I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 17 March 2022

9.30am

Via MS Teams

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Max Wilde

Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

 

10 March 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Max.Wilde@AucklandCouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

8.1    Business North Harbour update                                         5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 6

11        Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 17 February 2022                                                         7

12        Sanders Reserve Planting Plan 2022                                         29

13        Variations to the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 Work Programme                                                                                   37

14        Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan                                               43

15        Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park development - approval of construction stages                                                                 49

16        Upper Harbour Local Board input into Auckland Council's submission on Transforming Aotearoa New Zealand’s resource management system: Our future resource management system                                                                    63

17        Council-controlled organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021/2022                                                                             71

18        Governance forward work calendar                                         105

19        Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 10 and 24 February and 3 March 2022                   109

20        Local board members' reports - March 2022                          119

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 17 February 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.


 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Business North Harbour update

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide members with an update on the activities of Business North Harbour over the past 12 months.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Kevin O’Leary, General Manager, and Peter Lamberton, Chairperson, of Business North Harbour, will be in attendance to discuss their work programme and outline how this aligns with the local board’s strategic outcomes.

3.      A brief outline of Business North Harbour’s key projects and priorities will also be provided.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Kevin O’Leary and Peter Lamberton from Business North Harbour and thank them for their attendance and presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Business North Harbour Update Presentation - March 2022............................................................................. 125

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.


 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held Thursday, 17 February 2022

File No.: CP2022/02244

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board ordinary meeting held on Thursday, 17 February 2022, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the local board only.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      note that the open unconfirmed minutes of the Upper Harbour Local Board meeting held on Thursday, 17 February 2022, are attached at item 11 of the agenda for the information of the local board only and will be confirmed under item 4 of the agenda.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board open unconfirmed minutes - 17 February 2022.

9

b

Upper Harbour Local Board minutes attachments - 17 February 2022.

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Sanders Reserve Planting Plan 2022

File No.: CP2022/02487

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve the Sanders Reserve Planting Plan 2022 for autumn/winter planting season.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Local board views and direction were captured during a site visit to Sanders Reserve on 21 January 2022 in relation to planting activity proposed for autumn/winter 2022.

3.      Maps showing both the context of the wider Sanders Reserve area (Map A) and a focused view (Map B) showing proposed planting areas in line with local board feedback are attached. (Attachment A).

4.      Parks Sports and Recreation (PSR) staff expect to enable volunteers and community groups to plant 5,600 – 6,000 native plants at Sanders Reserve in 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      Approve the Sanders Reserve Planting Plan 2022, as shown in Attachment A, Sanders Reserve Infill Planting 2022 maps, dated 2 March 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The Sanders Reserve Planting Plan 2022 (Attachment A) gives effect to part c) i) of the local board’s 9 December 2021 resolution UH/2021/163 for the 2022 planting season:

“c)    direct staff to create a planting plan for Sanders Reserve for approval by the Upper Harbour Local Board ensuring that:

i)       the plan is created in collaboration with the local board and relevant council staff to ensure that planting does not occur in areas that have not been approved for planting by the local board”.

6.      During a site visit to Sanders Reserve with local board members on 21 January 2022 areas for proposed planting in autumn/winter 2022 were viewed and discussed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

7.      Whilst there were several actions noted for various teams during the visit, the following information is focused on the work proposed by the Parks Sport and Recreation (PSR) Ecological and Environmental Volunteers Programme in preparation for the 2022 planting season. The planting season begins in autumn and continues through winter, effectively straddling two financial years.

Proposed Kai Rakau lease area

8.      Local board members noted that they would like the area proposed to be leased to the Kai Rakau community group marked out clearly prior to any volunteer planting commencing. At the time of planting adjacent to this area, it will be marked out clearly by the Community Park Ranger using wooden pegs and string prior to any planting commencing.  However, no volunteer planting is intended to take place in or near the proposed Kai Rakau lease area in 2022.

Gully in north-east of reserve next to the equestrian area

9.      PSR staff confirmed the intention is site preparation (e.g.- weed removal) and infill planting within existing native plants in the gully to ecologically match the opposite (far) side of gully over time.

10.    The extended valley will accommodate infill and enrichment planting to match the far side.  Ideally infill will be over consecutive years.  This hasn’t been done for five to six years.  Species will be similar to what’s there now. Refer to Attachment A, Map B polygons W, X, Y, Z.

Between paths and equestrian fence on the northern side of the park

11.    No further infill planting is to be done between the path/track and equestrian area.

12.    There will be no further planting on the south-west side of the path/track.  This left-hand side area needs mowing – but not the trees.  Contactors are to leave existing trees in that area. 

Bush view

13.    On the north-east of the path/track, (mentioned as a possible picnic area (by the late John Smith)) the area is not to be planted, rather mowed at this stage. This location may be revisited in the future for consideration of either planting or open space. This is the blue polygon (labelled ‘No planting – mown picnic area’) on Attachment A, Map B.

14.    Further on, the lower north-east side of the track (area marked ‘W’ on Map B, Attachment A), could take more infill but must be at least one metre back from the track edge.

15.    The Community Park Ranger’s contractors will prepare the yellow polygon areas for planting by removing weeds ahead of the planting season (labelled U,V,W,X, Y and Z) shown on Attachment A, Map B.

16.    The area near the proposed Kai Rākau space is a lower priority so is not shown as it will need to be updated if the lease for Kai Rākau is agreed. This area is not proposed to be planted in 2022/2023.

General

17.    All plantings are to be located at least one metre from the edge of any path/track.

18.    The Community Park Ranger will continue to work closely with the Community Facilities Project Manager and the Parks and Places Specialist in relation to the mountain bike track project so as not to impede access when trees are mature.

Governance direction:

19.    Planting plans need to be clear where species are to be planted. The local board indicated it is more important to know the mature height rather than actual species and directed that all planting is to be graduated i.e., with taller growing species planted in lower lying areas. 

20.    On planting days, areas are to be well marked and volunteers managed to achieve planned objectives; they must be clearly informed on what can be planted and where. This will be done by the Community Park Ranger in collaboration with contractors where needed.

21.    Paths/tracks are to be kept clear for horses, bikes and people walking through the reserve with at least a one metre set-back for plantings to occur.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    Impact on emissions (mitigation): Planting native plants at Sanders Reserve contributes to increased carbon capture on council parks, and to the net-zero emissions goals of Auckland Council.

23.    Impact of climate change (adaptation): Native plants contribute to growing our urban forest to sequester carbon and reduce flood and heat impacts which are key actions for adapting to climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.    The native plantings contribute to the following key Auckland Council strategies:

a)   Upper Harbour Urban Ngahere Action Plan

b)   Auckland’s Climate Action Framework

c)   Upper Harbour Open Space Network Plan

d)   North West Wildlink

e)   Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy.

25.    The Community Ranger worked with the following Auckland Council departments on the proposed Sanders Reserve plantings:

a)   Parks Specialists (Community Parks and Places)

b)   Project managers and Maintenance Delivery Co-ordinators (Community Facilities).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.    A workshop was held with the local board on 10 February 2022 to discuss the next steps following a site visit to Sanders Reserve on 21 January 2022.

27.    During the site visit local board members provided direction on the areas proposed for planting in the 2022 planting season. Further details on these proposed areas were shared by the Community Park Ranger with the local board at the workshop on 10 February 2022.

28.    The upcoming native plantings contribute to the following Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

Outcome #1: Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities

Outcome #3: Healthy and active communities

Outcome #4: Our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.    The cultural benefits of Auckland’s urban ngahere are diverse and priceless. Native forest is important to mātauranga Māori (knowledge and understanding), and trees create a cultural connection to place and history.

30.    The urban ngahere is an important part of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland’s cultural heritage.

31.    Remnants of native forest represent traditional kai o te ngahere (supermarkets), wānanga o te ngahere (learning centres), kapata rongoā (the medicine cabinet), kura o te ngahere (schools) and wairua o te ngahere (spiritual domain).

32.    Trees also represent landing places of waka (canoe) and birth whenua.

33.    Plantings at Sanders Reserve contribute towards the cultural benefits of the urban ngahere of Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.    Cost of preparation and for the estimated 5600 – 6000 plants for 2022 autumn/winter plantings at Sanders Reserve will be met within the Ecological and Environmental Volunteers Programme 2022/2023 Locally Driven Initiatives budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.    Annual planting and maintenance at Sanders Reserve is important to continue to build on previous efforts by volunteers and community groups.

36.    A report to the local board’s 17 February 2022 business meeting included a proposal to update the Sanders Reserve Ecological Restoration Management Plan which will inform future plantings at Sanders Reserve.  This signals that the local board is supportive of future planting with annual planting plans to be developed in collaboration with the local board.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.    Following approval of the Sanders Reserve Planting Plan for autumn/winter 2022 PSR staff will contact Sustainable Paremoremo and Conservation Volunteers New Zealand to share the plan and associated maps.

38.    The local board members will be notified of community planting dates and times closer to planting season.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sanders Reserve Infill Planting 2022 maps, dated 2 March 2022

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Dan Marrow - Community Park Ranger

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

PDF Creator

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Variations to the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 Work Programme

File No.: CP2022/02848

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve variations to the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted its 2021/2022 work programme on 17 June 2021 (UH/2021/71). This included activities to deliver and/or support local civic events and to support local community groups to deliver incumbent anchor events in their local community.

3.      The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in cancellation or delay of events across Auckland. The government COVID-19 Protection Framework enables events to be delivered with restrictions which has contributed to uncertainty for the planning and delivery of events. 

4.      A number of events supported through the Event Partnership Fund (ID 473) work programme activity and the Local Civic Events (ID 475) work programme activity for 2021/2022 have been cancelled or delayed to the next financial year.  The local board has expressed a preference to re-allocate the unspent $20,000 of locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational (opex) budget to other activities in its work programme.

5.      Cancellation of projects and variations of budget allocations are considered to have a substantial impact on approved projects and the overall work programme. These are considered a substantial variation that requires a formal decision by the local board (UH/2021/71).

6.      This report provides an opportunity for the local board to formalise variations to its 2021/2022 work programme.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the following variations to the Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 work programme:

i)        cancel activity ID 475 ‘Local Civic Events’, Customer and Community Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022

ii)       reduce budget for activity ID 473 ‘Event Partnership Fund Upper Harbour’, Customer and Community Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022 by $11,000 and reallocate the unspent budget to other activities in the 2021/2022 work programme

iii)      allocate $9,000 of locally driven initiatives operational budget originally allocated to activity ID 475 ‘Local Civic Events’, Customer and Community Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022 to activity ID 1692 ‘Upper Harbour Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership’, Infrastructure and Environmental Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022, to provide more visits and engagement at construction sites in the Scott Point and Whenuapai areas

iv)      allocate $3,000 of local driven initiatives operational budget originally allocated to activity ID 473 ‘Event Partnership Fund Upper Harbour’, Customer and Community Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022 to activity ID 1692 ‘Upper Harbour Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership’, Infrastructure and Environmental Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022, to provide more visits and engagement at construction sites in the Scott Point and Whenuapai areas

v)       allocate $8,000 of locally driven initiatives operational budget originally allocated to activity ID 473 ‘Event Partnership Fund Upper Harbour’, Customer and Community Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022 to activity ID 474 ‘Community Grants Upper Harbour, Customer and Community Services Upper Harbour Local Board Work Programme 2021/2022.

Horopaki

Context

7.      On 17 November 2021, the local board received advice from the Event Production Team on the impact of the government announcements on the COVID-19 Protection Framework.

8.      This advice included information on how the proposed COVID-19 Protection Framework intends to ease restrictions of access for fully vaccinated people and tighten restrictions of access for unvaccinated people, including attending events. It also included information on the planning and cost implications of implementing the new framework at events.  The increased level of uncertainty related to planning and delivery under the framework has contributed to the cancellation or deferral of a number of events.

9.      The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted its Customer and Community Services (CCS) 2021/202 work programme on 17 June 2021 (UH/2021/71). This included an activity to fund local community groups to deliver incumbent anchor events in their community (Event Partnership Fund Upper Harbour ID 474, total budget approved of $17,000). These were:

·   Greenhithe Christmas Parade, approved budget $5,000 – event cancelled

·   Greenhithe Lunar New Year Festival, approved budget $3,000 – event cancelled

·   Shore to Shore, approved budget $3,000 – event cancelled

·   North Shore Run Series, approved budget $6,000 – event proceeded.

10.    The local board has indicated its preferred direction to reallocate unspent budget of $11,000 allocated to cancelled events that were to be supported through the Event Partnership Fund Upper Harbour (ID 474) work programme activity to other activities in the 2021/2022 work programme.

11.    The Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services (CCS) 2021/2022 work programme adopted on 17 June 2021 (UH/2021/71) also included an activity to deliver and/or support local civic events (Local Civic Events ID 474, total budget approved of $10,000). These included:

·   Ngati Manuhiri sculpture blessing

·   Observation Green play space opening

·   Bluebird Reserve play space opening

12.    Delivery of the Ngati Manuhiri sculpture and Observation Green playspace have been delayed and the local board indicated its preferred direction to cancel the Bluebird Reserve play space opening.

13.    The local board have indicated their preference is to cancel the Local Civic Events (ID 474) work programme activity for 2021/2022 and re-allocate the unspent $9,000 of locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational (opex) budget to other activities in its work programme.

14.    Cancelling projects and variations of budget allocations are considered substantial impacts on approved projects and the overall work programme. As a substantial variation, a formal decision by the local board is required (UH/2021/71).

15.    This report provides an opportunity for the local board to formalise its intended variations to the 2021/2022 work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.    The local board have indicated their intent to cancel the activity Local Civic Events (ID 474) work programme and reduce the budget for the activity Event Partnership Fund Upper Harbour (ID 474). Should the local board want to proceed with this decision, a total of $20,000 of LDI opex budget originally allocated to these activities will be available to reallocate to other activities in the 2021/2022 work programme.

17.    The following activity has capacity for delivery of additional scope by the end of the current financial year (30 June 2022).

Upper Harbour Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership (ID 1692)

18.    This work programme activity provides increased construction waste compliance and enforcement, with a focus on Scott Point and Whenuapai. The construction and demolition waste advisor works with builders and developers to improve site practices and provide increased reporting to the council’s compliance team.

19.    The current level of service has prioritized weekly surveillance and reporting in Scott Point but there is capacity to extend this, if budget is made available, to allow for weekly visits and engagement in the Whenuapai area.

20.    Staff have indicated that there is capacity to increase the scope of this project up to $12,000.

Community Grants Upper Harbour (ID 474)

21.    The local board has a total budget of $96,133 in its 2021/2022 community grants activity line. In comparison, the previous financial year of 2020/2021, the available budget was $237,383.

22.    In the first round of local and multi-board grants for 2021/2022, the local board received applications totalling $118,359.52. The local board allocated $33,000, leaving $63,133 available to be allocated in two more rounds this financial year.

23.    The local board’s contestable grants are popular with community groups. Should additional funding be allocated to this activity line it is likely the local board would be able to allocate it during future grants rounds in the current financial year.  If the local board does not reallocate the underspent budget, it will be considered as savings at the end of the financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.    Auckland Council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·      to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

25.    The impacts of climate change are assessed on a project-by-project basis and the appropriate approach is considered for each project to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

26.    The proposed work programme variations are unlikely to have a substantial impact on climate change, but it is possible that cancelling the events results in a reduction of waste that would have been produced in association with their delivery.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.    When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local boards.

28.    Auckland Unlimited have indicated there is latent capacity to deliver the expanded scope to the ‘Local Small Business Mentors Programme’ (ID 1612) within the budget allocated in the current financial year 2021/2022.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.    The local board have expressed a preference for cancelling the Local Civic Events (ID 474) activity and reducing the budget of the Events Partnership Fund Upper Harbour (ID 473) in the 2021/2022 work programme. This report allows the local board to formalise this decision as well as the opportunity to re-allocate the unspent budget to other activities in its 2021/2022 work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

30.    The Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, or location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation is undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

31.    Progress updates on delivery of Māori outcomes within specific activities are available through quarterly performance reports.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.    Should the local board formalise the decision to cancel activity ID 474 ‘Local Civic Events’ and reduce the budget for activity ID 473 ‘Events Partnership Fund Upper Harbour’, a total of $20,000 of LDI opex budget will be available for reallocation to other activities in the 2021/2022 work programme.

33.    The Event Team has confirmed that the full $20,000 amount is available to reallocate to other activities.

34.    Reallocation options and any financial implications of these are covered in the ‘analysis and advice’ section of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.    The Event Team do not have capacity to carry out surveys of local board areas to determine how local communities feel about the COVID-19 Protection Framework and if this would increase or decrease the likelihood of them attending events. The team was unable to guarantee attendance or identify the communities’ preferences for keeping or cancelling the events.

36.    The re-allocated budgets have to be delivered by the end of the current financial year, 30 June 2022. Operating departments have confirmed capacity to deliver on the options provided in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.    The Upper Harbour Local Board 2021/2022 work programme will be updated to reflect the local board’s formal decisions and any variations will be reflected from the quarter two performance report onwards.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Sharma – Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Local board input to development of Auckland Transport’s Interim Speed Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/02380

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek early local board input to the development of Auckland Transport’s proposed interim Auckland Speed Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Central government is committed to speed reductions and the ‘Vision Zero’ road safety policy and is considering implementing regulations that would require the creation of regional speed management plans.

3.      Introduction of an interim Speed Management Plan meets the council’s direction to Auckland Transport to reduce road deaths and serious injuries, and to prepare to meet the proposed central government rules.

4.      In December 2021, Auckland Transport advised all local boards about the development of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan for the period 2023-2026. The plan will create a framework for setting new speed limits and will influence plans for related safety infrastructure across Auckland.  

5.      Prior to developing the interim Speed Management Plan, Auckland Transport is seeking input from local boards, specifically to identify a list of roads in each local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

6.      The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first 10-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the introduction of an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan

b)      provide a list of roads within the local board area that should be reviewed when staff develop the proposed plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.      Auckland Transport (AT) has made speed limit changes covering 11 per cent of the road network, with changes to a further 27 per cent of the road network proposed. Each local board has received information detailing the roads in their area where changes are proposed under the first three phases of the Safe Speeds Programme.

8.      The Interim Speed Management Plan will continue this process of expanding Auckland’s network of safer roads.

 

9.      Between March and June 2022, AT will undertake an assessment to consider feedback from elected members, mana whenua, partners and the community against technical considerations related to benefit, cost, and risk. Several checks will then be made, including technical and legal reviews, and funding criteria. This work will inform the options that are presented as part of public consultation, planned to take place in late-2022.

Auckland Council Strategic Alignment

10.    Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport.

11.    Auckland Transport developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction. The interim speed management plan is a key contribution to ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’.

12.    The interim Speed Management Plan encourages safer speeds that contribute to ‘Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ by making roads safer and encouraging greater use of more environmentally friendly transport modes, such as walking and cycling. 

Central Government Alignment: Proposed Land Transport Rule on Setting Speed Limits

13.    ‘Road to Zero’ is New Zealand’s road safety strategy; infrastructure improvements and speed management are its first focus areas. In 2021, Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency consulted on a proposed new ‘Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2021’.

14.    The proposed changes include requirements for local authorities to develop speed management plans and set lower speed limits around schools to improve safety and encourage more children to use active modes of transport.

15.    Central government is considering the proposed rule and a decision is expected in the second quarter of 2022. Waka Kotahi is expected to release a new speed management guide at the same time as the new rule, which will include updated safe and appropriate speed limit ranges for our roads and streets. Under the proposed rule, AT is required to consult on speed limit changes in accordance with the Local Government Act 2002.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.    Development of an interim Speed Management Plan is a long process, and this engagement is an early step. AT will engage with the public, other agencies and elected members throughout 2022. 

17.    The current round of local board consultation started in December 2021. In February and March 2022, AT attended workshops with local boards and is now inviting feedback, specifically about roads or areas where there is community demand for safer speeds.

18.    Please note that where roads and schools are already included in conversations taking place within Tranche 2B of the previous speed limits programme, these should not be included in feedback on the interim Speed Management Plan.

19.    Feedback from local boards will contribute to the development of a draft Speed Management Plan that AT will consult on in late 2022. Following public consultation, the AT Board will finalise and approve an interim Auckland Speed Management Plan 2023-2026.

20.    The role of the local board is not to make technical decisions about speed management, but instead to provide the community’s perspective on local concerns and interests related to speed management.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.    Auckland Transport engages closely with the council to develop strategies, actions, and measures that support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and other council priorities.

22.    Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes safer and more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

23.    Recent surveys of town centres in which speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced in the first tranche of Auckland Transport’s speed limit changes demonstrated a link between slower speeds and more people walking or cycling. Surveys found that 19 per cent of local people now participate in at least one ‘active mode’ activity (for example, walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. Increasing the number of people choosing to walk or cycle reduces emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.    Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategies, actions, and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri the Auckland Climate Action Plan and other council priorities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.    The new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022, once introduced, will require road controlling authorities to:

·      reduce 40 per cent of their school speed limits by 2024, with all reductions completed by 2030

·      include their proposed speed limit changes and safety infrastructure treatments (including proposed safety camera placements) for the coming 10 years into speed management plans

·      implement a new consultation process that aligns with the three-year Regional Land Transport Planning (RLTP) consultation process.

26.    The new rule will remove the requirement to set speed limits through bylaws, enabling a whole-of-network approach that considers safety-related infrastructure improvements, speed limit changes and safety camera placement together.

27.    Taken together, these changes will have a significant impact on Auckland communities, and on the ways that Aucklanders input into decisions around safer speed limits.

28.    In addition to the feedback local boards are invited to provide in response to this report, local boards will continue to be kept informed and up to date as this process progresses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.    Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.


 

 

30.    Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

31.    Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

32.    Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The interim Speed Management Plan is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.    Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan has no financial implications for local boards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.    Providing feedback on the development of the interim Speed Management Plan does not present any risks for local boards.

35.    There is a risk to Auckland Transport if the interim Speed Management Plan is not finalised in time to meet central government requirements. This risk has been mitigated by ensuring that development and engagement on the interim plan begins ahead of the Minister of Transport announcing their final decision on the proposed rule.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.    Local board feedback will be used by AT to inform the development of the interim Speed Management Plan.

37.    Between March and June 2022, Waka Kotahi will confirm that the new Land Transport Rule: Setting of Speed Limits 2022 has been approved by the Minister of Transport.

38.    Between June and August 2022, AT will communicate to local boards how their feedback has been taken into account in the development of a draft plan.

39.    In late 2022, AT will undertake public consultation on a draft version of the interim Speed Management Plan. The AT Board will then consider any recommended changes to the draft and approve an interim plan.

40.    The interim Speed Management Plan will be in place between 2023 and 2026. During 2023, consultation will begin on the first 10-year plan which is expected to be in place from 2024 to 2034.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Stephen Rainbow, Head of Community Engagement – Central Hub, Auckland Transport

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park development - approval of construction stages

File No.: CP2022/02567

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve the construction stages for the development of Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      In 2018 the Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Master Plan December 2017 and resolved to support the allocation of funds to the development of the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park. The local board acknowledged that implementation may need to be staged as resources allow and, for that reason, this be brought back to the Upper Harbour Local Board to set priorities for staging. (Resolution number UH/2018/9).

3.      Detailed design for the sports and active recreation area of the park and two roads bordering the park was completed in September 2020. This has been identified as Stage 1. An option to construct part of Stage 1 (Stage 1a) as the highest priority is proposed, to align with funding currently available.

4.      As a part of the Upper Harbour Local Board financial year 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme, the local board approved a project, Scott Point – develop sustainable sports park (Stage 1) (SPID 2794), for the development of a sustainable sports park located at 121,125 and 129 Clark Road, Hobsonville.

5.      The local board has supported the allocation of $7.3 million of capital expenditure growth funding and $5.5 million of Auckland Transport funding towards delivering the first phase of the development. In addition, the local board supported a $2.35 million allocation from the New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) compensation funding for the compulsory acquisition of open space land in Upper Harbour towards the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park development. Funding of $700,000 has also been approved by the local board from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund for shared paths within the park. (Resolution number UH/2021/135).

6.      The local board indicated support for staging construction at a workshop in April 2021.

7.      The project will deliver on three Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

·        Outcome 1: Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities

·        Outcome 3: Healthy and active communities

·        Outcome 4: Our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced.

8.      Insufficient funding to complete the entire park development is identified as a key risk. Recent cost increases have required an additional $1.5 million to be allocated to the project from the regional growth programme. This has been approved by the Governing Body under delegation. The scope of the existing project is recommended to be amended to better reflect what is deliverable within the existing budgets.  Further changes can be mitigated through the implementation of a staged construction approach to align with available funding. 

9.      Staff now seek approval of the order of priority for staging the work through the construction phase.

10.    Site clearance and bulk earthworks commenced in October 2021.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the staging of construction of Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park in the order of priority:

i)       Stage 1a - sports fields 2 and 3, baseball diamond 2, car park, internal paths, shared path on southern boundary, toilet and changing facilities, park frontage along Squadron Drive Extension and the construction of Joshua Carder Drive extension and Craigs Way

ii)      Stage 1b (sports fields 1, 4 and 5, second baseball diamond and park frontage along Clark Road)

iii)    Stage 2 (playground and ecological restoration area)

iv)    Stage 3 (future hard courts and multi-use facility)

b)      approve a change to the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme project SPID2794 “Scott Point – develop sustainable sports park (Stage I)” including:

i)       increase of the project budget by $1.5 million from the local parks and sports fields development programme (growth).

ii)      amend the activity description to state “Develop a sustainable sports park to meet the needs of new and future residents. These works include demolition and site preparation, construction of sports fields 2 and 3, baseball diamond 2, car park construction, internal park road, shared path and toilet and changing rooms”.

c)      note that Scott Point - stage 1b will require approval as a new project in the regional local parks and sports fields development work programme for approval in June 2022 (subject to Governing Body approval) with works to begin in the 2023/2024 financial year.

d)      note that funding for stages 2 and 3 will be subject to future budget availability and decision making.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.    Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park is a 16.4ha area of land that occupies part of the Scott Point peninsula in the upper reaches of the Waitematā Harbour, northwest Auckland. The park is located at Hobsonville within an area of new development to the south of the Upper Harbour Motorway and has road boundaries on Clark Road, Squadron Drive Extension and Joshua Carder Drive (refer to Figure 1: Location of Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park).

12.    The park was an open green fields site with shelter belt trees, amenity tree plantings and vacant buildings. Areas of the site were formerly occupied by a small manufacturing business, a horticultural plant nursery and a local pony club.

13.    Significant greenfield development is taking place and the Scott Point site was acquired to provide for improved provision of formal sports facilities in this area and to create a destination park. The former Waitakere City Council acquired the land, in part as an offset for loss of a portion of Hobsonville Domain land to enable SH18 to be built.

14.    Over the next ten years, population within the Upper Harbour ward of the city is expected to grow by 30,000 residents, from 67,000 in 2018 to over 98,000 in 2028. Around 20,000 new residents are expected to call Scott Point and neighbouring Hobsonville home.

15.    There is a network of green spaces in existence or being put in place as part of the urbanisation of the Hobsonville and Scott Point peninsula. These green spaces include reserves, schools, and coastal walkways. Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park will be a major new contribution to this network.

Map

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Figure 1: Location of Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park (park boundary shown in red)

  Background

16.    The overall vision for the park is to develop a leading edge, sustainable park that the community is proud of. The park will become the first sustainable park in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Auckland Council is proposing to construct this project as a model and flagship for the future sustainable provision of parks. It will help steer the future course of design, development, management, and governance of parks across Auckland.

17.    A master plan report for the park was completed in December 2017 and updated in March 2018 (refer to Appendix A: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Master Plan Report March 2018). The park will comprise three main areas: an area for sports and active recreation; an informal recreation area, and areas of ecological restoration and conservation. Each of the areas is defined by the geography of the site. Natural landforms will be retained, and earthworks minimised. The master plan diagram is shown in Figure 2: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Master Plan.

Map

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Figure 2: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Master Plan

18.    Funding for the development is a combination of locally driven initiative funding (LDI), capital expenditure (growth funding), Local Board Transport Capital funding and New Zealand Transport Agency (NZTA) compensation funds. Auckland Transport funding has been allocated for the development of two roads bordering the park.

19.    In 2018 the local board resolved to –

a)   adopt the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Master Plan December 2017

b)   support the allocation of funds to the development of the Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park

c)   request that detailed design works commence to allow physical works to start on Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park in November 2019

d)   note that further budget allocation is required to deliver the full Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Master Plan December 2017, and implementation may need to be staged as resources allow and, for that reason, this be brought back to the Upper Harbour Local Board to set priorities for staging. (Resolution number UH/2018/9)

20.    In July 2019, the Finance and Performance Committee resolved to update the capital budget for the allocation of $6.044 million of compensation funding provided by the NZTA to fund park improvement projects. Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park was one of the three recommended projects (resolution number FIN/2019/77).

21.    As a part of the Upper Harbour Local Board financial year 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme, the local board approved a project, Scott Point – develop sustainable sports park (Stage 1) (ID 16182), for the development of a sustainable sports park at 121,125 and 129 Clark Road, Hobsonville.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

22.    High level cost estimates completed in 2019 indicated a budget of $23 million was required to complete the first stage of development. A staged approach to construction is required over multiple years to align with the availability of funding.

23.    An Early Contractor Involvement (ECI) procurement process was completed in January 2020 to appoint a construction contractor. HEB Construction Limited were awarded the contract and have been working with council and council’s appointed designer (Jacobs) through the detailed design phase.

24.    Detailed design for the sports and active recreation area of the park and two roads bordering the park was completed in September 2020. This has been identified as Stage 1. Stage 1 focuses on the sports fields, car park, shared paths and Joshua Carder Drive extension and Craigs Way and is shown in Figure 3: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Stage 1.

 

Diagram

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Figure 3: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Stage 1

 

25.    Resource consents for the park and the roads have been granted.

26.    The Stage 1 design was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 29 April 2021. An option to construct part of Stage 1 (Stage 1a) to align with funding currently available was presented.  The local board indicated support for this approach and to construct the reserve in stages with a total of approximately $13 million of funding available at that time in financial years 2021-2022 and 2022-2023.

27.    Funding is a combination of capital growth expenditure ($5.21 million), NZTA compensation funds ($2.35 million) and Local Board Transport Capital funds ($700,000). Auckland Transport funding of $5.5 million has been allocated for the road development.

28.    Stage 1a includes two sand carpet fields, a baseball diamond, car park, shared paths, park frontage along Squadron Drive Extension and the construction of Joshua Carder Drive extension and Craigs Way. Toilet and changing facilities are also proposed. The Stage 1a diagram is shown in Figure 4: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Stage 1a.

A picture containing diagram

Description automatically generated

Figure 4: Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park Stage 1a

 

29.    In September 2021 a revised pricing schedule and cost estimate were completed for the construction of Stage 1a. Staff requested HEB Construction Limited submit a price to complete construction of Stage 1a and separate the pricing into distinct design elements to enable work associated with funding sources to be clearly defined.

30.    An early works stage was included to enable this portion of the contract to be awarded more quickly and site clearing works to begin in spring. A breakdown of the Stage 1a design elements and cost is summarised in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Breakdown of construction stages

Stage

Description of work

Approximate Cost (including contingency)

Early works

(Stage 1a)

·    Tree and building removal

·    Sediment and erosion control

·    Earthworks

·    Removal of contaminated land

·    Geotechnical requirements

·    Water connections

$3,024,000

Park development

(Stage 1a)

·    Sports field construction (fields 2 & 3)

·    Baseball diamond 2 construction

·    Stormwater and wastewater drainage

·    Electrical connections and commissioning

·    Retaining walls

·    Car park construction

·    Paths and boardwalks

·    Furniture and fencing

·    Car park lighting

·    Landscaping

·    Park frontage along Squadron Drive Extension (includes footpaths, car parking and lighting)

·    Toilet and changing facilities

$6,000,000

Road development

(Stage 1a)

·    Earthworks

·    Stormwater drainage

·    Road construction and footpath construction

·    Road marking and signage

·    Street lighting

·    Vehicle crossings

·    Landscaping

$5,500,000

Park development (Stage 1b)

·    Sports field construction (fields 1, 4 & 5)

·    Baseball diamond 1 construction

·    Sports field lighting

·    Park frontage along Clark Road

To be completed as a future stage

Park development (Stage 2)

·    Design and construction of the ecological restoration area

·    Design and construction of the playground

To be completed as a future stage

Park development (Stage 3)

·    Design and construction of the hard courts and multi-use facility

To be completed as a possible future stage

Preferred option

31.     The construction of Stage 1a is proposed as the highest priority, from the funding currently available. Stage 1b can be constructed in the future as a separate stage and has been fully designed and consented. Stages 2 and 3 require design, consenting and cost estimates to be completed before progressing through to construction.

32.    Discussions and negotiations with the construction contractor have been undertaken to ensure that the proposed staging of works and programme of delivery provides best value for money. Cost saving options and refinements to the design have been made including the lowering of the field levels to save on importing fill, and the reuse of crushed concrete as aggregate beneath paths.


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.    The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050, and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

34.     Scott Point Sustainable Sports Park has been designed with sustainability as a key focus with the aim of guiding future design, development, management, and governance of parks across Auckland in a way that promotes sustainable custodianship.

35.     The park has been awarded a Leading rating for design by the Infrastructure Sustainability Council (ISC). To achieve this rating, a comprehensive design process was undertaken by council in partnership with local iwi, Jacobs and HEB Construction Limited to include resource sustainability and environmental benefits.

36.     The design has achieved a 13 percent energy reduction in whole of life carbon footprint including:

·    Alternative turf requiring less sand, and less turf area to mow and maintain

·    Topsoil reuse on site

·    Reduction in site clearance requirements

·    Optimised light control

37.    Water reduction of 36 percent is expected through the design of a Blue2Green rainwater capture and reuse system beneath a sports field and the use of targeted irrigation systems. A bore on-site will provide the main source of non-potable water for the park.

38.     Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material will be prioritised to ensure minimum impact. The design aims to minimise earthworks and reduce the quantity of soil removed from site. Boulders sourced from the City Rail Link project will be repurposed and incorporated as design features.

39.     Mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions will be achieved through sourcing of low-carbon material options (including sourcing materials locally) and the use of products with environmental declarations for embodied carbon reductions.

40.    Ecological enhancement of the area through revegetating agricultural land and prioritising native vegetation within the park is included in the design. Planting native species will mitigate the impact on the environment by increasing plant diversity and minimising stormwater flow to adjacent areas.

41.    It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions. HEB Construction Limited will seek to minimise these emissions as far as possible when delivering the project.

42.    Paths included within the design aim to provide links to other parts of the reserve and neighbouring streets to encourage walking throughout the community. This will have a positive climate impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.    Council staff from within Customer and Community Services (Community Facilities operational management and Parks, Sports and Recreation teams) have been consulted and support the development of the park in stages.

44.    Staff confirm the development will address the service level requirements for the provision of sports facilities in the area and propose a staged approach to delivery that aligns with both provision for the growing population over future years and available funding.

45.    A community nursery has been proposed for part of the site by the Parks, Sports and Recreation team. The nursery would be in an area unlikely to be developed in the short-term and would provide an opportunity for local community groups to become actively involved with the site and the park development. Existing buildings would be utilised.

46.    Auckland Transport is providing funding for the construction of two roads adjacent to the park development. Council staff and Auckland Transport staff have collaborated on the funding agreement, and the road design has been approved by Auckland Transport as part of the resource consent and plan approval process.

47.    Watercare have approached council with a proposal to include the installation of a new main water line along Joshua Carder Drive extension as part of the road construction works. This will be included at Watercare’s cost if the proposed work is able to align with the planned programme of work for the park and road construction.

48.    Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the park is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.    The project aligns with the following Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Table 2: Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

Outcome

Objective

Project alignment

Outcome 1: Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities

Our diverse communities feel connected, confident in their ability to face adversity together and are able to influence what happens in their neighbourhoods.

Engagement with the local community, baseball club representatives and iwi was undertaken and feedback was incorporated into the concept design.

Outcome 3: Healthy and active communities

People of all abilities have access to a wide variety of sports and recreation opportunities and well-maintained parks and community facilities.

Development of the park will provide greater access to facilities through the construction of new sports fields and park amenities, paths, and informal recreation areas within the local area. Greater opportunities for the community to be more active will be available.

Outcome 4: Our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced

Our communities care for Upper Harbour’s natural environment and are actively involved in preserving and restoring it.

Restoration of an area of the park into an ecological zone will provide opportunities for the community to be actively involved in developing the park.

In addition, a community nursery is proposed to be located on part of the site in the short-term encouraging community engagement and participation.

 

50.    The project will deliver significant improvements to benefit the community through increasing sports field playable hours and providing baseball facilities, which there is currently a shortfall of within the area.

51.    Consultation with Baseball New Zealand and North Shore City Baseball organisations indicated support for baseball diamonds within the park and for at least one to be prioritised within the first stage of construction.

52.     Community and sports groups using the park will benefit from the addition of informal recreation areas adjacent to the fields, improved connections, and safer pathway links to other areas of the community.

53.    In 2018, the local board previously indicated support for the development by adopting the Master Plan for the park, supporting the allocation of funds, and requesting that detailed design works commence.

54.    The Stage 1 design was discussed with the local board at a workshop on 29 April 2021. An option to construct part of Stage 1 (Stage 1a) to align with funding currently available was presented.  The local board indicated support for this approach and to construct the park in stages.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

55.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Auckland Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, and local board plans.

56.    Ngā Maunga Whakahii o Kaipara Development Trust and Te Kawerau ā Maki have partnered with council on the project through the design phase. It is anticipated that this partnership will be further developed as the park is constructed in stages over future years.

57.    A blessing of the site and sod turning event was held on 7 December 2021.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.    A total budget of $17,444,830 million has been approved by the local board and Governing Body for this project to date. This includes a previous decision to allocate $700,000 from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to this project under resolution (UH2021/135). Project funding and cost estimates are outlined in Tables 3 and 4 below:

59.     Table 3: Project funding (Stage 1a)

Budget source

FY19/20 & prior years

FY20/21

FY21/22

FY22/23

FY23/24

Total ($)

LDI Capex

$100,000

 

 

 

 

$100,000

Growth Capex

$1,914,247

$163,901

$3,452,782

$1,750,000

$1,500,000

$8,780,930

Ryman Healthcare

(contribution to fund path accessways from Ryman property)

 

$13,900

 

 

 

$13,900

NZTA compensation funding

 

 

$2,350,000

 

 

$2,350,000

Auckland Transport Capex

 

 

$2,750,000

$2,750,000

 

$5,500,000

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

 

 

 

$700,000

 

 

$700,000

Total

 

 

 

 

 

$17,444,830

 

60.     Table 4: Project cost estimate (Stage 1a)

Cost estimate

Comments

Total ($)

Design and consenting

Includes design, consenting, engagement, project management and Infrastructure Sustainability Council rating and support – completed to date

$2,192,000

Construction

Construction, project management and Infrastructure Sustainability Council rating and support

$13,000,000

Contingency (10%)

Allowance for unforeseen events and possible material cost escalations

$1,519,200

Total

 

$16,711,200

61.    An indicative cost estimate for the full scope of stage 1 work is $29 million which is greater than the current allocated budget for the project. It is proposed to construct the park development in stages to align with the available budget. Each stage will be constructed to completion to ensure there are no unfinished works.

62.    In December 2021 the Governing Body approved (under delegation) an additional $1.5 million for the project “Scott Point – develop sustainable sports park (Stage I)” (SPID2794) based on the cost estimates received from HEB Construction for Stage 1a.  The additional funding is required in order to complete sufficient establishing works to make Stage 1a viable.  This has increased the total budget for Stage 1a to $17,444,830 million. At the same time, the Governing Body approved an amended scope for the project to align the expected activity description to Stage 1a described above in this report.

63.    Stage 1b will require approval for inclusion in the regional local parks and sports fields development work programme for approval in June 2022 and subject to Governing Body approval.  The expected total budget is $13 million and works are planned to begin in the 2023/2024 financial year.

64.    The project is part of the risk adjusted programme for delivery. Funding will be brought forward where required, and where financially possible, to align with the construction programme.


 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.    Risks and mitigation measures are outlined in Table 5 below:

Table 5: Risks and mitigations

Risks identified

Mitigation

Consenting

Resource consent

Resource consents have been obtained for the roads and the park development.

Specific conditions regarding the removal of trees during the bird nesting season have been managed by the contractor.

Building consent

Toilet facility - the supplier of the toilet facility will be responsible for ensuring that the building is granted an appropriate consent or exemption.

Baseball fencing – the design engineer will be responsible for obtaining consent.

Sports field lighting – an exemption will be applied for prior to construction.

Ministry of Education (temporary occupation approval and land acquisition)

An agreement is in progress between the Ministry of Education and council and will be finalised prior to commencement of the road construction.

Health and Safety

Public are exposed to unsafe conditions during the construction phase

The construction area has been fenced off to avoid the public entering the work site and traffic safety measures will be put in place, including around the Scott Point Primary School.

The contractor has installed a temporary pedestrian link from the east side of the park to the primary school during construction.

Signage has been installed to direct the public safely around the work site.

Resource consent conditions will be adhered to regarding managing permitted noise and dust levels.

Budget

Insufficient funding

Cost estimates have been prepared through the concept design phase and revised in September 2021 and February 2022. A contingency allowance for unforeseen circumstances has been included. Staging of the construction works to align with available funding is planned. Each stage will be constructed to completion to ensure there are no unfinished works.

Timeframe

Delay to construction due to funding availability

Funding has been included within the Community Facilities work programme for financial years 2021/2022, and 2022/2023. The funding from NZTA has also been included.

A Funding Agreement with Auckland Transport is currently in progress for the transfer of funding for the road construction aspects.

Construction

Poor weather during construction may delay delivery

Earthworks commenced in the spring/summer of 2021/2022 when the weather was favourable. Aggregate will be spread on the carpark and road areas in autumn to enable all weather access to the site. A time contingency has been included within the programme to allow for weather delays.

Impact of Covid-19 on the sourcing of materials, and delays to the programme

The contractor appointed is experienced in delivering large scale projects and managing sub-consultants and supplier arrangements. Some delays and cost escalations may still be experienced but will be minimised where possible.

Contaminated land

Contaminated areas have been identified and the contractor has completed the safe removal and remediation of the site as part of the construction works undertaken to date.

Demolition of buildings and asbestos removal

The contractor will ensure the safe removal of buildings and remediation of the site as part of the construction works.

Completion of Squadron Drive extension and roundabout dependent on adjacent developer

There is a risk the developer will not begin this work until after council has completed construction of Joshua Carder Drive extension. This may result in the road being unable to be opened. Construction has been discussed with the property developer responsible for undertaking these works, and a timeframe for the completion of the work has yet to be determined.

Reputational

Project deferred or cancelled

There is reputational risk to council if the project is deferred or cancelled. Consultation with park user groups and the community has raised an expectation that the project will be delivered.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.    Table 6 below summarises the anticipated next steps and estimated delivery timeframes for the project. The estimated timeframes assume successful and timely completion of each identified project step.

Table 6:  Project phasing and timelines

Project phase

Planned completion timeframe

Early works contract awarded

October 2021

Site clearance work

October 2021 - March 2022

Main contract works (Stage 1a)

Accurate duration of the physical works is not known at this time and will be confirmed at a later stage. It is envisaged to be within the timeframe specified.

April 2022 – January 2023

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Scott Point Master Plan Report March 2018 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Angela Levet – Senior Project Manager, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Upper Harbour Local Board input into Auckland Council's submission on Transforming Aotearoa New Zealand’s resource management system: Our future resource management system

File No.: CP2022/01477

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To receive the Upper Harbour Local Board input into Auckland Council’s submission on Transforming Aotearoa New Zealand’s resource management system: Our future resource management system.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Government is undertaking comprehensive reform of the resource management system. This will entail the repeal of the RMA and enactment of three pieces of legislation: a Natural and Built Environments Act, a Spatial Planning Act, and a Managed Retreat and Climate Change Adaptation Act. The scale of reform is likely to be substantial and would have significant impacts on council.

3.      This input will be the third submission council has made on these reforms. Earlier submissions were in response to:

·   Transforming the resource management system: opportunities for change - Issues and options paper as part of the Resource Management Review Panel’s review of the resource management system

·   An exposure draft of the Natural and Built Environments Bill which was subject to a inquiry by the Environment Select Committee

4.      In November 2022, the Ministry for the Environment released Transforming Aotearoa New Zealand’s resource management system: Our future resource management system - Materials for Discussion.

5.      The consultation document can be found here: https://environment.govt.nz/assets/publications/Our-future-resource-management-system-materials-for-discussion.pdf

6.      The consultation document set out a number of issues for input. These span the scope of the Natural and Built Environments Act (NBA) and Strategic Planning Act (SPA) and include:

·   National Planning Framework

·   Regional spatial strategies

·   NBE plans

·   RSS and NBA joint committees

·   Consenting

·   Compliance, monitoring and enforcement

·   Monitoring and system oversight

·   Role of local government in the future system

·   National Māori entity

·   Joint committee composition

·   Enhanced Mana Whakahono ā Rohe arrangements, integrated with transfers of powers and joint management agreements

·   Funding in the future system

7.      Local board input into council’s submission was due on or about 14 February. As the Upper Harbour Local Board’s February business meeting was scheduled for 17 February 2022, the local board could not resolve its feedback at a business meeting.

8.      The local board’s formal feedback was agreed by the local board and approved by the Upper Harbour Local Board Chairperson using the following delegation process:

13

Local board feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council submissions

 

Resolution number UH/2020/47

MOVED by Member N Mayne, seconded by Member A Atkinson:  

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      delegate authority to the chairperson to approve the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils, where timeframes do not allow for local board input to be considered and approved at a local board meeting.

b)      restate resolution number UH/2019/138 b) iv) from the local board business meeting on 21 November 2019 as follows:

b)     agree to establish topic area leads to effectively and efficiently manage some aspects of the governance work of the local board for the 2019-2022 triennium, and confirm that topic area leads will:

iv)    lead the development of local board feedback on regional policies, plans and strategies relevant to the topic area and report back to the full local board for approval.

c)      note all local input approved and submitted for inclusion in an Auckland Council submission is to be included on the next local board meeting agenda for the public record.

CARRIED

 

9.      A copy of the Upper Harbour Local Board input is available under Attachment A of this agenda report.


 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board input into Auckland Council’s submission on Transforming Aotearoa New Zealand’s resource management system: Our future resource management system.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board input into Auckland Council’s submission on Transforming Aotearoa New Zealand’s resource management system: Our future resource management system.

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Sharma – Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Council-controlled organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Two, 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/02439

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The Upper Harbour Local Board receive an update on council-controlled organisation work programme items in its area, along with updates to the Upper Harbour Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The 2021/2022 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2021.

3.      Updates are made to the engagement plan throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

4.      An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A.

5.      Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the council-controlled organisations Quarterly Report for Quarter Two 2021/2022

b)      approve updates to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.      Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2021/2022 local work programme. 

7.      While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.      Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.      This report may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

10.    In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.    Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.    These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Upper Harbour Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022.

Auckland Transport

13.    Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment B.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

14.    No updates have been made.   

Auckland Unlimited

15.    Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment C.

Updates to the Auckland Unlimited work programme

Additional activities

16.    These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·        Government COVID-19 support packages (Activate and Reactivating Tāmaki Makaurau)

·        Sustainability Initiatives

·        Skills and workforce: Pacific Skills Shift

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

17.    Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment D.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

18.    No updates have been made.   

Watercare

19.    Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter One are provided as Attachment E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

20.    No updates have been made.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.    Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

22.    Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.    Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

24.    These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.    Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focused on those priority areas.

26.    Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.    Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.    While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.    The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

30.    Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.    It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.    The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter Three in June 2022.

33.    A workshop will be held in April to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2022/2023.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022

75

b

Auckland Transport 2021/2022 Q2 Report - Upper Harbour Local Board

93

c

Auckland Unlimited 2021/2022 Q2 Report Upper Harbour Local Board

99

d

Eke Panuku Development Auckland 2021/2022 Q2 Report - Upper Harbour Local Board

101

e

Watercare work programme 2021/2022 Q2 Report - Upper Harbour Local Board

103

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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17 March 2022

 

 

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17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2022/02245

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A to the agenda report. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.      The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·      ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·      clarifying what advice is expected and when

·      clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.      The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Foward Work Calander - April 2022 - June 2022.

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Record of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 10 and 24 February and 3 March 2022

File No.: CP2022/02246

 

  

 

 Meet the https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/planspoliciesreports/qphub/Documents/Qualityadvicestandards.pdf and use the for assistanceTe take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Upper Harbour Local Board workshops were held on Thursday 10 and 24 February and 3 March 2022. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A, B and C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 10 and 24 February and 3 March 2022 (refer to Attachments A, B and C to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 10 February 2022.

111

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 24 February 2022.

115

c

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 3 March 2022.

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

Local board members' reports - March 2022

File No.: CP2022/02247

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      An opportunity for members to provide an update on projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

[Note: This is an information item and if the local board wishes any action to be taken under this item, a written report must be provided for inclusion on the agenda.]

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written local board members’ reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Business North Harbour Update Presentation - March 2022                       Page 125



Upper Harbour Local Board

17 March 2022