I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 24 May 2022

9.30am

Papakura Council Chambers
35 Coles Crescent
Papakura

and via Microsoft Teams videoconference.

 

Either a recording or a transcript will be posted to the Auckland Council website.

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

16 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Deputation - Andrew Fisher, Ecogas        5

8.2     Deputation - Counties Manukau Sport     6

8.3     Deputation - Golf New Zealand                  6

9          Public Forum                                                                            7

10        Extraordinary Business                                       7

11        Franklin Quick Response Round Two and Multiboard Grants 2021/2022 grant allocations                                                                                9

12        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for Quarter Three 2021/2022                                                             27

13        Variation to 2021 - 2024 Customer and Community Services work programme           43

14        Auckland Transport-Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                      51

15        Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan – Project Grants 2021/2022                       57

16        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes                          67

17        Submission on Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan                                                                       81

18        Draft Auckland golf investment plan                91

19        Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board input into Transforming Recycling                           131

20        Governance Forward Work Calendar May 2022                                                                            141

21        Franklin Local Board workshop records       145

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 10 May 2022 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.


 

 

8.1       Deputation - Andrew Fisher, Ecogas

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Andrew Fisher from Ecogas will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Andrew Fisher from Ecogas is keen to address the board about this company and how they turn food waste into animal feed, fertilizer and gas; and turn plastic into building materials.

3.       Ecogas seeks to highlight future opportunities for Franklin communities with the local board. More information is on the website: https://www.ecogas.co.nz/       

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Andrew Fisher from Ecogas for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Counties Manukau Sport

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Russell Preston from Counties Manukau Sport will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Counties Manukau Sport have provided information for the board to review on their activities.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Russell Preston from Counties Manukau Sport for his attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Counties Manukau Sport - Impac Lab report.................................................. 161

b          Counties Manukau Sport - KPI report 173

 


 

 

8.3       Deputation – Golf New Zealand

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Hana-Rae Seifert from Golf New Zealand will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Golf New Zealand wish to address the board on the Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Hana-Rae Seifert from Golf New Zealand for her attendance and presentation on the Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Franklin Quick Response Round Two and Multiboard Grants 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/06415

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part fund or decline grant applications received for Franklin Quick Response Round Two and Multiboard 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Franklin Quick Response Round Two (refer Attachment B) and Multiboard 2021/2022 (refer Attachment C).

3.       The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 24 March 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

4.       The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $133,689 which includes Pool Grants ($25,000), Coastal Rescue Grants ($45,000) and Local Grants Contestable Rounds ($63,689) for the 2021/2022 financial year. The Local Grants Contestable Round covers two quick response rounds.

5.       The Local Board has set a total budget of $175,000 for the Community Partnership Fund 2021/2022.

6.       The Franklin Local Board approved a total of $32,080 for Quick Response Round One and a total of $2,500 for Multiboard Round One.

7.       Grants were not uplifted by the Bombay Community Group and Waiuku Business and Development Association. Total amount refunded is $5,786.

8.       The Franklin Local Board received nineteen applications for Quick Response Round Two and twelve Multiboard grant applications.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Franklin Quick Response Round Two and Multiboard Grant 2021/2022 listed in the following table:   

Table One: Franklin Quick Response Round Two

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2203-201

Well Women Franklin

Community

Towards room hire for peer support groups

$7,030.00

Eligible

 

QR2203-202

Āwhitu Peninsula Landcare Inc

 Historic Heritage

Towards the technical improvement to clean up and categorise the spatial objects in the GIS database

$2,380.00

 Eligible

QR2203-204

Carers New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards salaries, brochures and leasing costs at 3 Vinegar Lane, Ponsonby from 1 June 2022 to 31 May 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-205

Joan Loader Knitting Grannies Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of good quality baby wool suitable for garments for premature and/or very ill babies

$3,000.00

 Eligible

QR2203-207

Pukekohe Christmas Parade Committee

Pukekohe Business Association

Events

Towards St John ambulance costs, traffic management and advertising costs for the Pukekohe Christmas Parade 2022

$7,884.98

Eligible

QR2203-209

Waiuku Golf & Squash Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of wetland plants to improve the drainage of the golf course

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-210

Howick Tourism Inc known as East Auckland Tourism

Arts and culture

Contribution towards website maintenance, SEO and social media cost from July to Dec 2022

$6,000.00

Eligible

 

QR2203-211

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, and the facilitators' costs to deliver the “Road Safety” programme for the students from the Waiuku College.

$1,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-212

Lions Club of Pukekohe Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the venue hire for the Christmas Grotto fundraising event at Pukekohe Town Hall from 20 to 26 November 2022

$2,859.38

Eligible

QR2203-213

Auckland Paraplegic and Physically Disabled Association Inc

Sport and recreation

Towards officer wages, coaching and venue hire for the swimming programme 2022/2023 (June 2022 - September 2022) at the Franklin Pool and Leisure centre

$2,076.00

Eligible

QR2203-216

Ngaa Hau E Whaa Marae O Pukekohe

Community

Towards printing, images, displays, presentation, also the creation of a booklet/panui and catering for the opening of the Marae planned for December 2022.

$16,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-217

Kokako Lodge Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards smart TV, heavy duty fixed wall bracket, sound bar and delivery at Kokako Lodge from 7 June 2021 to 30 June 2021

$2,896.17

Eligible

QR2203-218

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards clinical supervision and training services between 1st July 2022 and 31st March 2023

$5,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-219

Franklin United Football Club Inc.

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire, lighting and maintenance at the Counties Navigation Stadium in Pukekohe

$8,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-220

Bloom Pukekohe

Community

Towards the purchase of shelves to store craft material and tools and potting mix for Bloom Pukekohe, a supervised learning programme for people with disabilities.

$2,063.00

Eligible

QR2203-221

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards salaries of two trained Kiwi Can Leaders in Pukekohe North School from 1 June 2022 to 8 July 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-222

New Zealand Council of Victim Support Groups - Pukekohe

Community

Contribution towards Victim Support’s volunteer programme in the Franklin Local Board area from July 2022 to 30 June 2023

$5,000.00

Eligible

QR2203-223

The Original Young Stagers Franklin

Future Te Aroha

Arts and culture

Towards venue costs, promotion, lighting, costume, mic hire, director, choreographer and musical director fees

$4,150.00

Eligible

QR2203-225

Nadja Scherff

Community

Towards venue hire, advertising and stationery for the Mommy Mapping project from June to July 2022

$239.74

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$82,579.27

 

 

 

Table Two: Multi-Board Grant Round Two 2021/2022 applications:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2022-202

Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards free or subsidised classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in various locations in Auckland (June 2022 - March 2023)

$4,766.00

Eligible

MB2022-204

The Auckland Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards ongoing operating expenses for facilitating softball leagues and tournaments in the Auckland Region from July 2022 to December 2022.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-219

Young Workers Resource Centre

Community

Towards education coordinator wages and mileage from June 2022 - March 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-220

Bellyful New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards meal production, volunteer support, and delivery costs in Auckland (June 2022 - December 2023)

$4,000.00

 Eligible

MB2022-229

The StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the workshops costs of tutor fees, venue hire, tutor and volunteer training, regional programme coordinator`s salary and equipment between 1st June 2022 to 31st December 2022.

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-236

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards operational costs (such as wages, rent, transport, equipment) to recruit volunteer mentors for young boys with no father in their lives in Auckland (September 2022 - September 2023)

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-237

Pet Refuge New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards administration costs for the Pet Refuge shelter in Rosedale Auckland (June 2022 - December 2022)

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-239

The Operating Theatre Trust t/a Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards Gift a Seat funding for 2,700 children to attend The Whale Rider in their local area for free (September 2022 - December 2022)

$3,109.00

Eligible

MB2022-243

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the marketing material costs and wages of co-ordinators and facilitators of the Community Education Webinars.

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-248

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Community

Towards items to deliver the KidsCan programme in schools and early childhood centres in Auckland (June 2022 - December 2022)

$4,000.00

 Eligible

MB2022-252

Communities Against Alcohol Harm

Community

Towards community navigator project in Auckland communities and online from June 2022 to June 2023.

$1,939.08

Eligible

MB2022-255

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards healthy homes interventions and winter warmer essentials from June 2022 to August 2022.

$1,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$42,314.08

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

10.     Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

11.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

12.     The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 24 March 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

13.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

17.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

19.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

20.     A summary of each application received through Franklin Local Board Quick Response Round One 2020/2021 is provided (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

22.     Five applications have stated they aim to deliver positive outcomes for Maori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     This report presents applications received in Franklin Quick Response Round Two (refer Attachment B) and Multiboard 2021/2022 (refer Attachment C).

24.     The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2020/2021 on 24 March 2020 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

25.     The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $133,689 which includes Pool Grants ($25,000), Coastal Rescue Grants ($45,000) and Local Grants Contestable Rounds ($63,689) for the 2021/2022 financial year. The Local Grants Contestable Round covers two quick response rounds.

26.     The Local Board has set a total budget of $175,000 for the Community Partnership Fund 2021/2022.

27.     The Franklin Local Board approved a total of $32,080 for Quick Response Round One and a total of $2,500 for Multiboard Round One.

28.     Grants were not uplifted by the Bombay Community Group and Waiuku Business and Development Association. Total amount refunded is $5,786

29.     The Franklin Local Board received nineteen applications for Quick Response Round Two and twelve Multiboard grant applications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

31.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following the Franklin Local Board allocation of funding for Quick Response Round Two, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Grants Programme 2021/2022

19

b

Franklin Quick Response Round 2 Application summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Franklin Multiboard Round 2 Application summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lima Seve - Grants Coordinator

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Franklin Local Board for Quarter Three 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/05418

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for Quarter Three, 1 January – 31 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Franklin Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       Some key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Franklin Art Centre delivered 23 programmes, to a combined total of 2455 participants. Highlights included the hosting of the annual Franklin Arts Festival. An online arts workshop offered for the first time - the Felting Workshop, was fully booked within 48 hours of opening for bookings.

·        The Franklin Youth Advisory Board (FYAB) have welcomed 4 new members to their board. FYAB recently submitted feedback on the Annual Budget, having engaged for feedback across Pukekohe High, Howick College, Wesley College and Pukekohe Christian School.

·        Predator Free Franklin Te Arahikoi: There were 974 people on Te Ara Hīkoi’s mailing list at the end of March, an 11.8 per cent increase since last the update. Te Ara Hīkoi held five trap and bait hub days and one working bee. Engagement with Ngāti Paoa has begun, to join three other iwi with significant interests in the area that have already agreed to sit on their board.

5.       Net financial operating performance for Franklin Local Board is 11 percent below budget for the year to date ended 31 March 2022.  Operating expenditure is nine percent below budget, mostly in Asset Based Services (ABS) where disruptions and closure under COVID-19 settings of leisure, aquatic and community facilities has seen a reduction in facility costs.  Operating revenue is overall 72 percent ahead of budget mainly with unbudgeted commercial revenue, but offset by a 30 percent budget shortfall in facility hire and library services revenue. Capital expenditure is behind revised budget at 72 percent year to date.  Delivery has also been severely disrupted by COVID-19 with cost escalations and supply chain distribution issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for Quarter Three ending 31 March 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Franklin Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programmes for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Plans and Places

·        Local Economic Development

·        Auckland Unlimited

7.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

          Chart, bar chart

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COVID-19 restrictions

8.       From 23 January 2022, Auckland moved back into Traffic Light Red setting under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, which impacted council and community-delivered event planning and programming. New Zealand then moved to the orange traffic light setting on 13 April 2022.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

9.       The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).


 

 

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

Chart, pie chart

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10.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Chart, waterfall chart

Description automatically generated

 

Key activity updates from quarter three

11.     The following work programme activities identified as initiatives in the Local Board Plan or activities in the Local Board Agreement:

·    ID 1467 Auckland Unlimited, Franklin Economic Broker: The Economic Broker continues to deliver the work programme. The XLabs pilot has commenced and has been well received by participants. The local board agreed the funds be used to pilot a Circular Economy Sprint, XLabs, to help local businesses find solutions to environmental sustainability challenges. One 2-day workshop was held in Pukekohe with 10 participants, and 3 online workshops were held in preparation for a 5-day XLabs Sprint to be held later in May

 

·    ID 1476 Auckland Unlimited, Young Enterprise Scheme: Good turnout to the Kick Start Day event in February from local high schools. Pukekohe High School 37 students, Onewhero Area School 22, Waiuku College 19, Wesley College 52

 

·    ID 132 C&CS – Community Empowerment, Community led placemaking and safety: A funding agreement with Clevedon Community and Business Association has been entered to deliver a new resident’s welcome pack.

The Electronic Sign project ran from late December 2021 through to 1 March 2022. The signage was in place at East and West coast beaches to support Police and compliance officers in their efforts to reduce anti-social behaviour, illegal parking, illegal camping, and littering. The project also promoted beach and water safety key messages for beach users. The signage was crucial to the success of this project as it allowed for live text changes to provide timely notices and to respond quickly to issues.

Activities with significant issues

12.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as Red indicating significant issues:

·    ID 615 C&CS, Local parks ecological and environmental volunteers programme FY22: The planned summer volunteer events were cancelled, as no face-to-face activities were permitted due to the Red Traffic Light system. There is an underspend of $20,000 which was not predicted in Q2 due to the summer seasonal events not being suitable for winter delivery. 1,229 volunteer hours were recorded for Q3, despite the restrictions for COVID-19. Landowner approval was given for the Hūnua Domain site. Site preparation for planting sites is under way

·    ID 621 C&CS, Mangrove removal programme FY22: Due to the length of inactivity in Q1 and Q2 due to COVID-19 impacts, there is a $10,000 underspend. Mangrove removal has returned to full working capacity with 529 hours recorded for the quarter

·    ID 1533 C&CS, Franklin Local Parks Management Plan: No activity this quarter. Project delayed and will start in Q1, Financial Year 2022/2023.

·    ID 20415 C&CS, Big Bay Reserve - renew coastal assets: analysis & discussions with the coastal engineers on the options are underway and the report is expected soon.

·    ID 21882 C&CS, Sunkist Bay Reserve - renew sea wall: Due to inter-dependencies of design and consenting it is necessary to include the design in a single project with the existing contract for seawall design. A fee proposal has been sought from the coastal designer. Next steps include produce a combined preliminary design, submit it to mana whenua for their consideration, and proceed to resource consent

·    ID 20742 C&CS, Waiuku War Memorial Town Hall - renew interior and repair roof: Asbestos has been detected in various places within the hall which requires removal during the project. Finalising last details of fire egress compliance for inclusion in scope of works for the construction tender.

13.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold or experiencing some delays:

·        ID 1699 C&CS, Hūnua Trail: Ongoing delays and phase 1 - Soft launch/ locals launch now proposed October 2022. Hūnua Traverse Draft Marketing Strategy completed. Investigation on the best governance and ongoing trail management continues. Signage preparation is underway ready to install with Kauri Dieback stations ready

·        ID 1214 C&CS, Wai-o-Maru Reserve development: The draft operational management plan will be presented to the Wai-o-Maru Joint Management Committee in Q4. It will then be workshopped with the local board

·        ID 140 C&CS, Local civic events Franklin: Whitford Playground opening was cancelled in line with the advice provided by central government on gatherings during the COVID-19 outbreak

·        ID 138 C&CS, Citizenship ceremonies Franklin: On-site citizenship ceremonies which were planned for Q3 were cancelled by the Department of Internal Affairs due to COVID-19 restrictions. The candidates received their certificates in absentia via courier. However, an online citizenship celebration was held on 24 March. The Franklin Local Board Chair played an active part in this online event

·        ID 139 C&CS: ANZAC services Franklin: Planning and delivery of ANZAC Day events continued, subject to Traffic Light settings at the time

·        ID 3121 C&CS: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two: Naming underway on 76 sites. Timelines are being finalised with iwi, likely to be around December 2022

·        ID 1534 C&CS, Investigate need, demand, and options for the future of Ardmore Hall: Project at Amber due to COVID-19 lockdown restrictions and Omicron impacts, with presentation of options to Te Poari ā Rohe o Franklin in May

·        ID 20445 C&CS, Clarks Beach and adjoining accesses - renew steps and fences: Mana whenua have begun providing their initial feedback and staff are working to appoint a coastal designer who will design the replacement structures. Next steps are to appoint a designer and begin the design process

·        ID 17718 C&CS, Clarks Beach Recreation Reserve and Golf Club - upgrade skate park, playground and land fixtures: A play equipment suite has been selected and will be ordered early in anticipation of price increases. Engagement with mana whenua is ongoing, with next steps to engage with mana whenua on the specific details of the selected play equipment

·        ID 27688 C&CS, Kawakawa Bay boat club - investigate and renew boat ramp pontoon piles: A coastal designer is producing the requirement statement to inform tender submissions, and the draft report draft has been received and is being reviewed. Next steps include completing the requirement statement, issue tender, appoint a contractor for construction and order the new pontoons

·        ID 20570 C&CS, Maraetai Park - upgrade junior play space: Professional services contract has been awarded, with next steps to review plans with local iwi group. Physical works will start in financial year 2023

·        ID 20637 C&CS, Pukekohe War Memorial Town Hall - renew heritage assets: Building identified as being earthquake prone, containing asbestos material and having weathertightness issues. The heritage architect designer selected for investigation full scoping and design has been completed and a structural engineer has been selected for detailed retrofit design. Delivery is expected to commence in FY2023 and continue in FY2024. Next steps include proceed with detailed retrofit design for seismic upgrade as well as design for roof replacement and addressing other building defects

·        ID 31047 C&CS, Pukekohe Paerata Paths Plan - develop delivery programme: Establishing level of planning and resource within the community and work with local community groups to plan the programme and methodology for building the priority routes

·        ID 19966 C&CS, Puriri Road Reserve - replace access: Project is funded beginning of FY 2023. Investigation and design work will begin in July 2022

·        ID 25946 C&CS, Te Puru Park - develop concept plan: Cultural Values Assessment to be completed first from iwi group before we progress, as iwi do not support any digging onsite

·        ID 20699 C&CS, Te Puru Park - renew skate park: Community Facilities are waiting for further direction and assessment on relocation of skate park as part of the Master Plan, with next steps to engage a designer and physical works to being in FY 2024

·        ID 15559 C&CS, Umupuia Coastal Reserve-upgrade park assets: Engagement with iwi is ongoing to resolve basic concept plans to progress consultation with the general public.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

14.     These activities are cancelled:

·    ID 141 C&CS, Movies in Parks – Franklin: As agreed with the local board in February 2022, this event was cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions.

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

15.     These activities have been merged with other activities for efficient delivery:

·    ID 1934 I&ES, Kawakawa Bay Boat Ramp – resurfacing: There are two Kawakawa projects; it was agreed that both will be delivered by the same Community Facilities project manager for continuity, cost efficiencies and design integration. The replacement of the pontoon piles has been scoped and has gone through procurement for delivery in Quarter Three and Four. The other project will be undertaken in the same period and involves physical works to resurface the boat ramp

·    ID 1978 I&ES, Glenbrook Beach - Investigate renewal of wave barrier and boat ramp: There are two Glenbrook Beach projects; it was agreed that both will be delivered by the same Community Facilities project manager for continuity, cost efficiencies and design integration. The delivery will be closely monitored by the Resilient Land and Coasts programme manager.

Activities with changes

16.     The following work programme activities have changes which been formally approved by the board.

Table 1: Work programme changes formally approved by the board

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Summary of Change

Resolution number

ID 642

I&ES

Predator Free Franklin

$11,855 to be reallocated to this budget line to purchase more bait and traps to support eradication.

FR/2022/44

ID 143

C&CS

Community Grants Franklin

$18,788 to be reallocated to the Grants programme to be distributed through the final round

FR/2022/44

ID 627

I&ES

Waterways Protection Fund Franklin

$7,445 to be reallocated to this budget line to enable funding for all recommended water protection funding applications

FR/2022/44

ID 1467

Auckland Unlimited

Local Economic Broker

$10,000 to be reallocated towards the Homeland project leverage programme and $7,863.00 towards promotion of screen production in Franklin. Total of $17,863 reallocated to this budget line

FR/2022/44

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

18.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

19.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·    ID 627 I&ES, Healthy Waters, Waterways Protection Fund – Franklin: Funding agreements will be in place by end May 2022 and projects will start from 1 June 2022.

·    ID 629 I&ES, Healthy Waters, Franklin Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme – Pukekohe: The next phase of the Pukekohe programme has been rescheduled to start in Quarter Four, with 80 visits to businesses over April through June 2022. The contractor is confident that the program will be delivered this financial year.

·    ID 661 I&ES, Environmental Services – Natural Environment Delivery, Finding Franklin Bats: EcoQuest have undertaken four separate surveys and high levels of bat activity have been observed at several sites that have previously not been surveyed

·    ID 720 I&ES, Healthy Waters, Papakura Stream Landowner Engagement Programme – Franklin: Sites were assessed to determine need for plant maintenance and weed releasing events. There is a goal to plant 30,000 trees along the Papakura stream this winter

·    ID 656 I&ES, The C.R.E.S.T Programme: This quarter has seen increased pest control along the Taihiki coastline. The large Pōhutukawa trees here form a coastal possum highway. They also provide important nesting habitat for shags, heron, spoonbills, and other coastal birds. Efforts have seen large numbers of possums taken off the Golf Course. This will allow the Pōhutukawa to start recovering and will boost bird numbers in the area. The hub day that was scheduled has been postponed until Quarter Four due to the impact of COVID-19

·    ID 618 I&ES, Manukau Harbour Forum – Franklin: The draft communications plan was put to the forum at the 11 February 2022 workshop and was resolved in the business meeting later that day with minor amendment. Engagement with stakeholders around the harbour has continued this Quarter with the Hauraki Gulf Forum and the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum. Connection has been made with the Manukau Harbour Restoration Society, MPI Pest Incursion team and conservation volunteers and others.

·    ID 932 I&ES, Waiuku Zero Waste Business and Community Education Programme: Face to face events re-commenced throughout Quarter Three. Waiuku Zero Waste delivered a number of events including a ‘Junk Play’ / ‘Activators’ style event in a local public reserve which was well-attended. They also hosted several tool library sessions and a repair café event. Waiuku Zero Waste is continuing to explore opportunities to host more events and outreach sessions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.     This report informs the Franklin Local Board of the performance for Quarter Three ending 31 March 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.     This report includes Franklin Local Board of the activities that have a direct Māori outcome focus as follows:

·        ID 131 C&CS Community Empowerment. Local Māori responsiveness – Franklin: Southern Strategic Brokers supported the Ara Kōtui project with Local Board Services. A briefing was received from Herewini Te Koha, CEO of Ngā Mātārae on his role and potential of adopting a consistent policy for use of mana whenua Intellectual Property by council. A rangatahi has been selected to be mentored by a local board member for the TUIA programme. Staff are supporting a local community-led organisation to create a rangatahi-led voter participation key messaging initiative through multiple digital platforms.

·        ID 1399 C&CS libraries: Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language celebrating Te Ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori: Te Reo continues to be used throughout all aspects of service offerings including online mediums and onsite marketing. The Māori collection is now situated centrally inside the Pukekohe Library space. At Waiuku Library, staff promoted the Māori collection with an engaging wall display

·        ID 1566 C&CS The Southern Initiative: Youth Economy (Youth Connections) – Franklin: $50,000 has been provided as funding to Te Ara Rangatahi to deliver their Mahia te Mahi - Rangatahi Opportunities, Employment and Education programme for 25 rangatahi. The programme is progressing well and is to be completed in June 2022

·        ID 1214 C&CS PSR Wai-o-Maru Reserve development: The draft Operational Management Plan will be presented to the Wai-o-Maru Joint Management Committee in Q4

·        ID 3121 C&CS, RSPIP: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two – Māori outcomes: Naming for Tranche Two is underway

·    ID 3122 C&CS, RSPIP: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche Two – Māori outcomes: Tranche One names adopted. All loaded on to website

·    ID 654 I&ES, Te Korowai o Papatuānuku: Plant maintenance has begun at the cultural planting sites to protect the establishing native trees. This project was a winner in the latest Mayoral Conservation Awards. The team are planning to make a summary video of the project to highlight the environmental and social benefits it promotes. Site preparation is underway at Tahuna Pā to prepare for planting in Quarter Four.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     This report is provided to enable Franklin Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programmes. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

·   Operating expenditure of $10.45 million is $994,000 below budget overall, being year to date net underspend in Asset Based Services (ABS) of $729,000 and net underspend in Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) of $265,000 for programmes still to be delivered within the current work programmes. 

·   Operating revenue of $626,000 is $263,000 ahead of budget being a mix of $109,000 lost revenue in facility hire and library services, and above budget commercial lease revenues of $372,000.

·   Capital expenditure is behind revised budget achieving spend of $3.1 million (72%) year to date.  Delivery has been severely disrupted by COVID-19 effects.

·   The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2022 for the Franklin Local Board area is in Appendix B attached.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance are susceptible to more risk, as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

25.     The approved Customer and Community Services CAPEX work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

26.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of Quarter Four (30 June 2022).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Q3 Work programme update (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Financial Q3 Report

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Orrin Kapua - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Table

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Variation to 2021 - 2024 Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/06058

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for variations to the Franklin Local Board 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board adopted its 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme on 22 June 2021 (resolution number FR/2021/90). 

3.       As projects progress through the consultation, investigation and design process, the specific work required, and the cost of delivery can change, impacting the approved budget. As a result, variations may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs and updated timeframes for some projects. 

4.       The adopted work programme contains a project for Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve - install connector footpaths (Project ID 29066). The project has allocated budget of $84,699 from the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI): capital expenditure (Capex) budget.

6.       The local contractors and council were to share the budget for the project; however the local contractor’s donated portion has decreased from earlier communications. Due to the decrease in the local contractors' donated amount, additional budget is now required to deliver the physical works.

7.       Staff seek approval of additional budget of $90,000 in financial year 2021/2022 for the project ‘Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve - install connector footpaths.

8.       To fund the additional budget for the ‘Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve - install connector footpaths’ project, staff have identified ‘ID 25893 Sunkist Bay Reserve - renew park assets’ project on the current approved 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (resolution number FR/2021/90) which requires $90,000 less Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) funding than the amount that was allocated in financial year 2021/2022.

9.       The budget reduction for the identified project in the current financial year is proposed to be allocated in future years in consultation with the local board as part of the development of their next year’s work programme.

10.     The identified realignment of budget as outlined in attachment A will ensure full scope of works will be delivered for the Clevedon Showgrounds footpath project as part of the 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme.

11.     Staff have discussed the proposal and rationale for this change with the local board at the local board workshop on 3 May 2022. The local board provided positive feedback and supported the proposal in principle. 

12.     The proposed variations are within the Franklin Local Board’s financial year 2021/2022 budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

13.     Subject to the local board’s decision, staff will update the work programme and progress updates will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the following variations including budget and timeline changes to its adopted 2021–2024 Customer and Community Services work programme as per attachment A, specifically:

i)       additional budget allocation of $90,000 for project ID 29066 ‘Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve - install connector footpaths’ from Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI): capital expenditure (Capex) budget over financial year 2021/2022.  

ii)       reduce budget allocation by $90,000 for project ID 25893 ‘Sunkist Bay Reserve-renew park assets’ utilising $106,085 of Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI): capital expenditure (Capex) budget over financial year 2021/2022.

Horopaki

Context

14.     Franklin Local Board approved the 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme on 22 June 2021 (resolution number FR/2021/90). The budget allocated for all projects on the work programme and the anticipated timelines were best estimates and are subject to change as projects progress through the design and delivery process.

15.     The local board approved a Locally Driven Initiative project at the Clevedon Showgrounds as part of their 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme to install connector footpaths to connect existing footpaths at the site.

16.     The local contractors and council were to share the budget for the project however, the local contractor’s donated portion has decreased from earlier communications. Due to the decrease in the local contractors' donated amount, additional budget of $90,000 is now required to deliver the physical works.

17.     The project ‘Sunkist Bay Reserve - renew park assets’ (project ID 25893) is in plan phase. It has been identified that this project is inter-dependent on another approved project ‘Project ID 21882 – Sunkist Bay Reserve - renew seawall’. Mana whenua, stakeholder, and public consultation is needed as part of combined design development and consenting of works for both projects. This requires additional time; therefore, less funding is required in financial year 2021/2022.

18.     Staff recommend that $90,000 from the current financial year budget be rephased over future years for this project. All future budget allocations to deliver the full scope of work for each project will be discussed with the local board as part of the development of their next year’s work programme.

19.     Approved funding allocations for the identified projects are shown in the Table ‘1’ below:


 

 

            Table 1: Approved funding allocation for the identified projects

Resolution Number

Project ID

Activity Name

Activity Description

Budget source

Total Budget Allocation

FR/2021/90

29066

Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve – install connector footpaths

Install sections of footpaths to connect existing paths, including the "Warren Shaw Path", as a priority.

FY20/21 - FY21/22 - investigation, design, and physical works

LDI: Capex

$84,669

FR/2021/90

25893

Sunkist Bay Reserve – renew park assets

Investigate and delivery of Sunkist Bay Reserve Esplanade enhancements beside rock seawall.

 

FY19/20 - FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY21/22 - FY22/23 - deliver physical works

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project.

LDI: Capex and ABS Local Renewal

$500,000

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     Proposed variations and how they will affect the current 2021–2024 Customer and CommunityServices work programme are shown in Attachment A and noted in Table 2 below: 

            Table 2: Description of the proposed variations to the 2021 - 2024 Customer and Community Services work programme

Project ID

Activity Name

Budget variations

 FY2021-2022 

Details 

29066

Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve – install connector footpaths

Additional budget of $90,00 is required for the work to install connector footpaths at the Clevedon Showgrounds Reserve

Approved FY20/21 budget $35,921

No change

Approved FY21/22 budget $48,748

Revised FY21/22 budget $138,748

(Increase of $90,000)

Increase in budget will ensure that the complete scope of the project is delivered.

 

Community aspirations of shared and connecting footpaths, for ease of accessibility to other routes, are met.

 

 

25893

Sunkist Bay Reserve – renew park assets

Budget of $106,085 is now required for:

·   Project management costs

·   Consultation fee

·   Preliminary design work

Approved FY20/21 prior budget $13,915

No Change

Approved FY21/22 budget $196,085,

Revised FY21/22 budget $106,085

Approved FY22/23 budget $290,000

Revised FY22/23 budget $290,000

Approved FY23/24+ budget $0

Revised FY23/24+ budget $90,000

 

Request for reduction in funding in financial year 2021/2022 is due to additional time required for combined design development with the inter-dependent ‘Sunkist Bay Reserve - renew seawall’ project through mana whenua, stakeholder, and public consultation.

 

 

21.     Staff will ensure that the proposed variations are within the local board’s financial year     2021/2022 budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme. All future budget allocations to deliver the full scope of work for each project will be discussed with the local board as a part of the 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services Community Facilities work programme approval process.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·           to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·           to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23.     This is an administrative report and the budget variations proposed in the report have no direct effect on climate change.  Each project will be considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

24.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible when delivering the projects. Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material, aligned with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle), will also be prioritised to ensure minimum impact

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services directorate (Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance and Parks, Sport, and Recreation) teams have been consulted and are supportive of the proposed budget changes of the connector footpaths as Clevedon Showground Reserve will help to meet the community aspirations of shared and connecting paths for ease of accessibility to other routes.

26.     The overall 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

27.     Staff collaboration will be ongoing throughout the life of the projects to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

29.     The proposed variations to the approved work programme as outlined in this report were discussed with the local board at a workshop on 3 May 2022. The local board provided positive feedback and indicated support for the proposal in principle.

30.     The identified projects in this report are part of approved 2021-2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and align with the following Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

 

            Table 3: Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

 Outcome

Objective / Initiative

Outcome 4: Kaitiakitanga and protection of our environment

We will work with mana whenua, local communities, and others to lead and inform environmental conservation, restoration, and regeneration projects and to recover and regenerate waste.

Outcome 6: A sense of belonging and strong community participation

We will support and enable community organisations to deliver local community activities and cultural programmes, to encourage local participation and to respond to local change.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The project proposal discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through the provision of quality facilities and open spaces that promote good health, the fostering of family and community relationships and connection to the natural environment.

32.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, and local board plans.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     The proposed variations are within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme. 

34.     Details of proposed variations are outlined in Table 2 and the recommended changes as shown in attachment A have been agreed with the local board’s lead financial advisor. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     Amendments to the projects as outlined in Table 2 are essential for delivery of the full scope of the projects. If the local board does not approve the change, there is a risk that the identified projects will remain incomplete and may not meet community expectations.  

36.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme if the COVID-19 alert level changes.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Subject to the local board’s decision on the proposal outlined in this report, the local board’s work programme will be amended to reflect the decision and works will commence on the projects as per the timing outlined in the approved work programme.

38.     Progress and updates on the work programme will be reported to the local board as part of the quarterly reports to the local board. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed amendment to 2021 - 2024 Customer  Community Services Work Programme May Report

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moushmi Sharan - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Table

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Text

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport-Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2022/05627

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve projects that the Franklin Local Board wishes Auckland Transport (AT) to deliver from the Local Board Transport Capital fund (LBTCF).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         This report describes of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) and provides Auckland Transport (AT) advice on five projects that the board previously nominated for delivery through the LBCTF, including financial implications of these decisions.

3.         Five projects were investigated at the board’s request including:

i)     Beachlands kerb and channel improvements

ii)    Jutland Road bridge

iii)   Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support

iv)   Clarks Beach to Waiau Pa pathway

v)    Waiuku Racecourse Road intersection improvements

4.         AT has developed rough order of costs (ROC) for four projects, and these are presented for the board’s consideration. The Waiuku Racecourse Road intersection improvements suggestion was not costed as this project is not ready to progress, as a trial to inform improvements is not yet complete.

5.         The Franklin Local Board Transport Capital Fund balance currently available for allocation is $2,234,358.

6.         The cost of delivering all four costed projects exceeds this budget and therefore board direction on which projects to progress is required.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      allocate and approve Franklin Local Board Transport Capital funding totaling up to $2,234,358 to one or more of the following options to enable Auckland Transport to commence planning and delivery of these projects:

i)    Beachlands kerb and channel improvements            $1,190,000

ii)   Jutland Road bridge                                                   $2,040,141     

iii)  Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support                              $   410,000

iv)  Clarks Beach to Waiau Pa pathway                                 $   500,000

 


 

Horopaki

Context

7.         The LBTCF is a capital budget established by the Governing Body through the Long-Term Plan (10-year budget) to allow local boards to deliver transport infrastructure projects that the board believes are a local priority, but are not considered a priority within AT’s work programme.

8.         The 2021 - 2031 Long Term Plan established the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) budget at $20m. The Franklin Local Board portion of this fund is determined by an agreed allocation formula. The Franklin Local Board allocation is $2,234,358.

9.         Projects nominated by local boards must be safe, not impede network efficiency and be in the road corridor. Projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

10.       AT has received project nominations from the Franklin Local Board and has provided advice on options over two local board workshops to support local board decision-making.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Decision Making

 

11.       At a workshop in 2021 the local board expressed interest in the following projects and requested further analysis including rough costings.

i)        Beachlands kerb and channel Improvements

ii)       Jutland Road bridge

iii)      Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support

iv)      Clarks Beach to Waiau Pa pathway

v)       Waiuku Racecourse Road intersection improvements.

 

12.       At the follow-up workshop on 12 April 2022 the local board were presented with the following analysis.

Site/Project

Notes

Comments

Cost

Beachlands kerb and channel improvements

Shelly Bay Road complete and design work View Ave, Karaka Ave and Second View Ave using LBCF.

The Board has already spent money preparing the designs. If the works don’t proceed the costs will need to be written off.

$1,190,00

Jutland Road bridge

Bridge options were considered. Clarification was requested with regard to the costs of relocating the old bridge versus a new bridge.

 

Using the existing structure removes some costs, but delivering it to site and supporting structures are the main costs

$2,040,141

 

Site/Project

Notes

Comments

Cost

Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support

The local board wants safety improvements to support pedestrian movement e.g. crossings, noting the Pukekohe Path network is across largely urban busy areas

Indicative costs

·   raised crossing $260,000

·   refuge island $150,000

Dependent on options selected

Clarks Beach to Waiau Pa pathway

Local Board supported a 2.4km gravel walkway as a preference

·    Updated cost: $500,000

$500,000

Waiuku Racecourse Road intersection improvements

Local board indicated no money be spent on line marking solutions. Look at temporary roundabout

These roundabouts have not been approved for use. The trial is still being monitored so not recommended for funding at this stage.

N/A

 

13.       At the12 April 2022 the local board went over the above material. To support discussion, AT staff to presented two budget allocation scenarios as below:

Option One

Cost

Beachlands kerb and channel – complete project

$1,190,000

Clarks Beach to Waiau Pa pathway – commence project

$500,000

Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support

$544,358 remaining (2 raised crossings)

 

Option two

Cost

Jutland Road Bridge

$2,040,141

Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support

$194,217 remaining (1 or 2 refuges)

 

14.         AT’s Programme Support Manager elaborated on the costs and risks of relocating the existing bridge and two key issues were discussed by the board, and identified as key considerations in providing final direction including:

i)    risk to pedestrian safety in the vicinity of Jutland Road because of poor development outcomes and the need for urgent safety interventions in the rapidly growing area

ii)   that the board has already funded the design work for the Beachlands kerb and channel project (phase 1) and that delays would put delivery at risk through cost increases and the need to ‘write off’ the project (phase 2) from a financial perspective.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

16.     The above projects would all contribute towards improving outcomes for active transport and therefore reducing Auckland’s carbon footprint.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.    Auckland Transport follow established processes where decisions in this report impact on other parts of the council group. This includes liaison with Auckland Council’s Community Facilities project manager responsible for the Pukekohe Paths Plan delivery.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.       The local board are the decision makers with regards to the LBTCF. Auckland Transport administers the fund, provides technical advice and is responsible for project delivery.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.       The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.       In total the board has $2,234,358 to allocate. This report allocates the remainder of the fund.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.       Auckland Transport will put risk management strategies in place on a project-by-project basis.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.       Following local board decision-making, Auckland Transport will proceed to delivery of the projects.


 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan – Project Grants 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/05156

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To allocate grants to projects identified and prioritised in the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2021/2022 Franklin Local Board work programme includes item 6 Implementation of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan [FR/2021/90]. This item has a $150,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget allocation.

3.       On 14 December 2021, the local board resolved to amend the implementation activity description to include a refresh of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan [FR/2021/183]. The balance of funding available to allocate grants to priority projects is $119,000.

4.       The purpose of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Plan is to provide direction and inform strategic decision-making in relation to the sporting facility network. Implementation through project grants supports identified priority projects to strengthen and develop the facility network and maximise community sport outcomes.

5.       Recommendations for the 2021/2022 grant allocations are illustrated in the table below:

Group

Project

Recommendation

Counties Tennis Association

$2,696,582 (total project cost)

Needs assessment, feasibility and business case for indoor courts

 

Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe

$30,000

Consents

Waiuku Association Football Club (and Waiuku District Cricket Club)

$90,000 - $120,000 (depending on fundraising and in-kind contributions)

Clubroom/changing room renovations

 

Massey Park, Waiuku

$89,000

Renovations

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board approve the following grants as part of item 6 of the 2021/2022 local board work programme:

a)   $30,000 to Counties Tennis Association Incorporated towards consents for the five-court enclosed and covered structure project at Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe

b)   $89,000 to Waiuku Association Football Club Incorporated for clubroom and changing room renovations, in partnership with Waiuku District Cricket Club Incorporated.

Horopaki

Context

Franklin Local Board - Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2021/2022

6.       The 2021/2022 work programme includes item 6 Implementation of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan [FR/2021/90].

7.       Franklin Local Board has allocated $150,000 from the 2021/2022 Locally Driven Initiatives operations budget for this item.

8.       On 14 December 2021 the local board resolved to amend the activity description of item 6 as follows:

A)  refresh the 2016 Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan and the 2019 priority projects list

B)  allocate grants to groups providing facilities identified as priority projects in the plan

C)  review the priority projects list every 3-4 years. [FR/2021/183]

Franklin Local Board Plan 2020

9.       Implementation of the plan relates to:

Outcome 3: Fit for purpose places and facilities.

Objective: Plan and advocate for investment in community facilities so that they can service future needs whilst retaining local character.

Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2016

10.     The Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan was adopted in August 2016 [FR/2016/153] with a further priority project refresh adopted in March 2019 [FR/2019/30].

11.     The purpose of the plan is to provide direction to the local board to assist with the prioritisation of future sport and recreation facility investment.

12.     The plan has supported Franklin Local Board to invest more than $600,000 into the community sport and active recreation facilities network since 2016.

2020/2021 Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facility Grants

13.     An update of the 2020/2021 allocation of grants can be found in the table below:

            Table 1: 2020/2021 Projects update

Recipient

Project update

Resolution

Pōhutukawa Coast Mountain Bike Club

 

 

“We have widely promoted the funding and the resultant new trails. Due to COVID lockdown we were not able to complete final planned stage… these are planned for early mid-2022.

Key learnings:

-     There is huge demand for a wide range of trails

-     The club has huge expansion possibilities over the next few years.”

 

$70,285 to the Pohutukawa Coast Bike Club towards constructing new tracks and winterproofing tracks in Whitford Forest

(+$109,440 Auckland Council Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund – SRFIF)

Maraetai Beach Boating Club (MBBC)

 

“Very thankful for the support of the local board. A stainless-steel plaque will be displayed permanently in front of the pavilion acknowledging the support from Franklin Local Board.

Key learnings:

-     To raise the funds necessary to upgrade community facilities such as MBBC requires tenacity and commitment.”

$46,545 to Maraetai Beach Boating Club towards renovating toilets and changing rooms and laying a concrete pad

 

 

Pukekohe Netball Centre

“Absolutely delighted with the rubberized court. Completed in February 2021, we’ve had one season on it and the girls thoroughly enjoyed the winter. It has been fabulous having good quality courts with the canopy, and it is just hard to get the girls off when it’s time to stop.”

$33,170 to Pukekohe Netball Centre towards resealing one netball court with a rubber surface

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     On 14 December 2021, the local board resolved to amend the implementation activity description to include a refresh of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan [FR/2021/183]. The balance of funding available to allocate grants to priority projects is $119,000.

Assessment process

15.     Eligible projects have been evaluated for strategic alignment in relation to facility outcomes and objectives identified in the following plans:

·    Auckland Sport & Recreation: Strategic Action Plan 2014-2024

·    Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039

·    Franklin Local Board Plan 2020

16.     The regional sports trust, CLM Community Sport, was engaged and actively contributed to an analysis of all projects, eligible and ineligible. The process was summarised by CLM Community Sport with the following comments:

·    we endorse the recommendations for this year’s grant allocations

·    supportive of the continued collaboration between council and CLM Community Sport to provide outcomes for our communities

·    currently working closely with Counties Tennis to further their development project which will be a great asset for the region

·    Massey Park is an important venue for the Waiuku sporting community, the clubs involved tend to roll up their sleeves without asking for help, so it’s great to see them supported through these recommendations.

Eligibility of projects

17.     The plan identifies a mix of community owned facility projects as well as council owned facility projects.

18.     Franklin Local Board has invested over $600,000 of locally driven initiatives operational budget into community owned facility projects since the adoption of the plan in 2016. As a result of this investment and the endorsement of projects for regional funding, nine projects on the current priority list are now complete.

19.     In addition to the completed priority projects, a further nine projects were deemed ineligible due to a number of reasons, including but not limited to:

·    little or no required investigation or planning undertaken for larger scale capital development projects

·    little or no fundraising for larger scale capital development projects

·    timing did not align to this funding period

·    projects are for council-owned assets and cannot be funded through grants (four of the six projects have investment planned through the Community Facilities work programme).

20.     Five priority projects were identified for further investigation as detailed in Table 2.

            Table 2: 2021/2022 Eligible projects

Group

Project

Comments

Recommendation

Waiuku Netball Centre (WNC)

$430,000 (2019 estimate)

Construct a canopy over two courts

 

No planning or fundraising has been undertaken for this project. WNC has a six-stage plan for the broader development of their courts and supporting infrastructure. They have been invited to the next round of the Auckland Council SRFIF for an application focussed on the upgrade of courts 3, 4, 5 and 6.

Not funded.

WNC have responded to a community engagement survey to inform the plan refresh.

Counties Tennis Association (CTA)

$2,696,582 (total project cost)

Needs assessment, feasibility and business case for indoor courts

Five-court enclosed, covered structure requiring the reconfiguration of existing courts. CTA has progressed through the facility planning gateways with the assistance of local board funding. They have been invited to the next round of the Auckland Council SRFIF for this project.

Grant funding of $30,000

Consents

Counties Manukau Hockey Association (CMHA)

No costings available

Upgrade or develop new pavilion located closer to turf No. 2

This project remains a vision for CMHA however they recognise the need for robust investigation and feasibility work given there are multiple options to achieve the desired outcomes.

Not funded.

CMHA has responded to a community engagement survey to inform the plan refresh.

Waiuku Association Football Club             (and Waiuku District Cricket Club)

$90,000 - $120,000 (depending on fundraising and in-kind contributions)

Clubroom/changing room renovations

The football club are co-owners of the clubroom/changing room facilities alongside cricket. There is a healthy relationship and mutual desire to refresh their facility to become safer and more inviting to whānau who utilise the park for their sporting endeavours. The facility supports the delivery of both codes on operating on a year-round basis.

Grant funding of $89,000

Renovations

Patumahoe Rugby Football Club (PRFC)

No costings available

Clubroom development

The club is still interested in exploring development options to cater for a diverse and growing membership. No planning or investigation has been completed to date. 

Not funded.

PRFC has responded to a community engagement survey to inform the plan refresh.

 


 

Counties Tennis Association – covered courts

21.     Counties Tennis Association, in partnership with Pukekohe Lawn Tennis Club and Counties Racqueteers Club, lead the vision for this project dating back to 2014 when Pukekohe Lawn Tennis set aside funds from the sale of property.

22.     The current site at the north-east corner of Rosa Birch Park comprises of 20 outdoor courts, 10 of which are floodlit, while 4 courts are marked for multi-use (equating to 2 futsal courts). There are 6 courts on the southern boundary of the park which are readily accessible to the wider public.

23.     Visitor Solutions were commissioned to carry out the 2020 feasibility study and more recently Community Asset Solutions have developed the 2022 business case.

24.     The feasibility study highlighted that an ‘enclosed’ facility was more viable than a traditional ‘indoor’ court build. The functionality, configuration and composition of different options was assessed with cost benefit analysis to arrive at the recommended option of a 5-court enclosed space.

25.     The business case assessed the project merits against a number of critical success factors and made a principal recommendation to seek landowner approval from council before proceeding to design, consenting and construction.

26.     Counties Tennis Association have raised $1,492,041 to date and have moved to stage 2 of the Auckland Council Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund, requesting $530,396 for the construction phase.

27.     Franklin Local Board contributed $30,000 towards investigation and analysis of this project in 2018/2019 [FR/2019/47].

28.     The recommendation is to assist the group with funding of $30,000 supporting the consents process as the last substantial cost identified by the group, prior to construction.

Massey Park clubroom/changing room renovation

29.     Massey Park clubrooms and changing rooms provide a focal point of sport and recreation activity for the Waiuku community.

30.     The joint objective of both football and cricket clubs is to encourage more players to join. They have identified a need to appeal to not only players but friends, families, and supporters to create a welcoming environment supported by fit-for-purpose facilities.

31.     Waiuku Association Football Club (Waiuku AFC) and Waiuku District Cricket Club (Waiuku DCC) co-own the facility on council land located at 2 Belgium Street, Waiuku. There is a community ground lease in place with the final expiry 30 November 2035.

32.     The facility has been victim to three break-ins over the past 18 months and both clubs would like to address some of their security and safety concerns as part of the renovation of the building.

33.     It is recommended that $89,000 is allocated to support the mutually agreed specific renovation items or areas of work including but not limited to:

·    installation of security door/shutter

·    internal and external painting including painting of the roof

·    maintenance to external staircase and ramp allowing for disability access

·    upgrade of sanitary items

·    kitchen upgrade

·    replacement of carpet

·    replacement of curtains

 

Options for consideration

i)           support recommendations to the value presented

·      Counties Tennis Association - $30,000

·      Waiuku AFC/Waiuku DCC - $89,000

ii)       support recommendations to a greater or lesser extent than presented

iii)      fund neither of the recommended projects

            Table 3: 2021/2022 Recommended priority project grants

Group

Project

Comments

Recommendation

Counties Tennis Association

$2,696,582 (total project cost)

Needs assessment, feasibility and business case for indoor courts

 

Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe

Five-court enclosed, covered structure requiring the reconfiguration of existing courts. CTA have progressed through the facility planning gateways with the assistance of local board funding. They have been invited to the next round of the Auckland Council SRFIF for this project.

Grant funding of $30,000

Consents

Waiuku AFC (and Waiuku DCC)

$90,000 - $120,000 (depending on fundraising and in-kind contributions)

Clubroom/changing room renovations

 

 

Massey Park, Waiuku

The football club are co-owners of the clubroom/changing room facilities alongside cricket. There is a healthy relationship and mutual desire to refresh their facility to become safer and more inviting to whānau who utilise the park for their sporting endeavours. The facility supports the delivery of both codes operating on a year-round basis.

Grant funding of $89,000

Renovations

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Counties Tennis Association – Enclosed court facility

34.     There will be no impact on greenhouse gas emissions from the consenting process for the enclosed court facility project.

35.     The construction phase of the project will examine environmental sustainability as one of the infrastructure priorities evaluated as part of the Auckland Council Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

Waiuku AFC/Waiuku DCC – Clubroom and changing room renovation

36.     The built environment is one of eight priorities within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. The funding agreement for the Massey Park project will include consideration of opportunities to reduce emissions and increase sustainability.

37.     Parks, Sport and Recreation staff will consult the relevant Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff to identify opportunities to increase environmentally friendly outcomes within the renovation project.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

Counties Tennis Association – Enclosed court facility

38.     The enclosed court facility project was one of 45 Expression of Interest applicants which progressed to stage two of the Auckland Council Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund.

39.     The application of $530,396 relates to the construction phase of this project with decisions made by the Parks, Arts, Community Events Committee at the 22 September 2022 business meeting.

40.     The 2022 business case provides a detailed analysis of operational sustainability and does not identify a need for local board or council support for ongoing operational expenses.

Waiuku AFC/Waiuku DCC – clubroom and changing room renovation

41.     There are no impacts identified for the council group. Ownership and operations of the facility at Massey Park will remain the responsibility of Waiuku AFC and Waiuku DCC.

42.     Proposed renovations to the clubrooms and changing rooms will not alter the building parcel and will not require landowner approval or changes to the community ground lease.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

43.     The following three options were presented for local board consideration at the 5 April 2022 workshop:

i)    support recommendations to the value presented

·    Counties Tennis Association - $30,000

·    Waiuku AFC/Waiuku DCC - $89,000

ii)   support recommendations to a greater or lesser extent than presented

iii)  fund neither of the recommended projects

44.     The local board gave positive workshop direction to the recommendations as presented, which remain unchanged within this report.

45.     Workshop comments included the need for the refresh of priorities and observations regarding the current state of community sport following the interruptions and subsequent challenges of COVID-19 in recent years.

46.     The investment into both projects supports local board outcome three, ‘fit for purpose places and facilities’ and allows the associated community groups to better service current and future needs.

Counties Tennis Association – Enclosed court facility

47.     Current uptake of the existing courts comprises of more than 850 tennis players per year and a further 75 futsal players. Despite losing one court through a reconfiguration to fit the enclosed structure Counties Tennis Association estimate an increase of 15% within the tennis use alone.

48.     Counties Tennis Association currently hold a community ground lease for the existing facility at Rosa Birch Park, this has a final expiry of 31 October 2029.

49.     A presentation of local applications is scheduled to be workshopped with the local board seeking endorsement for local projects. The workshop had not taken place at the time of writing this report.

50.     Counties Tennis Association will be required to gain landowner approval before construction of the enclosed facility. The land use advisor will consult specialists regarding any potential impacts of the proposal before advising the local board seeking a decision.

Waiuku AFC/Waiuku DCC – clubroom and changing room renovation

51.     Waiuku AFC provide opportunities get active and connect through football for around 400 members during their winter season and offer additional opportunities to a further 200 through tournaments and events.

52.     Waiuku DCC cater for approximately 100 players, from juniors through to seniors, across eight teams as part of affiliated Counties Cricket Association competitions.

53.     The Massey Park site is on council land with the facility coming under a community ground lease with final expiry 30 November 2035. The proposed renovations will not alter the building envelope and will not require landowner approval.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     The existing assessment criteria evaluates projects in relation to Māori outcomes which contribute to an overall score.

55.     Staff have partnered with mana whenua to develop an engagement plan which will offer opportunities to contribute to the refresh of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan and also provide

56.     Staff have engaged with mana whenua to identify opportunities to:

a)   inform the refresh of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan

b)   increase understanding of Māori outcomes in relation to the facility network

57.     Neither Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe or Massey Park, Waiuku registers as a site of cultural or heritage significance.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     The 2021/2022 Franklin Local Board work programme includes item 6 Implementation of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan [FR/2021/90]. This item has a $150,000 Locally Driven Initiatives operational budget allocation.

59.     On 14 December 2021, the local board resolved to amend the implementation activity description to include a refresh of the Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan [FR/2021/183]. The balance of funding available to allocate grants to priority projects is $119,000.

60.     Recommendations for the 2021/2022 implementation grants include:

a)   $30,000 to Counties Tennis Association Incorporated towards consents for the five-court enclosed, covered structure project at Rosa Birch Park, Pukekohe

b)   $89,000 to Waiuku Association Football Club Incorporated for clubroom and changing room renovations in partnership with Waiuku District Cricket Club Incorporated.

61.     Franklin Local Board contributed $30,000 towards investigation and analysis of this project in 2018/2019 [FR/2019/47]. This mahi was integral to the progression of the capital build project and has been completed and accounted for through reporting to council staff.

62.     There are no financial risks identified associated to the approval of the recommended grants.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Counties Tennis Association – Enclosed court facility

63.     There is a risk Counties Tennis Association are unsuccessful in their application to the Auckland Council Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund meaning construction would be delayed as further funding is sourced. 

64.     The funding agreement for the allocation of $30,000 towards consents will allow payments to be drawn down following the outcome of the Auckland Council SRFIF application to ensure timing is aligned to fundraising requirements.

65.     Investment supporting the consenting process will still further progress the project irrespective of funding application outcomes for the construction phase.

Waiuku AFC/Waiuku DCC – clubroom and changing room renovation

66.     No risks have been identified for the clubroom and changing room renovation. The funding agreement will ensure payments are made in alignment with the percentage of work completed or as otherwise agreed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     Should the local board resolve to allocate funding to the recommended projects, then:

i)    a funding agreement will be developed for the organisations, outlining the terms and conditions for the funding

ii)   staff will keep the local board informed on progress through local board reporting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Franklin Sport and Active Recreation Facilities Plan 2016 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Attachment B - Updated Priority Projects List 2019 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kieran Nevey - Sport & Recreation Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2022/05677

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on Phase Three (previously called Tranche 2B) of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport-related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe and appropriate speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. Evidence from changes made in 2020 demonstrates that safe and appropriate speed limits are effective in reducing road trauma.

4.       Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and recently completed public consultation on proposed Phase Three changes with the community. A list of changes proposed within this local board area is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Public consultation on changes proposed in Phase Three closed on 3 April 2022 and a summary of public responses is provided as Attachment B. Local boards are now invited to provide their feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on speed limit changes proposed as part of Phase Three of Auckland Transport’s Safe Speeds Programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use.

Alignment with Central Government Policy

7.       Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

8.       Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

9.       Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the Auckland Transport Board, Auckland Transport has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speed limits on many roads.

10.     In this phase, the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools, high-risk rural roads, rural marae, and roads requested by the community.

11.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Phase Three took place from 28 February - 3 April 2022, and included the following measures:

a)   flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes near roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

b)   advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist, and ethnic media

c)   radio advertising on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

d)   radio interviews and adlibs on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

e)   media releases

f)    social media campaigns

g)   an article published in OurAuckland

h)   translation of consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Braille and NZ Sign Language

i)    flyers, posters and hardcopy FreePost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

j)    15 online webinars, including a Mandarin language webinar

k)   a community drop-in session on Aotea Great Barrier.

12.     The community was able to provide their thoughts via a number of channels:

a)   online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

b)   a paper survey

c)   a web-based mapping tool

d)   emails direct to the Safe Speeds Programme Team

e)   at public hearings held on 6 April 2022.

13.     Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May (Attachment B) and now have the opportunity to provide feedback on Phase Three proposed speed limit changes within their local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Transport manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. This includes setting speed limits, and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted Auckland Transport has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and local boards.

15.     Auckland Transport’s first phase of reviewing and setting new speed limits was developing the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) that enabled AT to set new speed limits for Auckland’s highest risk roads.

16.     The impact of the changes made in this bylaw have been significant and support the claim that by setting safe and appropriate speed limits in Auckland, we reduce community harm.

17.     Since 30 June 2020, in areas where speed limits were changed, fatal crashes have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) during the 18-month period since this action was taken.[1]

18.     This change was most significant on rural roads where roads with reduced speed limits recorded a 71 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and more than a 25 per cent reduction in serious injury crashes.

19.     In selected locations, speed limit changes are complemented by physical speed calming measures such as speed bumps, raised pedestrian crossings, kerb changes and road marking. These physical measures help reinforce the safe and appropriate speed limits and assist with pedestrians and cyclists crossing busy roads. Physical measures are installed based upon risk, with a focus on locations such as town centres, residential areas and roads near schools.

20.     It will take time to confirm that these trends are sustained, however this initial impact is promising and indicates the effectiveness of the ‘Vision Zero’ approach. Overseas data records a similar impact on harm reduction and Auckland Transport’s advice to local boards is that the programme is working and should be supported.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     In town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced during Phase One of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of people saying they now participate in at least one active mode (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Auckland Transport has held workshops with local boards throughout the various phases of the Safe Speeds programme.

25.     Summaries of local submissions on changes proposed in Phase Three were provided to local boards in early May to inform their consideration of this topic.

26.     This report seeks feedback from the local board on the proposed speed limit changes within Phase Three of the Safe Speeds Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

28.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website at https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

29.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

30.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The Safe Speeds Programme is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

31.     Engagement with iwi at the AT northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui took place on the wider programme during 2021, and in early 2022 to introduce the Interim Speed Management Plan. Detailed engagement with individual rural marae as part of Phase Three commenced mid-2021 and is ongoing, with each marae typically requiring a tailored approach that takes into account localised safety issues.

32.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of Phase Three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme this programme has considerable financial implications.

34.     In 2017, the social cost of road harm in Auckland was about $1.1 billion.[2] These costs are paid by all Aucklanders. There is the cost of health care for those injured and - for some - lifetime rehabilitation and support. There is a cost to families, businesses and the region of those who can no longer live and work as they did before due to road deaths and serious injuries.

35.     Reducing the harm caused by road accidents impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that local boards represent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    The consultation length was extended from four to five weeks.

·    The number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased.

·    Digital advertising spend was increased and included Mandarin language public webinars and social media advertising.

37.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force at the end of November 2022.

39.     The November 2022 date may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept up to date if any changes are made.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Safe Speeds Programme Public feedback on proposed speed limit changes March/April 2022

73

b

Feedback Report - Franklin Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annie Ferguson – Communications and Engagement, Auckland Transport

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Nathan Cammock – Programme Director, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Submission on Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan

File No.: CP2022/06463

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with:

·    a brief overview of the draft National Adaptation Plan (the Plan), including a strategic overview, roles and responsibilities for local government, and a summary of critical and supporting actions

·    a brief overview of proposals for managed retreat and flood insurance

·    likely themes for Auckland Council’s submission

·    the timeframes for developing Auckland Council’s submission and opportunities to provide input.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is preparing for a submission on the draft National Adaptation Plan which was released by the Ministry for the Environment on 27 April 2022 for public consultation. The deadline for submissions is 3 June 2022.

3.       The submission will be informed by the council’s adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, Auckland Council’s climate change commitments and previous relevant consultation submissions.

4.       The submission will focus on the extent to which the draft National Adaptation Plan enables and/or inhibits climate change adaptation action for Auckland Council. The submission is likely to set out potential gaps and concerns for Auckland Council. In particular, the role and responsibilities of local government in relation to the Plan, and the extent to which critical actions outlined in the Plan support Auckland Council to fulfil its defined legislative roles and responsibilities. Both risks and opportunities for central government will be highlighted.

5.       In addition, views and perspectives on managed retreat, flood insurance and associated critical issues to be considered in the development of new legislation will be explored.

6.       To meet the submission deadline of 3 June 2022, delegated authority to approve the council’s final submission outside a scheduled committee meeting will be sought at a Governing Body meeting on 26th May.

7.       A draft submission will be circulated on 18 May 2022 to Environment and Climate Change Committee members, local board members, the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs.

8.       Feedback received from Environment and Climate Change Committee members by 25 May will be considered for incorporation into the final submission.

9.       Feedback received from local boards, the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs by 27 May 2022 will be appended to the final submission.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat, to be appended to Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): draft national adaptation plan (NAP) is the first central government-led adaptation plan for Aotearoa/New Zealand. The NAP presents an all-of government approach, that maps out a range of ‘critical actions’, ‘supporting actions’ and ‘proposed actions’ for the next six years.

12.     The NAP will prepare central government, local government, businesses, industry, iwi/Māori and communities to adapt to effects associated with unavoidable climate change that are occurring and will continue to occur. The NAP will sit alongside the Emission Reduction Plan, which Auckland Council has already made a submission on. 

13.     The NAP is required under the Climate Change Response Act 2002, to set out government’s approach to adapting to the effects of climate change. Under this Act, the NAP must take into account:

·    the economic, social, health, environmental, ecological, and cultural effects of climate change, including effects on iwi and Māori

·    the distribution of the effects of climate change across society, taking particular account of vulnerable groups or sectors

·    the ability of communities or organisations to undertake adaptation action, including how any action may be funded

·    scientific and technical advice.

14.     The NAP is preceded by several pivotal government climate reports, namely the Climate Change Adaptation Technical Working Group Report (2018) and National Climate Change Risk Assessment 2020 (NCCRA).

15.     The NAP responds to both reports with a particular emphasis on shaping regulatory frameworks and institutions to align with the changing climate context, aligning statutory and policy directions to account for changing risks, establishing coordination across government and with sectors, bringing together scattered climate information and supporting access to climate data sets and information.

16.     The NAP also responds directly to the forty-three priority climate risks outlined in the NCCRA. Of these forty-three risks, the NCCRA identified ten most significant risks that require urgent action within the next six years to reduce their impacts. The key risk areas of focus include, natural environment, homes, buildings and places, infrastructure, communities, economy and financial systems, and governance. A summary of the NCCRA can be found at https://environment.govt.nz/what-government-is-doing/areas-of-work/climate-change/adapting-to-climate-change/first-national-climate-change-risk-assessment-for-new-zealand/

17.     Consultation is also being undertaken on problems and key policy issues in relation to flood insurance and managed retreat. This report also gives a brief overview of these two issues.


 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document

Purpose

18.     The overarching vision of the NAP is:

·    ‘our people, places and systems are resilient and able to adapt to the effects of unavoidable climate changes in a fair, low-cost and ordered manner’

19.     The goals of the NAP are threefold:

·    reduce vulnerability to the impacts of climate change

·    enhance adaptive capacity and consider climate change in all decisions at all levels

·    strengthen resilience to climate change.

20.     The above goals have three key areas of focus:

·    reform institutions to be fit for a changing climate

·    provide data, information, tools and guidance to allow everyone to assess and reduce their own climate risks

·    embed climate resilience across government strategies and policies.

21.     The actions identified in the NAP focus on six outcome areas discussed further below.

·    system-wide

·    natural environment

·    homes, buildings and places

·    infrastructure

·    communities

·    economy and finance.

22.     Each outcome area has a set of objectives to address the risks for that area. Each objective has one or more actions to achieve that objective. The actions are categorised as critical actions, supporting actions and future actions.

23.     Treaty of Waitangi responsiveness is included through the support for a Māori based framework, known as Rauora (appended). This is complemented by a series of actions that specifically target Māori and others that will be significant to Māori. Notably, one key action is ‘establishing a foundation to work with Māori on climate actions’. There are three main components to this action. Firstly, funding for Māori partnership and representation. The purpose of this is to enable strategic input from Māori and to advance equitable governance arrangements over the emissions reduction plan and the NAP. Additionally, there is funding to support Māori to define, measure and implement a national Māori climate strategy and action plan. Lastly, support will be afforded to kaupapa Māori, tāngata Māori actions and solutions for the climate emergency.

24.     An Interdepartmental Executive Board is being established to oversee the emissions reduction plan and NAP. The Board will monitor and report on overall progress. The Climate Change Response Ministers Group will oversee the plan and drive progress.

25.     The NAP will be monitored by He Pou a Rangi – Climate Change Commission. A bi-annual monitoring and evaluation report will be submitted by the Commission to the Minister of Climate Change.  This process provides an opportunity for the Government to review and adjust the actions and manage changing uncertainty and risk. Beyond, the findings will also contribute to New Zealand’s international commitments to report on New Zealand’s progress towards building resilience.

Roles and responsibilities for local government outlined in the draft National Adaptation Plan

26.     Responsibility shared by all: The NAP identifies that responsibility for adaptation will be shared by all New Zealanders and that central government will not bear all the risks and costs. Risk and costs will be shared between asset or property owners, their insurance companies, their banks, local government and central government.

27.     Roles of different sector groups: The NAP provides an overview of the roles that different sectors of society including central government, local government, iwi/Māori, private sector, community and individuals and academia play.

28.     Local government at front line: The NAP recognises that local government (city, regional, district and unitary councils) is on the front line in preparing for and dealing with climate impacts and risks. The role of local government is outlined in the NAP as being centred around the following:

·    local government have statutory responsibilities to make key decisions on how to use and manage land and other natural resources to avoid and/or mitigate impacts of natural hazards

·    responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience

·    local government own a significant amount of assets, including infrastructure and forests that are all at risk

·    for most communities, local authorities are the government bodies that are closest to their needs and represent local views. Examples of this connection include the role of local authorities in land-use planning, water resources, three waters services, flood risk management, biodiversity and biosecurity, roading and emergency management

·    local government enhances community resilience through public education and local planning processes

·    responsiveness to iwi and Māori groups and other community groups

·    links to the private sector with a reliance on supply chains, production systems and a thriving economic environment.

29.     Priority risks for local government: The plan outlines water security, communities and natural ecosystems as priority risk areas for local government. Additionally, new and changing legislation will impact the role of local government.

30.     Central role: Local government plays a central role in managing natural hazard risks, which the impacts of climate change are contributing to increasing risk and vulnerability. Councils also have responsibilities for civil defence and emergency management and provide a critical link between climate change adaptation policy and communities. These links are established through its planning and emergency management functions and community engagement.

31.     NAP response: In response to the above priority risk areas for local government, the NAP responds in the following ways:

·    supports local government to take adaptation action, and outlines a programme of work to provide guidance and resources to encourage action

·    aims to help local government plan for future impacts and not just respond to events as they occur

·    takes a long-term view by ensuring governance and decision-making frameworks are fit for purpose and climate resilience is integrated into government strategies and policies

·    aims to build coordination and collaboration between central and local government, communities, iwi/Māori and businesses as we work together on innovative and effective adaptation solutions.

32.     The objectives and actions which respond to the various risk areas are summarised in the following section of this memorandum.

Critical and supporting climate actions

33.     The climate actions are organised under six main sections: System-wide; Natural Environment; Homes, Buildings and Places; Infrastructure; Communities and Economy and Finance. A full detailed outline of actions is included in Appendix 3 of the NAP.

34.     The actions are categorised as critical actions, supporting actions and future actions.

35.     System-Wide Actions (p 25- 38)

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions in this chapter. The objectives are centred around appropriate frameworks and settings to enable people and communities enabling access to information and data sets to manage their own risks, the development of tools and guidance governance; and the embedding of climate resilience. These actions seek to establish the foundation for adaptation action in this first NAP

·    critical actions include legislative changes over the next six years: reform of the resource management system (2022-2023); legislation to support managed retreat (2022-2025), reform institutional arrangements for water services (2022-2025); modernise the emergency management system (2022-2028); and a review of the future of local government (2022-2023)

·    a range of supporting actions are also outlined in the following areas: establishing a foundation to work with Māori on climate actions; natural hazards; natural disaster resilience; emergency management; and establishment government oversight and coordination.

36.     Natural Environment (p 43-51) 

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions of this chapter. The objectives are centred around healthy ecosystems, robust biosecurity to reduce new pests and diseases and working with nature to build climate resilience

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the natural environment risks in the NCCRA. In particular, they address the risks to:

§ risks to coastal ecosystems, including the intertidal zone, estuaries, dunes, coastal lakes and wetlands, due to ongoing sea-level rise and extreme weather events

§ risks to indigenous ecosystems and species from the enhanced spread, survival and establishment of invasive species due to climate change.

37.     Homes Buildings and Places (p53-60)

·    there are four main objectives to this chapter that shape the actions. The objectives are centred around climate resilient homes and buildings that meet social and cultural needs, new and existing places are planned and managed to minimise risks to communities, strengthening of Māori connection to whenua and places of cultural significance, threats to cultural heritage sites are understood and impacts minimised

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the risk to buildings due to extreme weather events, drought, increased fire weather and ongoing sea  level rise

·    other risks addressed through these actions include risks to:

§ Māori social, cultural, spiritual and economic wellbeing from loss and degradation of lands and waters, as well as cultural assets such as marae

§ Māori and European cultural heritage sites due to projected ongoing sea-level rise, extreme weather events and increasing fire weather.


 

38.     Infrastructure (p63-70)

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions to this chapter. The objectives are centred around reducing vulnerabilities to assets exposed to climate change, ensuring all new infrastructure is fit for climate change, and the use of renewal programmes to improve climate adaptative capacity

·    the actions in this chapter are designed to achieve these objectives and address the built environment risks in the NCCRA

·    in particular, they address the risk to potable water supplies (availability and quality) due to changes in rainfall, temperature, drought, extreme weather events and ongoing sea-level rise.

39.     Communities (p74-81)

·    there are four main objectives that shape the actions to this chapter. The objectives are centred around enabling communities to adapt, supporting vulnerable people and communities, support communities when disrupted and displaced, a health system that is prepared and can support vulnerable communities affected by climate change

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the human domain risks in the National Climate Change Risk Assessment (NCCRA). In particular:

§ social cohesion and community wellbeing are at risk due to displacement of individuals, families and communities due to climate change impacts

§ that climate change could exacerbate existing inequities and creating new and additional inequities due to differential distribution of climate change impacts.

40.     Economy and Finance (p84-88)

·    there are two main objectives that shape the actions of this chapter. The objectives are centred around supporting sectors, businesses and regional economies to adapt and economic stability and growth through a resilient financial system. The actions are varied and include for example a focus on freight and supply chain, fisheries reform, aquaculture, climate-related disclosure and the regulating financial entities.

Managed retreat

41.     The Ministry for the Environment is also consulting on a high-level framework for a managed retreat system, and related insurance matters.

42.     These two issues relate to the following critical actions within the NAP:

·    reform the Resource Management System

·    pass legislation to support managed retreat

·    develop options for home flood insurance issues.

43.     Five key objectives and six principles have been identified to guide the development of managed retreat legislation (the Climate Adaptation Act). The consultation documentation also identifies:

·    a high-level process for managed retreat

·    roles and responsibilities, with specific reference to local government

·    issues associated with property transfer (including consideration for Māori land)

·    implications for Māori.

44.     Feedback is also sought on the interaction of insurance with managed retreat.

45.     For local government, the potential risks and costs associated with managed retreat and liabilities associated with flood insurance are likely to be key discussion points.


 

Likely themes for Council’s submission

46.     Council’s submission on the NAP will focus on the extent to which the NAP enables and/or inhibits climate adaptation for Auckland Council.

47.     In particular, the role and responsibilities of local government in relation to the NAP, and the extent to which critical actions outlined in the NAP support Auckland Council to fulfil their defined legislative roles and responsibilities. Both risks and opportunities will be highlighted.

48.     The submission will also consider council’s views and perspectives in relation to the extent that the NAP enables and/or inhibits their current and future commitments to mana whenua.

49.     The submission will also consider managed retreat, insurance and associated critical issues to be considered in the development of new legislation for managed retreat.

Timeframe for development of the National Emissions Reduction Plan

Milestone

Date

Discussion document released

27 April 2022

MfE Local Government Workshop

10 May 2022

MfE Local Government Workshop

17 May 2022

Draft submission available

18 May 2022

Deadline for appended feedback

27 May 2022

Consultation period closes

3 June 2022

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     The National Adaptation Plan has the potential to strongly influence Auckland’s ability to take a precautionary approach to preparing for climate change, as adopted by council through Te Tāruke -ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

51.     Council’s submission to the NAP consultation document can reiterate its position and advocate for a NAP that places Auckland in the best position to achieve its, and Aotearoa’s adaptation goals.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     Feedback from relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations on the draft submission will be sought. The council-group was involved in establishing existing council positions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local authorities will play are key role in implementation of the proposed National Adaptation Plan, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience

·    enhance community resilience through public education and local planning processes.

Local board views are being sought on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat and will be appended to council’s final submission.

54.     The consultation documentation Kia urutau, kia ora: Kia āhuarangi rite a Aotearoa – Adapt and thrive: Building a climate-resilient New Zealand, which summarises consultation on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat, is appended to this document and can be downloaded at https://environment.govt.nz/publications/adapt-and-thrive-building-a-climate-resilient-aotearoa-new-zealand-consultation-document/. 

55.     Additional information on engagement, including a video summary of the draft National Adaptation Plan can be found at https://environment.govt.nz/what-you-can-do/have-your-say/climate-change-engagement/

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The National Climate Change Risk Assessment and the NAP acknowledge that all risks are relevant to Māori and some may disproportionately affect certain whānau, hapū and iwi, as well as Māori interests, values, practices and wellbeing. They also recognise the Government’s responsibility to give effect to Te Tiriti principles.

57.     The NAP draws on key concepts of the Rauora framework (Attachment 3) that brings together Māori values and principles into an indigenous worldview (te ao Māori) of climate change, and is complemented by a series of actions that specifically target Māori to enable strategic input and advance equitable governance. This aligns well with the direction in Te Tāruke -ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

58.     Feedback on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat is being sought from the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs, and will be appended to the council’s final submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     To work effectively, the future system requires appropriate funding mechanisms for its different roles and activities.

60.     The MfE is exploring what provisions and guidance can be provided in the future system, to set clear expectations regarding who should pay for what, and to support the availability and use of appropriate funding tools. Proposals will use existing guidance on charging in the public sector and look at applying this to the context of the future central government-led adaptation plans.

61.     Implementation and operation of the national adaptation plan will require significant investment from the council. Central government’s approach to sharing these costs is unclear. These costs will be driven by factors such as the transition from the current system, establishment and support of joint committees, development of new plans and strategies, changed workforce needs, and increased legal action. In addition, there are likely to be impacts on the ways the council approaches financial and infrastructure planning.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

62.     There is little risk in making a submission on the consultation on the NAP.

63.     Risks in relation to local government’s role in implementation of the NAP, e.g., funding and financing, will be considered as part of council’s response.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

64.     Local board resolutions on the draft National Adaptation Plan will be appended to the Auckland Council submission on this matter.

65.     Below are the key dates for input into the submission:

·    18 May 2022: draft submission circulated to local board members

·    27 May 2022: final date for any formal local board feedback to be appended to the submission.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Consultation document: Kia urutau, kia ora: Kia āhuarangi rite a Aotearoa – Adapt and thrive: Building a climate-resilient New Zealand. Draft National Adaptation Plan and Managed Retreat (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Insight into the Rauora Indigenous Worldview Framework for the National Climate Change Adaptation Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/05622

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that you support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)       increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)       tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[3]

8.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.     This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.     It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[4]

25.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

26.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[5] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 


 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[6]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

33.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

34.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

35.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

36.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

 


 

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Timeline

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Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

37.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

38.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

39.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

40.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

41.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

42.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

43.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

44.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

45.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

46.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

47.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

48.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

49.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

50.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

51.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

52.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

53.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan

 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

54.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

55.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

·        Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

·        The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

56.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

57.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·     51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

·     59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.


 

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

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Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

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People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 

Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 

Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 


28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

58.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

59.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

60.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

61.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

62.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

63.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

64.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

65.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

66.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

67.     Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

68.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

69.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

70.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

71.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

72.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

73.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

74.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

75.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.


 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

76.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

77.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

78.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

79.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

80.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

81.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

82.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

83.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

84.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

85.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

86.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

87.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

88.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

89.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - GM Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board input into Transforming Recycling

 

File No.: CP2022/05419

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To report on the Urgent Decision made by Franklin Local Board to provide feedback on the Ministry for the Environment’s consultation document Te kapanoni i te hangarua: Transforming recycling so that local views can be included within the Auckland Council submission.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       At its meeting on 26 November 2019 the Franklin Local Board resolved (FR/2019/168) the following in relation to urgent decision-making:

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)           adopt the urgent decision-making process for matters that require a decision where it is not practical to call the full board together and hold a meeting with requirements of a quorum.

b)           delegate authority to the chair and deputy chair, or any person acting in these roles, to make urgent decisions on behalf of the local board.

c)            agree that the relationship manager (or any person/s acting in this role) will authorise the urgent decision-making process by signing off an authorisation memo.

d)           note that all urgent decisions will be reported to the next ordinary business meeting of the local board.

3.      Auckland Council has been given the opportunity to provide feedback on the Government’s Te kapanoni i te hangarua: Transforming recycling consultation document.

4.      Formal feedback from local boards received before 5pm 21 April 2022 allowed time for appropriate consideration and influence on Council’s overall feedback.

10.     The next Franklin Local Board meeting was Tuesday 26 April and therefore, the opportunity for the local board to formalise its feedback by resolution fell outside of the scheduled business meeting times and an urgent decision is required.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)       notes the Urgent Decision finalised on 21 April 2022, which provided the following feedback on Te kapanoni i te hangarua: Transforming recycling Kaupapa whakahoki ipu - Container return scheme, as follows:

i)    whilst not proposed for implementation for a few years, note the current inflationary situation and optics of imposing a 20c + GST (23c) per container plus a 3 to 5c per container “core cost” element to items already rocketing in price. Acknowledging this may be a positive driver for claiming a refund of the 23c deposit. Obviously the core   cost component will not be refundable

 

ii)      need more information on retail drop offs and reverse vending machines, in particular around issues experienced currently around similar recycling / re-use charity shops and bins with non-accepted items being dumped etc.

iii)     agree that scheme should be a deposit scheme and not a redemption scheme

iv)     greater emphasis should be on enabling and supporting refilling alongside recycling, which will have the added bonus of contributing to carbon emissions associated with delivering single use containers to retail / distributors

v)      support a broad scope approach for the container return scheme of beverage containers to be used to make it easy and convenient for community to understand and use the scheme

vi)     advocate for education programmes to run alongside the scheme to enable our communities to respond to the larger issue of climate change and circular economic principles.

vii)    support a focus on circular economic principles which are aimed at reducing litter and decrease the amount of beverage containers that are stockpiled, littered or going to landfills and the ability for community groups and schools to run litter clean ups and other initiatives that deliver greater benefits to their organisation and to the wider community. Thought will be required to put in place mechanisms for this type of bulk refund to those groups / organisations.

viii)    note that refillable containers could play an important part in transitioning to a low-carbon circular economy and support refillables to be included in the container return scheme in the future.

ix)     Do not agree with the approach that fresh milk in all packaging types should be exempt in the container return scheme, suggesting instead that a simpler way of identifying what types of milk containers can be included in the scheme as per XV below be used noting that some milk products are sold in containers that are able to be included and to ban all milk packaging across the board is contrary to the aspiration of reducing recyclable containers going to land fill.

x)      support a ‘mixed-return model’ with a high degree of mandated retail participation to ensure consumers have easy access to container return/refund points, as well as the opportunity for voluntary participation in the network by interested parties

xi)     support the recovery targets for a NZ CRS of 85 per cent by year 3, and 90 per cent by year 5

xii)    agree that the scheme design (including the deposit level) should be reviewed regularly alongside of other initiatives being run by local authorities

xiii)    support the implementation of a container return scheme for New Zealand and advocate for local authorities to be included when rolling this scheme out to the communities

            Improvements to household kerbside recycling

xiv)   support creating nationwide consistency and easier to understand recycling by simpler classification and move away from the poorly understood numbering system with a simple  Shape

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xv)    support the proposal to standardise materials for recycling via household kerbside collection nationally on the basis that this measure will reduce confusion and inconsistency

 

 

xvi)   agree that the following should be considered when determining whether a class of materials should be accepted at kerbside in the future

A.     sustainable end markets

B.      end markets solutions are circular and minimise environmental harm

C.     viable processing technologies

D.     processing by both automated and manual Material recovery facilities

E.      no adverse effects on local authorities, including financial

F.      supply chains contribute appropriately to recovery and end-of-life solutions for their products

xvii)   support a network of convenient and easy places where people can recycle items that cannot easily be recycled at kerbside for those items too large or too small to be collected

xviii)  support enabling households to have access to food scrap collections to divert from landfills where this is appropriate, noting that in rural areas this may not be required and therefore provision to opt out should be considered in some circumstances

xix)   advocate for local authorities to play a vital role in supporting this scheme of increasing the diversion of household garden waste from landfill and note that the wealth of experience and resources that they bring from delivering kerbside collections

xx)    agree that non-food products or packaging should accepted in a food scraps bin or a food and garden waste bin under the following conditions:

A. products must meet New Zealand standards for compost-ability.

B. products are certified in their final form to ensure they do not pose a risk to                               soil or human health.

C. products are clearly labelled so that they can be distinguished from non-                             compostable products.

D. a technology or process is available to easily identify and sort compostable                                    from non-compostable products.

E. producers and users of the products and packaging contribute to the cost                                of collecting and processing.

xxi)   support the proposal to regularly review the scheme to understand how well kerbside collections are working and provide insights on where improvements in the system can be made and creates a baseline to measure performance

xxii)   agree that the private sector should also report on their household kerbside collections so that the overall performance of kerbside services in the region can be understood and creates a baseline to measure performance

xxiii)  endorse the proposed timeframe that would require local authorities to achieve the minimum diversion rate by 2030, and for a review of minimum diversion rates at that time.

xxiv)  advocate for more research, technical support, resources and behaviour change initiatives are needed to support the implementation of this programme of work

 

 

 

 

            Separation of business food waste

xxv)  support intent but a rule compelling companies must come with simple and accessible opportunities to incentivise companies to comply. This could be through enabling a targeted rate for businesses registered under the Food Act.

xxvi)  note that in order for this scheme to be effective of reducing the amount of waste going into landfills and to meet our national emissions target that business must also be required to facilitate the diversion of food waste

xxvii) agree that appropriate strategies be included to help businesses reduce and reuse their food waste including offering incentives to encourage innovation and creativity and partnering with business to upskill staff or develop food products or packaging that delivers to overall diversion outcomes.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Urgent Decision - Franklin Local Board input into Transforming Recycling consultation

135

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar May 2022

File No.: CP2022/05629

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated May 2022 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Governance Forward Work Programme May 2022

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/05626

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 5, 12, 19 and 26 April 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight of projects in their work programme or on matters that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops. Workshops are not open to the public, but a record of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

4.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 5, 12, 19 and 26 April 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 5, 12, 19 and 26 April 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board workshop record 5 April 2022

147

b

Franklin Local Board workshop record 12 April 2022

149

c

Franklin Local Board workshop record 19 April 2022

153

d

Franklin Local Board workshop record 26 April 2022

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board Workshop Record

 

Workshop record of the Franklin Local Board held by Microsoft Teams videoconference on 19 April 2022, commencing at 10.07am.

 

PRESENT

Chairperson:                          Andrew Baker

Members:                               Angela Fulljames, Alan Cole, Sharlene Druyven, Malcolm Bell, Logan Soole, Matthew Murphy, Amanda Kinzett

Apologies:                             Nil

Also present:                         Carol McKenzie-Rex, Local Area Manager; Georgina Gilmour, Senior             Advisor; Denise Gunn, Democracy Advisor; Orrin Kapua, Advisor; Lynn  Birch, PA/Office Manager; Lucy Stallworthy, Engagement Advisor

Item

Governance role

Summary of Discussions

Direction Setting

Orrin Kapua, Advisor

Georgina Gilmour, Senior Advisor

Setting direction/ keeping informed

Matters arising were:

·    Operating under COVID19 Orange setting

·    Budget reallocations report

Draft Regional Parks Management Plan review

Jo Mackay, Projexct Manager

Tristine le Guerne, Advisor Regional Parks

Input to regional decisionmaking

Staff reported back to the board on submissions received, with some analysis. A report will be presented to the board for formal submission at the April business meeting.

Eke Panuku

Hannah Ross, Senior Community Affairs Advisor

Michael Nettleship, Principal Urban Designer (Architecture)

Janet Kamau, Project Manager

Local initiative/ specific decisions

Staff reported back on consultation for the Roulston Park redevelopment and on the skate part engagement survey. The board indicated their preference on options provided for the projects.

Staff brought a proposal for a popup outdoor tables option for the Pukekohe Town Square, which will be further developed.

 

Item

Governance role

Summary of Discussions

Waterways Protection Grants

Wendy D’Arcy, Senior Healthy Waters Specialilst

Donna Carter, Relationship Advisor

Devika Anilkumar, Grants Advisor

Setting direction/priorities/ budgets

The board reviewed applications for the grant, prior to a report coming to the April business meeting for formal resolution.

The workshop concluded at 1.40pm


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ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Counties Manukau Sport - Impac Lab report   Page 161

Item 8.2      Attachment b    Counties Manukau Sport - KPI report   Page 173


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[1] Annual figures for the 18-month period 30 June 2020 to 31 December 2021, when compared to the prior five-year baseline period.

[2] https://www.transport.govt.nz/statistics-and-insights/safety-annual-statistics/sheet/social-cost-of-road-crashes

[3] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[4] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[5] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[6] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy