I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Monday, 30 May 2022

3.00pm

Reception Lounge
Auckland Town Hall
301-305 Queen Street
Auckland

Ngā Hui a te Poari Kaitohutohu mō te Pokapū o Te Tāone Nui o Tāmaki Makaurau /

Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

MEMBERSHIP

Chairperson

Mr Andrew Gaukrodger

Corporate sector

Deputy Chairperson

Mr James Mooney

Urban design/institute of architects

Members

Ms Viv Beck

Business Improvement District

 

Ms Noelene Buckland

City Centre Residents Group

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Auckland Council

 

Mr George Crawford

Property Council of NZ

 

Cr Chris Darby

Auckland Council (Mayor’s alternate)

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Auckland Council

 

Mr Matt Harray

Retail sector

 

Mr Jamey Holloway

Business Improvement District

 

Mr Mark Kingsford

Corporate sector

 

Dr Erik Lithander

Tertiary sector (University of Auckland)

 

Mr Nigel Murphy

Tertiary sector (Auckland University of Technology)

 

Mr Richard Northey

Waitematā Local Board, Auckland Council

 

Mr Antony Phillips

City Centre Residents Group

 

Ms Anahera Rawiri

Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

 

Mr Patrick Reynolds

Transport representative

 

(Quorum 10 members)

 

 

Mike Giddey

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

24 May 2022

Contact Telephone: +64 9 890 8143

Email: mike.giddey@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


Terms of Reference

 

(Excerpt –full terms of reference available as a separate document)

 

1.       These terms of reference set out the roles, responsibilities and working arrangements for the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board.

2.       The board is a key advisory body, with no decision-making or autonomous budgetary authority.

3.       The board will assist the Auckland Council, specifically the Governing Body and the Waitematā Local Board and Auckland Council Controlled Organisations to oversee and be a key advisor to the Auckland Council on achieving the vision and strategic outcomes of the Auckland Plan, the City Centre Masterplan, the expenditure of the city centre targeted rate and city centre issues.

 

Membership:

Includes one councillor and one local board member.

 

The board should include members who can provide expert advice on many areas including transport, landscape, environment and youth sectors. The membership includes a position for Mana Whenua. Representatives from CCOs may be board members without voting rights. The number of the board members should be between 16 and 21 at any time.

 

The new panel’s term should end one month prior to the next local government elections in 2022. The membership of the panel may be rolled over for more than one electoral term of three years.

Purpose of City Centre Targeted Rate

(Excerpt –full information available in a separate document)

 

Background

 

The City Centre targeted rate is to help fund the development and revitalisation of the city centre. The rate applies to business and residential land in the City Centre area.

Activities to be funded

 

The City Centre redevelopment programme aims to enhance the city centre as a place to work, live, visit and do business. It achieves this by providing a high-quality urban environment, promoting the competitive advantages of the city centre as a business location, and promoting the city centre as a place for high-quality education, research and development. The programme intends to reinforce and promote the city centre as a centre for arts and culture, with a unique identity as the heart and soul of Auckland. The rate will fund expenditure within the following activities: Regional planning; Roads and footpaths; Local parks, sports and recreation.

 

The targeted rate will continue until 2024/2025 to cover capital and operating expenditure generated by the projects in the City Centre redevelopment programme. From 2016/2017, unspent funds from the targeted rate have been used to transition the depreciation and consequential operating costs of capital works to the general rate so that from 2019/2020 these costs will be entirely funded from general rates.

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

30 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

5          Reimagining Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland: Harnessing the Region's Potential     9

6          Update on Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki: Regenerating our city centre programme Regeneration Conversations Phase Tahi                                35

7          Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Apologies

 

Apologies from Mr GC Crawford and Mayor P Goff have been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Monday, 28 February 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

 

4          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

30 May 2022

 

 

Reimagining Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland: Harnessing the Region's Potential

File No.: CP2022/06995

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the independent report by Koi Tū: The Centre for Informed Futures, commissioned by Tātaki Auckland Unlimited. The purpose of the Koi Tū report is to encourage open-minded conversation, consultation and debate on where Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland could head and what kind of city it could aim to be in the future – looking ahead over two generations.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The report, Reimagining Tāmaki Makaurau, is co-authored by Sir Peter Gluckman, Dr Dawnelle Clyne and Dr Anne Bardsley of Koi Tū: The Centre for Informed Futures, University of Auckland. The report is formally endorsed by:

•      Nick Hill, Chief Executive, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

•      Mark Franklin, Chair, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

•      Jim Stabback, Chief Executive, Auckland Council

•      Michael Quinn, Head of APO, NZ Government Auckland Policy Office

•      David Rankin, Chief Executive, Eke Panuku

•      Paul Majurey, Chairman, Eke Panuku.

The Scenarios

3.       The report presents nine integrated scenarios that challenge the assumptions of current trends, priorities and practices. These nine elements represent the outcomes that might be achieved by harnessing the potential of Auckland’s many assets, particularly those that are under-appreciated and under-leveraged. Together, these elements describe a view of future Auckland and set the stage for future generations of Aucklanders, with flow-on benefits to the whole of New Zealand.

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The Enablers

4.       Realising these scenarios will require:

a.       An agreed, long-term vision.

b.       A transdisciplinary, systems-oriented approach to research and planning – potentially best served by a singular research and planning unit through which all decisions are analysed, deliberated and implemented.

c.       Reconsideration of decision-making processes to reduce conflicts between central and local decisions and to enable coordination of decisions and planning.

d.       Democratic institutions and processes that enable broad citizen participation and deliberation in future planning, such as citizens’ assemblies and youth assemblies with genuine influence on decision processes.

e.       Innovative support for technological advances, allowing Auckland to be a test-bed for advanced sustainability-supporting technologies.

f.       Establishing an institution for ensuring the interests of future generations, such as a Commission for Future Generations, to ensure goals and policies fit with a future that extends well beyond any political cycle.

g.       Sustainable financing models that support long-term future development policies and projects, fostered by open dialogue between private and public sectors.

5.       The full report and a copy of the presentation being given at the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board meeting on 30 May 2022 can be found here: https://aucklandunlimited.com/tamaki-makaurau-auckland-future-report

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      receive the Koi Tū report, Reimagining Tāmaki Makaurau: harnessing the region’s potential.

b)      agree to hear future representations from Auckland Council, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited and or Koi Tū seeking ACCAB support and contribution to plans currently being formulated to implement the report by putting in place ‘The Enablers’ (listed in the Executive Summary).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rethinking Auckland_ Harnessing Auckland’s Potential for a Better Future

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shelley Watson, Director – Marketing & Communications, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

Nick Hill, Chief Executive, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

John Dunshea – General Manager Development Programme Office

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

30 May 2022

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

30 May 2022

 

 

Update on Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki: Regenerating our city centre programme Regeneration Conversations Phase Tahi

File No.: CP2022/07002

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board on the existing Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki : Regenerating our city centre programme with a focus on Regeneration Conversations Phase Tahi  led by Auckland Council in conjunction with Auckland Unlimited and Eke Panuku.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The city centre is an important development area and there are a number of existing work programmes united under the vision of the City Centre Masterplan 2020.

3.       This report outlines the programme: Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone: Regenerating our city centre. This programme is a long-term programme focusing on implementing the city centre masterplan and harnessing the potential of Te Pokapū Tāone o Tamaki, Auckland’s city centre.

4.       The current focus is on Regeneration Conversations Phase one, a project that ran between November 2021 and May 2022 and is part-funded by the city centre targeted rate.  A discussion document for this work will be available in late May 2022.

5.       Future workstreams will include embedding the findings from the discussion document into developments of future place-based plans, as well as identifying opportunities to deliver acupuncture projects.

6.       This programme is currently lead by the Development Programme Office at Auckland Council.  The ongoing development of this programme and commitment to resources will be determined over the coming months with Eke Panuku as the lead agency for the city centre.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board:

a)      note the update on the existing Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki : Regenerating our city centre programme with a focus on Regeneration Conversations Phase Tahi led by Auckland Council in conjunction with Auckland Unlimited and Eke Panuku.

Horopaki

Context

7.       The city centre is an important part of Tāmaki Makaurau and is the economic heart of the region. Significant investment in the city centre has been made over the last 10 years, including upgrading streets and public spaces as well as transport infrastructure such as the City Rail Link.

8.       The city centre is predicted to grow and remain a vital part of the region. In 2020, there were more than 40,000 living in the city centre and 124,000 jobs (Stats NZ). However, it is facing many challenges which require us to think about becoming a more resilient and regenerative place for future generations.

 

 

9.       Within this context, the council group is looking for opportunities to bring together a regenerative development programme for the city centre.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The city centre is an important part of Tāmaki Makaurau and is the economic heart of the region. Significant investment in the city centre has been made over the last 10 years, including upgrading streets and public spaces as well as transport infrastructure such as the City Rail Link.

11.     The city centre is predicted to grow and remain a vital part of the region (see Figure 1).  However, it is facing many challenges which require us to think about becoming a more resilient and regenerative place for future generations.

12.     Within this context, the council group is looking for opportunities to bring together a regenerative development programme for the city centre.

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Figure 1: Predicted Growth for the City Centre.

Discussion

13.     Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki : Regenerating our city centre has the potential to be a long-term programme focusing on harnessing the potential of Te Pokapū Tāone o Tamaki, Auckland’s city centre.  In Reimagining Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland: Harnessing the region’s potential, the potential of Auckland is defined as “a place where people thrive and want to live, with an identity they are proud of”. The authors also highlight the need to change the way we engage with communities to make the right decisions for the city centre’s future.

14.     Recently, the Development Programme Office commissioned a literature review on emerging trends in city centre planning and the changing nature and role of cities around the world, particularly in response to the experience of Covid-19. This report highlights the need to plan for the changing future of cities and their role in the social and economic system.

15.     Our city centre is also in the middle of a period of change, expedited by the impacts of COVID-19. 

 


 

 

16.     Regeneration approaches to planning and development are being used globally to help cities adapt to change and to ensure that urban centres reach their potential. Urban regeneration frameworks are rarely implemented solely by the public sector – buy-in from the community and business sector is needed to ensure the sustainability of regeneration efforts. Consequently, participation of mana whenua, landowners and developers, businesses, interest groups, the universities, and our rangatahi is crucial to the success of a regeneration framework.

17.     To make the most of the opportunities in the city centre, we need a conscious path of working together towards a shared future experience, to break down the silos and to ensure that development makes a positive contribution economically, socially and environmentally.

18.     The workstreams (Figure 2) will form the foundation of developing a regenerative approach to development in Tāmaki Makaurau’s city centre. They are parallel rather than sequential workstreams.

19.     The work was shared with the Waitematā Local Board and the Auckland City Centre Advisory Board in November 2021 and March 2022.

 

Figure 2: Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki: Regenerating our city centre workstreams.

 

20.     The Development Programme Office, Auckland Council, is currently leading the first part of Workstream one: Regeneration Conversations.

21.     In November 2021, the Planning Committee approved Eke Panuku as the lead agency for the city centre and it became a ‘transform’ priority location. The ongoing development of this programme and commitment to resources will be determined over the coming months.

Workstream one: Regeneration Conversations

22.     Workstream one focuses on encouraging the council group, consultants, industry, and our community to agree the ‘potential’ of the city centre.

23.     The first workstream in the Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki: Regenerating our city centre programme focuses on helping all stakeholders to recognise the need for change.

24.     Workstream one: Regeneration Conversations is proposed as an ongoing three-year programme delivered in a phased approach. Phase one was delivered between November 2021 and May 2022.

25.     Phase one was structured under five key focus areas, with a recognition that work would be ongoing to integrate outputs from each workstream to develop a ‘whole’ view of the city centre’s potential. The five key focus areas are:

·    Te Ahurea me te Tuakiri - Culture and Identity

·    Te Taiao - Environment

·    Te Panuku me te Waka - Mobility and Transport

·    Te Wāhi - Place

·    Te whanaketanga ā-ōhanga - Economic Development.

26.     Between November 2021 and May 2022, 25 thought leaders, academics and industry representatives met to discuss their views on the potential of our city centre, barriers to change, and opportunities to progress towards a vital, accessible, vibrant, and resilient city centre that is distinctly recognisable as Tāmaki Makaurau.

27.     The insights gathered from this group are being combined in a discussion document which will be available at the end of May 2022. The intention of the document is to ignite further industry and stakeholder discussion on the future of Tāmaki Makaurau’s city centre, and to inspire regenerative thinking about what that future might look like as we respond to the changes our city centre is currently facing. The project team has advised participants that they can discuss the process and their thoughts on social media from Monday 16 May 2022.

28.     Phase one, is a step towards a long-term commitment to a regenerative approach for Auckland’s city centre. Staff propose that the mahi undertaken to date be a pilot for an ongoing three-year programme focused on engaging with different communities and hearing new voices on the potential of the city centre.

29.     The subsequent phases in workstream one will be developed over the next six months by Auckland Council staff in consultation with Eke Panuku as lead agency after assessing the first phase.

Workstream 2: Development of Kete Wāhi Place-based Frameworks

30.     The city centre development and relevant council investment has been shaped by high-level strategic plans such as the Auckland Plan and the City Centre Masterplan 2020. In addition, private development enabled by the Auckland Unitary Plan and upcoming plan changes to implement the National Policy Statement on Urban Development, will have a strong influence on the future built form of the city centre.

31.     Plans and strategies have been refreshed and updated over time, however the outcomes sought within these documents and the ‘places’ that they identify within the city centre, have not radically changed over time. The implementation of the City Centre Masterplan and its related projects and programmes are expected to make the city centre a great place for all Aucklanders.

32.     Kete Wāhi Place-based plans are a continuation of the development of place-based plans that began in 2014 with the Downtown Framework.  Completing the kete of place-based plans is a key focus for the Council group and will implement the City Centre Masterplan in a regenerative way, ensuring a positive contribution to the environment and supporting a socially and economically resilient city centre. New ways of engaging with our communities will be encouraged though this process.

33.     Further detail is available in Attachment A: Memo: Te whakahou i tō tātou pokapū tāone o Tamaki: Regenerating our city centre – Workstream 2: Development of Place-based Implementation Plans and Attachment B: City Centre Masterplan 2012-2020 comparison layered map.

Workstream 3: Acupuncture Projects

34.     An acupuncture project is a concept in regeneration. The aim of acupuncture is to relieve stress in the human body by focusing on one, or several points. An acupuncture project applies the same concept to the urban environment. Small-scale interventions or demonstrations of behaviour change are selected and undertaken and can have transformative effects on the larger context of the city centre.

35.     Through Workstream one, acupuncture project opportunities have been identified that also support the Waitemāta Local Board Plan and the City Centre Masterplan 2020.The Regeneration Conversations Phase one discussion document will highlight some of these opportunities. This is expected to be completed by the end of May 2022.

36.     One example of an acupuncture project opportunity is High Street, where staff will develop the longer-term plan from a ‘wellbeing’ and place perspective rather than a traditional streetscape design approach. High Street will be the first project business case in the city centre to be led from a wellbeing perspective and staff hope that it allows a greater focus on place, economic development and bringing creativity into project planning. Identifying opportunities for acupuncture projects like High Street will also allow staff to evaluate the findings from the existing temporary works and incorporate and improve on any learnings, as was the intention with the original trial that took place in 2020.

37.     There are also opportunities for long term activation of the less loved places across the city to highlight creativity, play and a connection to the past.

38.     There is an opportunity for the council group to work with community organisations, property owners and businesses to support non-council group led initiatives that contribute to regenerative practice.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

39.     Regenerative practice is based on the concept that human wellbeing and environmental wellbeing is intrinsically linked. Taking a regenerative approach to our city centre puts the environment at the fore of any development decisions.

40.     This work also supports the progress towards low emissions area in the Wai Horotiu Queen Street Valley and for policy change such as the Climate Emissions Reduction Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     This work is cross-discipline and supported by the Council group.  Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited staff have been involved in the process and will be able to take acupuncture projects forward.  This work is crucial to thinking about the role of the city centre to the regional and national economy and how we support a resilient economy that is also sustainable and has a positive impact on our environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Presentations have been given to the Waitematā Local Board in November 2021, March 2022 and May 2022. Workshop commentary has been positive and supportive of the approach.  Further planning is being undertaken with the local board to look for opportunities to deliver of the vison in the Local Board Plan using regenerative approaches.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The workstreams have involved mana whenua and Maata Waka representatives. There is an opportunity as a future phase to take a wider approach and build the regenerative approach using Te Ao Maori and Matauranga Maori. Much of the potential of the city centre discussed in Regeneration Conversation Phase Tahi focused on the future of the city being Maori and a more visible approach to shared decision making and working to create a city for our rangatahi. We can do more to develop our city centre in partnership with mana whenua and to help realise the aspirations of and for Maori which are very aligned to regenerative approaches.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     The City Centre Targeted Rate portfolio budget has programme development lines to support the wider regeneration programme for Business Case Development, Victoria Quarter, Karangahape Quarter, Midtown, Te Tōangaroa.  These programmes are complemented by general rates.

45.     Further funding may be sought across the Council group through the Annual Plan 2024 to support the ongoing engagement under workstream one – Regeneration Conversations.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.     The programme has been put together so that it can be delivered in small, staged parts.  This reduces the risk of disruption to the overall outcomes.

47.     Continuation of the programme will be subject to budget and resource availability, that will be prioritised as part of the annual budget process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.     The discussion document for Regeneration Conversations Phase Tahi will be circulatedby email at the end of May 2022. You may see that participants discuss the work on social media from 16 May 2022.

49.     Staff will work alongside relevant communities and stakeholders to ensure that the programme is viable, visible, resourced, and part of the wider programme business case for the city centre being established in 2022.

50.     Staff will be collaborating across the council group to identify opportunities for acupuncture projects.

51.     There is an opportunity to include other workstreams across the council group under this programme if they share the same aims, for example, the Recovery programme.

 


 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Kete wahi development of place based frameworks

43

b

CCMP comparison map

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Liz Nicholls, Manager Investment Programmes

Authoriser

John Dunshea - General Manager Development Programmes Office

 

 


Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

30 May 2022

 

 

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Auckland City Centre Advisory Board

30 May 2022

 

 

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