lots was publicly notified in Manukau Courier and Auckland Council’s website in October 2021. No objections have been received.

8.       Staff recommend that the local board classifies Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 as local purpose (community facility) reserve pursuant to section 16(1) of the RA.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      classify pursuant to Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977:

i)        Lot 54 Deposited Plan 55184 contained in Record of Title NA35A/1455, as local purpose (community facility) reserve

ii)       Lot 55 Deposited Plan 60001 contained in Record of Title NA21A/575, as local purpose (community facility) reserve.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

9.         The redevelopment of Te Puke ō Tara, completed in July 2018, uncovered a legacy issue that needed a resolution by the local board and classification under the Reserves Act 1977. 

10.       Ōtara Recreation Centre Grounds and Ōtara N Kirk Pool Grounds were found to be sited on land (being Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001) held as unclassified reserve subject to provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

11.       Classification is a mandatory statutory process under section 16 of RA and if not undertaken would mean that Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations.

12.       The classification of Ōtara Recreation Centre Grounds and Ōtara N Kirk Pool Grounds was discussed with Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board at three separate business meetings held on 19 February 2019, 18 August 2020 and 17 August 2021.

13.       At its meeting on 19 February 2019, the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board resolved to support the reclassification of Lot 54 DP 55184 under resolution CP2019/00927.

14.       As the resolution recommended reclassification of Lot 54 rather than classification, Legal Services advised that the resolution to “reclassify” did not provide the required authority for a classification process to proceed. Their advice was for the local board to make a new resolution to “classify” Lot 54 DP 55184.  

15.       On 18 August 2020 the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board passed a resolution (OP/2020/113):

  a)    supporting the classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 as a ‘reserve’.

  b)    revoking the resolution from 2019 to reclassify Lot 54 DP 551884 on the basis that it contained a technical error; and

16.       Reserves Act 1977 requires that all reserves are classified for their principal or primary purpose (e.g. recreation reserve, local purpose reserve, scenic reserve). Resolving to classify a reserve as “reserve” does not meet the requirement for a reserve to be classified for its principal or primary purpose. Therefore, the resolution OP/2020/113 classifying Lot 54 DP 55184 as “reserve” was invalid and new resolution classifying Lot 54 DP 55184 for its principal or primary purpose was required. 

17.       On 17 August 2021 the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board passed the following resolution.

Resolution number OP/2021/118

MOVED by Chairperson R Autagavaia, seconded by Member L Fuli:

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      agree pursuant to standing order 1.10.4 to revoke the following part resolution of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, adopted at its meeting held on 18 August 2020, OP/2020/113a) on the basis that it contains a technical error:

         a)      support the classification of Lot 54 DP55184 as a reserve

b)      approve public notification of the proposed classification of:

          i)          Lot 54 Deposited Plan 55184 contained in Record of Title NA35A/1455,          as local purpose (community facility) reserve; and

          ii)         Lot 55 Deposited Plan 60001 contained in Record of Title NA21A/575,            as local purpose (community facility) reserve

pursuant to Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

                                                                                                               CARRIED

Classification

18.     Classification is a mandatory process under section 16 of RA which involves assigning a reserve (or parts of a reserve) to the appropriate class. The class determines the principal or primary purpose of the reserve. The present values of the reserve are considered as well as the future “potential” values and the possible future uses and activities on the reserve. 

19.     This report considers the proposed classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 and Lot 55 DP 60001 as local purpose (community facility) reserves pursuant to section 16(1) of RA.

20.     Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16 of RA to classify council’s reserves, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.

21.     The proposed classification was publicly advertised in Manukau Courier and on the council’s website. No objections to the proposed classification have been received.

22.     The proposal for classification was also presented at the South/Central Mana Whenua Forum on 27 October 2021. All attendees except one supported the proposed classification. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Lot 54 DP 55184

 

23.     Lot 54 DP 55184 is contained in Record of Title NA35A/1456 (outlined blue in Attachment A) and comprises an area of 6234 m². (Lot 54)

24.     Lot 54 is held by the Crown through Department of Conservation (DOC) as an unclassified local purpose reserve for civic, cultural and community purposes, subject to the provisions of RA, and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for those purposes.

Lot 55 DP 60001

25.     Lot 55 DP 60001 is contained in Record of Title NA21A/575 (outlined blue in Attachment A) and comprises an area of 6935 m². (Lot 55)

26.     Lot 55 is held by the Crown through DOC as an unclassified reserve for a site for a swimming pool and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for those purposes.

27.     Both, Lot 54 and Lot 55, were reserve contributions from the adjoining state housing subdivision.

28.     Being Crown derived, classification of Lot 54 and Lot 55 is required in terms of Section 16(1) of RA for which the Auckland Council has delegated authority from the Minister of Conservation to undertake the classification process without requiring any prior concurrence from DOC.

29.     To better accommodate the purpose for which Lot 54 and Lot 55 are currently used, it is proposed that both lots are classified as local purpose (community facilities) reserve.

Reserves Act 1977 - Public Notification

30.     Under section 16(4) of the Act, the council is required to publicly notify its intention to classify any reserves in terms of Section 16(1) of the Act.

31.     Section 16(5)(a) of the Act provides that where the proposed classification for any reserve is substantially the same as the purpose for which the reserves was held and administered immediately before the commencement of RA (RA came into force on 1 April 1978) public notification is not required.

32.     The proposed classification of Lot 54 does not alter the original purpose and can be seen to be substantially the same as the purpose for which the reserve was held and administered. Lot 54 has been held for the current purpose since 1968 (which is well before 1 April 1978). Even though public notification is not required, the recommendation from Legal Services was that classification of Lot 54 is publicly notified.

33.     As none of the provisions under section 16(5) of the RA applied to Lot 55, classification of Lot 55 was publicly notified. 

34.     The proposed classification was publicly notified in Manukau Courier and Council’s website.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     Community places have a positive climate impact as they allow people to connect, participate in activities locally and not have to travel long distances. They help foster a sense of community and contribute positively to people’s views of where they live.

36.     The proposed classification does not have any adverse climate impact on the current or future use of reserve.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The proposed classification has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The local board has previously expressed support for the classification of the reserve to enable the activities that have been in operation on the site to continue. This is evidenced by the following resolution:

Resolution number OP/2020/21

MOVED by Chairperson R Autagavaia, seconded by Member L Fuli:

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)   agree pursuant to standing order 1.10.4 to revoke the following part resolution of the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board, adopted at its meeting held on 18 August, OP/2021/113 on the basis that it contains a technical error:

a)   Support the classification of Lot 54 DP 55184 as a reserve

b)    approve public notification of the proposed classification of:

i)          Lot 54 Deposited Plan 55184 contained in Record of Title NA35A/1455, as local purpose (community facility) reserve; and

ii)         Lot 55 Deposited Plan 60001 contained in Record of Title NA21A/575, as local purpose (community facility) reserve

pursuant to Section 16(1) of the Reserves Act 1977.

                                                                                                                    CARRIED

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori.

40.     Prior to proceeding with the classification, the council is required under Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 to engage with local iwi. The proposed classification was presented to the mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in the land as indicated in paragraph 22 on 27 October 2021.

41.     There are no sites of value or significance to mana whenua identified in the Auckland Unitary Plan – Operative in Part in relation to this reserve.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     There are no financial implications created by the classification of the reserve except for the costs to publish notice of the classification, if approved, in the New Zealand Gazette. The fee for the notice is set by the word count in the notice and is unlikely to exceed $150.00. The costs incurred by publication in the New Zealand Gazette will be borne by Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

43.     Classification is a mandatory statutory process under RA and if not undertaken would mean Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Staff will complete the classification statutory requirements.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial photo

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Tamara Zunic - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021-22

File No.: CP2022/02389

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation work programme items in its area, along with updates to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021-22 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2021.

3.       Updates are made to the engagement plan throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

4.       An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Report for Quarter Two 2021-22

b)      approve updates to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This report may include the following types of changes:

·    additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.     Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.     These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

13.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment B.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

14.     No changes have been made.   

Auckland Unlimited

15.     Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment C.

Updates to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

Additional activities

16.     These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·        government COVID-19 support packages (Activate and Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau)

·        sustainability Initiatives

·        skills and workforce: Pacific Skills Shift.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

17.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment D.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

18.     No changes have been made.

Watercare

19.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

20.     No changes have been made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

22.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

24.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

26.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

30.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Three in June 2022.

33.     A workshop will be held in April to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2022-23.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022

105

b

Auckland Transport 2021-22 Q2 Report - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

119

c

Auckland Unlimited 2021-22 Q2 Report - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

121

d

Eke Panuku Development Auckland 2021-22 Q2 Report - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

123

e

Watercare work programme 2021-22 Q2 Report - Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

125

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/02356

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.       Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport (AT) to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.       In December 2021, AT advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-26. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.       Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, AT is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.       The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       AT has made speed limit changes covering 11% of the road network, with changes to a further 27% of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.       The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

9.       Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late-2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

11.     The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

12.     ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

13.     The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

14.     Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

16.     The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

17.     Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

18.     Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

19.     The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

21.     Auckland Transport’s plays a key role in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that 19% of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·    reduce 40% of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·    include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming ten years into speed management plans

·    implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

25.     The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

26.     Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

27.     In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

29.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

31.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

34.     There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing a final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

36.     Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

37.     Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

38.     In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

39.     The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first ten-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason, General Manager Local Board Services

Stephen Rainbow, Head of Community Engagement - Central Hub, Auckland Transport

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Local board resolution responses and information report

 

File No.: CP2022/01405

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       This report provides a summary of resolution responses and information reports for circulation to the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board.

Information reports for the local board:

2.       The local board made an objection to an application for a renewal of the alcohol off-license for Liquor Baron Ōtara 4/93 Ferguson Road, Ōtara on 28 January 2022. 

3.       The Senior Graffiti Vandalism Prevention Advisor provided the local board with the six-monthly graffiti vandalism update in February 2022 which is provided in Attachment A.

4.       The local board provided feedback to inform a council-wide submission on the proposed amendments to the Kia kaha ake te tiakina o ngā puna wai-inu / Improving the protection of drinking-water sources: Resource Management (National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water) Regulations 2007 consultation document (NES-DW).  A copy of the feedback is provided in Attachment B.

5.       Auckland Unlimited provided the local board with their February-March newsletter for the local area which is provided in Attachment C.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/sThat the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)         confirm its objection to an application for a renewal of the alcohol off-licence at Liquor Baron Ōtara 4/93 Ferguson Road, Ōtara

b)         note the six-monthly graffiti vandalism update in Attachment A

c)         note the feedback to inform a council-wide submission on the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water in Attachment B

d)         note the Auckland Unlimited February-March newsletter in Attachment C.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Six monthly graffiti vandalism update.

135

b

Feedback to on the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water.

141

c

Auckland Unlimited February-March newsletter

143

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

 

File No.: CP2022/00343

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board is in Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

 

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

 

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Work Calendar

155

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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15 March 2022

 

 

Record of Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2022/00347

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board record for the workshops held on 1 February, 8 February and 22 February 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.       Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion. This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board:

a)      note the Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board workshop records for: 1 February, 8 February and 22 February 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 1 February 2022.

161

b

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 8 February 2022.

163

c

Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board Workshop Record, 22 February 2022.

165

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Carol McGarry - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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15 March 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum Annual Report                                                            Page 171

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Business Manukau Strategic Plan Review 2022-27 Page 185

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Fix Up, Look Sharp presentation                   Page 187


Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Board

15 March 2022

 

 

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[1] Planning Committee [CP2017/11622]

[2] Page 4 of the Community Facilities Network Plan