I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Wednesday 16 March 2022

3.00pm

Via Microsoft Teams

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Deputy Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Steve Garner

 

 

Danielle Hancock

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Vicki Kenny

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Robyn Joynes

Democracy Advisor

 

10 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: +64 212447174

Email: robyn.joynes@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

Auckland Shooting Club

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

President

Member

Member

Steven Garner

Warkworth Tennis and Squash Club

Sandspit Yacht Club

Warkworth Gamefish Club

President

Member

Member

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Vicki Kenny

International Working Holidays Ltd

Nannies Abroad Ltd

Director/Owner/CEO

Director/Owner/CEO

Danielle Hancock

Kaukapakapa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Pest Free Kaukapakapa

New Zealand Biosecurity Services Limited

Member

 

Pest Free Coordinator

Operations Manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Protection Association

Agricultural & Pastoral Society - Warkworth

Vice Chairman

 

Committee member

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Boating Club

Springboard Advisory Board

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Committee Member

Member

Contractor

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director

Manager

Colin Smith

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

8.1    Deputation: Northern Action Group                                   5

8.2    Deputation: Friends of Awa Matakanakana (FOAM)         6

8.3    Deputation: Warkworth age-friendly study                        6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 6

11        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan                                                 9

12        Millwater and Silverdale community provision investigation 15

13        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021-2022                                                                             51

14        Rodney Local Board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water                                                                                              81

15        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                                85

16        Governance forward work calendar                                           89

17        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                   95

18        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Northern Action Group

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Northern Action Group have requested a deputation to discuss improving engagement and promoting Rodney’s interest within Auckland Council.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Bill Foster from the Northern Action Group for his presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Northern Action Group presentation........................... 107

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Friends of Awa Matakanakana (FOAM)

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      John Collins and Martin Evans from Friends of Awa Matakanakana have requested a deputation to discuss projects that require funding in the Matakana/Glen Eden catchments.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Collins and Mr Evans from Friends of Awa Matakanakana for their presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Friends of Awa Matakanakana presentation............... 115

 

 

8.3       Deputation: Warkworth age-friendly study

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Dr Sara Napier has requested a deputation to inform the local board of a Warkworth age-friendly study.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Dr Napier for her presentation

 

Attachments

a          Warkworth Age-friendly Survey presentation.............. 123

b          Warkworth Age-friendly Survey report........................ 129

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/02361

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.      Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.      In December 2021, Auckland Transport advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-2026. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.      Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, Auckland Transport is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.      The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first 10-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

Horopaki

Context

7.      Auckland Transport (AT) has made speed limit changes covering 11 per cent of the road network, with changes to a further 27 per cent of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.      The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

9.      Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late-2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.    Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport.

11.    Auckland Transport developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

12.    The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

13.    ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

14.    The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

15.    Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.    Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

17.    The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

18.    Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

19.    Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

20.    The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.    Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

22.    Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

23.    Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that 19 per cent of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.    Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.    The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·      reduce 40 per cent of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·      include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming 10 years into speed management plans

·      implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

26.    The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

27.    Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

28.    In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.    Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

30.    Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

31.    Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

32.    Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.    Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.    Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

35.    There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing their final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.    Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

37.    Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

38.    Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

39.    In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

40.    The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first 10-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.


 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Stephen Rainbow, Head of Community Engagement - Central

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Millwater and Silverdale community provision investigation

File No.: CP2022/01909

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To tautoko / endorse the findings of the community provision investigation for Millwater and Silverdale.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Action 52 of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan directed staff to investigate community provision in Millwater and Silverdale. The purpose is to identify current or future gaps in services or facilities against the guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan.

3.      The study area falls in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. Staff have also considered provision in the rural area directly to the west of the study area which sits in the Rodney Local Board area. This area is projected to experience significant growth and development over time.  This growth is likely to influence the service provision requirements in Millwater and Silverdale. This report is also being considered by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at their 17 March 2022 meeting.

4.      The key findings of the investigation are:

·    projected population growth across the study area will place pressure on existing facilities

·    existing provision is sufficient to support current and future demand for library, arts, community or venues for hire services in Millwater and Silverdale

·    condition issues at Ōrewa Library need addressing and are programmed to be addressed to maintain library service provision

·    existing provision is sufficient to support current and future demand for leisure and aquatic services in Millwater and Silverdale.

5.      The recommended key move to address the findings is to:

·    investigate opportunities to increase community access to schools and privately-owned pools and courts within the next five years.

6.      There is a risk that the rate of growth will differ from projections. There are opportunities in later years to reassess provision and mitigate the impacts of unforeseen growth.  It is recommended that a needs investigation be carried out when the population in the study area reaches 30,000.

7.      Staff aim for the report to be considered by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee at their April 2022 meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)   tautoko / endorse the findings of the Auckland Council’s Millwater and Silverdale community provision investigation 2021 as follows:

Library, arts, and community services

i)        residents within Millwater and Silverdale have access to community, library, arts and venues for hire services

ii)       there are no anticipated gaps in the current provision of community, library, arts or venues for hire services within Millwater and Silverdale

iii)      there are condition issues at Ōrewa Library, and without intervention the library may close, creating a gap in the network

Aquatic provision

iv)      residents within Millwater and Silverdale have access to aquatic services at Stanmore Bay Leisure and Aquatic Centre, and to Northern Arena facility within a ten-kilometre catchment

v)       there are no anticipated gaps in provision for aquatic services within the Millwater and Silverdale area

vi)      the Rodney sub-study area is currently rural and there are no provision guidelines for aquatic services in rural areas

Recreation and leisure

vii)     residents within Millwater and Silverdale have access to recreation and leisure services as the study area is within the catchment of at least one leisure facility

viii)    several schools in the Millwater and Silverdale catchments provide community access to indoor and outdoor courts

ix)      there are no anticipated gaps in provision for recreation and leisure services within the Millwater and Silverdale area and further community access may be negotiated in the future

b)      tautoko / support the following key move as identified in the Millwater and Silverdale community provision investigation 2021:

i)        investigate opportunities for increase community access to schools and privately-owned pools and courts within the next five years

c)      tautoko / support including the following action in the Communities Facilities Network Plan Action Plan: “investigate community needs in Millwater and Silverdale as well as the Rodney sub-catchment when the population reaches 30,000” as identified in the Millwater and Silverdale community provision investigation 2021.

Horopaki

Context

Background to the investigation into community provision

8.      Community services, whether provided by Auckland Council or a third party, are an important part of delivering the outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050, notably Outcome 1: Belonging and participating. The Community Facilities Network Plan guides council’s investment in the provision of community services.

9.      The community provision investigation for Millwater and Silverdale responds to the following action in the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan:

Action 52: Investigate community needs in Millwater and Silverdale, building on the findings and outcomes of previous research in the area. 

 

10.    The purpose of the investigation is to determine present or future gaps in community services in Millwater and Silverdale.

 

The Millwater and Silverdale study area and its sub-catchment

11.    The Millwater and Silverdale study area is approximately 8.2km² and represents 0.75 per cent of Auckland’s geographic area. It comprises the suburbs of Millwater North, Millwater South, Silverdale central and Kingsway (shown in red in Figure 1).

12.    The rural area directly to the west of the study area is projected to experience significant growth and development over time.  This growth is likely to influence the service provision requirements in Millwater and Silverdale. As such, an additional statistical area (shown in blue in Figure 1) has been included for analysis as a sub-catchment study area. It is referred to as the Rodney sub-catchment. Note that growth is only anticipated to occur in the eastern corner of the blue area, with the rest remaining mostly rural.

Figure 1: Millwater and Silverdale and the Rodney sub-catchment study areas

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Note: Millwater and Silverdale study area shown in red, Rodney sub-catchment shown in blue

Methodology for investigation

13.    To complete the investigation, staff conducted the following four streams of research:

·    Community profile - provides an overview of the current state and likely future state of the study area using census data, growth data and other primary research.

·    Social research summary - summarises the findings from recent social research, surveys community engagement to show how residents perceive and feel about their environment and their concerns and aspirations for Millwater and Silverdale.

·    Community facility stocktake - identifies the network of existing facilities (council and non-council) in the study area and analyses available data on the current state including what is on offer, how it is being used, who is using it, and its condition.

·    Gap analysis – analyses evidence from the community profile, social research and community facilities stock take. It assesses if current provision is sufficient to support demand and how it aligns with provision guidelines and desired national, regional and local outcomes. It determines if demand for services and facilities is likely to exceed supply and where and when this might occur.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.    The high-level findings of the community needs investigation are provided below.

The population is young and diverse

15.    A total of 19,750 people reside in Millwater and Silverdale and the Rodney sub-catchment (based on the 2018 Census), representing 1.2 per cent of Auckland’s total population. The characteristics of the population are summarised in Figure 2.

 

 

Figure 2: Characteristics of the population

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The resident population base is relatively young. Most residents fall between the ages of 0-24 years and 25-44 years.

 

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Most residents are in families and have young children.

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There is an even split between the number of residents born in New Zealand and those born overseas.

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Most residents identify as New Zealand European and Asian.

The percentage of Asian residents within Millwater and Silverdale is growing.

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The median personal income for both study areas is higher than the Auckland average.

 

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For both study areas, approximately half of all residents are employed.

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58% of residents in Millwater and Silverdale are in privately owned houses.

 

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Private vehicles are the dominant mode of transport within both study areas.

 

The population is growing as the area is being developed

16.    Over the next thirty years, the study areas are projected to grow, as shown in Figure 3, to: 

·    29,532 people by 2031 (or 1.5 per cent of Auckland population)

·    44,922 people by 2051 (or 1.9 per cent of Auckland population).

Figure 3: Projected population growth in the study areas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: Auckland Council’s population model i.11

Urbanisation of rural areas will result in changing needs for community services 

17.    Population growth in the study area is anticipated to occur in Silverdale and Millwater and the emerging suburb of Milldale (marked by the red circle in Figure 4). Parts of the Rodney sub-catchment is planned to become urbanised. The suburb of Milldale to the west of Millwater and Silverdale is zoned ‘future urban’ (yellow shading in Figure 4).

18.    Urbanisation is anticipated to bring newly developed neighbourhoods, good quality housing, as well as improved transport links and employment opportunities. The population is likely to have a high number of young families, working households, with increased ethnic diversity, particularly with an increase of those who identify as Asian.

19.    This significant growth and changing demographics over the next 30 years will drive demand for new services and creates opportunity to better target services to increase participation in low user groups.

Figure 4: Planning zones for the study areas

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Source: Auckland Council Geospatial services, 2021.

Social research provides insights as to behaviours and aspirations

20.    Recent relevant social research, surveys and engagement results provide useful insights as to the behaviours and aspirations of the Millwater and Silverdale community.

21.    Key sources used include:

·    Quality of Life Survey, 2018, The Quality of Life Project

·    Sport and Recreation in the Lives of Young Aucklanders, 2011, Sport New Zealand

·    The New Zealand Participation Survey 2017, Active NZ, Sport New Zealand

·    Community engagement report for Silverdale 2020, Serious Play Works

·    Hibiscus Coast Needs Assessment 2015, Point Research.

22.    The key findings of this social research are outlined in Figures 5 and 6.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 5: Community aspirations

Gap between valued ‘sense of community and felt ‘sense of community’
Some residents experience isolation and disconnection
Desire to build community cohesion
Good quality housing and schools in Millwater and Silverdale
Clubs and societies are important for community cohesion
Perceived high quality of life
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Figure 6: Community behaviour

 Swimming, netball and basketball are popular among younger residents Residents engage in physical activity at a comparable rate to the Auckland average
Those who identify as Asian are more likely to participate in indoor sports

 


 

 

 

 

Residents referenced the lack of indoor sports
Popular forms of exercise include walking, individual workouts and playing games Residents would like more opportunities to gather informally
There is a desire for social/meeting spaces
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


23.    The social research concluded that the community feels that there is:

·    a need for strengthening the sense of community - residents reported feelings of isolation and loneliness and expressed a desire for more community services and spaces in Millwater and Silverdale where people can gather and connect.

·    a lack of community infrastructure - residents raised concern over the current lack of community facilities in Millwater and Silverdale, particularly leisure and recreation facilities.

 

 

Existing community facilities

24.    Communities within Millwater and Silverdale and the Rodney sub-catchment can access community services through existing community facilities in the study areas as well as those in adjacent areas.

25.    The community facilities within Millwater and Silverdale are listed in Table 1 and community facilities within the Rodney sub-catchment in Table 2. The Rodney sub-catchment is rural at present, hence the limited number of facilities within the area.

Table 1: Community facilities within Millwater and Silverdale

Community facilities owned by Auckland Council

Community facilities owned by private providers

·    Stoney Homestead Community Hub

·    Silverdale Hall 

In partnership with Auckland Council:

·    Te Herenga Waka o Ōrewa Marae

 

·    One privately provided aquatic facility (Northern Arena Silverdale)

·    Four privately-owned venues for hire:

Saint John’s Hall

Northridge Country Lodge

Rotary House

Silverdale Rugby Club

 

 

Table 2: Community facilities within the Rodney sub-catchment

Community facilities owned by Auckland Council

Community facilities owned by private providers

·    Wainui Hall

There are no privately provided facilities

 

Gap analysis

26.    The Community Facilities Network Plan details provision guidelines as well as provision approach for different types of spaces required in community facilities. They are summarised in Table 3.

Table 3: Provision guidelines to support gaps identification

Local arts and culture space

Based on evidence of sustainable community demand

Local community centres

Within 15-minute walk from local or town centres or within 30-minute drive of rural and coastal centres

Target population threshold 5,000 to 10,000

Venues for hire

Within 15-minute walk from local or town centres or within 30-minute drive of rural and coastal centres

Libraries space

Capacity testing based on 41m2/1,000 population within a maximum distance of 30-minute travel

Local pools and leisure space

In areas outside catchments of existing facilities (i.e., 10 kilometres), recognising other providers

Target population thresholds: for pools 35,000 to 50,000 – for leisure 18,000 to 40,000

27.    Service provision was analysed against the provision guidelines in the Community Facilities Network Plan, a review of existing facilities, population projections, social research and community profiling to assess likely future demand and gaps over time.

28.    Table 4 summarises the key conclusions from the gap analysis.

 

Table 4: Key conclusions

Demand and provision

Likely future provision requirements

Library, community, and arts services

·   Millwater and Silverdale residents expressed a desire for social/meeting spaces.

·    There are several community facilities and venues for hire in the study areas.

·    The existing facilities in and around Millwater and Silverdale are fit for purpose, providing spaces and services that cater for a range of community activities. However, there are condition issues at the Ōrewa library that needs attention.

·    Residents within Millwater and Silverdale have sufficient access to community, library, arts and venues for hire services. Digital access to library services is growing.

·    There are currently no gaps in provision.

·    There is capacity in existing facilities to support growth.

·    The Ōrewa library should have the capacity to meet future demand, pending condition issues are attended to.

Leisure and recreation services

·   Residents raised concern over the current lack of community facilities in Millwater and Silverdale, particularly leisure and recreation facilities.

·    Millwater and Silverdale residents have access to at least one leisure facility within 10 kilometres.

·    There are four schools with indoor and outdoor courts in proximity to Millwater and Silverdale. They provide a total of 44 indoor courts. The community has access to these courts at varying levels.

 

 

 

·    There is no current requirement for additional indoor recreation space, given the National Strategy ratio for indoor courts (1:9000 people).

·    There is an opportunity to increase community access to school courts.

Aquatic services

·   Millwater and Silverdale residents have access to Stanmore Bay Leisure and Aquatic Centre, and to Northern Arena facility within ten kilometres.

·    Residents also travel to facilities in other catchments to access services.

·    There is no requirement for additional aquatic services at present.

·    Auckland Council is currently reviewing provision guidelines for aquatic services. This work will provide further clarity as to network requirements.

 

Recommended key move

29.    Based on the gap analysis, the investigation concludes that current provision is sufficient to support immediate and future demand.

30.    Staff recommend the following key move:

·   investigate opportunities for increase community access to schools and privately-owned pools and courts within the next five years.

31.    Staff also recommend investigating community provision again when the population within the study areas reaches 30,000. Auckland Council’s latest population projections estimate that this threshold will be reached by 2031. However, growth may be occurring faster than anticipated, notably driven by private plan changes. Staff proposes to closely monitor population growth.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.    The recommendations and key move focus on leveraging existing facility and service provision by schools and private providers and improving existing facilities. This ensures a sustainable approach to the provision of community services.

33.    Auckland Council’s investment in walking and cycling infrastructure as well as in public transport foster opportunities to reduce reliance on private vehicle travel to access community services and facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.    The community provision investigation has been developed in consultation with relevant council departments including Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships, Park Sport and Recreation, Community Facilities and Local Board Services. Their views are reflected in the findings and conclusions of the investigation. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.    The assessment areas of Millwater and Silverdale fall across the boundary of the Hibiscus and Bays and Rodney local boards. Views are being sought from both local boards. This report is also being considered by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board at their 17 March meeting.

36.    As population grows in these areas, and demand for services increases, is it likely that new services would be assessed for treatment as “multi-board services”, as proposed by the Governance Framework Review Service Levels and Funding project. This assessment would consider decision-making responsibility and funding capacity for those services.

37.    Local views, behaviours and preferences were considered in the development of this investigation. Local communities benefit from accessing community services.

38.    Improved community access to court and leisure services provided by schools and private providers would benefit the community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.    Māori identity and well-being is a key outcome in the Auckland Plan 2050.

40.    Approximately 5.4 per cent of the Millwater and Silverdale resident population identify as Māori. The social research used to inform this investigation gathered views from a variety of residents in the study areas, including Māori.

41.    The provision of community facilities and services in Millwater and Silverdale enable opportunities for residents who identify as Māori to participate in community and sport and recreation activities. This provision contributes towards Focus Area 1 of Auckland Plan: “Māori identity and well-being” - Meet the needs and support the aspirations of tamariki and their whanau and towards the social and cultural pou of the Independent Māori Statutory Board Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.    There are no direct financial implications associated with this report.

43.    The findings and recommendations of this investigation do not impact on existing and planned projects in the local board area.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.    The demographic and growth projections may change. Staff will update the projections of this investigation when new growth modelling is produced, and new census information becomes available.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.    Staff aim for the report to be considered by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee at their April 2022 meeting. The report will include the local board’s resolutions.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Millwater and Silverdale community provision summary findings

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katie Kim - Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021-2022

File No.: CP2022/02510

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Rodney Local Board with an update on council-controlled organisation work programme items in its area, along with updates to the Rodney Local Board Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The 2021-2022 Council-controlled Organisation Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2021.

3.      Updates are made to the engagement plan throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

4.      An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.      Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E to the agenda report. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Report for Quarter Two 2021-2022

b)      approve updates to the Joint Council-controlled Organisation Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Horopaki

Context

6.      Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four council-controlled organisation’s (CCOs) for the 2021-2022 local work programme. 

7.      While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.      Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.      This report may include the following types of changes:

·      additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·      proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·      proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

10.    In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.    Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.    These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Rodney Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022.

Auckland Transport

13.    Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment B. No updates have been made.

Auckland Unlimited

14.    Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment C.

Updates to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

Additional activities

15.    These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·        Government COVID-19 support packages (Activate and Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau)

·        Sustainability Initiatives

·        Skills and workforce: Pacific Skills Shift.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

16.    Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment D. No updates have been made.

Watercare

17.    Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Two are provided as Attachment E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

18.    The general line items on Warkworth wastewater have been replaced with four specific projects, each with their own engagement level:

·        Warkworth wastewater scheme – North Western sector wastewater servicing plan

·        Warkworth wastewater scheme – North East wastewater transfer pipeline project

·        Warkworth wastewater scheme – Lucy Moore Memorial Pump Station

·        Warkworth wastewater scheme – Snells Beach wastewater plant.

19.    The line item on Watercare Asset Management Plan has been removed as this work is now complete.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.    Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

21.    Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.    Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

23.    These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.    Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

25.    Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.    Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

27.    While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.    The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

29.    Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.    It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.    The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Three in June 2022.

32.    A workshop will be held in April to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2022-2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

55

b

Auckland Transport Quarter Two 2021-22 Report – Rodney Local Board

71

c

Auckland Unlimited Quarter Two 2021-22 Report – Rodney Local Board

75

d

Eke Panuku Quarter Two 2021-22 Report – Rodney Local Board

77

e

Watercare Quarter Two 2021-22 Report – Rodney Local Board

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Rodney Local Board input into Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water

File No.: CP2022/02120

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To inform the Rodney Local Board that a decision was made and approved under delegation to the chairperson to provide feedback to inform Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      At its meeting of 20 May 2020, the Rodney Local Board resolved (resolution number RD/2020/44) to delegate authority to the chairperson to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils.

3.      The Ministry of Environment has released its consultation document on National environmental standards for sources of human drinking water.

4.      The council’s submission will assess the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water against current priorities for managing source water and delivering drinking water services across the Auckland region. This will include current and future planning objectives within the Auckland Unitary Plan, management of land use activities through consenting processes, and operational priorities for the delivery of drinking water services.

5.      The deadline for feedback to be appended to the council’s submission on the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water was due midday 22 February 2022.

6.      The local board’s National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water feedback is formal, being signed off under delegation, but is being reported to the 16 March 2021 business meeting of the Rodney Local Board to ensure transparent decision-making.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the Rodney Local Board’s feedback (Attachment A to the agenda report) approved under delegation to the chairperson to inform Auckland Council’s submission on the proposed amendments to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water.


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board feedback to the Auckland Council submission to the National Environmental Standards for Sources of Human Drinking Water

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2022/00168

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive Cr Sayers’ update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor update February-March 2022

87

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2022/00169

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present the Rodney Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.      This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.      The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

· ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

· clarifying what advice is required and when

· clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.      The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local  Board governance forward work calendar

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/00170

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Attached are the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 15 February, 2 and 9 March 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 15 February, 2 and 9 March 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board workshop record 15 February 2022

97

b

Rodney Local Board workshop record 2 March 2022

99

c

Rodney Local Board workshop record 9 March

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Northern Action Group presentation           Page 107

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Friends of Awa Matakanakana presentation  Page 115

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Warkworth Age-friendly Survey presentation     Page 123

Item 8.3      Attachment b    Warkworth Age-friendly Survey report         Page 129


Rodney Local Board

16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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16 March 2022

 

 

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