I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 10 May 2022

9.30am

Via Microsoft Teams videoconference.

Either a recording or a transcript will be published to the Auckland Council website.

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

3 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Franklin Local Board consultation feedback and input into the Annual Budget 2022-2023                                                                                                                                 7

12        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) target rate for 2022/2023         25

13        Auckland Transport: Proposal to consult – new parking restrictions on Adams Drive and Lisle Farm Drive, Pukekohe                                                                      33

14        Approval for a new road name at 105 Beatty Road, Pukekohe                              49

15        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 April 2022 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board consultation feedback and input into the Annual Budget 2022-2023

File No.: CP2022/04960

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive consultation feedback from the Franklin Local Board area on:

·    proposed priorities and activities for the Franklin Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 

·    regional topics for the Annual Budget 2022/2023

2.       To recommend any local matters to the Governing Body that they will need to consider or make decisions on in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 process.

3.       To provide input on the proposed regional topics in the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Local Board Agreements set out annual funding priorities, activities, budgets, levels of service, performance measures and initiatives for each local board area. Local Board Agreements for 2022/2023 will be included in the council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023.

5.       Auckland Council publicly consulted from 28 February to 28 March 2022 to seek community views on the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023. This included consultation on the Franklin Local Board’s proposed priorities for 2022/2023 to be included in their Local Board Agreement.

6.       Auckland Council received 11,550 pieces of feedback in total across the region including 249 pieces of feedback from the Franklin local board area. Feedback from Franklin residents indicates:

·    77% support for local priorities

·    36 percent of individual and 38 percent of organisations (the majority) submitted in support of sale as an option to be considered in determining the future of Ardmore Hall, if proceeds were to be reinvested in nearby facilities

·    two thirds of submitters support the proposed climate action targeted rate

·    54 percent of individual submitters support the budget package

·    54 percent of individual submitters support the proposal to prioritise operational spending

·    62 percent of individual submitters support a move to a region-wide rates funded refuse collection.

·    half of individual submitters support the three proposals for waste service opt out provisions

·    36 percent of individual submitters support applying a minimum base charge to every separately used or inhabited part of a property (SUIP).

7.       In the Annual Budget process there are financial matters where local boards provide recommendations to the Governing Body, for consideration or decision-making. This includes:  

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds

·    any local board advocacy initiatives.

The Governing Body will consider these items as part of the Annual Budget decision-making process in June 2022.

8.       Local boards have a statutory responsibility to provide input into regional strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive consultation feedback on the proposed Franklin Local Board priorities and activities for 2022/2023.

b)      receive consultation feedback on regional topics in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 from people and organisations based in the Franklin local board area.

c)      recommend that the Governing Body approves any proposed locally driven initiative (LDI) capital projects, which are outside local boards allocated decision-making responsibility.

d)      recommend the release of local board specific reserve funds to the Governing Body.

e)      provide input on regional topics in the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023 to the Governing Body.

f)       provide its advocacy initiatives for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 to the Governing Body.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Each financial year Auckland Council must have a Local Board Agreement (as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board) for each local board area. The Franklin Local Board Agreement sets out how the Council will reflect the priorities in the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 in respect to the local activities to be provided in the Franklin Local Board area and includes information relating to budgets, levels of service, and performance measures.

10.     The Local Board Agreements 2022/2023 will form part of the Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023.

11.     Auckland Council publicly consulted from 28 February to 28 March 2022 to seek community views on the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023, as well as local board priorities and proposed activities to be included in the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023.

12.     Due to the impacts of the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic, significant pressure has been placed upon the council’s financial position. This has created significant flow-on effects for the council’s proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     This report includes analysis of consultation feedback, any local matters to be recommended to the Governing Body and seeks input on regional topics in the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023.

 

Consultation feedback overview 

14.     As part of the public consultation Auckland Council used a variety of methods and channels to reach and engage a broad cross section of Aucklanders to gain their feedback and input into regional and local topics.    

15.     In total, we received feedback 11,550 pieces of feedback in the consultation period. This feedback was received through:

·      written feedback – 9,464 online or hard copy forms, emails or letters

·      in person – 2,086 pieces of feedback through online Have Your Say events, or independently managed phone interviews. All events (except one which didn’t have any attendees) were moved to an online platform or cancelled due to the red Covid-19 traffic light setting.

16.     Written feedback was received from the following mana whenua iwi, four of which have interest in the Franklin Local Board area:

·      Ngāti Whatua o Orākei - Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whatua

·      Ngāti Paoa - Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·      Ngaati Whanunga - Ngaati Whanaunga Incorporated Society

·      Te Ahiwahui - Makaurau Marae Māori Trust

·      Te Kawerau ā Maki – Te Kawerau Iwi Tiaki Trust

·      Ngāti Tamaterā - Ngāti Tamaterā Treaty Settlement Trust

·      Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua.

 

Feedback received on the Franklin Local Board’s priorities for 2022/2023

17.     The Franklin Local Board consulted on the following priorities for 2022/2023:

·      Priority 1: develop and facilitate new opportunities that help our communities work, develop skills and do business locally

·      Priority 2: invest in council, community and private initiatives that restore and protect local streams, rivers, harbours and forests

·      Priority 3: review the capacity and function of our local parks and community facilities and reconcile them with anticipated growth so that we can direct our limited funds into assets that are future-fit

·      Priority 4:  explore improved and innovative services that address the inequities experienced by our geographically vulnerable and isolated communities

·      Priority 5:  continue to advocate for improvements to and development of roads of significance and for transport options that recognise the challenges unique to our rural and isolated communities and primary production industries.

18.     249 submissions were received on Franklin Local Board’s priorities for 2022/2023. The majority of individual local respondents support all priorities (86) or most priorities (106).

 

 

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19.     Franklin Local Board residents were asked if they would support the sale of Ardmore Hall and/or Bell Field if the proceeds of that sale were re-invested in Clevedon Showgrounds and/or public facilities in Clevedon Village.

20.     249 submissions were received regarding the future of Ardmore Hall. Of these, 96 supported the sale, 70 were against, 6 selected other and 68 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph and tables below give an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

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21.     Consultation feedback on local board priorities will be considered by the local board when approving their Local Board Agreement between 21-23 June 2022.

Information on submitters

22.     The tables and graphs below indicate the demographic categories people identified with. This information only relates to those submitters who provided demographic information.

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Key themes on local priorities

23.     Key themes of note across the feedback received (through written, in-person and social media channels) included:

·    Focus on core services 

·    Local priorities wording is too vague – would like more specific information

·    Need for better planning in areas experiencing growth

Future of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field

24.     Key themes of note on the topic of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field included:

·    agreement that the hall is currently under-utilised

·    a sense of sadness about potential loss of history and identity

·    concerns about keeping assets and open spaces (passive and active) for current and future generations

·    concerns about loss of amenity for the nearby school.

25.       No decision regarding the future of the hall and field will be made in response to this report.  Feedback on Ardmore Hall and Bell Field will be included as part of a future business meeting report that presents analysis and options.  It is anticipated this report will be on the 24 May 2022 agenda.

 

Specific requests for local projects and funding

26.     Specific requests for local projects and funding through the Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation included:

·    support for Pest Free 2050 through community led pest control, including allocation of more funding from the Natural Environment Targeted Rate.

·    a planning unit for active trails across Franklin

·    pest control support for lifestyle properties

·    upgrade to Jubilee pools to allow year-round use

·    general support for the Karaka sports park development

·    public basketball hoops in Pukekohe

·    playgrounds with fencing and share

·    sports facility/indoor pool for Waiuku

·    cycleway from Tuakau to Pukekohe via Buckland.

·    investment in Clevedon showgrounds

·    for all rural halls to have public toilets open 24/7

·    footpath on Waiuku-Otaua Rd to Cemetery Rd

·    facilities and events for young people that support creativity, arts, music.

 

Mana whenua feedback on local priorities

27.    Four submissions were received with mana whenua iwi with interests in the Franklin Local Board Area:

·        Ngāti Paoa (Trust Board) – support local priorities provided they can be supported financially

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua – requested support with building new wharekai at their marae in Waiuku; and also support for initiatives in the water knowledge, water safety messaging and water health space

·        Ngāti Tamaterā – reiterated the principal of a Tiriti based relationship, including a suggestion for induction hui as an initial meet and greet exercise, with the opportunity to present iwi frameworks, strategy and management plans; with potential for site visits to marae and for local boards to share their priorities.  Ngāti Tamatera priority areas include housing, employment, education, strong identity, and healthy and thriving whanau

·        Ngaati Whanaunga – expectation for relationship to be based on Treaty principles; request for more opportunities for rangatira to rangatira engagement, for Ngaati Whanaunga to be treated as a partner and not just another ‘stakeholder’, and for Council engagement to move to a more sustainable model of engagement that moves beyond a project-by-project approach.  Priorities for Ngaati Whanaunga are: healthy and prosperous business; healthy and prosperous people, healthy and prosperous whaanau and hapuu; healthy and prosperous environment.

 

Overview of feedback received on regional topics in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 from the Franklin Local Board area

28.     The proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023 sets out Auckland Council’s priorities and how to pay for them. Consultation on the proposed Annual Budget asked submitters to respond to four key questions on:

1.   Climate

2.   Budget pressures

3.   Operating spending prioritisation

4.   Waste service standardisation

The submissions received from the Franklin Local Board area on these key issues are summarised below, along with an overview of any other areas of feedback on regional proposals with a local impact.

 

Key Question 1: Climate

29.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposed climate action package which will be funded by a targeted rate. The climate action package includes investments in low-carbon public transport, active walking and cycling networks; and urban ngahere (forest) canopy cover.

30.     This is proposed to be funded through $574 million from a targeted rate over the next 10 years as well additional funding from government co-funding.


 

31.     Of the 278 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 168 were in support, 92 did not support, three made other comments and 15 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graphs below give an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

 

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32.     Key themes in the feedback from those that did not support included:

·    actions proposed don’t benefit Franklin/rural areas

·    actions proposed will not make any significant difference

·    climate change is an international issue better addressed by central government

·    more pressing priorities at this time including meeting people’s basic needs and focussing on core services

·    actions proposed will not made any significant difference

·    council should find the funds to support these actions within existing budgets

 

33.     Feedback from mana whenua iwi with interests in the Franklin Local Board area included:

·        Ngāti Paoa (Trust Board) – support, as it is vital that we address climate change

·        Ngāti Tamaterā – support in principle, emphasising the need to collaborate with mana whenua iwi to address the impact of climate change on Māori communities and marae

·        Ngaati Whanaunga – support with recommendations such as a focus on initiatives that are inexpensive and have tangible benefits for Māori eg supporting working from home, providing access to WIFI, ensuring bus routes, and walking and cycling infrastructure are located close to marae and supporting access to cycles.

 

Key Question 2: Budget pressures

34.     Aucklanders were asked about a range of levers proposed to manage on-going budget pressures. Council is forecasting a budget shortfall of $85 million for 2022/2023 compared to what was budgeted for in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. This is due to on-going impacts of COVID-19 on revenue and growing inflationary pressure.

35.     A range of levers are proposed to manage the budget pressures including:

-     using the Government’s Better Off support package funding

-     changing the timing of some capital spending

-     implementing cost reductions in the form of efficiency savings and a potential reduction in some services

-     keeping the previously agreed general rates increase of 3.5 per cent for 2022/2023; and

-     continuing work on the sale or long-term lease of non-strategic assets as required.

 

36.     Of the 247 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 134 were in support, 53 did not support, 14 made other comments and 14 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

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37.     Key themes in the feedback from those that did not support included:

·    not seeing local benefits from increased rates

·    frustration as the question did not allow them to demonstrate which aspects they support/did not support

·    opposing sale of assets and green spaces, particularly in context of intensification.

38.     Feedback from mana whenua iwi with interests in the Franklin Local Board area included:

·        Ngāti Paoa – support

·        Ngaati Whanuanga – do not support using Three Waters funding to fund business as usual activities

·        Ngāti Tamaterā – support, focussing on core council services with a targeted approach, taking into account real need that communities are experiencing.

39.    Since consultation, further reduction in revenue caused by the COVID-19 omicron outbreak and rising interest and inflation costs has compounded budget pressures.

 

40     Local Board Chairs attended a Finance and Performance Committee workshop outlining the increased pressures and a briefing was held for all local board members.

 

Key Question 3: Operating spending prioritisation

39.     Aucklanders were asked to provide feedback on a proposal that would see council prioritise operating spending to help manage on-going budget pressures. A set of criteria to be used when making decisions about cost reductions, including those that could reduce, stop or change some services was proposed.

40.     The proposal involves implementing $15 million of additional permanent cost reductions in the form of efficiency saving and low-priority service reductions across the group in 2023/2024, growing to $30 million per annum from 2024/2025 onwards.

41.     Of the 237 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 129 were in support, 40 did not support, 10 made other comments and 58 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

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42.     Key themes in the feedback from those that did not support included:

·      concern that what is a ‘key priority’ and what council ‘should do’ is subjective

·      climate change should be a ‘must do’, while others said climate change response was an unnecessary waste of money

·      concern that prioritisation will benefit the city centre at the expense of local communities, with corresponding need to address equity for communities with historical under-investment.

43.     Feedback from mana whenua iwi with interests in the Franklin Local Board area included:

·        Ngāti Paoa (Trust Board) – support

·        Ngaati Whanaunga – unclear why best financial practice approaches that should be used during daily operations is subject to engagement feedback; decision making criteria fails to factor in Maaori community needs

·        Ngāti Tamaterā – support, to ensure core services are kept operating.

 

Key Question 4: Waste service standardisation

44.     Aucklanders were asked about a proposal to standardise waste services and charges across Auckland. The proposal would involve a move to a region-wide rates funded refuse collection service and see a choice of three bin sizes (with different pricing for each) to accommodate different household needs.


 

45.     Of the 253 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 156 were in support, 70 did not support, nine made other comments and 18 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

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46.     Key themes in the feedback from those that did not support included:

·    cost should be included in the general rates

·    PAYT incentivised people to reduce waste whereas bins encourage waste maximisation

·    against the costs to implement the new system

47.     Feedback from mana whenua iwi with interests in the Franklin Local Board area included:

·       Ngāti Paoa (Trust Board) – support

·       Ngaati Whanaunga – support, as rates funded option results in maximum access and equity for all households, however also emphasising the need for a public education campaign around waste minimisation and cyclical resource flow to maximise resource use and re-use

·       Ngāti Tamaterā – support in principle with concerns regarding impact on overcrowded houses and large whanau with potential need for targeted increased bin capacity.

48.     Auckland Council is also proposing to standardise which properties can opt-out of waste management services and charges across Auckland.

49.     Auckland Council is proposing to standardise the opt-out rules for residential multi-unit developments (10 or more units).


 

50.     Of the 236 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 118 were in support, 42 did not support, four made other comments and 72 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

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51.     Auckland Council is proposing to standardise the opt-out rules for residential and lifestyle properties with between two and nine units.

52.     Of the 227 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 107 were in support, 41 did not support, five made other comments and 74 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

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53.     Auckland Council is proposing to standardise the opt-out rules for non-residential properties

54.     Of the 226 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 112 were in support, 35 did not support, eight made other comments and 71 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

 

55.     Auckland Council is proposing to apply a minimum base charge to every separately used or inhabited part of a property.

56.     Of the 222 submitters who gave feedback on this question, 81 were in support, 71 did not support, four made other comments and 66 responded as “I don’t know”.  The graph below gives an overview of the responses from the Franklin Local Board area.

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Other feedback

57.     Aucklanders were asked what is important to them and if they had any feedback on any other issues, including a proposal to increase local board decision-making over local community services:

·    four submitters were in support of the proposal to increase local board decision-making over local community services

·    one submitter also emphasised need for local boards to still take a regional view to avoid ‘white elephant’ projects

·    Ngāti Tamaterā were in support, suggesting that meaningful engagement and partnership with mana whenua and sharing decision making opportunities is key and provides an opportunity for iwi to help design local board work programmes, priority areas and shared outcomes

·    Ngāti Paoa (Trust Board) were in support, provided community comments are taken into consideration

58.     Four submitters made comments in relation to the Tupuna Maunga Authority, emphasising need to focus on maintenance of Maunga and unhappiness with the exotic/native trees issue.

 

Recommendations on local matters 

59.     This report allows the local board to recommend local matters to the Governing Body for consideration as part of the Annual Budget process in June 2022. This includes:

·    proposed locally driven initiative capital projects outside local boards’ decision-making responsibility

·    release of local board specific reserve funds.

·    local advocacy initiatives.

Funding for Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

60.     Local boards are allocated funding for locally driven initiatives (LDI) annually, to spend on local projects or programmes that are important to their communities. Local boards have decision-making over the LDI funds but need approval from the Governing Body where:

·      operational LDI funding is to be converted into capital LDI funding.

·      the release of local board specific reserve funds is requested, which are being held by the council for a specific purpose.

·      a LDI capital project exceeds $1 million.

These conditions do not apply to the Franklin Local Board for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Local board advocacy

61.     Local boards are requested to provide approved advocacy initiatives which considers the consultation feedback above. This allows the Finance and Performance Committee to consider these advocacy items when making recommendations on the Annual Budget 2022/2023 to the Governing Body in June.

62.     The advocacy initiatives approved by the local board will be included as an appendix to the 2022/2023 Local Board Agreement

Local board input on regional topics in the Annual Budget 2022-2023

63.     Local boards have a statutory responsibility for identifying and communicating the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws, and any proposed changes to be made to them. This report provides an opportunity for the local board to provide input on council’s proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

64.     The decisions recommended in this report are part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and local board agreement process to approve funding and expenditure over the next year.

65.     Projects allocated funding through this Annual Budget process will all have varying levels of potential climate impact associated with them. The climate impacts of projects Auckland Council chooses to progress, are all assessed carefully as part of council’s rigorous reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

66.     The Annual Budget 2022/2023 is an Auckland Council Group document and will include budgets at a consolidated group level. Consultation items and updates to budgets to reflect decisions and new information may include items from across the group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

67.     The local board’s decisions and feedback are being sought in this report. The local board has a statutory role in providing its feedback on regional plans.

68.     Local boards play an important role in the development of the council’s Annual Budget. Local Board Agreements form part of the Annual Budget. Local board nominees have also attended Finance and Performance Committee workshops on the Annual Budget.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

69.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local Board Agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate the council’s responsiveness to Māori.

70.     Local board plans, developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local board area priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and the wider Māori community.

71.     Analysis provided of consultation feedback received on the proposed Annual Budget includes submissions made by mana whenua and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.

72.     Ongoing conversations between local boards and Māori will assist to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in the council’s decision-making processes.

73.     Some projects approved for funding could have discernible impacts on Māori. The potential impacts on Māori, as part of any project progressed by Auckland Council, will be assessed appropriately and accordingly as part of relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

74.     This report is seeking the local board’s decisions on financial matters in the local board agreement that must then be considered by the Governing Body.

75.     The local board also provides input to regional plans and proposals. There is information in the council’s consultation material for each plan or proposal with the financial implications of each option outlined for consideration.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

76.     The council must adopt its Annual Budget, which includes Local Board Agreements, by 30 June 2022. The local board is required to make recommendations on these local matters for the Annual Budget by mid May 2022 and present to the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 May, to enable and support the Governing Body to make decisions on key items to be included in the Annual Budget on 7 June 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

77.     The local board will approve its Local Board Agreement and corresponding work programmes in June 2022.

78.     Recommendations and feedback from the local board will be provided to the Finance and Performance committee for consideration ahead of that Committee making recommendations to the Governing Body for decision.

79.     The final Annual Budget 2022/2023 (including local board agreements) will be adopted by the Governing Body on 29 June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Template - Annual Budget 2022-2023 - Franklin Local Board Regional Input and Advocacy

23

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) target rate for 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/00317

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Pukekohe and Waiuku Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Pukekohe and Waiuku business associations, by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID target rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each association’s BID strategic priorities.

6.       Pukekohe Business Associations members approved a BID grant sum of $500,000 for 2022/2023. This figure is an increase of $38,000 (8.5%) from the current financial year.

7.       Waiuku Business Associations member approved BID grant of $140,000 for 2022/2023 – a 3.68% increase ($4,780). 

8.       The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

9.       For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

10.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

11.     Staff are satisfied Pukekohe and Waiuku business associations sufficiently comply with the BID Policy.

12.     Staff propose the Franklin Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the BID targeted rate sought by Pukekohe and Waiuku business associations as part of the council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023 decision-making.

13.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022. This enables Pukekohe and Waiuku to implement programmes that contribute to: Outcome 1: Our strengths generate local opportunity and prosperity, thereby supporting the aspirations of the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020.

14.     Franklin Local Board’s BID programmes, managed by the BID-operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting their members. A BID programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the flow-on effects from the pandemic lockdowns through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A BID programme can also facilitate opportunities that address the climate change emergency, with a focus on sustainability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programme:

i)        $500,000 for Pukekohe Business Association

ii)       $140,000 for Waiuku Business and Development Association

 

 

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration1 Mar with the council

15.     Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 (SOURCE: Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 (“i11v6”) more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

16.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, promote innovation and attract new businesses and customers.

17.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to support business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth. 

18.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

19.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects from the pandemic and related ‘traffic light’ lockdown, affecting the city centre, retail-based town centres and commercial precincts.

20.     BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

21.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all commercially rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct.

22.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

23.     This revenue is paid to the business association every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

 

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rates

24.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

25.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing BID programmes; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

 

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

The business association sets the BID target rate grant amount to deliver its work programme

26.       BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID targeted rate grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the association’s board must consider what the local business and property owners can afford.

27.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

28.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

29.     The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID target rate grant amount for the following financial year.

 

 

Local boards are responsible for recommending the BID targeted rate grant if a BID complies with the BID Policy

30.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rate grants to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

31.     The Franklin Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programme last year (resolution number FR/2021/71), as did 18 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

The Governing Body sets the targeted rate when it approves the Annual Budget

32.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

33.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rate grants, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

34.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Both Pukekohe and Waiuku Business Associations comply with the BID Policy

35.     Staff are satisfied that Pukekohe and Franklin business associations have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

36.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·   Business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031 requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·   AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2021 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

37.     In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration – a current registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any – problems or issues that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

38.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

 

         Table 1: Business association’s compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2022

 

Requirement

Financial Year 2020/2021

 

Logo, company name

Description automatically generated

 

Strategic Plan*

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2019-2022

2018-2023

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

1 March 2022

1 March 2022

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to 2022

valid to 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2021 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

39.     As Pukekohe and Waiuku business associations have met the requirements of the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate.


 

 

Pukekohe and Waiuku business association retain the same BID grant amount for 2021/2022

40.     As shown in Table 2 below:

·    Pukekohe’s BID targeted rate grant for 2022/2023 - $500,000 – a 8.5% increase ($38,000).

·    Waiuku’s BID target rate grant for 2022/2023 - $140,000 – a 3.68% increase ($4,780).

         Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2022/2023 c.f. 2021/2022

 

 

   BID

2022/2023

 

2021/2022

 

Increase / %

 

 

Logo, company name

Description automatically generated

 

 

$500,000

 

 

$462,000

 

 

 

$38,000 (8.5%)

LAST INCREASED: 2018

 

 

$140,000

 

$135,025

 

$4,780 (3.68%)

LAST INCREASED: 2020

 

Of Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 26 increased their targeted rates for 2022/2023 with the percentage increase ranging from between 1.6% to 10%, while 24 maintained the fiscal status quo.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations, promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

42.     BID programmes can impact on climate change through running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to promoting online channels and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. BID-operating business association ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes and projects that impact them.

44.     The BID-operating business associations work with Auckland Unlimited (AU) on economic development initiatives, events and sustainability programmes.

45.     The BID-operating business associations also work constructively with both Panuku and Auckland Transport on often controversial proposals and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

Each business association values its strong and enduring governance-to-governance relationship with the Franklin Local Board. The contributions by the local boards BID appointees, alternatives and economic development portfolio-holders have, for many years, promoted mutual understanding, collaboration and aligned economic outcomes.

Visions, plans aligned

47.     The BID-operating business associations and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

48.     Pukekohe and Waiuku BID programmes tangibly support the vision and aspirations of the Franklin Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 1: Our strengths generate local opportunity and prosperity.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

49.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the BID targeted rate grants for Pukekohe and Waiuku business associations means that the BID programme will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties with their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in its strategic plans.

50.     Franklin Local Board is among several local boards which provides additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and each business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     Māori make up more than 15% of the population living in the Franklin Local Board area, compared to 11.5% of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in their district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

53.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the commercial properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties.

54.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the local boards, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rates grants for these business associations.

56.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

57.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

58.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

59.     Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of pandemics and ‘traffic light’   lockdowns will continue to be felt, in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

60.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

61.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022 to Pukekohe and Waiuku business associations. This enables each BID to implement programmes that improve the local business environment and support businesses as they recover from the flow-on effects from the pandemic.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport: Proposal to consult – new parking restrictions on Adams Drive and Lisle Farm Drive, Pukekohe

File No.: CP2022/05430

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek formal local board feedback on the proposal for new parking restrictions on Adams Drive and Lisle Farms, Pukekohe in advance of public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board approached Auckland Transport (AT) on behalf of business and landowners on Lisle Farm Drive and Adams Drive with a request to implement new parking restrictions to enable safe access to their properties.

3.       AT has noted that a resolution of this sort of issue would usually be resolved through the actions of the property or landowner; however agreed to progress an investigation into a AT- delivered solution on the condition that the Franklin Local Board provided clear support for the proposal.

4.       The proposal was presented to the board at a workshop on Tuesday 12 April 2022 (Attachments A and B).  The board indicated informal support for the majority of the proposal at this workshop but did however request further broken yellow lines on parts of Adams Road. AT undertook to investigate these requested changes.

5.       Investigation and design for the proposal has now been completed and AT now seeks formal endorsement from the board so that it can proceed to the consultation phase.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      endorse the proposal for new parking restrictions on Adams Drive and Lisle Farm Drive, Pukekohe (as outlined in Attachments A and B to the report) including the new parking restrictions adjacent to 82 and 84 Adams Drive, Pukekohe.

b)      recommend that Auckland Transport progress the proposal to consultation with the public.

 

 

 Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       AT has received, through a series of local board workshops and other correspondence from the Pukekohe sub-division transport representative, a request to implement parking restrictions on Adams Drive and Lisle Farm Drive, Pukekohe.

 

 

 

Adams Drive

7.       Businesses and the board have observed that parking behaviour on Adams Drive, particularly adjacent to business driveways, is creating safety concerns and disruption to the flow of traffic on Adams Drive with flow-on effects for adjacent Paerata Road.

8.       Some businesses on Adams Drive need clear access to their properties by large trucks but are experiencing issues with cars parking too close to vehicle entrances.

9.       The board has indicated that, with the support of local businesses, it would like broken yellow lines (BYLs) installed 3-3.3 meters either side of driveways to 84, 82 and 1251 Paerata Road (Norwoods Adams Drive rear entrance opposite 84) to reduce risk to motorists using Adams Drive and Paerata Road and improve truck access to businesses.

10.     AT considers that the roading conditions at this location do not present a significant enough problem to prompt new restrictions, noting that new restrictions are usually met with community resistance. AT has agreed however to progress this as a project with board endorsement, with local board assurances that the community will welcome new restrictions.

11.     As the roading authority, Auckland Transport is relatively comfortable progressing installation of BYLs either side of driveways (vehicle crossings) at 82 and 84 Adams Drive as indicated on Attachment A of this report.

12.     Auckland Transport does not however recommend restrictions for 1251 Paerata Road (the Norwoods rear entrance point opposite 84 Adam Drive) as requested by the board at the workshop on April 12th. This driveway is very wide and of sufficient width to accommodate both adjacent on-street parking and safe vehicle/truck access. Installing parking restrictions adjacent to this wide vehicle crossing would mean that similar requests would likely be made elsewhere. The remainder of the proposed restrictions on Adams Drive primarily are for narrow vehicle crossings where the width is less than 7.2m.

13.     AT recommends progressing to consultation on the proposal as outlined in Attachment A.

Lisle Farm Drive

 

14.     The proposal for controls on Lisle Farm Drive have been workshopped with the local board as outlined in Attachment B.

15.     This involved additional broken yellow lines proceeding from the corner and outside 1 and 3 Lisle Farm Drive to the next corner.

16.     AT is comfortable that the proposal as outlined in attachment B and as previously informally endorsed by the board at workshop progress to consultation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposal for Broken Yellow Lines on Adams Drive Pukekohe

37

b

Proposal for Broken Yellow Lines Lisle Farm Drive, Pukekohe

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Member Relationship Manager, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Sol Hessell – Traffic Engineering Team Leader South, Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

Approval for a new road name at 105 Beatty Road, Pukekohe 

File No.: CP2022/05486

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to extend an existing public road and name a new public road created by way of a subdivision development at 105 Beatty Road, Pukekohe.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer Franklin Park Limited, Tingran Duan (Planner) from The Survey Company has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new public road at 105 Beatty Road, Pukekohe are:

·    Farrell Road (Applicant Preferred)

·    Mitchell Way (Alternative 1)

·    Te Kumete Road (Alternative 2)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name Farrell Road (applicant’s preferred name) for the new public road to be created by way of subdivision at 105 Beatty Road, Pukekohe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90098132 and resource consent references BUN60362684 (LUC60362686 & SUB60362685)).

b)      approves the name Regis Park Drive for the new public road to be extended at 105 Beatty Road, Pukekohe, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90098132 and resource consent references BUN60362684 (LUC60362686 & SUB60362685)).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60362684 (LUC60362686 & SUB60362685) was issued on 2 August 2021 for the subdivision of the site to create 11 new residential lots accessed via a new public road to vest off The Regis Park Drive extension.

7.       Location and site plans for the development can be found in Attachments A & B. Regis Park Drive is to be extended up to the proposed new intersection (as indicated by the dashed line in Attachment B) with a new road generally following a west-east alignment from that point.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new public requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment B, where the new road requires a name is highlighted in yellow to the north of the Regis Park Drive extension.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The applicant has consulted with the Franklin Historical Society and offer the descriptions in the table below. They provided the applicant with the names Farrell & Mitchell and their background story in the area. The Farrell family have been a very popular family for many years and the Franklin Historical Society also wish to incorporate these names (especially Farrell) into the history of Pukekohe:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Farrell Road

(Applicant preferred)

Mathew and Nan Farrell arrived in NZ from Ireland (Tipperary) in 1920. They took up residence in Helvetia Road Paerata in 1944. Along with their 10 children, they farmed cows, pigs, and market gardening. From humble beginnings, the farm grew well in excess of 500 acres. It was a labour of love, caring and sharing.

The family grew to huge numbers; today the descendants of Mathew and Nan number in excess of 500.

The Farrells contributed in many ways and were reliable people who looked after their neighbours.

The Farrell family were and still are vibrant members of Franklin, Counties, Pukekohe, and international sporting bodies.

Mitchell Way

(Alternative 1)

James Mitchell and family were farmers on the land where the Heights Cemetery is now. He was a great supporter of rugby in the local area, participating in management and coaching local clubs in several grades over the years. The Mitchell family were great followers of many sports in the local area.

Te Kumete Road

(Alternative 2)

This area was part of the traditional cultivation lands of Ngāti Tamaoho, on the slower slopes of Pukekohekohe. They were known as some of the best cultivation soils in the entire motu.

Te Kumete means a type of bowl often used for serving or carrying food.

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Road’ is an acceptable road type for the new road, suiting its form and layout, as ‘Way for the alternative names.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.  The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     The applicant’s agent has confirmed they have consulted with Ngāti Tamaoho in relation to developments in the area who have suggested names for this location, recognising the traditional cultivation lands of Ngāti Tamaoho on the lower slopes of Pukekohe.

22.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua but the proposed Te Reo Māori name is one of those suggested by Ngāti Tamaoho as being suitable for the locality.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

24.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Location Map

53

b

Site Plan

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elizabeth Salter - Subdivision Technical Officer

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

10 May 2022

 

 

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