I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Manurewa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 May 2022

6.00pm

Manurewa Local Board Office
7 Hill Road
Manurewa

 

Manurewa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Joseph Allan

 

Deputy Chairperson

Melissa Moore

 

Members

Anne Candy

 

 

Tabetha Gorrie

 

 

Rangi McLean

 

 

Glenn Murphy

 

 

Ken Penney

 

 

Dave Pizzini

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rohin Patel

Democracy Advisor

 

11 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 914 618

Email: rohin.patel@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

8.1    Deputation - Ngāti Tamaoho                                                5

8.2    Deputation - Manukau Branch of National Council of Women                                                                                   6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 6

11        Governing Body Members' Update                                              9

12        Members' Update                                                                         11

13        Chairperson's Update                                                                  13

14        Auckland Transport Report May 2022                                       15

15        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes                                                                     19

16        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) target rate grants for 2022/2023                                                                    31

17        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022                                   39

18        Draft Auckland golf investment plan                                         87

19        Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2022                                                                                      127

20        Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records                           133

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

A board member will lead the meeting in prayer.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)           confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 12 May 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Manurewa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Ngāti Tamaoho

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   Matekino Marshall, CEO of Ngāti Tamaoho, will speak to the board about their aspirations for the year and what their priorities are.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Matekino Marshall, CEO of Ngāti Tamaoho, for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Manukau Branch of National Council of Women

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   Judi Goldsworthy from the Manukau Branch of National Council of Women will speak to the board to seek assistance in finding office style accommodation for the organisation.         

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      thank Judi Goldsworthy from the Manukau Branch of National Council of Women for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Governing Body Members' Update

File No.: CP2022/05162

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for the ward area Governing Body members to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provide for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive verbal updates from Councillors Angela Dalton and Daniel Newman.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Members' Update

File No.: CP2022/05163

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for members to update the Manurewa Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      An opportunity for members of the Manurewa Local Board to give a written or verbal update on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the update from members.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Chairperson's Update

File No.: CP2022/05164

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on issues he has been involved in.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      An opportunity for the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson to update the local board on his activities over the last month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal report from the Manurewa Local Board Chairperson.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport Report May 2022

File No.: CP2022/05937

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To update the Manurewa Local Board about transport related matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The purpose of the report is to provide an update on transport related items including:

·    Truck parking at night

·    Half price fares

·    Safety improvement projects

·    Waiata Shores bridge

·    Ram raids and bollards.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the May 2022 report from Auckland Transport.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.      Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. AT reports on a regular basis to local boards, as set out in the Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within and on behalf of their local communities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

4.      This section of the report contains information about relevant projects, issues and initiatives. It provides summaries of the detailed advice and analysis provided to the local board during workshops and briefings.

Truck parking at night

5.      In 2021, AT in conjunction with New Zealand Police, New Zealand Transport Agency and Accident Compensation Commission undertook a study on truck parking at night. One of the findings was the low level of compliance about putting a red light at the back of the truck. The main findings were:

·    Mangere, Manukau and Manurewa are the areas with the highest numbers (over 35 per cent of the total of infringement notices)

·    Takanini and Ōtara present high numbers too, with over 15 per cent of the total

·    the issue is predominant in south and east Auckland.

6.      AT is now in the process of preparing an awareness campaign to educate the drivers. Once the material is prepared it will be shared with local board members.

Half price fares

7.      From 1 April, fares across the AT metro public transport network dropped by 50 per cent, saving passengers an estimated $10 million on bus, train and ferry fares over three months.

8.      As well as covering individual trips, the discount covers all AT HOP monthly passes and concessions, and halves the current daily cap from $20, meaning Aucklanders will never pay more than $10 for a day’s travel on the AT metro network. Total Mobility and AT Local will be included in the initiative.

9.      The decision by government to temporarily halve public transport fares and reduce petrol excise duties and road user charges will provide some immediate relief to commuters, particularly those on low and fixed incomes.

10.    The price difference between driving and catching public transport will be substantial, with our $10 daily cap meaning passengers could travel from Pukekohe to Gulf Harbour and back for the price of about 3.5 litres of petrol.

Safety improvement projects

11.    There are currently three safety improvement projects underway in the road corridor running between Grand Vue Road and Alfriston Road. These are at different stages of their implementation, and are summarised below.

Location

Project

Status

Grand Vue/Hill Roads intersection

Intersection improvements

Modelling of traffic surveys

Hill/Claude Roads

Signalisation

Consultation analysis

Claude/Alfriston Roads

Signalisation

Utility issues resolved, preconstruction planning underway

Waiata Shores bridge

12.    AT approved additional funding, that is in the order of 50 per cent above the original sum of $50,000, for the offer of services (OoS) received for the feasibility study, While some aspects of the investigation are on-going, AT’s project manager will present to both the Papakura and Manurewa local boards on the three proposed bridge site options.

Ram raids and bollards

13.    Prominent in the media is the significant increase of ram raids in Auckland. This escalation has not just targeted local dairies and liquor stores but malls and high-end fashion outlets.

14.    AT has been liaising with business associations and providing the following guidelines.

15.    AT generally does not install bollards outside businesses for building protection purposes, due to the high costs of ongoing maintenance at the expense of the public.

16.    However, where a site has experienced ram-raiding or repeated vehicle accidents, AT will consider the installation of bollards near the front of their building at the landowner’s expense.

The requirements are as follows:

·    The applicant will need to submit a written application, with details of the incident and either include a police report or insurance claim / recommendation.

·    Provide a detailed plan, drawing or picture of the bollards they are wanting to install, with specific details of the location they are wanting to place the bollards.

·    The landowner will be responsible for all costs associated with the installation, removal and ongoing maintenance, and they must keep the bollards in a good and safe condition.

·    The applicant must undertake a proper footpath assessment to ensure the installation of bollards does not interfere or affect any underground utility services.

·    Any work undertaken on the footpath must obtain a Corridor Access Request (CAR) permit before digging commences. Details of this process is available on our website: Corridor Access Requests (at.govt.nz)

·    The landowner must also obtain and fully comply with any statutory consent requirements, such as building and/or resource consent – which may be required from Auckland Council

·    Auckland Transport reserves the right to withdraw its authorisation if it is determined the footpath site is required for future redevelopment projects. Should this eventuate, the property owner will be given a thirty-day (30 day) notification period to allow for the bollard/s to be removed.

General bollard requirements:

·    Bollards should be installed directly outside the building (within 500 millimetres of the building)

·    The minimum height for bollards is 1000 millimetres

·    Bollards must have a colour contrast to the existing environment. For example, black is not considered a suitable contrast if the background is a dark colour

·    Footpaths need to have at minimum 1.8 metre clearance. Obstacles and hazards must be kept clear of the main travel route for pedestrians - especially for visually impaired (low vision) or blind pedestrians

·    Applicants can contact Loretta Su’a-Chang, Senior Transport Engineer, at Loretta.Chang@at.govt.nz if they require further assistance with the process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.    AT engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

18.    AT’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

19.    There is a growing global, national and local need to urgently address the threats posed by climate change through reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The scientific evidence is compelling. In New Zealand the Climate Change Response (Zero-Carbon) Act was enacted in 2019, which requires national GHG emissions to be net-zero by 2050. In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency, followed by the endorsement in July 2020 of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

20.    Tackling climate change will require a very significant change to the way we travel around our region although the timing and the detail of how this change might unfold are still to become obvious. Auckland Council has climate change targets. Auckland Council through the Auckland Climate Plan has committed to a 50 percent reduction in emissions by 2030, the amount required to keep the planet within 1.5°C of warming by 2100.

21.    Roughly five percent of Auckland’s road and rail strategic networks are found in areas susceptible to coastal inundation, including parts of the state highway network which are crucial links for freight movements and access to key regional destinations. Over 1,000km (or about 13 percent) of AT’s local road network has recently been identified as vulnerable to a 1-in-100-year flood event. AT is currently identifying and prioritising the risks of climate change to the transport system (assets, services, customers and staff) to permit a more strategic approach to designing and managing our assets in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.    The impact of information (or decisions) in this report are confined to AT and do not impact on other parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.    The purpose of this report is to inform the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.    There are no impacts specific to Māori for this reporting period. AT is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi-the Treaty of Waitangi-and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

25.    Our Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to with 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them.

26.    This plan in full is available on the AT’s Website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.    There are no direct financial implications as this is an information report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.    Risks are managed as part of each AT project.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.    A report will be prepared for the July business meeting.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas – Elected Members Relationship Manager

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2022/05674

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek local board feedback on Phase Three (previously called Tranche 2B) of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport-related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.      Setting safe and appropriate speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. Evidence from changes made in 2020 demonstrates that safe and appropriate speed limits are effective in reducing road trauma.

4.      Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and recently completed public consultation on proposed Phase Three changes with the community. A list of changes proposed within this local board area is provided as Attachment A.

5.      Public consultation on changes proposed in Phase Three closed on 3 April 2022 and a summary of public responses is provided as Attachment B. Local boards are now invited to provide their feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on speed limit changes proposed as part of Phase Three of Auckland Transport’s Safe Speeds Programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.      Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use.

Alignment with Central Government Policy

7.      Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

8.      Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

9.      Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the Auckland Transport Board, Auckland Transport has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speed limits on many roads.

10.    In this phase, the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools, high-risk rural roads, rural marae, and roads requested by the community.

11.    Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Phase Three took place from 28 February - 3 April 2022, and included the following measures:

a)   flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes near roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

b)   advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist, and ethnic media

c)   radio advertising on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

d)   radio interviews and adlibs on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

e)   media releases

f)    social media campaigns

g)   an article published in OurAuckland

h)   translation of consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Braille and NZ Sign Language

i)    flyers, posters and hardcopy FreePost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

j)    15 online webinars, including a Mandarin language webinar

k)   a community drop-in session on Aotea Great Barrier.

12.    The community was able to provide their thoughts via a number of channels:

a)   online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

b)   a paper survey

c)   a web-based mapping tool

d)   emails direct to the Safe Speeds Programme Team

e)   at public hearings held on 6 April 2022.

13.    Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May (Attachment B) and now have the opportunity to provide feedback on Phase Three proposed speed limit changes within their local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.    Auckland Transport manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. This includes setting speed limits, and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted Auckland Transport has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and local boards.

15.    Auckland Transport’s first phase of reviewing and setting new speed limits was developing the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) that enabled AT to set new speed limits for Auckland’s highest risk roads.

16.    The impact of the changes made in this bylaw have been significant and support the claim that by setting safe and appropriate speed limits in Auckland, we reduce community harm.

17.    Since 30 June 2020, in areas where speed limits were changed, fatal crashes have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) during the 18-month period since this action was taken.[1]

18.    This change was most significant on rural roads where roads with reduced speed limits recorded a 71 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and more than a 25 per cent reduction in serious injury crashes.

19.    In selected locations, speed limit changes are complemented by physical speed calming measures such as speed bumps, raised pedestrian crossings, kerb changes and road marking. These physical measures help reinforce the safe and appropriate speed limits and assist with pedestrians and cyclists crossing busy roads. Physical measures are installed based upon risk, with a focus on locations such as town centres, residential areas and roads near schools.

20.    It will take time to confirm that these trends are sustained, however this initial impact is promising and indicates the effectiveness of the ‘Vision Zero’ approach. Overseas data records a similar impact on harm reduction and Auckland Transport’s advice to local boards is that the programme is working and should be supported.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.    The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.    In town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced during Phase One of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of people saying they now participate in at least one active mode (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.    Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.    Auckland Transport has held workshops with local boards throughout the various phases of the Safe Speeds programme.

25.    Summaries of local submissions on changes proposed in Phase Three were provided to local boards in early May to inform their consideration of this topic.

26.    This report seeks feedback from the local board on the proposed speed limit changes within Phase Three of the Safe Speeds Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.    Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

28.    AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website at https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

29.    Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

30.    Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The Safe Speeds Programme is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

31.    Engagement with iwi at the AT northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui took place on the wider programme during 2021, and in early 2022 to introduce the Interim Speed Management Plan. Detailed engagement with individual rural marae as part of Phase Three commenced mid-2021 and is ongoing, with each marae typically requiring a tailored approach that takes into account localised safety issues.

32.    Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of Phase Three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.    Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme this programme has considerable financial implications.

34.    In 2017, the social cost of road harm in Auckland was about $1.1 billion.[2] These costs are paid by all Aucklanders. There is the cost of health care for those injured and - for some - lifetime rehabilitation and support. There is a cost to families, businesses and the region of those who can no longer live and work as they did before due to road deaths and serious injuries.

35.    Reducing the harm caused by road accidents impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that local boards represent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.    Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    The consultation length was extended from four to five weeks.

·    The number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased.

·    Digital advertising spend was increased and included Mandarin language public webinars and social media advertising.

37.    Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.    The new speed limits are proposed to come into force at the end of November 2022.

39.    The November 2022 date may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept up to date if any changes are made.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Manurewa Local Board - Proposed speed limit changes - phase 3

25

b

Attachment B - Safe Speeds Programme Public feedback on proposed speed limit change March/April 2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annie Ferguson – Communications and Engagement, Auckland Transport

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Nathan Cammock – Programme Director, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) target rate grants for 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/00479

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Manurewa and Wiri Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.      Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Manurewa Business Association (MBA) and Wiri Business Association (WBA), by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

4.      Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.

5.      Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each association’s BID strategic priorities.

6.      MBA members approved a BID targeted rate grant amount of $315,000 for 2022/2023. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

7.      WBA members approved a BID targeted rate grant amount of $755,425 for 2022/2023. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

8.      The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

9.      For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

10.    The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

11.    Staff are satisfied both MBA and WBA sufficiently comply with the BID Policy.

12.    Staff propose the Manurewa Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the BID targeted rate grants sought by MBA and WBA as part of the council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023 decision-making.

13.    After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022. This enables MBA and WBA to implement programmes that contribute to Outcome 5: Our prosperous local economy supports local people, thereby supporting the aspirations of the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020.

14.    Manurewa’s BID programmes, managed by the two BID-operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting its members facing two global challenges. A BID programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the economic flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A BID programme can also facilitate opportunities that address the climate change emergency, with a focus on sustainability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)        $315,000 for Manurewa Business Association

ii)       $755,425 for Wiri Business Association.

 

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

15.    The Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 reports Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

16.    Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, promote innovation and attract new businesses and customers.

17.    The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

18.    BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to work with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth. 

19.    BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

20.    The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects of extended COVID-19 lockdowns, affecting both retail-based town centres and industrial precincts.

21.    BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

22.    BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all business rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct.

23.    Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

24.    This revenue is paid to the business association every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rate grants

25.    Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate grant funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

26.    The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing BID programmes; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

 

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

The business association sets the BID targeted rate grant amount to deliver its work programme

27.    BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID targeted rate grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID targeted rate grant amount, the association’s board must take into account what the local business and property owners can afford.

28.    Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

29.    The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

30.    The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID targeted rate grant amount for the following financial year.

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate grant if a BID complies with the BID Policy

31.    Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities relating to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rate grants to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

32.    The Manurewa Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the two BID programmes last year (resolution number MR/2021/67), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

The Governing Body sets the targeted rates when it approves the Annual Budget

33.    The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

34.    In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

35.    BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Both business associations comply with the BID Policy

36.    Staff are satisfied that MBA and WBA have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

37.    Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·   Business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·   AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2021 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

38.    In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration – a current registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any – problems or issues that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

39.    The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

 

Table 1: Business associations’ compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2022

 

Requirement

Financial Year 2020/2021

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A picture containing logo

Description automatically generated

Strategic Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2021 - 2025

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2022 - 2027

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

10 March 2022

10 March 2022

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to November 2022

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to December 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2020 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

40.    As MBA and WBA have sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates.

 

Manurewa and Wiri Business Association retained their current BID targeted rate grant amounts for 2022/2023

41.    As shown in Table 2 below:

·    Manurewa has maintained its BID targeted rate grant at $315,000 for the 2022/2023 financial year. Records show this business association last increased the sum in 2020/2021 by expanding Manurewa BID programme boundary area.

·    Wiri has maintained its BID targeted rate grant at $755,425 for the 2022/2023 financial year. Records show this business association last increase the sum in 2020/2021.

A regional perspective   

42.    Across Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 26 increased their targeted rates between 1.6 per cent to 10 per cent - for 2022/2023, while 24 maintained the fiscal status quo.

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2022/2023 c.f. 2021/2022

 

 

   BID

 

2022/2023

 

2021/2022

 

Increase / %

 

 

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$315,000

 

 

 

$315,000

 

 

Nil

A picture containing logo

Description automatically generated

 

 

$755,425

 

 

 

$755,425

 

 

Nil

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.    Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

44.    From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to promoting online channels and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BID programmes leading the local business sector’s response to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

45.    Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes and projects that impact them.

46.    The BID-operating business associations work with Auckland Unlimited (AU) on economic development initiatives, events and sustainability programmes.

47.    The BID-operating business associations also work constructively with both Eke Panuku and Auckland Transport on often controversial proposals and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.    The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

49.    MBA and WBA BID-operating business associations value their strong and enduring governance-to-governance relationship with the Manurewa Local Board. The contributions by the local board’s ‘BID representatives’, past and present, have promoted mutual understanding, collaboration and aligned economic outcomes.

 

Visions, plans aligned

50.    The BID-operating business associations and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

51.    Manurewa and Wiri BID programmes tangibly support the vision and aspirations of the Manurewa Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 5: Our prosperous local economy supports local people.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

52.    Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for both the Manurewa and Wiri business associations means that the BID programmes will continue to be funded from targeted rates on business rated properties within their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

53.    Manurewa Local Board is among several local boards which provides additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and each business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.    Māori make up more than 26 per cent of the population living in the Manurewa Local Board area, compared to 11.5 pern cent of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.    There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

56.    The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties. 

57.    If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rate grants proposed by the business associations, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.    There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rate grants for these business associations.

59.    To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.    The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

61.    The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

62.    Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of COVID-19 pandemic will continue to be felt in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses. The BID programmes in this local board area can, through business resilience and recovery initiatives, help to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.    If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

64.    After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022, to the Manurewa and Wiri BID-operating business associations. This enables the associations to implement their BID programmes that improve the local business environment and support businesses as they recover from the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Manurewa Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/05934

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Manurewa Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.      The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Manurewa Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.      The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Reduced attendance numbers at community venues and leisure centres in the local board area due to COVID-19 Protection Framework restrictions.

·        Cancellation of Jazz at Nathan and Movies in Parks events planned for this quarter due to COVID-19 restrictions.

·        Delivery of 58 out of 99 scheduled Active Recreation activations for the year, with delivery of the remaining activations expected by 30 June 2022.

·        A clean-up event at Trimdon Reserve where 23 volunteers removed 1,600 kilograms of rubbish from in and around the Papakura Stream.

5.      All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk): 

·        Randwick Park Skate Activation

·        Clendon Community House / Finlayson Community House - refurbish facility.

6.      Net operating performance for Manurewa local board area is just one-point-three per cent over budget for the year to date ended 31 March 2022. Operating expenditure is nine-point-five percent below budget year to date. Operating revenue is 45 per cent below budget resulting from a substantial decrease in revenue since disruptions and closure of most facilities under COVID-19 restrictions. Capital expenditure has achieved 39 per cent of budget spend year to date.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2022

b)      note LDI opex underspends of $38,000 in the following work programme items:

i)        line item 649 ‘Randwick Park Skate Activation’ - $18,000

ii)       line item 1656 ‘MR: ecological and environmental volunteers programme FY22’ - $20,000

c)      reallocate $38,000 of LDI opex from the work programme items in b) to work programme line item 321 ‘Community grants Manurewa’.

Horopaki

Context

7.      The Manurewa Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Emergency Management

·        Auckland Unlimited.

8.      The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Chart, bar chart

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COVID-19 restrictions

9.      From 23 January 2022, Auckland moved back into traffic light red setting under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, which has impacted council and community-delivered event planning and programming.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

10.    The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

Chart, pie chart

Description automatically generated 

11.    The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Chart, waterfall chart

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates from quarter three

12.    The following are key activity updates from quarter two. These are aligned to outcomes in the Manurewa Local Board Plan.

Our communities are inclusive, vibrant, healthy and connected

·        Programmes delivered at Nathan Homestead in this quarter include:

o   resident artists Lissy and Rudi Robinson-Cole’s exhibition ‘Pūnanga Powhera the Dream Sanctuary’ which featured on Māori Television and Seven Sharp

o   collaborations with Te Pātaka Kōrero o Manurewa’s Wriggle and Rhyme; Proud Centre's Rainbow Machine; and the Botanic Gardens for a painting workshop that was held both at the Gardens and the Homestead

the 'Fire and Clay' exhibition opened on March 28, hosting the Auckland Studio Potters annual prizegiving

o   Cinema Under the Stars, a series of four film evenings, went ahead with appropriate attendance restrictions.

·        The Manurewa Seniors’ Network decided not to meet in person while in the COVID-19 Protection Framework Red traffic light setting. A member of one of the seniors’ groups has been appointed as the coordinator for the network. Staff have partnered with 20/20 Trust to offer digital literacy classes for seniors. Attendees are provided with a device, which they can keep after completing the classes.

·        The Manurewa Link Shuttle has added a new route that incorporates the Manukau SuperClinic.

·        Staff are progressing the board’s Strengthening our Streets project by connecting with a local community contractor to support and help with grass roots engagement and consultation within the nominated areas. Staff have also connected internally with Auckland Emergency Management, Infrastructure and Environmental Services, Parks, Sports and Recreation, and Youth Empowerment to look opportunities to link in with this project.

·        Participant numbers at community venues decreased by 59 per cent and bookings hours have decreased by 52 per cent compared to the same time last year. All hirers indicated that they were satisfied and would recommend the venues they have visited in the local board area.

·        Manu Tukutuku continued to offer the Community Closet (free clothing for the neighbourhood) and Kids Kai (a youth food initiative). Kids Kai is held every Thursday during school term, with an average of 9-12 young people attending.

·        Highlights from programmes delivered at Te Pātaka Kōrero o Manurewa and Te Pātaka Kōrero o Waimāhia this quarter include:

o   celebrations for Pride Month, Lunar New Year, Holi, and Waitangi Day

o   Manurewa, Waimāhia and Takaanini Library collaborated to continue outreach to Pasifika Language Nests within COVID-19 restrictions. Four full immersion units are taking advantage of a monthly delivery of 35 pukapuka from the libraries’ Pasifika Children’s Collection, including curated storytime and rhymetime packs tailored by Pasifika Specialists

o   the school holiday programme provided take-home packs filled with craft activities and puzzles, which were taken up by over 100 tamariki

o   Wriggle and Rhyme sessions during January and February were held at Nathan Homestead and The Auckland Botanic Gardens. Most sessions had close to the 100-person limit permitted at outdoor events

o   Early Childhood Education Centres outreach moved to an online story time accompanied with a physical delivery of themed pukapuka.

·        Manurewa Youth Council highlights for this quarter include:

o   raising awareness of Pride Month by releasing an informational guide to transgender identity, a guide to gender pronouns and a post celebrating LGBTQ+ New Zealanders as icons

o   celebrating Lunar New Year with an informational post

o   providing feedback for Auckland Council’s Annual Budget consultation.

Our people enjoy a choice of quality community spaces and use them often

·        Attendance at Manurewa Leisure Centre, Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre, and Te Matariki Clendon Community Centre was lower than usual due to COVID-19 Protection Framework restrictions and uncertainty on the part of users regarding the restrictions. However, staff report a steady increase in attendance numbers though the quarter.

·        Te Matariki Clendon Community Centre has continued with centre programme delivery, including school programmes, after-school care, basketball skills, youth programmes and music lessons. Bookings have risen even though capacity restrictions are in place, and community groups are slowly returning to their normal activities in the centre.

·        Operational hours at Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre were reduced by 460 hours, compared to the same time last year. In this quarter there were eight days in which the centre was unable to open due to staffing levels dropping below 50 per cent, because of isolation requirements. Gym memberships have dropped by 17 per cent compared to the same time last year but are slowly increasing. Learn-to-Swim numbers have had a steady increase from the same time last year.

·        Groups benefiting from the board subsidising pool entry fees during this time included 2,081 people aged 65 and over, 2,009 adults supervising children, and 69 people with disabilities.

·        Manurewa Leisure Centre visits are 48 per cent lower than in same period last year.  The OSCAR programme roll has increased, and user group bookings have grown through March.

·        Fifty-eight out of 99 scheduled Active Recreation activations for the year have been delivered, with all activations delivered in accordance with appropriate COVID-19 Protection Framework restrictions. Although COVID-19 impacts have delayed delivery, staff expect the full activation programme for the year to be delivered by 30 June.

Our prosperous local economy supports local people

·        The Southern Initiative engaged the following providers to delivery programmes as part of the board’s Youth Economy (Youth Connections) work programme item:

o   Brown Pride has been funded $12,500 to deliver the Young Kings Employment preparation programme for five young people. Participants will be assisted to identify their career aspirations, get ready for employment and be connected to employment. This programme has commenced delivery and will be delivered by June 2022.

o   Tukua Enterprise Nek Gen 2 programme, delivered by Ngahere Communities, has been funded $25,000 to support enterprise for ten rangatahi. This programme will start delivery after the Easter holidays and will be completed by the end of June 2022.

o   KidsCoin has been funded $22,500 to support three rangatahi and whānau to do the 3 Bags Full (3BF) programme. This commenced at the end of November 2021 and will complete delivery by June 2022.

Our natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced

·        Preparation has begun for a Sustainability Market at Te Pātaka Kōrero o Manurewa. Resources such as pre-loved clothing, linen, and kitchenware are being gathered; vegetable seedlings have been donated by The Auckland Botanic Gardens and Zealandia Nurseries; and community groups have confirmed they will have a presence on the day.

·        Ecological and environmental volunteers undertook 671 volunteer hours in this quarter, with events and volunteer hours restricted due to the COVID-19 Protection Framework Red traffic light setting.

·        Activities delivered through the Pest Free Urban South work programme line in this quarter include:

o   confirmation of the Beautification Trust as the lead organisation for Pest Free Urban South in Manurewa. They are in the process of recruiting a local activator to support their in-house project manager

o   launching the annual Moth Plant Competition with schools and community groups. This is the first year running this competition in Manurewa and the organisers are aiming to have many teams involved and many moth plants removed from the environment

o   staff supplied materials to the Beautification Trust's Boomer Business Community Shed and they have partnered with Ormiston Junior College woodwork students to help build 75 wooden rat tunnel boxes for the project which will be given out at a hub day to be held at the Maich Teaching Gardens in May or June 2022

o   discussion about collaboration with interested groups has continued.

·        A clean-up event was held in Trimdon Reserve on Saturday 19 March 2022, with 23 volunteers removing 1,600 kilograms of rubbish from in and around the stream.

·        The following activities were delivered through the Manurewa Waste Minimisation work programme item:

o   the team designed a magnet and flyer outlining options on how to dispose of and minimise waste as driveway actions were not undertaken due to COVID-19 restrictions. They delivered 2,300 flyers in hotspot areas and distributed 210 magnets to hotspot streets. Waste champions reported a reduction in illegal dumping for the three weeks following the flyer drop

o   reporting for January showed 39 illegal dumping incidents reported, with 14 in monitored sign areas and 25 along the route. In February 40 illegal dumping incidents were reported, with 13 in monitored sign areas and 27 along the route. In March there were 12 illegal dumping incidents reported, with six in monitored sign areas and six along the route

o   the storytelling element of the project has been transferred to Te Awa Ora/Talking Trash as COVID-19 meant the film crew were unable to deliver. In quarter four the waste champions will create a series of two to three videos on reducing waste in the home and reporting illegal dumping.

Activities with significant issues

13.    The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as having significant issues:

·        Totara Park Pool: Operations: Seasonal lifeguard recruitment was adversely affected by COVID-19 restrictions in effect during late 2021. Transfers of staff from other centres and the support of CLM lifeguards was required to be able to open the pools on Saturday 8 January 2022. However, subsequent loss of staff due to COVID-19 caused staff levels to drop below the Poolsafe requirements, and the pools were closed on Tuesday 1 February 2022. Staff anticipate operations at Totara Park Pool will return to normal next summer.

·        Randwick Park Skate Activation: Staff have been unable to secure a provider for this service. The unspent $18,000 budget is not expected to be used this financial year and is available for the board to reallocate.

·        MR: ecological and environmental volunteers programme FY22: COVID-19 restrictions during this financial year have restricted the ability for volunteers to deliver this programme. An underspend of $20,000 is available for the board to reallocate.

·        Awa restoration programme: Due to the effect of COVID-19 restrictions during this financial year, the planting budget for this item will not be completely used and a carry forward of $10,000 to be utilised for next year’s plant maintenance has been requested by staff.

Activities on hold

14.    The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Randwick Park Skate Activation: This activity is on hold as staff have been unable to secure a provider for this service.

·        Clendon Community House / Finlayson Community House - refurbish facility: This activity is on hold as funding for this project has been deferred until 2022/2023 and 2023/2024.

Changes to the local board work programme

Cancelled activities

15.    These activities are cancelled:

·        Movies in Parks Manurewa: Cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions.

·        LB event - Jazz at Nathan Homestead: Cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions.

·        Armistice Day Manurewa: Cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions.

·        Manurewa AFC Building - renew building exterior and roof: Cancelled as there is currently no available budget. Repairs have been made to the roof to ensure that it is watertight.

Activities with underspends

16.    Staff have identified two activities within the operational work programme that will deliver an underspend for the 2021/2022 financial year that is available for reallocation by the local board.

17.    The identified LDI opex underspends are:

·        Randwick Park Skate Activation - $18,000

·        MR: ecological and environmental volunteers programme FY22 - $20,000

18.    The total underspend amount to reallocate is $38,000.

19.    The board discussed options for reallocating these LDI opex underspends at its workshop on 5 May 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.    Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

21.    Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.    When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.    This report informs the Manurewa Local Board of the performance for quarter three, ending 31 March 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.    Southern Strategic Brokers supported the Ara Kōtui project with Local Board Services. A briefing was received from Herewini Te Koha, CEO of Ngā Mātārae, on his role and the potential of adopting a consistent policy for use of mana whenua Intellectual Property by council.

25.    Two rangatahi have been selected to be mentored by the local board chair for the TUIA programme. Mentor and mentees will attend a wānanga in April delivered by the TUIA Charitable Trust.

26.    Staff are supporting a local community-led organisation to create a rangatahi-led voter participation key messaging initiative through multiple digital platforms.

27.    Following the announcement of NZMRL 2022 Māori Rugby League National Tournaments, there has been an increase in teams booking space at Manu Tukutuku for training. Auckland Māori Rugby League held two Haka Wananga there in late March, and Te Waiohua ki Tamaki held whānau netball.

28.    Waitangi Day was celebrated at libraries with customers colouring a paper feather and writing what Waitangi Day means to them and their whānau. These feathers were then placed on to a korowai for display. Waitangi ki Manukau celebrations were moved online this year, with Te Pātaka Kōrero o Waimāhia producing a Shadow Puppet story of Te Timatanga / the creation story which gained over 300 views.

29.    A series highlighting some of the restored Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) tranche one names in the Clendon area has been shared on Facebook by Te Pātaka Kōrero o Waimāhia staff. This piece of work discusses the ingoa hou, where they come from, images highlighting the area and some information about how to enjoy the space.

30.    Manurewa Pool and Leisure Centre partnered with Pride Project for the Mangopare Rangatahi programme, supporting its members to start their journey to a healthy lifestyle.

31.    Shared interest discussions have stalled on the new tranche two sites for Te Kete Rukuruku. Delays are expected while this is resolved. Mana whenua iwi are still working on naming the sites rolled over from tranche one. Thirty-four names are expected to be gifted prior to June, with another 20 expected early next financial year.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.    This report is provided to enable the Manurewa Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Financial Performance

33.    Operating expenditure of $10.53 million is $1.11 million below budget. Generally affected this year by COVID-19 alert levels, underspend has built up where disruptions and closure of leisure and aquatic and community facilities, and libraries, has seen a reduction in wage costs, repairs, service utilities and other service expenses.

34.    Operating Revenue of $1.48 million is $1.23 million lower than budget with most of the revenue decrease in recreation, leisure, fitness, and aquatics facilities.

35.    Capital expenditure of $945,000 is behind budget by $1.5 million with delays in some key projects forecast to ramp up before the end of this financial year.

36.    The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2022 for Manurewa local board area is in Attachment B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

37.    While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

38.    The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

39.    Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.    The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2022).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work programme update

49

b

Financial performance report

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robert Boswell - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/05618

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.      Staff recommend that you support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.      There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.      If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.      The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)        increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)      tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.      There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[3]

8.      Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.      There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.    This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.    Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.    Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.    The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.    Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.    A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.    Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.    An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.    Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.    The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.    Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.    It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.    The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.    The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.    Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[4]

25.    It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

26.    Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.    These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.    In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.    The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[5] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.    A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.    Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.    Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[6]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

33.    If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

34.    The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

35.    Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

36.    Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

 

 

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Timeline

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Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

37.    If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

38.    Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

39.    During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

40.    Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

41.    Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

42.    Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

43.    In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

44.    Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

45.    Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

46.    Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

47.    Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

48.    Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

49.    There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

50.    A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

51.    Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

52.    The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

53.    Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan


 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

54.    Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

55.    A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

·        Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

·        The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

56.    Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

57.    Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·      51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

·      59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

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Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

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People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 

Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 

Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 


28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

58.    There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

59.    On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

60.    Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

61.    They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

62.    The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

63.    Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

64.    Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

65.    They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

66.    Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

67.    Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

68.    There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

69.    If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

70.    It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

71.    Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

72.    Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

73.    A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

74.    If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

75.    Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

76.    Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

77.    The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

78.    If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

79.    Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

80.    Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

81.    Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

82.    This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

83.    The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

84.    Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

85.    There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

86.    If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

87.    The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

88.    Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

89.    If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.    The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar - May 2022

File No.: CP2022/05165

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To present to the Manurewa Local Board the three months Governance Forward Work Calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Governance Forward Work Calendar is a schedule of items that will come before the local board at business meetings and workshops over the next three months. The Governance Forward Work Calendar for the Manurewa Local Board is included in Attachment A.

3.      The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

i)    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

ii)   clarifying what advice is required and when

iii)  clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.      The calendar will be updated every month, be included on the agenda for business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

5.      The Governance Forward Work Calendar is also shared with mana whenua iwi organisations, along with an invitation to contact the local board through Local Board Services Department in liaison with Local Board Chair should mana whenua representatives wish to attend a business meeting or workshop on particular subjects of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Manurewa Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar April 2022

129

     


 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Manurewa Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/05166

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To note the Manurewa Local Board records of workshops held on 7 and 14 April 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Under Standing Order 12.1.1 the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its local board workshops held over the past month.

3.      Resolutions or decisions are not made at workshops as they are solely for the provision of information and discussion.

4.      This report attaches the workshop record for the period stated below.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Manurewa Local Board:

a)      note the Manurewa Local Board workshop records held on:

i)        7 April 2022

ii)       14 April 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

7 April 2022, Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

135

b

14 April 2022, Manurewa Local Board Workshop Record

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rohin Patel - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Manurewa Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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[1] Annual figures for the 18-month period 30 June 2020 to 31 December 2021, when compared to the prior five-year baseline period.

[2] https://www.transport.govt.nz/statistics-and-insights/safety-annual-statistics/sheet/social-cost-of-road-crashes

[3] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[4] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[5] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[6] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy