I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 26 April 2022

9.30am

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams

videoconference. Either a recording or written

summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website

 

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

14 April 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Whakaupoko Landcare                                                                 5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Franklin Local Board Work Programme Reallocations 2021/2022                          9

12        Franklin Waterways Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations   15

13        Variation to 2021 - 2024 Customer and Community Services work programme 37

14        Park Service Assessment Outcomes for the Development of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve                                                                                               45

15        Parks Service Assessment Outcomes for the Development of Pukekohe Hill Reserve.                                                                                                                        53

16        Auckland Transport bimonthly report April 2022                                                    61

17        Auckland Transport - Activities in the Road Corridor Bylaw 2022                        65

18        Transport Emissions Reduction Plan                                                                     107

19        Local board feedback on the draft 2021 Regional Parks Management Plan      127

20        Approval for the extension of existing names for two new roads at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands                                                                                                  167

21        Approval to correct the spelling of two road names (‘Metorita Crescent’ & ‘Haukake Road’) approved at the Paerata Rise subdivision (741 & 801 Paerata Rise, Pukekohe)                                                                                                                   173

22        Governance Forward Work Calendar April 2022                                                   179

23        Franklin Local Board workshop records                                                                185

24        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 22 March 2022, including the confidential section, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

8.1       Deputation - Whakaupoko Landcare


Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.         Representatives of Whakaupoko Landcare will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2..  Whakaupoko Landcare covers the areas of Mauku, Pukeoware, Aka Aka, Glenbrook, Patumahoe and Puni. The area contains a number of scattered bush remnants dominated by taraire, puriri and totara, and a high kereru population.

3.   Whakaupoko Landcare was formed and registered as a charitable organisation in 2004 to progress pest and weed control, monitoring, revegetation, habitat restoration and educational activities.

4.   Whakaupoko Landcare seeks to address the local board on the Green Trails Project, for which the group has received an Auckland Council grant from the regional Environment and Natural Heritage fund.

5.   The group will also provide a brief overview of a Biodiversity Corridors report that will shortly be finalised. The focus of this report is about developing a plan to connect all the communities of Franklin via a Green Trails network, primarily using existing legal public access.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank the representatives of Whakaupoko Landcare for their attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.


 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board Work Programme Reallocations 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/03844

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve reallocation of funding within the Franklin Local Board’s 2021/2022 work programme

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board approved its work programme 2021/2022 in June 2021.

3.       As projects progress through the delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change. As a result, variations are sought to the work programme to ensure the local board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget is optimised.

4.       The following activities within the work programme are tracking towards an underspend for the 2021/2022 financial year and have budget available for reallocation:

a)   ID 141: Movies in Parks Franklin - $13,087

b)   ID 140: Local Civic Events - $5,000

c)   ID N/A: Film Revenue - $7,863

d)   ID 615 Ecological Volunteers - $20,000

e)   ID 621 Mangrove removal - $10,000

5.       Underspent budget should be allocated to projects that can be completed by the end of the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.       It is recommended that the underspent budget from the above initiatives is reallocated to support the following activities, on the basis that these are able to utilise funding prior to the end of the financial year:

a)   ID 642: Predator Free Franklin - $15,000

b)   ID 143: Community Grants Franklin - $18,788

c)   ID 627: Waterways Protection Fund Franklin - $4,299

d)   ID 1467: Local Economic Broker $17,863

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the reallocation of $55,950 of budget underspend towards the following activities:

i)      ID 642: Predator Free Franklin - $15,000

ii)     ID 143: Community Grants Franklin - $18,788

iii)    ID 627: Waterways Protection Fund Franklin $4,299

iv)    ID 1467: Local Economic Broker $17,863.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Franklin Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following operating departments:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Auckland Unlimited.

8.       The local board receives performance updates on the work programme throughout the year; the last report was presented at the February 2022 business meeting.

9.       As projects progress through the delivery process the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change. As a result, variations are sought to the work programme to ensure the local board’s locally driven initiatives operational budget is optimised.

10.     Underspent operational expenditure can be reallocated across departments, but must remain as operational expenditure (that is, it cannot not be used as capital expenditure), and should be reallocated on the basis that delivery can be achieved before the end of the financial year.

11.     Any budget reallocated in the current financial year must be spent by 30 June 2022 otherwise it will be treated as savings.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Activities with underspends

12.     Staff have identified five activities within the operational work programme that will deliver an underspend for the 2021/2022 financial year. The total underspend amount to reallocate is $55,950.00.

13.     The following table provides a breakdown of the underspend against each activity.


 

  Table 1: Work programme underspend for reallocation by the local board

ID

Work Programme

Activity Name

Reason for underspend

Underspend

amount

141

CCS

Movies in Parks Franklin 

Could not proceed due to COVID Protection Framework restrictions

$13,087.00

140

CCS

Local Civic Events

Unable to deliver planned events due to COVID Protection Framework restrictions

$5,000.00

N/A

CCS

Film Revenue

Film revenue was unallocated through the 2021/2022 work programming process.

$7,863.00

615

CCS

Ecological Volunteers

Programme unable to be delivered in full due to COVID Protection Framework restrictions

$20,000.00

621

CCS

Mangrove removal

Programme unable to be delivered in full due to COVID Protection Framework restrictions

$10,000.00

 

 

 

TOTAL

$55,950.00

Activities to reallocate budget

14.     Staff have identified the following activities, which can be delivered by the end of the 2021/2022 financial year, to reallocate budget.

  Table 2: Activities to reallocate

ID

Work Programme

Activity Name

How budget will be spent

Reallocation

amount

642

I&ES

Predator Free Franklin

To purchase bait and traps that are provided free to the community to support pest eradication in the Franklin Local Board area. In addition to enabling more traps and bait to be distributed, funding for this equipment will also free up resources to allow delivery agents to progress other pest eradication initiatives. 

$15,000.00

143

CCS

Community Grants Franklin

To be distributed through the final rounds of the grants programme. Additional funding will allow more local community-led initiatives and projects. Projects must meet grants policy criteria, including having an alignment with board priorities.

$18,788.00

627

I&ES

Waterways Protection Fund Franklin

Additional funding to top up allocated $60,000.00 to enable funding for all recommended water protection funding applications (refer to recommendations within the Waterways Protecting Funding report on the 26 April agenda)

$4,299.00

 

1467

AUL

Local Economic Broker

$10,000.00 toward Homeland Project leverage programme (participant training workshops x2 and media plan delivery and $7,863.00 toward promotion of Screen Production in Franklin, including distribution of the Franklin Film Prospectus.

$17,863.00

 

 

 

TOTAL

$55,950.00

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The proposed work programme reallocation does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change; although contributions to Water Protection Funding and the pest management programme will generate positive environmental outcomes that could be considered to offset impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Underspends have been identified by the relevant departments within the Auckland Council organisation and either have or will be reported through quarterly reports.

17.     Activities suitable for reallocation have been suggested by the Franklin Integrated Work Programming team; that is those staff that have a strong understanding of Franklin Local Board priorities and who are responsible for drafting and progressing annual board work programmes.

18.     In identifying activities, staff have considered what is realistically able to be delivered before the end of the financial year, alignment with strategic priority and what will deliver maximum and direct social, economic and environmental benefit to Franklin Communities.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The proposed reallocation will deliver additional benefit through existing work programme deliverables. These deliverables are aligned to the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives as outlined in Table 3 below.


 

Table 3: reallocation proposal alignment with the Franklin Local Board Plan by activity

ID

Activity Name

Outcome

Objective

642

Predator Free Franklin

Kaitiakitanga and protection of our environment 

Support community and iwi driven initiatives that will protect and restore the natural environment and address the impacts of climate change

143

Community Grants Franklin

A sense of belonging and strong community participation

Our community are supported to actively contribute to their community and the places they live

627

Waterways Protection Fund Franklin

Kaitiakitanga and protection of our environment 

Protect and enhance the mauri (lifeforce) of our awa (waterways), moana (harbour) and ngahere (indigenous forests)

1467

Local Economic Broker

Our strengths generate local opportunity and prosperity

Facilitate local economic development opportunity, and recovery by protecting and promoting our natural resources, local narrative and local talents.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The proposed reallocations align with the values set out in the Independent Māori Statutory Board Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 https://www.imsb.maori.nz/The-Issues-of-Significance-2021/the-issue-of-significance-2021  as set out in Table 4 below

Table 3: reallocation proposal alignment with the values set out in the Independent Māori Statutory Board Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021

ID

Activity Name

Value

Objective

642

Predator Free Franklin

Manaakitanga

Improve quality of life

143

Community Grants Franklin

Rangatiratanga

 

Enhance leadership and participation

627

Waterways Protection Fund Franklin

Manaakitanga

 

Improve quality of life

1467

Local Economic Broker

Wairuatanga

 

Promote distinctive identity

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     Reallocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise its Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) opex budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

22.     The activities recommended to receive funding are existing programmes and deliver to the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020.

23.     Should the local board choose not to support the reallocation of the funding from the initiatives identified above, the funding would be offered up as budget savings.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     There is a risk some of the reallocated budget remains unspent at the end of the financial year. However, delivery staff have suggested these activities on the basis that it is feasible to deliver within the timeframes required. This risk is therefore low.

25.     The COVID-19 response may still interrupt the ability to deliver work programme activities. Delivery departments will endeavour to adapt work programme activities for delivery where feasible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     The funding will be reallocated according to the local board’s resolution, and the relevant department will progress with the delivery of the next steps, reporting on progress through regular workshop updates or through quarterly reports received at business meetings.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Georgina Gilmour - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Franklin Waterways Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/02769

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for Franklin Waterway Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received under the Franklin Waterways Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022 (refer Attachment B).

3.       The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 24 March 2021 (refer to Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

4.       The Franklin Local Board has set a total Waterway Protection Fund budget of $60,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       Ten applications were received for Franklin Waterway Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $218,018.30.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      Agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Franklin Waterways Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022 listed in the following table:

Table One: Franklin Waterways Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022 grant applications

 

Application ID

Applicant

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

FWPF21-10

H&R Partnership

Towards the cost of fencing

$13,003.51

Eligible

FWPF21-12

RH Masfen Family Trust No.4

Towards the cost of plant Supply, planting labour and plant maintenance

$27,600

Eligible

FWPF21-17

Mataitai Farm Trust

Towards the cost of fencing, weed management and plants

$19,250

Eligible

FWPF21-18

Jacqueline & Vaughan Hayton

Towards the cost of plant supply and labour for driveway stream, plant supply for mainstream, and fencing materials and labour for 1359m

$59,146.87

Eligible

FWPF21-19

Smith Shields Family Trust

Towards the cost of gully plant supply, fencing labour and materials, house waterway fencing labour and materials, and freight cost 

 

$34,867.05

Eligible

FWPF21-23

John Wright

Towards the cost of plant supply and labour, fencing materials and labour

$8,961.88

Eligible

FWPF21-24

Graceland Limited

Towards the cost of fencing and planting

 

$24,517.50

Eligible

FWPF21-25

Tarek Yousef

Towards the cost of plant supply, fencing materials and labour

 

 

$10,308

Eligible

FWPF21-28

Andrew McRae

Towards the cost of plant supply, plant labour and maintenance

$15,213

Eligible

FWPF21-29

Robert Granshaw

Towards the cost of plant supply, fencing materials and Labour

 

$5,150.49

Eligible

 

 

Total

$218,018.30

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·        any additional accountability requirements

8.       Franklin Local Board adopted their grants programme for 2021/2022 on 24 March 2021. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

9.       The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

10.     The Franklin Local Board has set a total waterways protection fund budget of $60,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy, the Franklin Local Board Grant Programme and the Franklin Local Board Waterway Protection Fund Guidelines 2021/2022 criteria.

12.     The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

14.     All applications in this round respond to council’s commitment to address climate change.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The focus of an application is identified as environment or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

19.     A summary of each application received through the Franklin Waterways Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022 is provided (refer Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

21.     One organisation applying in this round have indicated that their project targets Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups or individuals is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

23.     The Franklin Local Board has set a total waterway protection fund budget of $60,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

24.     Ten applications were received for Franklin Waterway Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $218,018.30

25.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes including information in this report and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following the Franklin Local Board allocating funding for the waterway protection fund, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Grant Programme 2021/2022

19

b

Franklin Waterways Protection Fund Round One 2021/2022 - applications

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Devika Anilkumar - Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Variation to 2021 - 2024 Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/04697

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for variations to the Franklin Local Board 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board adopted its 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme on 22 June 2021 (resolution number FR/2021/90). 

3.       As projects progress through the consultation, investigation and design process, the specific work required, and the cost of delivery can change, impacting the approved budget. As a result, variations may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs and updated timeframes for some projects. 

4.       The adopted work programme contains a renewal project for Glenbrook War Memorial Hall to replace water supply system (Project ID 28732). The project has allocated budget of $85,000 from the Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget.

5.       Staff have identified that the Glenbrook War Memorial Hall currently does not meet building code compliance and there has been a significant increase in the cost of building material due to COVID-19 pandemic henceforth the project now requires additional budget to replace the water supply system.

6.       Staff seek approval of additional budget of $33,455 in financial year 2021/2022 for the project ‘Glenbrook War Memorial Hall – replace water supply system’.

7.       To fund the additional budget for the ‘Glenbrook War Memorial Hall – replace water supply system’ project, staff have identified ‘ID 20637 Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall – renew heritage assets’ project on the current approved 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (resolution number FR/2021/90) which requires $33,455 less renewal funding than the amount that was allocated in financial year 2021/2022.

8.       The budget reduction for the identified project in the current financial year is proposed to be allocated in future years in consultation with the local board as part of the development of their next year’s work programme.

9.       The identified realignment of budget as outlined in attachment A will ensure full scope of works will be delivered for the Glenbrook War Memorial Hall project as part of the 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme.

10.     Staff have discussed the proposal and rationale for this change with the local board at the local board workshop on 5 April 2022. The local board provided positive feedback and supported the proposal in principle. 

11.     The proposed variations are within the Franklin Local Board’s financial year 2021/2022 budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

12.     Subject to the local board’s decision, staff will update the work programme and progress updates will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the following variations including budget and timeline changes to its adopted 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme as per attachment A, specifically:

i)        additional budget allocation of $33,455 for project ID 28732 ‘Glenbrook War Memorial Hall – replace water supply system’ from ABS: Capex Renewal budget over financial year 2021/2022.  

ii)       reduce budget allocation by $33,455 for project ID 20637 ‘Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall – renew heritage assets’ utilising $516,813 of ABS: Capex Renewal budget over financial year 2021/2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     Franklin Local Board approved the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme on 22 June 2021 (resolution number FR/2021/90). The budget allocated for all projects on the work programme and the anticipated timelines were best estimates and are subject to change as projects progress through the design and delivery process.

14.     The local board approved a renewal project at the Glenbrook War Memorial Hall as part of their 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme to replace water supply systems at the hall.

15.     An asset condition assessment was carried out as part of investigation and design phase of the project. The assessment has identified that the water system is inadequate and does not meet building code compliance (including seismic) and fire and emergency regulations.

16.     There has been a significant increase in the cost of building material due to COVID-19 pandemic henceforth the project now requires an additional budget to replace the water supply system.

17.     Staff have identified ‘Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall – renew heritage assets’ project in the current approved 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme where budget allocation can be realigned:

·   The project ‘Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall – renew heritage assets’ (project ID 20637) is in plan phase. It has been identified that the building requires seismic strengthening. The project manager is waiting for seismic report from the engineers requiring additional time. Staff recommend that the budget be rephased over future years for this project.

18.     All future budget allocations to deliver the full scope of work for each project will be discussed with the local board as part of the development of their next year’s work programme.

19.     Approved funding allocations for the identified projects are shown in the Table ‘1’ below:


 

Table 1: Approved funding allocation for the identified projects

Resolution Number

Project ID

Activity Name

Activity Description

Budget source

Total Budget Allocation

FR/2021/90

28732

Glenbrook War Memorial Hall – replace water supply system

Replace the tank and lines to the water source for the hall.

FY21/22 - investigation and physical work

ABS: Capex Renewal

$85,000

FR/2021/90

20637

Pukekohe War Memorial Hall – renew heritage assets

Renew assets in conjunction with the heritage team.

FY19/20 - investigation and design

FY20/21 – FY21/22 physical works

ABS: Capex Renewal

$717,982

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     Proposed variations and how they will affect the current 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme are shown in Attachment A and noted in Table 2 below: 

Table 2: Description of the proposed variations to the 2021 - 2024 Customer and Community Services work programme

Project ID

Activity Name

Budget variations

 FY2021-2022 

Details 

28732

Glenbrook War Memorial Hall – replace water supply system

Additional ABS: Capex Renewals budget of $33,455 is required for the renewals work to replace the water supply system at the Glenbrook Hall.

Approved FY21/22 budget $85,000

Revised FY21/22 budget $118,455

 (increase of $33,455)

 

Increase in budget will ensure that the asset is renewed to meet service level requirements and is compliant with the building code and fire and emergency regulations.

 

 

20637

Pukekohe War Memorial Hall – renew heritage assets

ABS: Capex Renewals budget of $145,000 is now required for:

·   Project management costs

·   Engineers’ consultation

Approved FY21/22 budget $550,268,

Revised FY21/22 budget $516,813

Approved FY22/23 budget $100,000

Revised FY22/23 budget $133,455

 

Request for reduction in funding in financial year 2021/2022 is due additional time required for seismic report from the engineers. The reduction is proposed to be allocated in FY22/23.  

 

21.     Staff will ensure that the proposed variations are within the local board’s financial year 2021/2022 budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·           to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·           to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23.     This is an administrative report and the budget variations proposed in the report have no direct effect on climate change.  Each project will be considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

24.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible when delivering the projects. Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material, aligned with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle), will also be prioritised to ensure minimum impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services directorate (Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance and Parks, Sport and Recreation) teams have been consulted and are supportive of the proposed budget changes as renewal of the water supply system at the Glenbrook War Memorial Hall will help to meet the building code compliance and service level requirements.

26.     The overall 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

27.     Staff collaboration will be ongoing throughout the life of the projects to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

29.     The proposed variations to the approved work programme as outlined in this report were discussed with the local board at a workshop on 5 April 2022. The local board provided positive feedback and indicated support for the proposal in principle.

30.     The identified projects in this report are part of approved 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and align with the following Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

 

Table 3: Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

 Outcome

Objective / Initiative

Outcome 3: Fit for purpose places and facilities

We will plan for and respond to future growth and the impacts of climate change whilst protecting and celebrating what is special and unique about our communities.

Outcome 6: A sense of belonging and strong community participation

We will support and enable community organisations to deliver local community activities and cultural programmes, to encourage local participation and to respond to local change.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The project proposal discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through the provision of quality facilities and open spaces that promote good health, the fostering of family and community relationships and connection to the natural environment.

32.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework and Local Board Plans.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The proposed variations are within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme. 

34.     Details of proposed variations are outlined in Table 2 and the recommended changes as shown in attachment A have been agreed with the local board’s lead financial advisor. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     Amendments to the projects as outlined in Table 2 are essential for delivery of the full scope of the projects. If the local board does not approve the change, there is a risk that the identified projects will remain incomplete and may not meet community expectations.  

36.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme if the COVID-19 alert level changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Subject to the local board’s decision on the proposal outlined in this report, the local board’s work programme will be amended to reflect the decision and works will commence on the projects as per the timing outlined in the approved work programme.

38.     Progress and updates on the work programme will be reported to the local board as part of the quarterly reports to the local board. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed amendments to 2021 - 2024 Community Facilities work programme

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moushmi Sharan - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Table

Description automatically generated



Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Park Service Assessment Outcomes for the Development of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve

File No.: CP2022/03604

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongoPurpose of the report

1.       To agree the parks service outcomes to be achieved through the future development of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the 2021/22 Franklin Local Board work programme the board requested that a park service assessment be undertaken for Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve to establish agreed park service outcomes to be achieved through redevelopment of the reserve in future board work programmes.

3.       Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve is a 24.5-hectare reserve containing regenerating native forest (10.5-hectares), pine plantation (18-hectares) and pasture (4-hectares).

4.       The existing pine plantation is now being considered for harvest, and this has resulted in the board wishing to consider how the reserve should be redeveloped once the pines are removed.

5.       A park service assessment was workshopped with the local board on 1 March 2022 and the following service outcomes were provisionally supported by the local board:

·    Restore 24.5-hectare indigenous ecosystem including the provision for walking, cycling.

·    Recognise the cultural importance of this rohe to Ngāti Te Ata, ensuring that Māori outcomes are integrated within future development planning for the reserve.

·    Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) principles will overlay and guide park development planning.

·    Park amenities are considered important to ensure visitation to the reserve is enriched and activated will focus on the following:

i)    Access to and connectivity throughout the reserve will focus on accessibility

ii)   Provision of areas where people can gather, rest and be protected from the elements

iii)   Interpretative/directional information.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the preparation of a park service assessment that will guide redevelopment of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve following the harvesting of the pine plantation.

b)      support the following park service outcomes to guide future renewal and development planning for the Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve:

i)    A restored 24.5-hectare indigenous ecosystem including the provision for walking, cycling in a natural setting that will enable Aucklanders to connect with nature and for them to get active their way.

ii)   A developed reserve with recreational access that will increase local activation and support visitor experiences for general tourism within the Āwhitu Peninsula.

iii)   The cultural significance of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve is important to mana whenua and engagement is required to ensure Māori outcomes are integrated within future design and development planning for the reserve.

iv)  Connections to, and within, the reserve will focus on accessibility based on Crime Prevention through Environmental Design principles (CPTED), plus high quality interpretative/directional information.

v)   Supporting amenities will ensure that visitation to the reserve is enriched through the provision of areas where people can gather, rest and be protected from the elements.

vi)  Future renewal and development programmes that evolve will look to ensure that design reflects the cultural, ecological, and cultivated landscape of this location.

 

Horopaki

Context

 

6.       Franklin Local Board’s work programme for 2021/2022 includes development of a park service assessment for Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve located at Matakawau Rd, Matakawau.

7.       Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve is a 24.5 hectares reserve located between the small rural settlements of Matakawau and Matakawau Point. The reserve can be divided into three distinct areas:

-     regenerating native vegetation (approximately 10.5 hectares) including stands of kauri.

-     pine plantation (approximately 18 hectares).

-     pasture (approximately 4 hectares).

A picture containing text, military vehicle

Description automatically generated

            Figure 1 – Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve

8.       The reserve is undeveloped with no significant infrastructure. However, it does offer some informal recreational options for the community such as walking, jogging and exploration of the ecological areas. There is evidence of informal tracks within the reserve and approximately 15 years ago a short walk loop track was developed by community volunteers where users could enjoy the native bush including the stands of kauri and other larger NZ species. As a result of kauri dieback this area of the reserve where this track is located is now closed for use.

9.       Community Facilities (CF) in their 2022/23 and 2023/24 work programmes have a total of $30,000 allocated to investigate the viability and methodology for the harvesting of the pine plantation.

10.     The proposed harvesting of the 18-hectares of pine plantation established the key driver for the board to consider future development of the reserve following the pine removal.

11.     The park service assessment was undertaken in late 2021 and the outcomes of this assessment were workshopped with the board on 1 March 2022.

12.     At the 1 March 2022 board workshop, the following park service outcomes were supported by the board. These service outcomes will inform the development of a concept plan that will guide the redevelopment of the reserve following the harvesting of the pine trees:

-     a restored 24.5-hectare indigenous ecosystem including the provision for walking, cycling in a natural setting will connect Aucklanders with nature and enable them to get active their way.

-     a developed reserve with recreational access will add real interest to general tourism within the Āwhitu Peninsula and potentially attract visitors to Matakawau.

-     the cultural significance of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve is of importance and engagement with mana whenua is required to ensure Māori outcomes are integrated within the future development of the reserve.

-     connections to, and within, the reserve will focus on accessibility based on CPTED principles, plus high quality interpretative/directional information. Supporting park amenities will ensure that visitation to the reserve is enriched through the provision of areas where people can gather, rest and be protected from the elements. 

-     supporting park amenities will ensure that visitation to the reserve is enriched through the provision of areas where people can gather, rest and be protected from the elements.

-     future renewal and development programmes that evolve will look to ensure that design reflects the cultural, ecological, and cultivated landscape of this location.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

13.     The purpose of the park service assessment is to realise opportunities enabled by the pine removal project and to determine park service outcomes which could be delivered through future renewals and development programmes to redevelop Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve.

14.     In 2017 the board funded the development of a ‘Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve Biodiversity Management Plan’. The purpose of the plan was to understand the overall biodiversity of this area, the connection of the reserve to the ecology of the area and recommended restorative ecological works and a staged approach to restoring the overall indigenous ecosystem.

15.     A key part of restoring the ecology is the removal of the pines.

16.     The Āwhitu Peninsula is culturally important for Ngāti Te Ata who advocate for a partnership approach to sustainable management of natural and physical resources including parks and open spaces and the increase of native biodiversity and improved ecosystems:

‘Tikanga Māori and customary activities influence how parks and open spaces are planned, developed and managed’.

17.     A key purpose of this reserve is to meet the recreation needs of the local community and visitors by offering a range of experiences that complement, rather than replicate, other park experiences provided across the local network. of this reserve will assist the board in achieving a key outcome, ‘Fit for purpose places and facilities’ from their local board plan.

18.     The board at their workshop of 7 September 2021 gave direction that the following considerations will guide this parks service assessment:

-     Recreation services delivered by the surrounding parks network and provision gaps across the local network.

-     Supporting Māori outcomes.

-     Ngahere and climate impact outcomes.

-     Kaitiakitanga/place-making.

-     Heritage.

-     Landscape opportunities.

-     Accessibility, inclusivity, and connectivity.

-     Open space for informal and spontaneous recreation.

-     Social and gathering space.

-     Community aspiration for ongoing recreational reserve development.

19.     The board has agreed the principles that will guide the parks service assessment as outlined.

20.     Location; Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve is a large reserve that is located 400 metres from Matakawau Village Centre. The redevelopment of this large reserve will provide positive recreational benefits to both the community and visitors to Matakawau. The ecological and recreational development possibilities for the reserve will add interest and activation options for both visitors and residents, located within a 5-minute walk of the village centre. 

21.     Māori outcomes; Ngāti Te Ata whakapapa to the Āwhitu Peninsula and work in partnership with Āwhitu Peninsula Landcare on projects to restore native flora through a variety of ecological projects across their rohe. Āwhitu Peninsula Landcare who are based on the adjacent recreation reserve in partnership with Ngāti Te Ata have indicated their enthusiasm to be involved further with the board in the redevelopment of the reserve. Ongoing engagement with mana whenua will be a key part of future reserve redevelopment planning focussed on ensuring the boards vision and direction for Māori outcomes are achieved.

22.     Ngahere, climate impact outcomes; The board has specifically expressed a desire to focus on the restoration of the indigenous ecosystem at this site (Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve Biodiversity Management Plan) following the harvesting of the pine trees. Ongoing forest restoration following the pine removal will improve climate impact outcomes as the native forest establishes and sustains itself.

23.     Kaitiakitanga/Placemaking and heritage; The Matakawau community has always valued the recreational opportunity that the reserve offers and recognise that the proposed harvesting of the pines provides the opportunity to focus on improving both ecological and recreational outcomes within the reserve. Research shows that local parks play a critical role in building strong communities through placemaking. With both Ngāti Te Ata and wider community support and involvement in the ecological restoration this board objective can be achieved.

24.     Landscape and recreational opportunity; The reserve and a future restoration of the indigenous ecosystem potentially creates more interest from an informal recreation perspective by including provision for walking, cycling and ecological connectivity through the reserve. These informal recreational outcomes have long been a vision of the Matakawau community. A healthy ecologically strengthened indigenous forest will be a vast improvement on the slowly declining pine plantation.

25.     The Āwhitu Peninsula has become an important tourist destination for Franklin and Matakawau being centrally located on the peninsula with a small village centre that is a destination point for visitors. The ecological and recreational development possibilities for the reserve will add interest and activation options for both visitors and residents, located within a 5-minute walk of the village centre.

26.     The board has recognised that the redevelopment of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve will ensure that one of their key local board outcomes is achieved - Fit for purpose places and facilities. To achieve the board’s vision the following park services are recommended as the areas that require redevelopment focus to ensure that ongoing visitor experience to the reserve is enhanced and sustained into the future:

·    A restored 24.5-hectare indigenous ecosystem including the provision for walking, cycling in a natural setting will connect Aucklanders with nature and enable them to get active their way.

·    The cultural significance of Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve and its significance to mana whenua will be a key focus in redevelopment of the reserve.  Ongoing engagement is required to ensure Māori outcomes are integrated within the future development design and planning in the redevelopment of the reserve.

·    Future design and improvement work within the reserve will have as the following underlying design principle, Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) to be focussed on through future design detail.

·    Connectivity to and within the reserve will focus on shared and safe accessibility.

·    Supporting park amenities will ensure that visitation is enriched through the provision of areas where visitors can gather, rest, be protected from the elements and enjoy the native forest restoration project within the reserve.

·    Quality interpretive and directional information will be reviewed and enhanced to support visitor experience

·    Future approved renewal and development programmes will ensure that design reflects the cultural, ecological, and cultivated landscape of this location.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     The redevelopment of the reserve will have a positive impact on our resilience to climate change and will be considered through the methodology for the harvesting of the pine plantation.

28.     The reserve redevelopment has an emphasis on the restoration of a native species, and the forest trees will help absorb emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Community Facilities (CF) in their 2022/23 and 2023/24 work programmes have a total of $30,000 allocated to investigate the viability and methodology for the harvesting of the pine plantation.

30.     The board has confirmed that it wishes to redevelop the reserve once the pine trees have been harvested. Development of a concept plan to guide the redevelopment of the reserve has yet to be included in a future board work programme and funded.

31.     The approved parks service outcomes will inform the development of a concept plan that then can guide overall redevelopment of this reserve. The concept plan will provide development objectives to all departments who are involved in maintenance, renewal, development of this reserve that will then be used to inform future work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

32.     The board several years ago funded a study into ecological improvements that could be made once the pine trees were harvested, this being the ‘Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve Biodiversity Management Plan’.

33.     The community have always valued the reserve for the existing native ecology and the fact that such a sizable reserve has recreational possibilities. Some years ago, the community developed a short walk track network that has been enjoyed by many.

34.     The Āwhitu Landcare Group have expressed a desire to work with the board and mana whenua on the redevelopment possibilities for the reserve following pine harvesting.

35.     The board has now committed funding over the next two financial years to investigate and plan for the pine harvest.

36.     The recommended service outcomes presented were workshopped and refined at a board workshop on 1 March 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Mana whenua have a strong focus on Kaitiakitanga to ensure a sustainable future for all. Ngāti Te Ata have a strong partnership with the Awhitu Landcare Group and are actively involved in native restoration projects throughout their rohe.

38.     Māori have a critical role in ensuring Aucklanders are more active and connected with nature and celebrating our Māori identity and will be engaged specifically in relation to ongoing park renewal and development.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

 

39.     Over the next two financial years $30,000 has been provided to Community Facilities through the board’s LDI opex programme to investigate the viability and methodology for the harvesting of the pine plantation

40.     Once a programme for harvesting the pines is developed and funded then the board can start to plan the redevelopment of the reserve guided by the parks service outcomes they wish to achieve.

41.     Funding for the development of a concept plan to guide future redevelopment of the reserve has yet to be approved.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     The board has agreed on the parks service outcomes to be achieved in redeveloping the Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve, recognising ecological recreational and cultural values that redevelopment of the reserve can achieve.

43.     It is assumed that the funding allocated to evaluate the feasibility to remove the pine plantation will result in a planned project to harvest the pines. Therefore, planning for the redevelopment of the reserve should be initiated once a decision to harvest the pines is approved.

44.     Funding to develop a concept plan for the redevelopment of the reserve has yet to be allocated by the board and included within a future board capex work programmes. This is potentially a risk that will slow the momentum of the board’s redevelopment focus.

45.     Funding to develop a concept plan to redevelop the reserve should be planned for and allocated as the Community Facilities pine harvest feasibility project nears completion in 2023. At this time there should be clarity on how the pine harvest can progress along with a recommended timing schedule. Concept planning at this time will enable the board to work with Community Facilities on an agreed reserve redevelopment programme in future years.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     That the board provide LDI capital funding in the 2023/24 work programme to develop a concept plan for redevelopment of the Matakawau Recreation and Plantation Reserve following the harvesting of the existing pine plantation within the reserve.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Greg Lowe - Parks and Places Specialist (Parks Services)

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

 

Parks Service Assessment Outcomes for the Development of Pukekohe Hill Reserve.

File No.: CP2022/03661

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To agree the parks service outcomes to be achieved through future development of Pukekohe Hill Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As part of the 2021/22 Franklin Local Board work programme the board requested that a parks service assessment be undertaken for Pukekohe Hill Reserve to establish agreed parks service outcomes for the site.

3.       The reserve is a focus for informal recreation, a destination for both the local community and visitors to Pukekohe who use the summit as a place to enjoy the extensive views offered from a variety of elevated locations within the reserve. The elevation challenge also attracts high numbers of walkers, runners, and cyclists to the reserve.

4.       Population growth in the area is resulting in increasing visitation to the site and development considerations need to be made now to ensure that the reserve meets base line provision and quality standards. The board has highlighted in their Local Board Plan that Pukekohe Hill Reserve has the potential to be developed as a subregional resource that offers cultural, recreational, and environmental experiences. The service assessment undertaken has identified four key service outcomes on which future concept planning can be based. The following service outcomes were provisionally supported at a local board workshop on 1 March 2022:

·    a Māori presence

·    connectivity and ease of access

·    amenities that provide protection from the elements and enhance social/gathering spaces

·    a design that is sympathetic to surrounding landscape and associated cultural and heritage features.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the following park service outcomes to guide future planning to increase activation and visitor experience for Pukekohe Hill Reserve:

i)    Māori outcomes are to be integrated within the future vision and design for the reserve.

ii)   Connectivity within the reserve will focus on accessibility, Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design principles, with accurate quality interpretive/directional information.

iii)   Supporting amenities will ensure that visitation is enriched through the provision of areas where people can gather, rest, be protected from the elements and enjoy the scenic view shafts available from the summit of Pukekohe Hill.

iv)  Future renewal and development programmes that evolve will look to ensure that design reflects the cultural, ecological, and cultivated landscape of this location.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       Franklin Local Board’s work programme for 2021/2022 includes development of a parks service assessment for Pukekohe Hill Reserve.

6.       Pukekohe Hill Reserve is a 6.7-hectare reserve located at the summit of the highest point within Pukekohe. Pukekohe is the largest urban and business centre within the Franklin Local Board area.

Figure 1 – Pukekohe Hill Reserve location

7.       Within the reserve there are two distinctive stands of regenerating native tree plantings on the southern slope below the summit. There is an informal shared use path that runs along the western side of the reserve in amongst the tree canopy that provides for walking, cycling and an ecological connection through this area of the reserve.

Figure 2 – Pukekohe Hill Reserve and Anzac Rd boundary alignments

8.       The summit of Pukekohe Hill being the highest point within the town and immediate surrounding areas has strategic communication advantages. It has a number of infrastructure communication devices that are connected to a tower on the western side of the lookout and there is one telemetry aerial attached to the lighting pole located on the lookout. A functioning water reservoir is also located within the reserve.

9.       Kia Puāwai o Pukekohe/Unlock the Potential of Pukekohe is one of a number of transformational redevelopment projects currently underway throughout the region. The project focus reflects the significant population growth that is occurring in Pukekohe and Franklin as a whole. The Local Board in partnership with Mana Whenua and Eke Panuku has agreed the following key goals that will support the outcomes of this ‘unlock’ project:

- Improve access for all.

- Enhance local identity.

10.     Pukekohe Hill while not a focus within the overall Kia Puāwai o Pukekohe is one of Franklin’s iconic destinations which will support and help the achievement of these outcomes. While the focus of Kia Puāwai o Pukekohe is the Pukekohe’s CBD area, the value of Pukekohe Hill as a destination contributes to the overall experience of living in and visiting Pukekohe.

11.     It is sometime since park amenities have been reviewed and assessed against the local board’s park service outcomes – ‘Fit for purpose places and facilities’. The board’s vision to develop the reserve as a sub-regional resource offering a range of experiences now provides impetus to review the whole of site and how it will meet demand now and into the future.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The key purpose of this reserve is to meet the recreational needs of a growing local community and visitors by offering a range of experiences that complement, rather than replicate, other park experiences provided across the local network. Pukekohe Hill Reserve is a key destination park in Pukekohe that provides elements of cultural, recreational, and environmental experiences for visitors.

13.     Parks help create our identity and define a sense of place by reflecting local communities, local character, and local history. Pukekohe Hill within the Pukekohe sub-division is an important destination within the overall of the Franklin Local Board. The board has highlighted in their Local Board Plan that Pukekohe Hill Reserve has the potential to be developed as a subregional resource that offers cultural, recreational, and environmental experiences. To achieve this, we need a well-considered plan with a vision that reflects outcome three of the plan: ‘Fit for purpose places and facilities.

14.     The board at their workshop of 7 September 2021 gave direction that the following park service principles will guide this parks service assessment:

-     Recreation services delivered by the surrounding parks network and provision gaps across the local network.

-     Supporting Māori outcomes.

-     Ngahere and climate impact outcomes.

-     Kaitiakitanga/place-making.

-     Heritage.

-     Landscape opportunities.

-     Accessibility, inclusivity, and connectivity.

-     Open space for informal and spontaneous recreation.

-     Social and gathering space.

-     Community aspiration for ongoing recreational reserve development

15.     The following principles will ensure that the reserve continues to meet future community and board expectations.

16.     Location: Pukekohe Hill Reserve’s primary purpose is to provide for informal recreation however its location at the summit of Pukekohe Hill and the views across the board area it provides has resulted in the reserve becoming a major destination for both residents and visitors to Pukekohe. The board recognise the destination values and the potential that reserve redevelopment could achieve to ensure that cultural, recreational, and environmental experiences are enhanced.

17.     Māori outcomes: Ngāti Tamaoho whakapapa to this area of Pukekohe and worked in partnership with the board in the redevelopment of the viewing platform several years ago. Ongoing engagement with mana whenua will be a key part of future reserve redevelopment planning focussed on ensuring the board’s vision and direction for Māori outcomes are achieved.

18.     Ngahere, climate impact outcomes, kaitiakitanga/placemaking and heritage: Pukekohe Hill Reserve has two distinct areas of regenerating native forest and there is opportunity to enhance and improve the overall ecological health and sustainability of these areas. Ongoing forest restoration will enhance climate impact outcomes. Future restoration and management of these areas could involve community initiatives that create strong kaitiakitanga, educational and visitor interest.

19.     Landscape and recreational opportunity: It has been sometime since Pukekohe Hill Reserve has had a focus on improvements to park amenities to support visitation numbers. The board has recognised that Pukekohe Hill Reserve requires focus to ensure that one of their key local board outcomes is achieved - Fit for purpose places and facilities. To achieve the board’s vision the following service outcomes are recommended:

·    Future design and improvement work within the reserve will have as the following underlying design principle, Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) to be focussed on through future design detail.

·    Connectivity within the reserve will focus on accessibility

·    Supporting park amenities will ensure that visitation is enriched through the provision of areas where visitors can gather, rest, be protected from the elements and enjoy the scenic view shafts available from the summit of Pukekohe Hill

·    Quality interpretive and directional information will be reviewed and enhanced to support visitor experience

·    Future approved renewal and development programmes will ensure that design reflects the cultural, ecological, and cultivated landscape of this location. 

20.     The approved parks service outcomes will become the directional focus for the development of a concept plan to redevelop Pukekohe Hill Reserve. This plan will be used to guide renewal and development planning in future board work programmes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Initially this project will have a neutral impact on climate change reflecting the conceptual thinking related to the future redevelopment of the reserve. However future detail design related to the service outcomes to be achieved through the redevelopment of the reserve will support priorities identified in Auckland’s Climate Plan:

-     Natural environment – planting of trees and vegetation

-     Built environment through new build and renewal projects

-     Transport – improved walkways and shared paths connections throughout the reserve

-     Te Puāwaitanga ō Tātai – there is intergenerational whakapapa linked with the reserve and the ongoing partnership with mana whenua will ensure ongoing enhancement and protection of this whakapapa.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Within the local board work programme there is a project to renew carparking and roading within Pukekohe Hill Reserve over a three-year period 2022 -2025. As the board are focussed on the redevelopment of the reserve it is recommended that this work is deferred until a concept plan for the redevelopment of Pukekohe Hill Reserve is approved. The renewal of caparking and roading can then be integrated into future redevelopment planning.

23.     Future redevelopment proposals for the reserve will be of interest to Council partners specifically Watercare and Eke Panuku. Both organisations will be engaged with as part of the concept design planning process.  

24.     The approved parks service outcomes will guide the concept plan and give clear development objectives to all departments that are involved in maintenance and management of this open space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The board has confirmed that it recognises the iconic values of Pukekohe Hill to both the town and Franklin and believes the reserve has the potential to be developed as a subregional resource that offers cultural, recreational, and environmental experiences. The board wish to develop a well-considered plan with a vision that reflects community aspirations and priorities and how these can be achieved.

26.     The cultural significance of Pukekohe Hill Reserve is of major importance and engagement with mana whenua is required to ensure Māori outcomes are integrated within the future development of the reserve.

27.     The recreational values of Pukekohe Hill Reserve are varied and engagement with the broader community will ensure that these values are incorporated within the future vison for further renewal and development programmes.

28.     At the 1 March board workshop, the following parks service outcomes were supported by the board and will be used to guide the development of a concept plan for the future redevelopment of Pukekohe Hill Reserve:

-     Māori outcomes are to be integrated within the future vision and design for the reserve.

-     Connectivity within the reserve will focus on accessibility, CPTED principles in design with accurate quality interpretive/directional information.

-     Supporting park amenities will ensure that visitation is enriched through the provision of areas where people can gather, rest, be protected from the elements and enjoy the scenic view shafts available from the summit of Pukekohe Hill.

-     Future renewal and development programmes that evolve will look to ensure that design reflects the cultural, ecological, and cultivated landscape of this location.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Pukekohe Hill is culturally significant to Ngāti Tamaoho and this is highlighted through the installation of carved pou and wall panels at the summit lookout point.

A picture containing grass, tree, outdoor

Description automatically generated

Figure 3. Pukekohe Hill Reserve summit lookout

 

30.     Māori have a critical role in ensuring Aucklanders are more active and connected with nature and celebrating our Māori identity and will be engaged specifically in relation to ongoing park renewal and development.

31.     Engagement with Ngāti Tamaoho will be an important focus of concept plan development once the project has been approved by the board.

32.     Ngāti Tamaoho’s strong association with Pukekohe Hill is reflective of the board’s vision to work in partnership with mana whenua in the delivery of local projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The board in their current work programme has funded the renewal carparking and roading within Pukekohe Hill Reserve over a three-year period, 2022-2025.

34.     Given the board has committed to the redevelopment of the reserve the renewal of the carparking and roading should be deferred and incorporated into future renewal planning based on the final approved concept plan outcomes, yet to be programmed by the board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     The board at their March workshop supported the parks service outcomes recommended to be achieved through future redevelopment of Pukekohe Hill Reserve, recognising iconic recreational and destination values that the reserve location offers.

36.     Funding to develop a concept plan and implementation for the redevelopment of the reserve has yet to be allocated by the board and included within a future board capex work programme. If funding is not allocated the service outcomes will not be able to be delivered.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Consideration of LDI capital funding in the local board work programme to develop a concept plan for Pukekohe Hill Reserve.

38.     That the board delay the proposed carparking and renewal programme by one year to enable the concept planning work to be completed which will then guide decision making in the planning for these renewal works.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Greg Lowe - Parks and Places Specialist (Parks Services)

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport bimonthly report April 2022

File No.: CP2022/03820

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Franklin Local Board on transport related matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The purpose of the report is to provide an update on transport related items including:

·    Half price fares

·    Public transport patronage

·    Te Puru Park to Maraetai

·    Adams and Lisle parking restrictions

·    Massey Avenue and Tobin Street carparks

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the April 2022 report from Auckland Transport.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports on a regular basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

4.       This section of the report contains information about relevant projects, issues and initiatives. It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings.

Half price fares

5.       The decision by government to temporarily halve public transport fares and reduce petrol excise duties and road user charges will provide some immediate relief to commuters, particularly those on low and fixed incomes.

6.       Half-price public transport will also help people look to public transport as a cheap and efficient way to travel, enabling them to avoid the higher fuel costs that the international oil shock has created.

7.       This initiative also supports the government’s commitment to maintain the high levels of investment in transport infrastructure agreed with council in the Auckland Transport Alignment Project, which will ensure we can continue to address the twin challenges of carbon emissions and congestion now and into the future.

Public transport patronage

8.       The local board has requested regular updates on passenger transport patronage. This is published on AT’s website here: https://at.govt.nz/about-us/reports-publications/at-metro-patronage-report/ . In addition, this will be included as part of the AT reporting update.

Bus patronage.

Feb-22

391

Connector

Pukekohe Northeast Loop

Ritchies

67

1,189

392

Connector

Pukekohe Northwest Loop

Ritchies

67

1,738

393

Connector

Pukekohe South Loop

Ritchies

67

954

394

Local

Pukekohe to Wesley College via Paerata Rd

Ritchies

67

306

395

Peak only

Papakura to Waiuku

Ritchies

67

219

396

Local

Pukekohe to Waiuku via Patumahoe

Ritchies

67

819

398

part Waikato Regional Council

Pukekohe to Tuakau

Ritchies

67

399

part Waikato Regional Council

Pukekohe to Port Waikato via Tuakau

Ritchies

67

20

 

Ferries

9.       Pine Harbour was 6,413 passengers for weekdays in February. The weekend trial has been reported separately.

10.     Rail statistics will also be provided once the service is resumed after the electrification process.

11.     March 2022 is likely to be an ideal benchmark of trends. New Zealand is coming out of two years of COVID restrictions and there has been significant growth in Franklin.

Te Puru Park to Maraetai

12.     As part of the latest two tranches of the speed bylaw, the stretch of road between Te Puru Park and the coastal settlement of Maraetai was raised by the local board. Following further discussion with key staff, it has been agreed that this is an area that needs additional study and potentially extra measures to complement the proposed bylaw changes. A cursory drive through the area often leaves people perceiving it as rural, but it is actually becoming urbanised. AT staff will arrange a staff visit with local board members in the near future.

Adams and Lisle parking restrictions

13.     At the workshop on Tuesday 12 April, AT sought further feedback from the local board on suggestions for additional parking restrictions on the Adams and Lisle area of Waiuku. The board may seek to formally endorse its feedback at this business meeting.

Massey Avenue and Tobin Street carparks

14.     At the workshop on Tuesday 12 April, the local board discussed the Eke Panuku proposals regarding Massey Avenue and Tobin Street carparks. The board may seek to formally endorse its feedback at this business meeting.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     AT engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

16.     AT’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

17.     There is a growing global, national and local need to urgently address the threats posed by climate change through reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The scientific evidence is compelling. In New Zealand the Climate Change Response (Zero-Carbon) Act was enacted in 2019, which requires national GHG emissions to be net-zero by 2050. In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency, followed by the endorsement in July 2020 of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

18.     Tackling climate change will require a very significant change to the way we travel around our region although the timing and the detail of how this change might unfold are still to become obvious. Auckland Council through the Auckland Climate Plan has committed to a 50 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, the amount required to keep the planet within 1.5°C of warming by 2100.

19.     Roughly five percent of Auckland’s road and rail strategic networks are found in areas susceptible to coastal inundation, including parts of the state highway network which are crucial links for freight movements and access to key regional destinations. Over 1,000km (or about 13 percent) of AT’s local road network has recently been identified as vulnerable to a 1-in-100 year flood event. AT is currently identifying and prioritising the risks of climate change to the transport system (assets, services, customers and staff) to permit a more strategic approach to designing and managing our assets in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     The purpose of this report is to inform the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     There are no impacts specific to Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi - the Treaty of Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

23.     Our Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them.

24.     This plan in full is available on the AT’s Website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     There are no unplanned financial implications as a consequence of this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Risks are managed as part of each AT project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     In addition to upcoming workshops the local board will be updated at its June 2022 meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Members Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport - Activities in the Road Corridor Bylaw 2022

File No.: CP2022/03981

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board input on Auckland Transport’s proposed Activities in the Road Corridor Bylaw 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport proposes to use bylaw-making powers granted to Auckland Transport under the Local Government Act 2002 and the Land Transport Act 1998 to replace five existing, legacy bylaws with a new ‘Activities in the Road Corridor Bylaw’.

3.       A single bylaw encompassing all activities in the road corridor will make it easier for members of the public to find information about regulations, and for Auckland Transport to regulate activities in a consistent and appropriate way.

4.       As part of developing the proposed bylaw, a consolidation and refresh of regulations will be undertaken, and new provisions may be proposed where appropriate.

5.       Public consultation occurred in January and February 2022, and the new bylaw is expected to be operational in June 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft Activities in the Road Corridor Bylaw 2022 ahead of it being submitted to the Auckland Transport Board for final approval.

Horopaki

Context

6.       There are five bylaws relating to activities in the road corridor that require an approval from Auckland Transport. These are:

·    Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015

·    Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw 2013

·    Rodney District Council General Bylaw 1998 Chapter Six Stock on Roads

·    Franklin District Council Stock on Roads Bylaw

·    Legacy Bylaw Provisions on Construction in the Road Corridor and Other Public Places 2015.

7.       Auckland Transport has developed a draft bylaw to regulate activities within the road corridor that were previously covered under these bylaws, such as construction; trading, events, and filming; and livestock on roads.

8.       The new bylaw should streamline processes and ensure activities across the road corridor are done so legally and safely and will be made under the bylaw-making powers granted to Auckland Transport under the Local Government Act 2002 and the Land Transport Act 1998.

9.       The proposed bylaw is a consolidation and refresh of regulations in the above bylaws. New provisions may also be proposed where appropriate, for example to future proof for planned activities such as climate change adaptations.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     Of the five bylaws listed above, three have expired (Rodney and Franklin livestock bylaws, and Public Safety and Nuisance bylaw) and one will expire at the end of March 2022 (Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015). The legacy bylaw provisions on Construction in the Road Corridor and Other Public Places Bylaw - a combined legacy bylaw approved in 2015 which covers seven bylaws from pre-amalgamation councils – is due to expire in October 2022.

11.     The existing bylaws do not cover everything they need to, because:

·    they were written before some innovations, situations or issues emerged, or

·    new operational issues have now been identified which need to be addressed to enable better management of the transport system.

12.     The core components of the bylaw will be based on existing bylaw rules around activities in, on, under and above the road corridor to ensure that relevant activities are undertaken safely, without damaging Auckland Transport assets. The bylaw will also detail which approvals are required.

13.     Key proposed changes to the bylaw are outlined in Attachment A and the full draft bylaw is included as Attachment B.

14.     Where possible, Auckland Transport intends to future-proof bylaws to allow for strategic outcomes and activities, such as changes to who uses parts of the road corridor.

15.     In addition, the ability to set fees and charges or reclaim costs associated with permits, licenses, leases, inspections, investigations or enforcement will be included where appropriate.

Public consultation

16.     Auckland Transport undertook engagement with the public in January and February 2022, by distributing information to all database contacts including Business Improvement Districts and advisory boards. A letter was posted to rural livestock owners.

17.     An electronic survey was advertised using social media and media releases.

18.     Facilitated focus groups were conducted with industry leaders and representatives from the following groups:

·    construction and traffic management

·    events and filming

·    trading (including micro-mobility, mobile vendors and performers)

·    livestock.

19.     Written submissions were invited, and seven people spoke to a hearings panel. 

20.     A more detailed review of public engagement and the emergent themes was supplied to local boards in mid-March and is included as Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Auckland Transport is strongly committed to providing alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the wider transport network by encouraging use of electric vehicles, use of non-car transport and public transport.

22.     This bylaw contributes directly to these goals, including new provisions for managing electric vehicle parking and better regulating micro-mobility (i.e. electric scooters), both of which will directly lower emissions.

23.     Further, the bylaw seeks to address some of the issues currently experienced managing traffic around filming, events and work in the road corridor. Better traffic management improves the efficiency all types of transport, reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     Officers from Auckland Transport and Auckland Council worked together to develop the draft bylaw and investigated two options to make sure that Auckland Transport and Auckland Council bylaws remain compatible, and avoid regulatory gaps:

·    option one was for both organisations to develop ‘mirror’ bylaws, which are identical, and then each entity just enforces the aspects under their respective legal remits

·    option two was for each organisation to develop ‘zipper’ style bylaws, where each bylaw covers the aspects under control of the organisation, and the two bylaws together cover the full needs with no overlap

25.     The ‘Activities in the Road Corridor Bylaw’ has utilised the ‘zipper’ approach as:

·    the bylaw relates to approval processes for activities within the transport network (for example, construction of a vehicle crossing or running a mobile stall); and

·    Auckland Transport’s mandate for bylaws is much narrower than Auckland Council’s. ‘Zipper’ bylaws allow fewer, clearer, and more succinct bylaws that are consistent across activities; and

·    Auckland Transport can still delegate enforcement powers to Auckland Council, e.g., for permitting micro-mobility providers.

26.     Provisions relating to trading, events and filming have been aligned with the Auckland Council Public Trading, Events and Filming Bylaw 2022, which takes effect from 26 February 2022 and regulates similar activities in public places other than the road corridor.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     This report is to formalise local board feedback on the draft bylaw.

28.     Local board members were invited to attend an online briefing for local boards on 18 February 2022. In addition, local board workshops with subject matter experts were organised for boards that requested one.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Both Auckland Transport and Auckland Council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. Auckland Transport also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.     The actions being considered are likely to have few specific impacts on Māori, because the bylaw consolidates a number of existing bylaws into one new bylaw.  Further, the bylaw changes do not impact on land or water rather on behaviours so do not impact on Māori kaitiakitanga of these resources.

31.     At the time this report was written, specific Māori engagement is being undertaken. Representatives of mana whenua tribes have been contacted and hui are currently underway. This feedback is not currently available but will be included in the information provided to the Auckland Transport Board.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     There are no financial implications for local boards providing feedback on the proposed bylaw.

33.     For Auckland Transport, this bylaw will have limited financial impact. The bylaw consolidates existing bylaws into one bylaw and does not create significant new revenue streams, nor public expenditure.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     Three of the bylaws have expired and a fourth is due to expire in 2022. Without a replacement bylaw, Auckland Transport does not have the legal right to give approval for activities in the road corridor or enforce certain behaviours on the road network. For example, Auckland Council’s current regulation of public hire micro-mobility devices is regulated through the Auckland Transport Trading and Events in Public Places Bylaw 2015, which expires at the end of March 2022.

35.     Although Auckland Transport will not be able to have this new bylaw in place before the end of March the aim is to mitigate risk by getting approval as quickly as possible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     Based on feedback received from local boards, iwi and through the public consultation, Auckland Transport staff will make recommendations to the Auckland Transport Board on any proposed changes to the draft bylaw.

37.     The Auckland Transport Board will decide in May 2022 whether to go ahead with the changes to the draft bylaw as proposed.

38.     The Activities in the Road Corridor bylaw is expected to become operative in June 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Quick guide – Activities in the road corridor bylaw 2022

71

b

Draft bylaw – Activities in the road corridor

77

c

Consultation report – Activities in the road corridor

99

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Planning, Local Board Services

Andrew McGill, Head of Integrated Network Planning, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Transport Emissions Reduction Plan

File No.: CP2022/04120

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a progress update on the development of the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan and seek formal feedback.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are developing a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to deliver a 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030 and achieve wider wellbeing outcomes. Improving equitable access to sustainable transport modes is a key principle of the TERP.

3.       The TERP gives effect to the commitments in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan to halve regional emissions by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050.

4.       The TERP is being developed in the wider context of increasing government action on climate change. This includes the development of the government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP), which is expected to introduce policy changes and additional funding to better enable the delivery of sustainable transport modes.

5.       A recommended TERP pathway will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in July 2022. Implementation of the pathway will require significant additional funding, policy changes and the reshaping of the urban environment by the Auckland Council group and Government.

6.       A bespoke TERP emissions model has been developed to identify the scale of the challenge. Preliminary modelling indicates that change is possible, but the level of transformation required is immense. Three key observations arise from the modelling work so far:

·    although central government has outlined several actions in its ERP, these do not go far enough, nor do they act fast enough to achieve a 64 per cent reduction in emissions. TERP must fill a large gap between the baseline and the target

·    all levers across transport and a range of other sectors will need to be pulled as hard as they can be within the timeframe available

·    among the levers, mode shift is by far the most powerful to meet the 2030 target. However, significant mode shift to all sustainable modes is required, especially active modes. A compact urban form and accelerated decarbonisation of the public and private vehicle fleet are also crucial.

7.       Achieving a low carbon transport system will bring many other benefits for all Aucklanders, including cleaner air, safer streets, reduced transport costs and easier ways of getting around the city. The TERP will set out a pathway to deliver this vision.

8.       Previous local board feedback shows overwhelming support for more investment in sustainable transport. There is also broad support for policies that suppress private vehicle travel, such as congestion pricing, subject to the adequate provision of sustainable options.

9.       Local boards have a critical role to play in advocating for specific improvements that support their communities transitioning to low carbon travel, e.g., addressing safety hotspots, accelerating the delivery of walking, cycling and micromobility networks, and improving the coverage, frequency, and hours of operation for public transport.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the progress update provided on the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan

b)      note the scale of the challenge to meet Auckland’s transport emissions reduction target and that mode shift is the most powerful lever for reducing transport emissions

c)      provide feedback on:

i)    ways to dramatically reduce transport emissions in its local board area, or more broadly, while achieving broader wellbeing outcomes

ii)   ways to increase uptake of walking, cycling and public transport for communities in its local board area

iii)   barriers that might prevent the implementation of a sustainable, healthy, accessible, and equitable transport system for Auckland, and potential solutions

iv)  ways to build public support for the initiatives that will be introduced as part of the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are developing a Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) to deliver a 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030. As transport is Auckland’s largest source of emissions, modelling has shown that this steep reduction in transport emissions is necessary to fulfil Auckland’s commitment to halve emissions by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050.[1]

11.     The TERP also seeks to achieve wider wellbeing outcomes for mana whenua, mataawaka and Auckland’s diverse communities.

Past decisions and information provided

12.     The TERP’s approach and governance framework were endorsed by the Environment and Climate Change Committee in August 2021 (ECC/2021/32). In December 2021, the Committee noted the urgency of Auckland’s decarbonisation challenge and unanimously endorsed Auckland Council and Auckland Transport taking quick and decisive action to reduce the region’s transport emissions through several ‘early actions’ that can be advanced prior to the approval of the TERP (ECC/2021/45).

13.     A memo on the TERP was provided to local board members in October 2021 (Attachment A), followed by two local board briefings which were held online in November and December 2021.

Broader policy context

14.     The TERP is being developed in the wider context of increasing government action on climate change. Central government is due to finalise its Emissions Reduction Plan (ERP) in May 2022. Its ERP discussion document in November 2021 set out targets in key areas, including a 20 per cent reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled.

15.     Central government’s ERP discussion document also includes many highly ambitious policy interventions that will be required to achieve those targets, which are well-aligned with Auckland’s TERP.

16.     In its present state, however, the ERP leaves too many of its actions until after 2030. Therefore, the TERP cannot rely on government’s ERP alone to meet Auckland’s targets. The TERP needs to pull hard on all the levers available and advocate for government to bring forward the actions and investment it outlines in its ERP.

17.     The National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS – UD) is another key instrument due to take effect that, over time, has the potential to enable significant emissions reductions through more compact urban forms. Auckland Council’s response to the NPS will be crucial.

18.     The systemic changes that will be delivered through the ERP, resource management reforms, and the NPS - UD will create an environment that is much more conducive to reducing transport emissions than is currently the case – the near future context will be very different from what it is today.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Understanding the scale of the challenge

19.     As reported to the Environment and Climate Change Committee in December 2021, preliminary modelling shows that a large gap remains between the baseline and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri’s modelled 64 per cent pathway, even accounting for initiatives within the government’s ERP. Modelling shows that there is likely only one pathway available for the TERP: it needs every lever available, and it needs to pull each of them as hard as it can. 

20.     The figure below illustrates the gap between the projected baseline (shown in red) and the target (shown in green).

Chart, pie chart

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21.     Modelling shows that significant reduction in vehicle kilometres travelled (VKT) is the only plausible strategy to achieve a 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030. Reducing VKT will require rapid and transformational improvements to public transport, walking and cycling options for all Aucklanders. Land use changes that enhance accessibility by bringing destinations closer will also be required, to make walking, cycling and public transport systematically the most competitive modes for daily trips.

22.     Staff are also engaging with the freight, rail, shipping, and aviation sectors to understand the opportunity for emissions reduction within these sectors, opportunities for cross-sector collaboration, and potential barriers that need to be resolved.

Taking a systems approach

23.     Cities around the world are increasingly taking a systems approach to transforming energy-intensive transport systems into sustainable, healthy, and accessible ones. This approach recognises that “climate action could be more efficient and effective if focused on systems as a whole, so that – by design – systems require less energy and materials, and produce less emissions, while achieving wider wellbeing outcomes, such as improving our health and safety, and subsequently better lives” (OECD 2022[2]).

24.     Taking a systems approach to tackling Auckland’s carbon-intensive transport system means firstly addressing its car-oriented status quo and the cycle of induced demand, urban sprawl, and the long-standing erosion of active and shared transport modes that further perpetuate car dependency.

25.     Induced demand, urban sprawl and erosion of shared and active transport modes are the source of high emissions and a number of negative impacts on people’s wellbeing, such as air and noise pollution, congestion, road injuries and fatalities, reduced travel options and unequal access to opportunities.

26.     Without addressing the challenges of the transport system as a whole, there is a tendency for incremental improvements to dominate, focusing on technological and pricing solutions without changing the underlying system.

Developing a package of interventions

27.     The TERP takes a systems approach in developing a high-level programme of interventions, which work synergistically to create a transport system that is sustainable-by-design and achieves broader wellbeing goals.

28.     These interventions draw from best practice around the globe and fall under broader themes, examples of which are likely to include:

·    accessible neighbourhoods in an accessible region

·    using online options where appropriate e.g., working from home

·    replacing private vehicles trips with active, public, and shared modes

·    transitioning to zero emissions vehicles

·    better options for moving goods.

29.     Auckland Transport’s increased emphasis on addressing climate change and road harm means that there is a range of programmes underway that can be scaled up and funded as part of the implementation of the TERP pathway.

30.     The scale of transformation required to drastically cut transport emissions will not be possible without fixing the existing inequities of the transport system. Improving equitable access to sustainable transport modes is therefore a key principle of the TERP. In most instances the types of interventions needed to bring about significant emissions reductions will also help improve transport equity. However, a small number of specific interventions (road pricing, for example) have the potential to make the transport system more unaffordable for some communities and additional mitigations will be required as part of the TERP programme.

Assessing the broader impacts of TERP

31.     An impact assessment will be undertaken to assess the social, environmental, financial, and cultural impacts of the TERP. This assessment could:

·    help inform decision-makers of the impacts on society as a whole

·    support future decision-making about intervention design (e.g., to mitigate inequitable impacts, where to concentrate certain efforts)

·    provide a sense of the type and scale of co-benefits (in addition to emissions reduction) and costs

·    show the changes to costs and benefits over time (i.e., 2030 and beyond).

Identifying barriers and potential solutions

32.     Work is underway to identify the legislative, regulatory, financial, and cultural impediments to achieving emissions reductions of the scale required by the TERP. The purpose in identifying these systemic barriers is not to set a cap on the ambition of the TERP but rather to document the reforms required at both central and local government level as part of the implementation of the TERP. Some of these barriers are features of the way in which institutions or funding mechanisms have been designed, others are more cultural in nature.

33.     Many of the impediments are already well known and in many cases work is underway outside of the TERP process to address them. The barriers workstream of the TERP will bring this together and point to areas where further work is required over and above what is already underway across different agencies.

34.     The output from this workstream will include:

·    an assessment of the criticality of resolving specific barriers for the ability to achieve rapid and significant emissions reductions

·    an assessment of the relative ease of resolving each barrier

·    the role of Auckland Council and Auckland Transport in resolving each barrier – resolution of many of the barriers will fall within the remit of central government and local government’s role may be one of advocacy

·    a high-level forward work programme, based on the above, to address the identified barriers.

35.     Continued collaboration between Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, Waka Kotahi, and the Ministry of Transport on many of these issues will be crucial to the resolution of many of the barriers identified by this workstream.

Engagement

36.     Staff have engaged with mana whenua, local boards, and a range of stakeholder groups in the development of the TERP. These groups include:

·    Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and iwi chairs

·    local boards

·    Auckland Council’s demographic advisory panels

·    transport advocates, ranging from Bike Auckland to the Automobile Association

·    business interests such as the Sustainable Business Council and Employers Manufacturers Association

·    academics and experts in public health, Māori health, community psychology, injury prevention, disability access, sustainability transitions, climate finance

·    frontline community groups such as South Seas Healthcare.

37.     Feedback has generally been positive. There is widespread recognition on the need for systems change to achieve Auckland’s climate goals and address the problems caused by decades of transport and land use policies that have prioritised private vehicle travel over other sustainable modes.

38.     Deep and sustained engagement with iwi Māori and Auckland’s diverse communities is necessary to reimagine a low carbon transport future for Auckland. Staff are exploring how the implementation of the TERP could be supported over a longer period through the use of deliberative democracy, living labs and wānanga to better enable citizen participation and identify community aspirations as well as barriers in transitioning to a sustainable, healthy, and accessible transport system.

Supporting the implementation of the TERP

Building public support

39.     The TERP requires a thoughtful public communications approach to proactively socialise the scale of change required to achieve the region’s climate goals.

40.     Auckland Transport and Auckland Council communications staff, with guidance from the Transport Emissions Reference Group, are developing an agreed set of principles to guide on-going and future communication campaigns and behavioural change programmes, as well as assess funding requirements for any dedicated additional campaigns/programmes to support the TERP.

Applying behavioural science to transport emissions reduction

41.     Achieving a two thirds reduction in transport emissions by 2030 requires a range of responses, including the purposeful application of behavioural science. Information sharing or communication campaigns alone will not be sufficient.

42.     Rather than assuming people’s preferences are fixed, social scientists point to “malleable preferences” and the opportunity to redesign infrastructure and services to bring about significant behavioural change and improved wellbeing.[3] A memo by Dr Jesse Allpress from Auckland’s RIMU provides an overview of the behavioural science behind reducing transport emissions (Attachment B).

Measuring Aucklanders’ access to opportunities via sustainable modes

43.     Reducing VKT without impacting negatively on people’s wellbeing requires a focus on accessibility (people’s ability to reach desired services and activities) instead of mobility (people’s ability to travel faster and further).

44.     Staff are developing a regionwide assessment framework to measure access to social and economic opportunities via walking, cycling and public transport. This framework will:

·    measure access across the urban area to destinations (‘opportunities’) that enable the people of Tāmaki Makaurau to fulfil their daily needs consistently and reliably

·    identify current barriers to access to opportunities for the people of Tāmaki Makaurau

·    assess distribution of access across Tāmaki Makaurau and across demographic groups and understand how different factors (e.g., age, level of ability) could limit a person’s potential use of the transport network

·    inform investment and planning for transport infrastructure and services, land-use planning, and the location of new facilities. This will involve integrating the framework into policy and investment decision-making processes over time.

Assessing willingness and ability to change travel behaviour

45.     An initial project will investigate Aucklanders’ most frequent car trips with a focus on the real and perceived viability of non-driving alternatives. The research will survey over 4000 car drivers in Auckland on their ability and willingness to travel in alternative ways. These perceptions will be compared to ‘objective’ travel data from Google Maps.

46.     The research will identify:

·    where negative perception matches actual experience (to target service improvement)

·    where negative perception does not match actual experience (to target other behavioural interventions)

·    the suburbs and population groups where access to alternative modes of travel is poorest, so these inequities can be addressed via the TERP.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     Auckland has less than 100 months to transform its current transport and land use system to meet its 2030 emissions reduction target. Meeting this target will require a fundamental shift from traditional transport planning and investment processes. Incremental change, reliance on existing practices and focusing on standalone policy instruments will simply not be enough.

48.     A transport emissions reduction plan needs an integrated mix of policies. Supply-side interventions that make public transport, walking and cycling more attractive will only lead to emissions reduction if they replace trips that were previously made in private cars. A stronger focus on demand-side approaches is also required, e.g., congestion pricing and changes to the supply and cost of parking.

49.     While technological innovation and fleet improvements will play an important role in the transition to low carbon transport, particularly beyond 2030, these policies need to be combined with interventions that reduce the demand for travel in private vehicles and increase the use of sustainable transport modes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport are jointly developing the TERP. This is reflected in the composition of the working groups and in all levels of the governance framework.

51.     The Auckland Transport Board is represented in the Transport Emissions Reference Group, which provides staff with oversight and direction on the TERP.

52.     The TERP’s recommended pathway will be recommended to both the Environment and Climate Change committee and the Auckland Transport Board for their endorsement in mid-2022.

53.     Implementation of the TERP will require concerted action from multiple agencies. Auckland Transport will be particularly critical to the success of implementation given its key role in relation to many aspects of Auckland’s transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

54.     The TERP is a strategic regional plan and will not include area-specific projects. However, implementation of a transport decarbonisation pathway will have significant impacts at the local level.

55.     Local board feedback on the Climate Change Commission’s draft advice, the government’s Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document and Auckland Transport’s Regional Land Transport Plan shows overwhelming support for more investment in sustainable transport. There is also broad support for policies that suppress private vehicle travel, such as congestion pricing, subject to a range of caveats, such as the adequate provision of sustainable options.

56.     Local boards have a critical role to play in advocating for specific improvements that support their communities to transition to low carbon travel, e.g., addressing safety hotspots, accelerating the delivery of walking, cycling and micromobility networks, and improving the coverage, frequency, and hours of operation for public transport.

57.     Staff are seeking feedback from the local boards on the following topics:

·        ways to dramatically reduce transport emissions in the local board area, or more broadly, while achieving broader wellbeing outcomes

·        ways to increase uptake of walking, cycling and public transport for communities in the local board area

·        barriers that might prevent the implementation of a sustainable, healthy, accessible, and equitable transport system for Auckland, and potential solutions

·        ways to build public support for the initiatives that will be introduced as part of the Transport Emissions Reduction Plan.

58.     Successful implementation of the TERP at a local level will require Council Controlled organisations (CCOs) to urgently review how they currently design, consult on, fund, and implement minor capital works, as recommended in the Independent Panel’s review of Auckland Council’s CCOs.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.     Addressing climate change for the benefit of current and future generations aligns strongly with Māori values of environmental and inter-generational wellbeing.

60.     Some of the low carbon transport interventions that Mana Whenua and Mataawaka have advocated for in previous submissions include more reliable and affordable public transport as well as safe walking and cycling facilities.

61.     Partnership with iwi, hapū and Māori organisations in delivering climate action is a common theme in submissions received. Equity is also a strong focus for many submitters, highlighting the need for a transport system that increases access, choice, and affordability, particularly for lower income groups and those living outside of the urban core.

62.     Reducing transport emissions to mitigate against the worst impacts of climate change has significant positive implications for Māori. These include cleaner air, fewer traffic-related deaths and serious injuries, lower transport costs, and more equitable access to opportunities for whānau. However, without additional support, some low carbon transport policies could adversely impact on disadvantaged communities.

63.     The Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum and Independent Māori Statutory Board are represented on the Transport Emissions Reference Group, which provides staff with oversight and direction on the TERP.

64.     Staff have presented to the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum twice on the TERP and have also written directly to iwi chairs to seek early feedback.

65.     A series of hui will be held between March 2022 and April 2022 to seek input from Mana Whenua and Mataawaka on the TERP, including solutions that will support Māori communities in Tāmaki Makaurau to transition to low carbon travel. The council expects to continue working with Mana Whenua and Mataawaka to co-design solutions as part of the implementation of the TERP.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     Development of the TERP is being funded from within existing Auckland Council and Auckland Transport budgets.

67.     Delivery of the recommended pathway will require significant investment from both Auckland Council and central government over a period of many years. As part of the assessment of the wider impacts of the TERP, high level costings of the recommended pathway will be worked up. Detailed costings of specific interventions are beyond the scope of this plan, but this work will be undertaken over time as specific projects move closer to implementation.

68.     Some of the early interventions identified in this report may require additional funding to that which is signalled in the Long-term Plan (LTP) and Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP). Funding implications will be investigated and reported back to the committee as part of the pre-implementation decision making process.

69.     In the ERP discussion document, the government indicated its intention to substantially increase funding for public transport and active modes. Auckland would expect to benefit from a good proportion of any additional government funding given its greater potential for mode shift than other parts of New Zealand. Any confirmation of additional government funding would likely come through the final ERP and the government’s budget, both due in May 2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

70.     The table below provides the key risks associated with the TERP. The paper presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee on 2 December 2021 includes the full risk register. 

Risks

Mitigation update

There may not be sufficient evidence to credibly support the assumptions that will go into the model, especially if there is a delay to the technical work required, and some interventions will be difficult to model.

A consultancy has been engaged to provide advice on international best practice in terms of assessing the likely emissions reduction potential of interventions.  This is being augmented by work undertaken internally to document the experiences of many international and domestic cities that have implemented the types of interventions that will be included in the recommended pathway. 

Current central and local government funding, planning and regulatory frameworks are not reformed quickly enough to enable the transformation required to meet the transport emissions reduction goals in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. 

Work on identifying barriers to implementation and potential ways of unlocking them is an important aspect of the TERP.  Responsibility for addressing many of them lies with other agencies and continued collaboration will be essential as the work proceeds.  Government’s ERP discussion document proposes solutions for several key regulatory, fiscal, and legislative barriers.

Disruption from the scale of change required could disproportionately impact disadvantaged communities.

Equity has been one key focus area for the work to date.  Many of the interventions proposed will help address current transport inequities, e.g., vastly improved public and active transport will help address lower levels of access and travel choice for certain parts of Auckland.  Other interventions such as road pricing will require specific mitigation measures.

The equity impacts of the recommended pathway will be assessed and presented to the committee.

Strong support for climate action does not always translate into support for specific action at the local level.

A public communications campaign is needed to identify the wider benefits of decarbonisation, the risks of inaction and the ways to ensure a Just Transition. Early work on this has started with the Reference Group.

The implementation of specific actions within the chosen pathway will be subject to public consultation processes.

Auckland Council is not seen to model good emissions reducing behaviours within its own corporate activities

Auckland Council will be asking Aucklanders to make considerable adjustments to the way they travel around the city. It is important for the perceived credibility of the plan that council’s own practices are seen to role model best practice in reducing transport emissions. While the transition to a lower emissions fleet is a start, work should be undertaken immediately to consider what else could be done, particularly around site specific travel plans, encouragement for staff to use public transport, parking privileges.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

71.     A recommended pathway will be presented to the Environment and Climate Change Committee for approval in July 2022. Feedback from local boards will be summarised and included in the committee report.

72.     Implementation of the TERP will follow the committee’s decision in 2022. Local boards will have an opportunity to provide input on the interventions in the endorsed pathway as they are planned and implemented in the future. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local board memo October 2021 - TERP

117

b

The behavioural science behind reducing Auckland’s transport emissions

121

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Szening Ooi - Principal Transport Advisor

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on the draft 2021 Regional Parks Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/03963

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable local boards to provide formal written feedback to the draft Regional Parks Management Plan (draft plan) hearings panel.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee approved the draft plan for public consultation on 2 December 2021. Through the 12-week public consultation period from 10 December 2021 to 4 March 2022, 4684 submissions were received from individuals, organisations and mana whenua. A summary of the submissions received is in Attachment A and submitters identified by local board area are in Attachment D. Local boards can use Attachment D to find local board specific submissions on the review’s hearings page[4].

3.       The draft plan provides a policy framework to manage the use, protection and development of 28 regional parks. Mutukaroa / Hamlins Hill Regional Park, a portion of the Hūnua Ranges Regional Park called the Hūnua Falls Special Management Zone and the Botanic Gardens have been excluded from the draft plan.

4.       The draft plan presents the vision, values, management framework, general policies, and specific information and management intentions for each park. It provides a management response to key areas of focus, including:

·   increased involvement of mana whenua in accordance with te Tiriti partnership principle

·   adaptation to, and mitigation of, climate change on regional parks

·   focus on biodiversity protection

·   adding value to visitor experiences

·   acknowledging that collaboration with others is increasingly important to achieve the aspirations of this draft plan.

5.       In preparing the draft plan, staff considered the suggestions and input from mana whenua, local boards, community and organisations as required under the Reserves Act 1977 and Local Government Act 2002 and reviewed legislative requirements and current council policy.

6.       Of the 4684 written submissions received within the submission period, more than 3830 submissions were generated from a campaign website (www.handsoff.nz) through which 3646 people sent an identical submission. Commentators on mainstream and social media claimed the draft plan hid an intention to transfer control of regional parks without proper consultation to either the Hauraki Gulf Forum or to iwi authorities. This raised concern for many people and prompted them to submit via the campaign website.

7.       The proposal in the draft plan to investigate joining relevant parks to the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park does not lead to transfer of control to the Hauraki Gulf Forum, even under the legislative changes being proposed by the Forum. No transfer of control away from the council is proposed in the draft plan.

8.       Some other groupings of identical submission points were submitted by motor campervan users, the Waitākere community and the Pakiri community.

9.       Across all submissions a large variety of comments were received, between them commenting on all chapters of the draft plan, with varying levels of support and criticism.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the public feedback on the draft 2021 Regional Parks Management Plan

b)      provide formal feedback on the draft 2021 Regional Park Management Plan to the hearings panel

c)      appoint [local board member names] to speak to the hearings panel on the boards feedback in b) on 9 May 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The PACE committee has decision-making responsibility over the regional parks as identified in Schedule 1 to the Allocation of Decision-Making Responsibility Table in the Long-term Plan.

11.     Under the Reserves Act 1977 and Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008, the 2010 Regional Parks Management Plan was due for review.

12.     In August 2020 the PACE committee notified an intention to prepare a new plan (PAC/2020/36). The council sought suggestions from the community (in September and October 2020) as required under the Reserves Act. A summary of the suggestions was provided to elected members including local board members in December 2020.

13.     Following the agreed principles for local board involvement in regional policies, all local boards were invited to input their suggestions for the review (January-March 2021). Local boards are invited now to review submissions on the draft plan and provide feedback to the hearings panel. Interested local boards held workshops earlier in April 2022 prior to this business meeting.

14.     Engagement with 16 mana whenua and the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum occurred throughout the preparation of the draft plan, to meet Reserves Act requirements to give effect to the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and to align to the council’s commitments to improving Māori outcomes.

15.     The draft plan is intended to serve as the reserve management plan for the regional parkland that is held under the Reserves Act 1977 (noting the exclusions outlined in paragraph 22).

16.     Under s 41(3) of the Reserves Act, the plan must adequately incorporate and ensure the use and management of the reserve is aligned to the purposes for which it is classified and ensure compliance with the principles set out under the relevant classification in the Act.

17.     It also fulfils the requirement for a management plan for the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park under s19 of the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008. The council must give effect to the Act and its objectives when preparing the plan for the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park.

18.     Regional parkland that is not held under the Reserves Act is held under the Local Government Act 2002, for which this is a discretionary plan.

19.     The Regulatory Committee appointed hearings panel members at its meeting on 14 December 2021. The hearings panel members are: Councillor Linda Cooper (chair), Councillor Christine Fletcher, Independent Māori Statutory Board Member Glenn Wilcox, independent David Hill, independent James Whetu.

20.     Once finalised the draft plan will replace the 2010 plan. The timeline and process from here is provided later in this report. The intention is to finalise the plan for adoption in this political term.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The draft Regional Parks Management Plan

The draft plan covers 28 regional parks with some exclusions

21.     The draft plan provides a policy framework to manage the use, protection and development of 28 regional parks. The PACE Committee resolved to exclude the Auckland Botanic Gardens (Resolution number PAC/2020/36) and the Mutukaroa / Hamlins Hill Regional Park and Hūnua Falls area of the Hūnua Ranges Regional Park (Resolution number PAC/2021/69) from this omnibus plan for these reasons.

·   the Botanic Gardens is a different type of regional park and will have its own management plan

·   a management trust established to govern the Crown-owned portion of Mutukaroa / Hamlins Hill is not currently active, and is subject to Treaty settlements, so it was not possible to develop a plan chapter at this point

·   a significant part of the Hūnua Falls area is subject to completed and pending Treaty settlements which transfer land from the Crown to iwi but retain the council as the administering body. The council must jointly prepare part of this land with its iwi owner, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki. A larger part of Crown-owned land in the same vicinity is subject to similar Treaty settlement legislation with four future iwi owners (Ngāi Tai, Ngāti Paoa, Ngaati Whanaunga and Ngāi Koheriki) once all four settlements are completed. These areas and the arrival area to the falls have been excluded from the draft plan.

Consideration of suggestions

22.     Local boards provided 245 suggestion points, which were considered in drafting the plan (see Attachments B and C).

23.     From the first round of public consultation during September and October 2020, 789 submitters including 53 organisations and a petition from 3681 petitioners provided suggestions and comments to be considered in the council’s review.

24.     Full consideration was given to the thousands of individual suggestion points in preparing the draft plan. Particular interest came from submissions relating to track closures in the Waitākere Ranges, dogs, conflicts between vehicle users and others on Muriwai beach, requests for more recreational activities, and a petition seeking the end to the killing of farmed animals for animal rights reasons.


 

Outline

25.     The draft plan structure is as follows.

·   book one: context, vision, values, a management framework and general policies

·   book two: a chapter for each of 28 regional parks, including park vision and description, mana whenua associations, recreational provision, challenges and opportunities, management intentions and key stakeholders

·   maps to illustrate the parks

·   appendices: most of the appendices provide supporting factual information. Appendix 4 presents track development principles and criteria for development of new tracks.

26.     The full draft plan runs to 508 pages with 60 maps. Due to its size, it is not appended to this report. The draft plan may be downloaded in full or in part at https://akhaveyoursay.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/regional-parks-management-plan 

Key points

27.     Through this draft plan the regional parks will remain under Auckland Council control as the treasured taonga of Tāmaki Makaurau. Concerns were raised by commentators in mainstream and social media during the consultation period in January-February 2022 suggesting the draft plan proposed to transfer some regional parks to the Hauraki Gulf Forum. These concerns are misplaced. The proposal in the draft plan to investigate joining relevant parks to the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park does not lead to transfer of control to the Hauraki Gulf Forum, even under the legislative changes being proposed by the Forum. No transfer of control away from the council is proposed in the draft plan.

28.     The plan safeguards the natural, undeveloped feel of the regional parks that people have consistently told us they value and enjoy. Aucklanders will retain free access to opportunities to explore and enjoy our unique and stunning coastline, forests and farmland.

29.     However, the draft plan notes that the context of park management is changing. Mana whenua have expressed that they want to be involved in park management at all levels. The need to protect biodiversity is more important than ever in the face of climate change and population growth pressures. We need to reorient our activities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions on parks as in other aspects of council’s business. At the same time Aucklanders want to enjoy these special places in ever greater numbers, and the council faces increasing pressures to do more with limited resources.

Proposals in the draft plan

30.     The draft plan responds to the changing context by:

·   seeking to follow the partnership principle under Te Tiriti o Waitangi, setting a course to work with mana whenua at management, project and operational levels

·   mitigating and preparing for climate change by:

o keeping 35,000ha of forest healthy

o aiming to reduce visitor vehicle emissions

o revegetating 200ha of retired farmland

o referencing council’s shoreline adaptation plans and council’s biodiversity work to face increased drought, fire risk, and hotter temperatures

o providing more shade and shelter for visitors and animals

·   seeking to protect the unique precious biodiversity in our regional parks by:

o following the direction set by our scientists on regional priorities

o implementing pest control programmes

o continuing to protect kauri from kauri dieback disease

o supporting the significant contributions made by conservation volunteers

·   continuing to recognise and protect the cultural heritage on regional parks, which is of significant value to mana whenua and to Aucklanders

·   responding to recreation requests by prioritising:

o track network planning in the Waitākere Ranges to identify next steps beyond the existing track reopening programme

o recreation planning to unlock the potential opportunities in the Hūnua Ranges

o planning for expected rapid growth in visitor numbers at Te Ārai

o providing for other opportunities across the regional parks network

·   responding to the growing population and increasing diversity of Aucklanders by:

o seeking to cater for different cultural needs where we can safely do so

o aiming to provide more information about heritage and nature to build understanding and a sense of identity and connection

o continuing education programmes and supporting others to deliver also

·   overcoming budget limitations by seeking to collaborate with others to deliver the outcomes of this plan, including reviewing the commercial activities framework.

31.     The draft plan aligns to, and references, current council policies, strategies and programmes, noting management of regional parks touches on many areas of council policy and activity.

Public consultation on the draft plan

32.     As required by section 41(6) of the Reserves Act (for land held under that Act), the draft plan was open for public consultation from 10 December 2021 to 4 March 2022. The Reserves Act provides for written comments from submitters followed by hearings.

33.     Given the high level of interest in this draft plan, the consultation period was publicised widely through council channels, emails to mana whenua, previous submitters and a wide list of regional park stakeholders, via social media, on regional parks and through leisure centres. Hard copies were available in a number of libraries and in the Arataki Visitor Centre and a public online briefing was held.

34.     The consultation also followed the special consultative procedure under s.83 of the Local Government Act 2002, noting that a summary was not required under s.87(2)(a). The requirement to adopt the special consultative procedure stems from the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area Act 2008 and applies to the Waitākere Ranges Regional Park.

Submissions received

35.     Some 4684 written submissions (excluding duplicates) were received within the submission period including from mana whenua, individuals, and 82 organisations. Of those more than 3830 submissions were generated from a campaign website of which 3646 were identical.

36.     The table shows the number of submissions and identical campaign submissions received by local board area (where this information was provided). Attachment D lists submitters (other than the identical form submitters) who provided their local board area or postal code. The full list including campaign form submitter names is published on the hearings page.


 

Table 1: Number of submissions by local board area[5]

Local board area

Number of 'unique' submissions

Number of repeat campaign submissions

Albert-Eden

56

99

Aotea / Great Barrier

2

0

Devonport-Takapuna

40

130

Franklin

40

208

Henderson-Massey

21

31

Hibiscus and Bays

112

350

Howick

23

184

Kaipātiki

19

100

Māngere-Ōtāhuhu

7

10

Manurewa

2

45

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki

19

117

Ōrākei

41

271

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

1

10

Papakura

7

43

Puketāpapa

10

31

Rodney

172

241

Upper Harbour

20

117

Waiheke

19

72

Waitākere Ranges

166

114

Waitematā

25

106

Whau

18

37

Outside Auckland

73

1313

Location not provided

112

17

Regional / national organisations

33

0

Totals

1038

3646

Grand total

4684

 

37.     Thousands of comments (supportive and critical) were received, covering many parts of the draft plan. The summary of submissions presents an overview of:

·   responses to the feedback form questions

·   emailed comments on the general sections of the draft plan

·   all comments relating to each regional park chapter.

38.     Four groupings of submitters presented the same or similar comments. These were in respect to:

·   seeking continued council control of regional parks (the campaign submission)

·   opposition to aspects of the draft plan in respect to Waitākere Ranges Regional Park, including:

o seeking access to closed tracks and seeking to not be excluded from the central part of the forest long-term

o seeking changes to reinstate aspects of the 2010 management plan for the park including the 2010 vision

o opposition to any proposals that might facilitate increased numbers of visitors and change the wilderness aspect of the park

·   more opportunities for overnight stays for self-contained certified campervans from campervan users

·   local community views on Pakiri Regional Park.

39.     All submissions are publicly viewable on the council’s hearings page at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/have-your-say/hearings/find-hearing/Pages/Hearing-documents.aspx?HearingId=526.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     The draft plan aims to embed the mitigation and adaptation policies from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. The proposed adaptation and mitigation policies are outlined in paragraph 30. The expected impact of the mitigation policies will be to gradually reduce emissions associated with farming and visitor vehicles over time, and to retain and increase the carbon stored in permanent indigenous forest.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Advice from staff across the council group helped to draft this plan including from:

·   Parks, Sport and Recreation in particular regional parks and visitor experience

·   Community Facilities in particular land advisory, farming and sustainability

·   Infrastructure and Environmental Services including coastal, biosecurity, natural environment teams

·   Auckland Plan Strategy and Research including the chief sustainability office, strategic advice, natural environment strategy and Hauraki Gulf

·   Ngā Matarae / Māori Outcomes

·   Plans and Places in particular heritage

·   Community and Social Policy.

42.     Auckland Transport, Auckland Unlimited (Screen Auckland in particular) and Watercare were engaged over aspects of the draft plan relevant to their roles.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     A summary of all the submissions received from the community and organisations is in Attachment A.

44.     Attachment B provides the collated local board suggestions for the review from March 2021. Attachment C presents the common themes from local boards’ input and the draft plan response.

45.     A list of submitters by local board area (where known) is in Attachment D.

46.     This report is presented to enable local boards to include comments on the draft plan for the hearing panel, following workshops earlier this month of April 2022. The hearings panel has set aside Monday 9 May to listen to local board representatives.

47.     Local boards will be provided with updates on the hearings panel report and PACE committee decisions.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     The Reserves Act is one of the acts in the First Schedule to the Conservation Act 1987. In performing functions and duties under the Reserves Act, the council must give effect to the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

49.     Treaty obligations are overarching and not something to be considered or applied after all other matters are considered.

50.     The draft plan acknowledges council’s obligation to iwi in relation to Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi in regional parks management planning. In developing the draft plan council aimed to honour these obligations.

51.     The draft plan’s intentions to involve mana whenua in park management and acknowledgement of mana whenua associations with regional parkland, impact positively on mana whenua and council’s commitments to improve Māori outcomes (in particular Kia ora Tāmaki and Kia ora Te Taiao, which relates to the role of Māori as kaitiaki).

52.     Sixteen of the 19 mana whenua in the region and the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum, formerly the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum, engaged during the drafting of the plan.

53.     Mana whenua aspire to a more substantive role including co-governance and co-management. The role of mana whenua with respect to regional parks and how the draft plan portrays mana whenua and partnerships was the most highlighted point across all mana whenua engagement. The Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum sought clarity on how the council views its partnership role, in particular seeking co-governance for mana whenua of the regional parks. It also sought recognition of case law that confirmed mana whenua priority for business opportunities on Reserves Act land.

54.     In chapter one the draft plan identifies that governance of the regional parks rests with the council’s governing body. While it does not provide for co-governance of the regional parks, the draft plan acknowledges that this is part of a broader discussion.

55.     The policy chapter titled Mana Whenua Partnerships provides for potential co-management acknowledging paragraph 60) but does not specify how this should occur, as there are a variety of emerging models of co-management. Given the number of iwi involved and the variety of associations with different regional parks it would not be appropriate to specify models in this plan. This chapter includes policies aligning to council’s commitment to improve Māori outcomes and to address mana whenua aspirations as outlined in the Issues of Significance 2021-2025, including:

·   setting an enabling framework to build partnerships at all levels

·   enabling an expanded mana whenua role beyond cultural heritage; the draft plan reflects mana whenua interest in all areas of park management

·   supporting a Māori identity on parks and Māori wellbeing including through park naming (the draft plan reflects the decisions made by this committee on 11 November inviting mana whenua to provide Māori names for six parks (PAC/2021/61).

56.     The first management intention in each park chapter is to work with mana whenua to explore their priorities and involvement in delivering the intentions for that park.

57.     Several mana whenua and the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum submitted on the draft plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     There are no cost implications arising from local board feedback.

59.     Costs relating to the review are covered from the project budget. Hearings’ commissioner costs are met from existing operational budgets.

60.     This draft plan sets aspirations for the care, management and use of regional parks. The policies and management intentions are not costed nor prioritised and in many cases they are aspirational. The draft plan provides for the regional community to partner in support of council to deliver the outcomes in the plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations.

Risk

Mitigation

The draft plan sets out ambitions that exceed the current budget. There is a risk that it will raise expectations beyond current resource capacity in the Long-term Plan.

The draft plan explicitly identifies the intentions are not fully funded and explains funding decisions are through the Long-term Plan and annual budgets.

It opens the door to collaboration with and resourcing by others and notes plan delivery will involve setting priorities across its wider portfolio and is impacted by changes to budget and revenue, such as impacts from Covid-19.

Many suggestions and submissions relate to issues that are beyond the scope of the plan and are not addressed, raising the risk that people think the council is not responsive.

Continue to communicate that the plan covers matters relating to the management of the regional parks covered by the plan, setting the scene for management for the next decade.

If the correct processes under the Reserves Act 1977 and other legislation are not followed, the review process could be open to challenge.

·    confirm the legal status of regional park land holdings and check the statutory and other obligations over each land parcel to ensure compliance

·    ensure legal requirements regarding consultation processes are correctly followed.

The large number of submissions received through the ‘campaign’ website is evidence that many were unnecessarily concerned there was a plan to move the regional parks from council control.

The Our Auckland article titled ‘No plan to change ownership or management of Auckland’s regional parks’ released on 11 February 2022 provided reassurance that council was not planning to relinquish control of the regional parks.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

62.     The next steps will be:

·   local board feedback provided through the minutes to this report will be sent to the hearings panel

·   the hearings panel will hear from representatives of local boards on 9 May 2022

·   hearings with submitters are booked for the week of 16 May 2022

·   deliberations are booked for the week of 23 May 2022

·   providing the hearings panel completes its report with recommendations for changes by 30 June 2022, the panel’s recommendations will be reported to the PACE committee on 11 August 2022.

63.     The review’s target is to present to the PACE committee a final amended regional parks management plan for adoption at its meeting on 22 September 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of submissions to the draft plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Local board input to the preparation of the draft plan

137

c

Summary of response to local board input

151

d

Submitters identified by local board area

153

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Mackay - Project Manager

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Approval for the extension of existing names for two new roads at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands

File No.: CP2022/03885

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to extend two existing names along two new public roads created by way of a subdivision development at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands.

2.       This report is supplementary to the item considered on 14 December 2021 (Resolution Number FR/2021/197) whereby the Franklin Local Board approved the name Kōwaitau Avenue for the new Road 1 that connects the proposed extensions of Seventh View Avenue and Eighth View Avenue.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

4.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, David Heald, agent Ian Gibson of Airey Consultants Ltd has proposed the names presented in the tables below for consideration by the Local Board.

5.       The existing road names ‘Seventh View Avenue’ and ‘Eighth View Avenue’ were approved as part of previous stages of development of the New Avenues land and other local subdivisions. The extension of the existing names into 44 Eighth View Avenue requires formal approval from the Franklin Local Board.

6.       As the proposed names are extensions of existing road names, no alternative names have been provided and consultation was not undertaken in this instance.

7.       The proposed road name extensions meet the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards) for road naming, as they have already been previously approved by the Franklin Local Board.

8.       The proposed names to be extended along the two new public roads at 44 Eighth View Avenue are:

Road Reference

Proposed Name to extend

Public Road 2 (Extension)

Seventh View Avenue

Public Road 3 (Extension)

Eighth View Avenue

 

 

 

 


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Seventh View Avenue’ for the new public road (Road 2) to be extended at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road name reference RDN90096946 and resource consent references BUN60362291 and SUB60362293).

b)      approve the name ‘Eighth View Avenue’ for the new public road (Road 3) to be extended at 44 Eighth View Avenue, Beachlands, pursuant to section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road name reference RDN90096946 and resource consent references BUN60362291 and SUB60362293).

Horopaki

Context

9.       Location and site plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B respectively.

10.     Resource consent reference BUN60362291 (subdivision reference number SUB60362293) was issued in July 2021 for the construction of 48 new residential freehold allotments and a new public road.

11.     Two existing public roads are being extended as part of the development at 44 Eighth View Avenue and require formal approval from the local board to retain the names ‘Seventh View Avenue’ and ‘Eighth View Avenue’.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

13.    The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

14.     It is recommended that the two existing names (‘Seventh View Avenue’ and ‘Eighth View Avenue’) be extended along the new section of roads to ensure smooth passage and ease of navigation and wayfinding.


 

15.     The Applicant’s proposed names and meanings are set out in the table below:

Road reference

Proposed name to extend

Meaning (as described by applicant)

ROAD 2 (extension)

Seventh View Avenue

As part of previous stages of development of the New Avenues land and of other local subdivisions, the road names for the adjacent sections of existing road were selected, being Eighth View Avenue and Seventh View Avenue.

ROAD 3 (extension)

Eighth View Avenue

As part of previous stages of development of the New Avenues land and of other local subdivisions, the road names for the adjacent sections of existing road were selected, being Eighth View Avenue and Seventh View Avenue.

 

16.     All the name options listed in the tables above are acceptable for use, having been reassessed by the Council Subdivision team to ensure that they meet Auckland Council’s Road Naming Guidelines and the National Addressing Standards for road naming. All technical standards have been met; therefore it is up to the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context.

17.     ‘Avenue’ is an acceptable road type for the new public road extensions, suiting the form and layout of the road, as per the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 26 July 2021 the applicant’s agent made contact with Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki to propose new names for the ROAD 1 (Previously approved by Franklin Board on 14 December 2021 - Resolution Number FR/2021/197). The applicant has consulted with all other iwi groups in the past, who previously deferred to Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, so no other groups have been approached on this occasion.

23.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site and Location plan

171

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Approval to correct the spelling of two road names (‘Metorita Crescent’ & ‘Haukake Road’) approved at the Paerata Rise subdivision (741 & 801 Paerata Rise, Pukekohe)

File No.: CP2022/04343

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to correct the spelling of the approved road names ‘Metorita Crescent’ and ‘Haukake Road’ at the Paerata Rise subdivision located at 741 & 801 Paerata Rise, Pukekohe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       This report seeks to correct the spelling of two road names (‘Metorita Crescent’ & ‘Haukake Road’) proposed by Grafton Downs Limited and approved by the Franklin Local Board on the 23 February 2021 (Resolution number FR/2021/12). The applicant has requested the two road names be corrected to ‘Metoriti Crescent’ and ‘Hauhake Road’ respectively as per the original letter of support from Te Taha Māori.

4.       The proposed road name has been reassessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). Mana Whenua were first consulted at the time of the original report (File No.: CP2021/00563) in the manner required by the Guidelines

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      partially rescind resolution FR/2021/12 in relation to resolution (a)(v) & (vii) which approved the name ‘Metorita Crescent’ for Public Road 7 and ‘Haukake Road’ for Public Road 9 at the Paerata Rise subdivision located at 741 & 801 Paerata Rise, Pukekohe (road name reference RDN90098554, and resource consent references SUB60338930 and BUN60338879). These names were spelt incorrectly.

b)      approve the names ‘Metoriti Crescent’ for Public Road 7 and ‘Hauhake Road’ for Public Road 9 created by way of subdivision at the Paerata Rise development located at 741 & 801 Paerata Rise, Pukekohe (road naming reference RDN90098554 and resource consent references SUB60338930 and BUN60338879).

Horopaki

Context

5.       Paerata Rise is a large-scale housing development owned by Grafton Downs Limited, set across 286ha of land surrounding Wesley College in Paerata, Auckland. There are over 200 new roads within the development that require naming, with many of these having already been considered by the Franklin Local Board.

6.       Of the 12 names approved by the Franklin Local Board on 23 February 2021, two have found to have an incorrect spelling due to a typographic error in the original road naming application.

7.       The developer has advised Council that this present phase of the development has not yet been completed so no residents will be affected by the road name corrections.

8.       A site and location plan of affected roads can be found in Attachment A.

9.       As no new road names are proposed, consultation with the wider community and mana whenua was not undertaken in this instance.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The name (and its meaning) to be corrected:

Road Ref

Name to be corrected

Meaning (as described by applicant)

ROAD 7

Metoriti Crescent

Meaning – Methodist

Source: Te Taha Māori

ROAD 9

Hauhake road

Meaning – Harvest

Source: Te Taha Māori

11.    The remaining names approved under resolution number FR/2021/12 have been checked and do not require any corrections.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     All road name options within the development are in Te Reo Māori and have been suggested by Te Taha Māori and adopted by the applicant, in consultation with the three main iwi groups involved in this development, being Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua and Te Ākitai Waiohua. As a new road name is not being proposed but rather the correction of a spelling error, consultation with mana whenua has not been undertaken in this instance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

17.     Appropriate signage will be installed accordingly in collaboration with the developer once approval is obtained for the corrected road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

19.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan

177

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar April 2022

File No.: CP2022/03818

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated April 2022 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work programme April 2022

181

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/03819

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 8, 15 and 22 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight of projects in their work programme or on matters that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops. Workshops are not open to the public, but a record of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

4.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 8, 15 and 22 March 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 8, 15 and 22 March 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record 8 March 2022

187

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record 15 March 2022

189

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record 22 March 2022

191

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

26 April 2022

 

 

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26 April 2022

 

 

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26 April 2022

 

 

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[1] Auckland Council (2020). Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/topic-based-plans-strategies/environmental-plans-strategies/aucklands-climate-plan/Pages/default.aspx

[2] OECD (2021). Transport strategies for net-zero systems by design. https://www.oecd.org/climate-change/well-being-lens/

[3] Creutzig, F., Niamir, L., Bai, X. et al. (2022). Demand-side solutions to climate change mitigation consistent with high levels of well-being. Nature Climate Change, 12, 36–46.

[4] https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/have-your-say/hearings/find-hearing/Pages/Hearing-documents.aspx?HearingId=526

[5] Notes: Duplicate submissions from the same submitter were excluded. The first of the identical campaign submissions is counted in the ‘unique’ submissions column. The campaign submissions provided postal codes which have been mapped to local board areas. Postal code areas do not match local board areas. The local board area forming the largest portion of the postal code area was assigned to the postal code, however some of these submitters may be resident in a neighbouring area.