I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 18 May 2022

10.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office and Microsoft Teams
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant, JP

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley QSO

 

 

Melanie Kenrick

 

 

Cindy Schmidt

 

 

Andrew Shaw

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Short

Democracy Advisor

 

12 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.short@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              6

6.1     Anne Farrington                                          6

7          Petitions                                                                 7

8          Deputations                                                           7

8.1     Takapuna Golf - Auckland Council's draft Golf Investment Plan                                  7

9          Public Forum                                                                            7

10        Extraordinary Business                                       7

11        Draft Auckland golf investment plan                  9

12        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2022/2023          47

13        Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)                                               55

14        Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations                                                           85

15        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report 249

16        Members' Reports                                            251

17        Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update                 253

18        Governance Forward Work Calendar             255

19        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - April 2022                                                           261

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome / Karakia

 

Text

Description automatically generated

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)        A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)       A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 11 May 2022, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.


 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1       Anne Farrington

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To acknowledge the sudden passing of prominent local Kaipātiki resident Anne Farrington on 7 May 2022 and express its sincere condolences to the Farrington family.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Anne Farrington was appointed Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to women in the 2017 Queen’s Birthday Honours.

3.       In 2017, Anne Farrington was recognised as a Founding, Life Member and serving Committee member for Birkenhead Heritage Society and was acknowledged for her long years of service to the community. Since 1975, Anne has been involved with Soroptimist International, at local, regional, national, federation and international levels.

4.       Soroptimist International was founded in 1921 in Oakland, California and sought to bring about change to the lives of women and girls worldwide – transforming lives through education, empowerment and by enabling opportunities. The name comes from Latin Sorer meaning Sister, and optima meaning best – interpreted as the ‘best for women’.  The Association was awarded Consultative Status with UNESCO in 1949, and ESOCEC  (Economic and Social Council) United Nations in 1950. The first project was to “Save the Redwoods” in California, followed by numerous education programmes worldwide.

5.       In New Zealand, the organisation set up a refugee relief committee for people escaping Europe during WWII. From the start it involved business and professional women and Anne has held a range of leadership positions with her local North Shore club, as Regional President of the Upper North Island clubs, and Treasurer of the Māori Scholarship Trust. She served at the national level as Treasurer and Trustee of a scholarship trust for education ‘for women over 25 years and on a course of study’, and various regional scholarships towards furthering girls’ education.

6.       Anne Farrington had also served on the Council of the Federation of Soroptimist International of the South West Pacific, a member of the team which chose the Soroptimist International Programme focus for the next four years, and Treasurer of the umbrella organisation comprising four Federations. 

7.       Locally Anne had led the Women’s Fellowship of All Saints Anglican Church in Birkenhead, Parish Auditor for 20 years, and completed a similar valuable task for the Birkenhead Heritage Society for many years. Anne and her husband Edward presented the old Villa, which is now the Society Museum, named Farrington House. 

8.       Since 2017, Anne Farrington continued to support the Birkenhead Heritage society, holding Committee Meetings in her home. Providing her advice and knowledge willingly to assist the smooth running of the Museum and society. She was also the financial reviewer for the Annual Report. Anne was a wonderful hostess and friend and she will be greatly missed by many people.            

9.       The Kaipātiki Local Board would like to acknowledge the passing of Anne Farrington and express its sincere condolences to the Farrington family. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      acknowledge the recent passing of Anne Farrington and express its sincere condolences to the Farrington family.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Takapuna Golf - Auckland Council's draft Golf Investment Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Takapuna Golf and Auckland Council’s draft Golf Investment Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       David Haines, Director of Haines Planning and planning adviser to Takapuna Golf, will be in attendance to address the board on this item. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation.

b)      thank David Haines and Takapuna Golf for their attendance and presentation.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/06069

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan entitled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that local boards support the draft Auckland golf investment plan entitled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders;

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups; and

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform regional decision-making.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland golf investment plan entitled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)       increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)       tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion as of 2018.[1]

8.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.     This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment; and

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.     It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders;

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups; and

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[2]

25.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

26.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[3] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation, and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 


 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[4]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

33.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

34.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

35.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

36.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Timeline

Description automatically generated

Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

37.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

38.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

39.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

40.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

41.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

42.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

43.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

44.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf experience could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

45.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

46.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

47.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

48.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

49.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

50.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

51.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

52.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

53.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan


 

 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

54.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

55.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

·     Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

·     The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

56.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

57.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·     51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

·     59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

Description automatically generated

Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

Description automatically generated

People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 


Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 


Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 

28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

58.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

59.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

60.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

61.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

62.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

63.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

64.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

65.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

66.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

67.     Staff recommend that local boards support the adoption of this plan.

68.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

69.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

70.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

71.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

72.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

73.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

74.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

75.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

76.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities;

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates; and

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

77.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

78.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

79.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

80.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

81.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

82.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

83.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

84.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

85.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

86.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

87.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

88.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

89.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

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18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

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Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/00321

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Northcote and Birkenhead Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2022/2034 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Birkenhead Town Centre Inc and Northcote Town Centre Inc, by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rate grants to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each BID’s strategic priorities.

6.       Northcote Town Centre’s members voted on a nil increase to maintain the amount of target rate they will receive at $125,000 for 2022/2023.  

7.       Birkenhead Town Centre Associations members voted to increase the BID targeted grant sum to $206,167 for 2022/2023, a 5% ($9,818) increase.

8.       The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

9.       For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

10.     Council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy, and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

11.     Staff are satisfied both Northcote and Birkenhead associations sufficiently comply with the BID Policy.

12.     Staff propose the Kaipātiki Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the BID targeted rates sought by the Northcote Town Centre and Birkenhead Town Centre business associations.

13.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022. This will enable Northcote Town Centre and Birkenhead Town Centre business associations to implement programmes that improve the local business environment while supporting the economic and placemaking aspirations of the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020.

14.     Northcote Town Centre and Birkenhead Town Centre, like all BID-operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting its members facing two global challenges. A BID programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the flow-on economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A BID programme can facilitate opportunities that address the world’s climate change emergency with a focus on sustainability.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)     $125,000 for Northcote Town Centre Inc.

ii)    $206,167 for Birkenhead Town Centre Association Inc.

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

15.     Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000  more people in the next 30 years (source: Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2025). This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

16.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

17.     The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

18.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to work with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth.

19.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

20.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, affecting both retail-based town centres and commercial precincts.

21.     BID-programme operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.


 

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

22.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all business rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or business precinct.

23.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

24.     This revenue is paid to the business associations every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rate grants

25.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Hōtaka ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

26.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating, and disestablishing BIDs; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements. 

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

 

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The business association sets the BID targeted rate grant amount to deliver its work programme

27.     BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID targeted rate grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the association’s board must consider what the local business and property owners can afford.

28.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

29.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

30.     The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID grant amount for the following financial year.

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate grant if a BID complies with the BID Policy

31.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.  The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the business association is substantially complying with the BID Policy.

32.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the two BID programmes last year (resolution number KT/2021/62), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

The Governing Body sets the targeted rate when it approves the Annual Budget

33.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

34.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

35.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff therefore cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Northcote Town Centre and Birkenhead Town Centre complies with the BID Policy

36.     Staff are satisfied the Northcote and Birkenhead business associations have both sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

37.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·     Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·     Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·     Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·     Business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·     Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the budgeting process which sets all rates.

·     Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the business association and its members.

·     Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·     Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·     AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2021 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

38.     In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any, that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

39.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for this information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

Table 1: Business association compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2022

 

Requirement

Financial Year 2020/2021

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Strategic Plan*

2020-2025

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenexpires 2022

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

2 March 2022

2 March 2022

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to Nov 2023

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green valid to Nov 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2020 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

40.     As Northcote and Birkenhead Business Associations have both sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

Northcote Business Association retains the same BID grant for 2022/2023 Birkenhead Business Association increases by $9,818 to $206,167 pa

41.     Birkenhead’s members voted to increase their BID targeted rate grant sum to $206,167 for 2022/2023, an increase of $9,818 (5%).

42.     Northcote’s members voted to maintain their BID targeted rate grant at $125,000 for 2022/2023.

A regional perspective

43.     Across Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 26 increased their targeted rates - by between 1.6% and 10% - for 2022/2023 while 24 maintained the fiscal status quo.

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2021/2022 c.f. 2020/2021

 

 

   BID

 

2022/2023

 

2021/2022

 

Increase / %

 

 

Northcote

 

 

$125,000

 

 

 

$125,000

 

 

 

Nil

LAST INCREASED: 2020

 

Birkenhead

 

$206,167

 

$196,350

 

$9,818 – 5%

LAST INCREASED: 2016

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

44.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

45.     From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to transitioning to energy-efficient lighting and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BIDs facilitating local responses to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. The BIDs ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and staff across the council group, including CCOs, on those plans, policies, programmes and projects that impact them.

47.     The BIDs work closely with Auckland Unlimited on local economic development initiatives, events and sustainability programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternate) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

49.     Both business associations value their strong and enduring governance-to-governance relationships with the Kaipātiki Local Board. The contributions by the local board’s ‘BID representatives’ (and alternates) have, for many years, promoted mutual understanding, collaboration and aligned economic outcomes.

Visions, plans aligned

50.     Kaipātiki’s BIDs and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

51.     The two BID programmes tangibly support the aspirations of the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020, most notably Outcome 3: Ngā Wāhi me ngā Takiwā | Places and Spaces and Outcome 5: Te Āheinga me te Taurikura | Opportunity and Prosperity.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

52.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Northcote Town Centre and Birkenhead Village means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties in their districts. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

53.     Local boards may provide additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and the business association.  Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     At the 2018 Census, Māori represented 8.7 per cent of the population living in the Kaipātiki Local Board area, compared to 11.5 per cent of AucklandIndividual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe.  The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

56.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties. 

57.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the local boards, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rate for the two business associations.

59.     To sustain trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to members and have its accounts audited.

61.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

62.     The economic impacts of the COVID-19 global pandemic continue to affect Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses. The two Kaipātiki-based BID programmes are, through business resilience and recovery initiatives, helping to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic and lockdown restrictions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     If the board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

64.       After the Annual Budget is approved, the council will collect the targeted rate funds and distribute them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022. This will allow Northcote Town Centre and Birkenhead Village to implement programmes that improve the local business environment, support businesses as they recover from the flow-on effects of lockdowns and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)

File No.: CP2022/06067

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022), including progress and completion of actions since 2015 and prioritisation of actions over the next three years.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) is a strategic document outlining how Auckland Council will invest in community facilities. It was approved by Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2015.

3.       The accompanying Action Plan prioritises actions and projects that will be undertaken to implement the CFNP. The CFNP contains criteria for identifying and prioritising actions. 

4.       Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions. The Action Plan was last updated in 2019.

5.       The Action Plan has been revised for 2022 using the methodology outlined in the CFNP. It contains 33 new actions.

6.       There are now 155 total actions in the Action Plan including:

·    65 completed actions

·    36 actions underway

·    50 actions to start

·    4 actions on hold.

7.       Implementation of priority actions within the revised Action Plan will initially focus on:

·    completing 36 actions that are already underway

·    starting four new area-based actions located in Investment Priority Areas

·    starting two network-wide strategic improvement actions.

8.       Feedback from local boards will be part of the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in August 2022 (when considering the adoption of the Action Plan).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)   support the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022), provided in Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

What is the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan?

9.       The Community Facilities Network Plan and its companion Action Plan were approved in 2015 by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (resolution number REG/2015/57).

10.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) guides the council’s investment in the provision of community facilities and services. It provides direction on the development of new facilities, major upgrades of existing facilities, optimisation, and potential divestment of facilities no longer meeting community needs.

11.     The CFNP addresses provision for:

·    arts and culture facilities

·    community centres

·    libraries

·    pools and leisure facilities

·    venues for hire (community or rural halls).

12.     The CFNP’s accompanying Action Plan prioritises projects to:

·    ensure existing facilities are fit for purpose

·    address gaps or duplication in provision and needs for community facilities

·    meet future demand arising from population growth and changing users’ expectations.

13.     Together the CFNP and its companion Action Plan support council’s goal to focus community service investment on:

·    quality over quantity

·    addressing service gaps where growth is significant

·    improving portfolio performance.

The Action Plan is revised every three years

14.     Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions.

15.     The Action Plan was last reviewed in 2018 and adopted by the Environment and Community Committee in April 2019 (resolution number ENV/2019/47).

16.     Progress on the Action Plan is reported annually to the relevant committees. The last update was provided to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in November 2021 (resolution number PAC/2021/58).

17.     A summary of progress on the revised 2022 Action Plan is provided in Attachment B. It shows that 65 actions are completed, 36 actions are underway, 50 actions have not started, and 4 actions are on hold.

Actions are structured by category, theme and progress 

18.     There are three categories and two themes of actions in the Action Plan (refer Table 1).

Table 1: CFNP Action Plan categories

19.     The 2022 Action Plan presents actions in two parts.

·    Part A – new actions (identified since the last review) and actions carried over from the previous review which have not been started.

·    Part B – actions underway at the time of the review and previously completed actions.

Departments work together to identify business and strategic improvement actions

20.     The development of new business and strategic improvements involved Community & Social Policy, Community Facilities, and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships. These departments worked together to support quality advice and to improve the way we plan and prioritise delivery of community services.

The identification of area-based actions follows a set process

21.     The process for the development of area-based actions in Part A of the 2022 Action Plan is set by the CFNP and shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Review process for 2022 CFNP Action Plan

Text

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22.     Potential area-based actions for Part A were identified from a range of sources:

·    political resolutions requesting the addition of items to the Action Plan

·    work arising from completed actions in the Action Plan 2019

·    the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

·    local board plan initiatives and work programmes

·    input from business intelligence and across the Auckland Council organisation

·    actions not started in the Action Plan 2019.

Area-based actions are prioritised through the weighting of network, community, and building criteria

23.     Once identified, the master list of area-based actions was assessed based on the prioritisation criteria outlined in section 5.2 of the CFNP (refer Table 2).

Table 2: Prioritisation criteria for area-based actions as defined by the CFNP

24.     The tools used to conduct the assessment included population data, geospatial information, asset condition information, and in some instances needs assessments and business cases.

The priorities in the CFNP Action Plan guide the focus of our resources

25.     The impact of Covid-19 and the resulting economic slow-down has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. The 10-year Budget (Recovery Budget), adopted 29 June 2021, highlights:

·    a tight fiscal environment for the immediate future

·    the need to reduce capital expenditure across the council family

·    reprioritisation of projects

·    the unsustainability of maintaining the current community facility network while meeting the needs of growing and changing communities.

26.     The ‘focused investment’ approach for community investment, adopted as part of the 10-year Budget, means we must focus on renewing priority assets, reducing our asset portfolio, expanding provision of tailored/alternative service delivery models and exploring partnership opportunities.

27.     The approach for community investment supports the direction of the CFNP and in this constrained environment, priority actions determined by the criteria in the CFNP are guiding the focus of our resources.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The revised CFNP Action Plan 2022

28.     The revised Action Plan 2022 is provided in Attachment A.

29.     Table 3 shows the distribution of all actions in the Action Plan 2022 and progress of actions since the Community Facilities Network Plan was adopted in 2015.

Table 3: Summary of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan

30.     Attachment B shows the progress status of the revised 2022 Action Plan, as well as the distribution of actions across local boards, service type and priority status.

31.     The progress being made on actions demonstrates staff’s commitment to focusing resources on a collectively agreed and mandated programme of work, as well as the commitment to delivering agreed priorities in a constrained environment.

The focus of the CFNP Action Plan work programme 2022/2023

32.     The focus of next year’s work will be towards completing priority actions that; are already in progress, are located in Investment Priority Areas (identified in the 10-year Budget) or are strategic improvements with a network-wide reach (refer Table 4).

33.     This focus ensures our effort is scalable and our advice about investment in community facilities is more effective. The efficiency created will allow us to concentrate on the priority actions that have not yet been started.

Table 4: Summary of proposed work programme for 2022/2023

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Consideration of climate impact happens at a project level. There are no direct climate impacts arising from this report on the action plan.

35.     Future detailed business cases will include application of the Community Facilities – Sustainable Asset Policy. The regional policy, the first of three phases under the council’s Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS), commits council to:

·    achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development

·    achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on the development of all new assets with a budget over $10 million

·    incorporate decarbonisation principles into guideline documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets.

36.     The assessment of climate impacts in investigations and business cases will improve by applying learnings from across the organisation in its responsiveness to climate change. Staff will also seek to understand the allowances that need to be made to meet climate impact targets for Action Plan projects related to the development of new facilities, or the improvement of existing facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     During the development of the Action Plan 2022 input has been sought from the following departments:

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

·    Local Board Services

·    Parks Sports and Recreation

·    Financial and Business Performance

·    Connected Communities

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy.

38.     Delivery of the Action Plan 2022 is resourced by council’s Community & Social Policy and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships teams subject to capacity. Individual actions are delivered with participation from other departments and, where relevant, Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Local boards provided feedback on direction and specific content during the development of the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan prior to adoption in 2015. 

40.     Key initiatives from local board plans (2020) were an input of the review process for the development of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan (refer Figure 1).

41.     The CFNP’s prioritisation criteria applies the highest weighting of 15 per cent to local board priority to ensure local board’s views influence the overall assessment of actions. 

42.     Progressing area-based actions are reflected in relevant local board work programmes. Local boards provide feedback and input throughout the investigations and have decision making responsibilities as per schedule the 10-year Budget 2021-31

43.     Decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within funding parameters set by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The Community Facilities Network Plan outlines, in Section 2.2, how it will deliver on Māori outcomes. These outcomes include:

·    engage with Māori organisations to understand Māori expectations and investigate the community needs of Māori groups, and factor this into decision-making for community facilities

·    actively engage and consult to ensure the planning, development, and operations of facilities consider Māori needs and aspirations

·    work closely with Māori groups and key stakeholders, including local iwi, to develop appropriate cultural programmes to be delivered through facilities

·    investigate Māori demographic participation and usage trends, identifying opportunities to increase the attendance and use of facilities by Māori and developing appropriate business responses

·    provide visual representations of commitment to Māori to tell stories of their connections to the place (such as signage) and honouring tikanga

·    ensure that, in any exploration of potential future sites for facilities, Māori concerns about wāhi tapu are incorporated.

45.     Engagement with Māori is included as part of investigations and continues through the planning and delivery of responses. Examples include:

·    interviews and hui with mana whenua

·    interviews and hui with mataawaka in local settings to understand community needs

·    workshops and focus groups with local marae

·    intercept surveys with representative samples of the Māori population base

·    kanohi ki te kanohi interviews conducted in Te Reo Māori.

 

46.     Feedback provided from Māori is specific to the nature of the investigation for which the engagement occurred. This feedback is used to inform the delivery of options and responses.

47.     Staff will work with other relevant parts of the council to ensure effective engagement with Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     There are currently no identified financial implications for the delivery of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022 as work is delivered utilising existing resources.

49.     Investment decisions and associated funding implications are reported separately to the relevant decision-maker(s).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     There is a risk that development of the Action Plan 2022 may not match local board priorities, as implementation of the Action Plan involves understanding service needs and taking a network view. This risk is mitigated by:

·    continuing to socialise and reinforce the strategic objectives of the CFNP to elected members, key staff, and through all deliverables 

·    clarifying local board plans were reviewed and any potential community service-related content was considered for potential inclusion as an action

·    including One Local Initiative projects into the Action Plan 2022.

51.     There is financial risk that:

·    budget allocated in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 may be insufficient to deliver some of the action findings

·    the need for significant new investment identified from actions will be challenging due to the impact Covid-19 has had on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity

·    some investigations may require changes to the funding identified in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

52.     This financial risk is mitigated by:

·    ensuring investigations include looking at options for funding other than rates or debt

·    ensuring findings of investigations that require new investment are supported by indicative business cases

·    managing expectations by acknowledging budget constraints

·    managing expectations by acknowledging the delegation for decision-making on investment in new facilities is held by the Governing Body and is considered as part of long-term planning (decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within parameters set by the Governing Body).

53.     There is a timing risk that delivery of actions may take longer because of reduced operational capacity and may not align with elected members and/or local communities’ expectations.  This risk is mitigated by driving delivery to meet targeted timeframes for priority actions and managing expectations based on the principles and direction set by the CFNP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Local board resolutions will be included in the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider adoption of the Action Plan in August 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment A - Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP)

65

b

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Attachment B - Focus of Community Facilities Action Plan 2022

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Williams - Service Programmes Lead

Angela Clarke - Head of Service Investment & Programming

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 



Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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18 May 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/06002

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Kaipātiki Local Board with information on applications in Kaipātiki Grants, Local Grants Round Three and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022; to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

3.       The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted the Kaipātiki Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board (refer to Attachment D of the agenda report).

4.       The local board has set a total of $149,456 for community grants from its Local Driven Initiatives Operational budget (LDI Opex) for the 2021/2022 financial year which covers three local grant rounds and two multi-board grant rounds.

5.       Twenty-two applications were received for Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three requesting a total of $179,090.75. An additional ten multi-board applications were received for Multiboard Grants Round Two, requesting $38,780.

6.       The total amount requested, for the two grant rounds, is $217,870.75

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three 2021/2022 listed in the following table: 

Table One: Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three 2021/2022 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2208-301

Neighbourhood Support North Shore Incorporated

Community

Towards the managers salary between 2nd June 2022 till 1st June 2023

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-305

Beach Haven and Birkdale Community Watch

Community

Towards petrol vouchers for volunteers.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-306

New Zealand Taiji Martial Arts Society

Sport and recreation

Towards the venue hire of Northcote Community Hall between 1st June 2022 and 31st May 2023.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-307

The Upside Downs Education Trust

Community

Towards subsidized speech and language therapy for five children.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-310

Birkenhead Bowling Club Incorporated

Community

Towards roof repair costs.

$8,309.00

Eligible

LG2208-311

ToughLove New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards advertising and training materials of six-week email course between 1st June 2022 and 31st May 2023.

$2,174.00

Eligible

LG2208-312

Life Education Trust North Shore

Community

Towards Child Healthcare programme`s take home resources for 3500 students.

$2,500.00

Eligible

LG2208-313

Birkenhead United Association Football & Sports Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the preliminary design and consenting ‍
costs of the Birkenhead football club upgrade between 5th October 2022 and 24th April 2023.

$57,821.75

Eligible

LG2208-314

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the training and supervisions costs of volunteer staff.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-315

Birkenhead Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the administration, promotion and management of the Birkenhead Photo Competition 2022 and production of 5th Anniversary photo book.

$7,930.00

Eligible

LG2208-316

North Harbour Triathlon Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the pool and hall hire charges between 1st June 2022 and 30th September 2022.

$9,154.00

Eligible

LG2208-317

North Shore Music Theatre Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards purchase of new seating platforms.

$19,880.00

Eligible

LG2208-318

North Shore Budget Service Incorporated

Community

Towards website upgrade, marketing, new laptop and desktop system.

$10,250.00

Eligible

LG2208-319

Glenfield Tennis Club

Sport and recreation

Towards the fees of the coach for the Junior coaching Programme which runs between 17th October 2022 and 17th December 2022.

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-320

Sunnybrae Normal School

Community

Towards the plants, fertilizer, compost, building materials and labour for the gazebo in the Sunnybrae Bush Project.

$4,500.00

Eligible

LG2208-322

Melanoma New Zealand

Community

Towards the wages of the Nurse Educator and Administrator for 2 days between 1st July 2022 and 31st October 2022

$1,260.00

Eligible

LG2208-323

Northcote Town Centre Inc

Community

Towards the upgrade of three existing CCTV cameras and installation of two new CCTV cameras at the Northcote town centre.

$7,500.00

Eligible

LG2208-324

Badminton New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards Venue hire for the North Island Inter-Association competition between 11th June 2022 and 23rd July 2022

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-325

Willow Christian Trust

Community

Towards purchase of 50inch TV Screen and wall mount for Community Centre foyer entrance.

$1,203.00

Eligible

LG2208-326

Auckland King Tides Initiative

under the umbrella of "The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Inc"

Environment

Towards the design and production of the CoastSnap device, to be installed at Little Shoal Bay/Beach Haven.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-327

Action Education Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards 20 spoken word workshops costs between 1st June 2022 and 31st May 2023

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2208-328

Shepherds Park Squash Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards marketing brochures and heat pump installation.

$3,609.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$179,090.75

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022, listed in Table Two:

Table Two: Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant applications

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2022-214

North Harbour Community Patrol

Community

Towards resources for mobile crime prevention patrols in suburbs in Devonport-Takapuna, Hibiscus and Bays, Kaipātiki, and Upper Harbour (June 2022 - May 2023)

$1,317.00

Eligible

MB2022-215

The Reading Revolution

Community

Towards wages of the manager delivering the "Readers Leaders programme"

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-225

Outline Aotearoa Incorporated

Community

Towards cost of the peer support service programme`s volunteer training, clinical supervision, advertising, stationery, insurance and information technology service.

$1,250.00

Eligible

MB2022-236

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards operational costs (such as wages, rent, transport, equipment) to recruit volunteer mentors for young boys with no father in their lives in Auckland (September 2022 - September 2023)

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-237

Pet Refuge New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards administration costs for the Pet Refuge shelter in Rosedale Auckland (June 2022 - December 2022)

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-239

The Operating Theatre Trust t/a Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards Gift a Seat funding for 2,700 children to attend The Whale Rider in their local area for free (September 2022 - December 2022)

$3,913.00

Eligible

MB2022-243

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the marketing material costs and wages of co-ordinators and facilitators of the Community Education Webinars.

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-244

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of youth worker wages, project coordination, external facilitation and administration fees to run 12 weekly recreational programmes between 6 June 2022 to 10 March 2023.

$1,800.00

Eligible

MB2022-248

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Community

Towards items to deliver the KidsCan programme in schools and early childhood centres in Auckland (June 2022 - December 2022)

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-260

Glass Ceiling Arts Collective Limited

Community

Towards the wages and professional fees of three teachers, a support person, a creative director, a producer, one film editor and a photographer for two days workshop.

$10,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$38,780.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Kaipātiki Local Board adopted its grants programme for 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 (refer to Attachment C of the agenda report). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria.The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Kaipātiki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Kaipātiki Local Board Community Grant Programme 2021/2022.

17.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

18.     A summary of each application received through Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three 2021/2022 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (to Attachment B of the agenda report) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements

21.     The local board has set a total of $149,456 for community grants from its Local Driven Initiatives Operational budget (LDI Opex) for the 2021/2022 financial year which covers three local grant rounds and two multi-board grant rounds.

22.     Twenty-two applications were received for Kaipātiki Local Grants Round Three requesting a total of $179,090.75 An additional ten multi-board applications were received for Multiboard Grants Round One, requesting $38,780.

23.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Kaipātiki Local Board allocation of funding for Local Grants Round Three 2021/2022 and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022, Commercial and Finance staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Local Grants Round Three Applications Summary

95

b

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Multiboard Round Two Applications Summary

195

c

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Grant Programme 2021/2022

245

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ann Kuruvilla - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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18 May 2022

 

 

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18 May 2022

 

 

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18 May 2022

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2022/00235

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2022/00243

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2022/00251

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Maori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Maori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/03155

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2022 and an overview of workshops scheduled for the month ahead.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local board’s governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities;

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when; and

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The June - July 2022 governance forward work calendar for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       The May - June 2022 workshop forward work plan for the Kaipātiki Local Board is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Scheduled items may change at short notice depending on the urgency of matters presented to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Kaipātiki Local Board June - July 2022 governance forward work calendar and May – June 2022 workshop forward work plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Governance Forward Work Calendar June - July 2022

257

b

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Workshop Forward Work Plan, May - June 2022

259

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - April 2022

File No.: CP2022/03157

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 6 April 2022, Wednesday 13 April 2022 and Wednesday 27 April 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 6 April 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Community Facilities Network Plan Revised Action Plan 2022

·     Infrastructure & Environmental Services

-     Water Quality Monitoring and Implementation

·     Locally Driven Initiatives Capex budgets

·     Birkenhead War Memorial Park Masterplan – One Local Initiative (OLI)

·     Auckland Transport

-     Onewa Road Clearway

·     Draft Regional Parks Management Plan

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 13 April 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Connected Communities

-     Future management of Northcote War Memorial Hall (Highbury Community House) and Birkdale Hall (Birkdale Beach Haven Community Project)

·     Local Board Annual Planning – Performance Measures and Fees and Charges

·     CCO Joint Engagement Plans – review in preparation for agreeing 2022/23 plan

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 27 April 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Community Facilities

-     Proposed local parks renewals funding for Kauri Dieback projects for the 2022/2023 – 2024/2025 financial years

·     Northcote Update

-     Te Ara Awataha update

-     Kainga Ora update

-     Eke Panuku town centre update

-     Northcote transport 

·     Māori Outcomes & AIM Services

-     Beach Haven Uruamo Maranga Ake Marae update

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 6 April 2022, Wednesday 13 April 2022 and Wednesday 27 April 2022. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 6 April 2022
workshop record

263

b

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 13 April 2022
workshop record

265

c

18 May 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - 27 April 2022
workshop record

267

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Short - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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18 May 2022

 

 

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[1] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[2] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[3] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[4] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy