I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 24 May 2022

10.00am

via MS Teams

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Maria Meredith

 

Deputy Chairperson

Chris Makoare

 

Members

Don Allan

 

 

Debbie Burrows

 

 

Nerissa Henry

 

 

Peter McGlashan

 

 

Tony Woodcock

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Lisa Amoa

Democracy Advisor

 

19 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027 222 8206

Email: Lisa.Amoa@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Jacob Cameron of Golf New Zealand                                                                5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Governing Body Member's Update                                                                              7

12        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                  15

13        Board Member's Reports                                                                                            17

14        Draft Auckland golf investment plan                                                                         19

15        Submission on Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan                                                                                                            57

16        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes 85

17        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2022/2023                                                                                                                                       93

18        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022                                                                           103

19        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022                          155

20        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023                     171

21        Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three and Multi-Board Round Two 2021/2022, grant allocations                                                                                     179

22        Allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board Transport Capital Fund  193

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      199

24        Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops                                  203

25        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 April 2022 and the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 10 May 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Jacob Cameron of Golf New Zealand

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing Jacob Cameron of Golf New Zealand with the opportunity to present to the board their position on the Auckland Golf Investment Plan draft.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       As per standing orders the Chairperson has approved the deputation request from Golf New Zealand.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      thank Jacob Cameron of Golf New Zealand for his attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Governing Body Member's Update

File No.: CP2022/06553

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on local activities that the Governing Body representative is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To provide the Governing Body Member an opportunity to update the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Governing Body Member’s update.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Cr Bartley's MTLB Report May 2022

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Amoa – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2022/06554

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the Chairperson is involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing the Chairperson with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson’s report for May 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Amoa - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Board Member's Reports

File No.: CP2022/06555

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To keep the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board informed on the local activities that the local board members are involved with.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Providing board members with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the board members report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Amoa – Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/06571

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that you support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)        increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)      tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[1]

8.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.     This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.     It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[2]

25.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

26.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[3] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[4]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

33.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

34.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

35.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

36.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

 

 

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Timeline

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Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

37.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

38.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

39.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

40.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

41.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

42.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

43.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

44.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

45.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

46.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

47.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

48.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

49.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

50.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

51.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

52.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

53.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan


 

 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

54.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

55.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

·     Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

·     The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

56.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

57.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·     51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

·     59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

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Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

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People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 


Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 


Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 

28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

58.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

59.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

60.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

61.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

62.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

63.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

64.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

65.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

66.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

67.     Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

68.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

69.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

70.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

71.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

72.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

73.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

74.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

75.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

76.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

77.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

78.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

79.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

80.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

81.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

82.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

83.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

84.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

85.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

86.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

87.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

88.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

89.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

31

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Submission on Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan

File No.: CP2022/06552

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with:

·    a brief overview of the draft National Adaptation Plan (the Plan), including a strategic overview, roles and responsibilities for local government, and a summary of critical and supporting actions

·    a brief overview of proposals for managed retreat and flood insurance

·    likely themes for Auckland Council’s submission

·    the timeframes for developing Auckland Council’s submission and opportunities to provide input.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is preparing for a submission on the draft National Adaptation Plan which was released by the Ministry for the Environment on 27 April 2022 for public consultation. The deadline for submissions is 3 June 2022.

3.       The submission will be informed by the council’s adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan,  Auckland Council’s climate change commitments and previous relevant consultation submissions.

4.       The submission will focus on the extent to which the draft National Adaptation Plan enables and/or inhibits climate change adaptation action for Auckland Council. The submission is likely to  set out potential gaps and concerns for Auckland Council. In particular, the role and responsibilities of local government in relation to the Plan, and the extent to which critical actions outlined in the Plan support Auckland Council to fulfil its defined legislative roles and responsibilities. Both risks and opportunities for central government will be highlighted.

5.       In addition, views and perspectives on managed retreat, flood insurance and associated critical issues to be considered in the development of new legislation will be explored.

6.       To meet the submission deadline of 3 June 2022, delegated authority to approve the council’s final submission outside a scheduled committee meeting will be sought at a Governing Body meeting on 26th May.

7.       A draft submission will be circulated on 18 May 2022 to Environment and Climate Change Committee members, local board members, the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs.

8.       Feedback received from Environment and Climate Change Committee members by 25 May will be considered for incorporation into the final submission.

9.       Feedback received from local boards, the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs by 27 May 2022 will be appended to the final submission.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat to be appended to Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): draft national adaptation plan (NAP) is the first central government-led adaptation plan for Aotearoa/New Zealand. The NAP presents an all-of government approach, that maps out a range of ‘critical actions’, ‘supporting actions’ and ‘proposed actions’ for the next six years.

12.     The NAP will prepare central government, local government, businesses, industry, iwi/Māori and communities to adapt to effects associated with unavoidable climate change that are occurring and will continue to occur. The NAP will sit alongside the Emission Reduction Plan, which Auckland Council has already made a submission on. 

13.     The NAP is required under the Climate Change Response Act 2002, to set out government’s approach to adapting to the effects of climate change. Under this Act, the NAP must take into account:

·    the economic, social, health, environmental, ecological, and cultural effects of climate change, including effects on iwi and Māori

·    the distribution of the effects of climate change across society, taking particular account of vulnerable groups or sectors

·    the ability of communities or organisations to undertake adaptation action, including how any action may be funded

·    scientific and technical advice.

14.     The NAP is preceded by several pivotal government climate reports, namely the Climate Change Adaptation Technical Working Group Report (2018) and National Climate Change Risk Assessment 2020 (NCCRA).

15.     The NAP responds to both reports with a particular emphasis on shaping regulatory frameworks and institutions to align with the changing climate context, aligning statutory and policy directions to account for changing risks, establishing coordination across government and with sectors, bringing together scattered climate information and supporting access to climate data sets and information.

16.     The NAP also responds directly to the forty-three priority climate risks outlined in the NCCRA. Of these forty-three risks, the NCCRA identified ten most significant risks that require urgent action within the next six years to reduce their impacts. The key risk areas of focus include, natural environment, homes, buildings and places, infrastructure, communities, economy and financial systems, and governance. A summary of the NCCRA can be found at https://environment.govt.nz/what-government-is-doing/areas-of-work/climate-change/adapting-to-climate-change/first-national-climate-change-risk-assessment-for-new-zealand/

17.     Consultation is also being undertaken on problems and key policy issues in relation to flood insurance and managed retreat. This report also gives a brief overview of these two issues.

 

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document

Purpose

18.     The overarching vision of the NAP is:

·    ‘our people, places and systems are resilient and able to adapt to the effects of unavoidable climate changes in a fair, low-cost and ordered manner’

19.     The goals of the NAP are threefold:

·    reduce vulnerability to the impacts of climate change

·    enhance adaptive capacity and consider climate change in all decisions at all levels

·    strengthen resilience to climate change.

20.     The above goals have three key areas of focus:

·    reform institutions to be fit for a changing climate

·    provide data, information, tools and guidance to allow everyone to assess and reduce their own climate risks

·    embed climate resilience across government strategies and policies.

21.     The actions identified in the NAP focus on six outcome areas discussed further below.

·    system-wide

·    natural environment

·    homes, buildings and places

·    infrastructure

·    communities

·    economy and finance.

22.     Each outcome area has a set of objectives to address the risks for that area. Each objective has one or more actions to achieve that objective. The actions are categorised as critical actions, supporting actions and future actions.

23.     Treaty of Waitangi responsiveness is included through the support for a Māori based framework, known as Rauora (appended). This is complemented by a series of actions that specifically target Māori and others that will be significant to Māori. Notably, one key action is ‘establishing a foundation to work with Māori on climate actions’. There are three main components to this action. Firstly, funding for Māori partnership and representation. The purpose of this is to enable strategic input from Māori and to advance equitable governance arrangements over the emissions reduction plan and the NAP. Additionally, there is funding to support Māori to define, measure and implement a national Māori climate strategy and action plan. Lastly, support will be afforded to kaupapa Māori, tāngata Māori actions and solutions for the climate emergency.

24.     An Interdepartmental Executive Board is being established to oversee the emissions reduction plan and NAP. The Board will monitor and report on overall progress. The Climate Change Response Ministers Group will oversee the plan and drive progress.

25.     The NAP will be monitored by He Pou a Rangi – Climate Change Commission. A bi-annual monitoring and evaluation report will be submitted by the Commission to the Minister of Climate Change.  This process provides an opportunity for the Government to review and adjust the actions and manage changing uncertainty and risk. Beyond, the findings will also contribute to New Zealand’s international commitments to report on New Zealand’s progress towards building resilience.

Roles and responsibilities for local government outlined in the draft National Adaptation Plan

26.     Responsibility shared by all: The NAP identifies that responsibility for adaptation will be shared by all New Zealanders and that central government will not bear all the risks and costs. Risk and costs will be shared between asset or property owners, their insurance companies, their banks, local government and central government.

27.     Roles of different sector groups: The NAP provides an overview of the roles that different sectors of society including central government, local government, iwi/Māori, private sector, community and individuals and academia play.

28.     Local government at front line: The NAP recognises that local government (city, regional, district and unitary councils) is on the front line in preparing for and dealing with climate impacts and risks. The role of local government is outlined in the NAP as being centred around the following:

·    local government have statutory responsibilities to make key decisions on how to use and manage land and other natural resources to avoid and/or mitigate impacts of natural hazards

·    responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience

·    local government own a significant amount of assets, including infrastructure and forests that are all at risk

·    for most communities, local authorities are the government bodies that are closest to their needs and represent local views. Examples of this connection include the role of local authorities in land-use planning, water resources, three waters services, flood risk management, biodiversity and biosecurity, roading and emergency management

·    local government enhances community resilience through public education and local planning processes

·    responsiveness to iwi and Māori groups and other community groups

·    links to the private sector with a reliance on supply chains, production systems and a thriving economic environment.

29.     Priority risks for local government: The plan outlines water security, communities and natural ecosystems as priority risk areas for local government. Additionally, new and changing legislation will impact the role of local government.

30.     Central role: Local government plays a central role in managing natural hazard risks, which the impacts of climate change are contributing to increasing risk and vulnerability. Councils also have responsibilities for civil defence and emergency management and provide a critical link between climate change adaptation policy and communities. These links are established through its planning and emergency management functions and community engagement.

31.     NAP response: In response to the above priority risk areas for local government, the NAP responds in the following ways:

·    supports local government to take adaptation action, and outlines a programme of work to provide guidance and resources to encourage action

·    aims to help local government plan for future impacts and not just respond to events as they occur

·    takes a long-term view by ensuring governance and decision-making frameworks are fit for purpose and climate resilience is integrated into government strategies and policies

·    aims to build coordination and collaboration between central and local government, communities, iwi/Māori and businesses as we work together on innovative and effective adaptation solutions.

32.     The objectives and actions which respond to the various risk areas are summarised in the following section of this memorandum.

Critical and supporting climate actions

33.     The climate actions are organised under six main sections: System-wide; Natural Environment; Homes, Buildings and Places; Infrastructure ; Communities and Economy and Finance . A full detailed outline of actions is included in Appendix 3 of the NAP.

34.     The actions are categorised as critical actions, supporting actions and future actions.

35.     System-Wide Actions (p 25- 38)

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions in this chapter. The objectives are centred around appropriate frameworks and settings to enable people and communities enabling access to information and data sets to manage their own risks, the development of tools and guidance governance; and the embedding of climate resilience. These actions seek to establish the foundation for adaptation action in this first NAP

·    critical actions include legislative changes over the next six years: reform of the resource management system (2022-2023); legislation to support managed retreat (2022-2025), reform institutional arrangements for water services (2022-2025); modernise the emergency management system (2022-2028); and a review of the future of local government (2022-2023)

·    a range of supporting actions are also outlined in the following areas: establishing a foundation to work with Māori on climate actions; natural hazards; natural disaster resilience; emergency management; and establishment government oversight and coordination.

36.     Natural Environment (p 43-51) 

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions of this chapter. The objectives are centred around healthy ecosystems, robust biosecurity to reduce new pests and diseases and working with nature to build climate resilience

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the natural environment risks in the NCCRA. In particular, they address the risks to:

§ risks to coastal ecosystems, including the intertidal zone, estuaries, dunes, coastal lakes and wetlands, due to ongoing sea-level rise and extreme weather events

§ risks to indigenous ecosystems and species from the enhanced spread, survival and establishment of invasive species due to climate change.

37.     Homes Buildings and Places (p53-60)

·    there are four main objectives to this chapter that shape the actions. The objectives are centred around climate resilient homes and buildings that meet social and cultural needs, new and existing places are planned and managed to minimise risks to communities, strengthening of Māori connection to whenua and places of cultural significance, threats to cultural heritage sites are understood and impacts minimised

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the risk to buildings due to extreme weather events, drought, increased fire weather and ongoing sea  level rise

·    other risks addressed through these actions include risks to:

§ Māori social, cultural, spiritual and economic wellbeing from loss and degradation of lands and waters, as well as cultural assets such as marae

§ Māori and European cultural heritage sites due to projected ongoing sea-level rise, extreme weather events and increasing fire weather.

38.     Infrastructure (p63-70)

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions to this chapter. The objectives are centred around reducing vulnerabilities to assets exposed to climate change, ensuring all new infrastructure is fit for climate change, and the use of renewal programmes to improve climate adaptative capacity

·    the actions in this chapter are designed to achieve these objectives and address the built environment risks in the NCCRA

·    in particular, they address the risk to potable water supplies (availability and quality) due to changes in rainfall, temperature, drought, extreme weather events and ongoing sea-level rise.

39.     Communities (p74-81)

·    there are four main objectives that shape the actions to this chapter. The objectives are centred around enabling communities to adapt, supporting vulnerable people and communities, support communities when disrupted and displaced, a health system that is prepared and can support vulnerable communities affected by climate change

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the human domain risks in the National Climate Change Risk Assessment (NCCRA). In particular:

§ social cohesion and community wellbeing are at risk due to displacement of individuals, families and communities due to climate change impacts

§ that climate change could exacerbate existing inequities and creating new and additional inequities due to differential distribution of climate change impacts.

40.     Economy and Finance (p84-88)

·    there are two main objectives that shape the actions of this chapter. The objectives are centred around supporting sectors, businesses and regional economies to adapt and economic stability and growth through a resilient financial system. The actions are varied and include for example a focus on freight and supply chain, fisheries reform, aquaculture, climate-related disclosure and the regulating financial entities.

Managed retreat

41.     The Ministry for the Environment is also consulting on a high-level framework for a managed retreat system, and related insurance matters.

42.     These two issues relate to the following critical actions within the NAP:

·    reform the Resource Management System

·    pass legislation to support managed retreat

·    develop options for home flood insurance issues.

43.     Five key objectives and six principles have been identified to guide the development of managed retreat legislation (the Climate Adaptation Act). The consultation documentation also identifies:

·    a high-level process for managed retreat

·    roles and responsibilities, with specific reference to local government

·    issues associated with property transfer (including consideration for Māori land)

·    implications for Māori.

44.     Feedback is also sought on the interaction of insurance with managed retreat.

45.     For local government, the potential risks and costs associated with managed retreat and liabilities associated with flood insurance are likely to be key discussion points.

 

Likely themes for Council’s submission

46.     Council’s submission on the NAP will focus on the extent to which the NAP enables and/or inhibits climate adaptation for Auckland Council.

47.     In particular, the role and responsibilities of local government in relation to the NAP, and the extent to which critical actions outlined in the NAP support Auckland Council to fulfil their defined legislative roles and responsibilities. Both risks and opportunities will be highlighted.

48.     The submission will also consider council’s views and perspectives in relation to the extent that the NAP enables and/or inhibits their current and future commitments to mana whenua.

49.     The submission will also consider managed retreat, insurance and associated critical issues to be considered in the development of new legislation for managed retreat.

Timeframe for development of the National Emissions Reduction Plan

Milestone

Date

Discussion document released

27 April 2022

MfE Local Government Workshop

10 May 2022

MfE Local Government Workshop

17 May 2022

Draft submission available

18 May 2022

Deadline for appended feedback

27 May 2022

Consultation period closes

3 June 2022

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     The National Adaptation Plan has the potential to strongly influence Auckland’s ability to take a precautionary approach to preparing for climate change, as adopted by council through Te Tāruke -ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

51.     Council’s submission to the NAP consultation document can reiterate its position and advocate for a NAP that places Auckland in the best position to achieve its, and Aotearoa’s adaptation goals.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     Feedback from relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations on the draft submission will be sought. The council-group was involved in establishing existing council positions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local authorities will play are key role in implementation of the proposed National Adaptation Plan, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience

·    enhance community resilience through public education and local planning processes.

Local board views are being sought on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat and will be appended to council’s final submission.

54.     The consultation documentation Kia urutau, kia ora: Kia āhuarangi rite a Aotearoa – Adapt and thrive: Building a climate-resilient New Zealand, which summarises consultation on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat, is appended to this document and can be downloaded at https://environment.govt.nz/publications/adapt-and-thrive-building-a-climate-resilient-aotearoa-new-zealand-consultation-document/. 

55.     Additional information on engagement, including a video summary of the draft National Adaptation Plan can be found at https://environment.govt.nz/what-you-can-do/have-your-say/climate-change-engagement/

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The National Climate Change Risk Assessment and the NAP acknowledge that all risks are relevant to Māori and some may disproportionately affect certain whānau, hapū and iwi, as well as Māori interests, values, practices and wellbeing. They also recognise the Government’s responsibility to give effect to Te Tiriti principles.

57.     The NAP draws on key concepts of the Rauora framework (Attachment 3) that brings together Māori values and principles into an indigenous worldview (te ao Māori) of climate change, and is complemented by a series of actions that specifically target Māori to enable strategic input and advance equitable governance. This aligns well with the direction in Te Tāruke -ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

58.     Feedback on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat is being sought from the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs, and will be appended to the council’s final submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     To work effectively, the future system requires appropriate funding mechanisms for its different roles and activities.

60.     The MfE is exploring what provisions and guidance can be provided in the future system, to set clear expectations regarding who should pay for what, and to support the availability and use of appropriate funding tools. Proposals will use existing guidance on charging in the public sector and look at applying this to the context of the future central government-led adaptation plans.

61.     Implementation and operation of the national adaptation plan will require significant investment from the council. Central government’s approach to sharing these costs is unclear. These costs will be driven by factors such as the transition from the current system, establishment and support of joint committees, development of new plans and strategies, changed workforce needs, and increased legal action. In addition, there are likely to be impacts on the ways the council approaches financial and infrastructure planning.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

62.     There is little risk in making a submission on the consultation on the NAP.

63.     Risks in relation to local government’s role in implementation of the NAP, e.g., funding and financing, will be considered as part of council’s response.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

64.     Local board resolutions on the draft National Adaptation Plan will be appended to the Auckland Council submission on this matter.

65.     Below are the key dates for input into the submission:

·    18 May 2022: draft submission circulated to local board members

·    27 May 2022: final date for any formal local board feedback to be appended to the submission.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Consultation document: Kia urutau, kia ora: Kia āhuarangi rite a Aotearoa – Adapt and thrive: Building a climate-resilient New Zealand. Draft National Adaptation Plan and Managed Retreat (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Insight into the Rauora Indigenous Worldview Framework for the National Climate Change Adaptation Plan

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Lauren Simpson - Principal Sustainability & Resilience Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2022/06572

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on Phase Three (previously called Tranche 2B) of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport-related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe and appropriate speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. Evidence from changes made in 2020 demonstrates that safe and appropriate speed limits are effective in reducing road trauma.

4.       Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and recently completed public consultation on proposed Phase Three changes with the community. A list of changes proposed within this local board area is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Public consultation on changes proposed in Phase Three closed on 3 April 2022 and a summary of public responses is provided as Attachment B. Local boards are now invited to provide their feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on speed limit changes proposed as part of Phase Three of Auckland Transport’s Safe Speeds Programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use.

Alignment with Central Government Policy

7.       Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

8.       Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

9.       Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the Auckland Transport Board, Auckland Transport has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speed limits on many roads.

10.     In this phase, the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools, high-risk rural roads, rural marae, and roads requested by the community.

11.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Phase Three took place from 28 February - 3 April 2022, and included the following measures:

a)   flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes near roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

b)   advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist, and ethnic media

c)   radio advertising on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

d)   radio interviews and adlibs on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

e)   media releases

f)    social media campaigns

g)   an article published in OurAuckland

h)   translation of consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Braille and NZ Sign Language

i)    flyers, posters and hardcopy FreePost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

j)    15 online webinars, including a Mandarin language webinar

k)   a community drop-in session on Aotea Great Barrier.

12.     The community was able to provide their thoughts via a number of channels:

a)   online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

b)   a paper survey

c)   a web-based mapping tool

d)   emails direct to the Safe Speeds Programme Team

e)   at public hearings held on 6 April 2022.

13.     Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May (Attachment B) and now have the opportunity to provide feedback on Phase Three proposed speed limit changes within their local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Transport manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. This includes setting speed limits, and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted Auckland Transport has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and local boards.

15.     Auckland Transport’s first phase of reviewing and setting new speed limits was developing the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) that enabled AT to set new speed limits for Auckland’s highest risk roads.

16.     The impact of the changes made in this bylaw have been significant and support the claim that by setting safe and appropriate speed limits in Auckland, we reduce community harm.

17.     Since 30 June 2020, in areas where speed limits were changed, fatal crashes have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) during the 18-month period since this action was taken.[5]

18.     This change was most significant on rural roads where roads with reduced speed limits recorded a 71 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and more than a 25 per cent reduction in serious injury crashes.

19.     In selected locations, speed limit changes are complemented by physical speed calming measures such as speed bumps, raised pedestrian crossings, kerb changes and road marking. These physical measures help reinforce the safe and appropriate speed limits and assist with pedestrians and cyclists crossing busy roads. Physical measures are installed based upon risk, with a focus on locations such as town centres, residential areas and roads near schools.

20.     It will take time to confirm that these trends are sustained, however this initial impact is promising and indicates the effectiveness of the ‘Vision Zero’ approach. Overseas data records a similar impact on harm reduction and Auckland Transport’s advice to local boards is that the programme is working and should be supported.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micro mobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     In town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced during Phase One of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of people saying they now participate in at least one active mode (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Auckland Transport has held workshops with local boards throughout the various phases of the Safe Speeds programme.

25.     Summaries of local submissions on changes proposed in Phase Three were provided to local boards in early May to inform their consideration of this topic.

26.     This report seeks feedback from the local board on the proposed speed limit changes within Phase Three of the Safe Speeds Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

28.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website at https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

29.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

30.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The Safe Speeds Programme is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

31.     Engagement with iwi at the AT northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui took place on the wider programme during 2021, and in early 2022 to introduce the Interim Speed Management Plan. Detailed engagement with individual rural marae as part of Phase Three commenced mid-2021 and is ongoing, with each marae typically requiring a tailored approach that takes into account localised safety issues.

32.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of Phase Three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme this programme has considerable financial implications.

34.     In 2017, the social cost of road harm in Auckland was about $1.1 billion.[6] These costs are paid by all Aucklanders. There is the cost of health care for those injured and - for some - lifetime rehabilitation and support. There is a cost to families, businesses and the region of those who can no longer live and work as they did before due to road deaths and serious injuries.

35.     Reducing the harm caused by road accidents impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that local boards represent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    The consultation length was extended from four to five weeks.

·    The number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased.

·    Digital advertising spend was increased and included Mandarin language public webinars and social media advertising.

37.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force at the end of November 2022.

39.     The November 2022 date may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept up to date if any changes are made.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board - Proposed speed limit changes - phase 3

91

b

Attachment B - Safe Speeds Programme Public feedback on proposed speed limit changes March/April 2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annie Ferguson – Communications and Engagement, Auckland Transport

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Nathan Cammock – Programme Director, Auckland Transport

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Table

Description automatically generated


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grants for 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/00323

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for the Glen Innes, Onehunga, and Panmure Business Improvement District (BID) programmes for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations, by collecting a targeted rate from business rated properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rate grants to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each association’s BID strategic priorities.

6.       Glen Innes Business Association members approved a BID targeted rate grant sum of $170,000 for 2022/2023. This figure is an increase of 2.4% ($4000) from the current financial year.

7.       Onehunga Business Association members approved the sum of $420,000. This figure is an increase of 1.6% ($10,000) from the current financial year.

8.       Panmure Business Association members approved $457,212.88. This figure is an increase of 3% ($13,316.88) from the current financial year.

9.       The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

10.     For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

11.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

12.     Staff are satisfied the Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations sufficiently complies with the BID Policy.

13.     Staff propose the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the BID targeted rate sought by Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations as part of the council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023 decision-making.

14.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022. This enables Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations to implement programmes that contribute to Outcome 6: Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially, thereby supporting the aspirations of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020.

15.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki’s BID programmes, managed by the BID-operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting their members facing two global challenges. A BID programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the flow-on effects from the COVID 19 lockdowns through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A BID programme can also facilitate opportunities that address the climate change emergency, with a focus on sustainability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programmes:

i)          $170,000 for Glen Innes Business Association

ii)         $420,000 for Onehunga Business Association

iii)        $457,212.88 for Panmure Business Association

 

 

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

16.     Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 (SOURCE: Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 (“i11v6”) more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

17.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, promote innovation and attract new businesses and customers.

18.     The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

19.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to work with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth. 

20.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

21.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic and related lockdowns, affecting both retail-based town centres and industrial precincts.

22.     BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

23.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all business rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or business precinct.

24.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

25.     This revenue is paid to the business association every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rate grants

26.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

27.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating, and disestablishing BID programmes; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

The business association sets the BID targeted rate grant amount to deliver its work programme

28.     BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID targeted rate grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the association’s board must consider what the local business and property owners can afford.

29.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

30.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

31.     The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID grant amount for the following financial year.

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate if a BID complies with the BID Policy

32.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is substantially complying with the BID Policy.

33.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programme last year (resolution number MT/2021/77), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

The Governing Body sets the targeted rate when it approves the Annual Budget

34.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2021/2022 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

35.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

36.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations complies with the BID Policy

37.     Staff are satisfied that Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

38.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·   Business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·   AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2021 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

39.     In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration – a current registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any – problems or issues that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

40.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

 

Table 1: Business association’s compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2022

Requirement

Financial Year 2020/2021

 

Text

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Logo

Description automatically generated

Logo

Description automatically generated

Strategic Plan

2018 - 2023

2020 - 2023

2016-2023

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

 

15 February 2021

 

15 February 2021

 

15 February 2021

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to 2023

valid to 2023

valid to 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2020 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

 

41.     As Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations have sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate.

 

Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations have all increased their BID targeted grant amounts for 2022/2023

42.     As shown in Table 2 below:

·        Glen Innes Business Association members approved a BID targeted rate grant sum of $170,000 for 2022/2023. This figure is an increase of 2.4% ($4000) from the current financial year.

·        Onehunga Business Association members approved the sum of $420,000. This figure is an increase of 1.6% ($10,000) from the current financial year.

·        Panmure Business Association members approved $457,212.88. This figure is an increase of 3% ($13,316.88) from the current financial year.

 

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2022/2023 c.f. 2021/2022

 

 

BID

 

2022/2023

 

2021/2022

 

Increase / %

 

 

 

Text

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

 

$170,000

 

 

$166,000

 

 

 

+4000 (2.4%)

LAST INCREASED: 2012

Logo

Description automatically generated

 

$420,000

 

$410,000

 

+$10,000 (1.6%)

LAST INCREASED: 2020

 

Logo

Description automatically generated

 

 

$457,212.88

 

$443,896

 

+$13,316.88 (3%)

LAST INCREASED: 2018

 

A regional perspective

43.     Of Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 26 increased their targeted rates for 2022/2023 with the percentage increase ranging from between 1.6% to 10%.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

44.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations, promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

45.     From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to promoting online channels and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BID programmes leading the local business sector’s response to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes, and projects that impact them.

47.     The BID-operating business associations work with Auckland Unlimited (AU) on economic development initiatives, events, and sustainability programmes.

48.     The BID-operating business associations also work constructively with both Panuku and Auckland Transport on often controversial proposals and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

49.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

Visions, plans aligned

50.     The BID-operating business associations and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

51.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board BID programmes tangibly support the vision and aspirations of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 6: Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

52.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure business associations means that the BID programme will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties within their respective current rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plan.

53.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is among several local boards which provides additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and each business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Māori make up more than 14% of the population living in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board area, compared to 11.5% of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in their district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

56.     The BID targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties. 

57.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the local boards, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rates for these business associations.

59.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

60.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

61.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

62.     Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of COVID-19 lockdowns will continue to be felt, in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

63.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

64.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022 to the Glen Innes, Onehunga and Panmure Business Associations. This enables each BID to implement programmes that improve their local business environment and support businesses as they recover from the flow-on effects from the COVID 19 lockdowns and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/06765

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Te Karanga Trust launched their Creative Pathways mentoring programme in Glen Innes for rangatahi attending alternative education

·        All three libraries supported cultural events in the library and online. This included activities around Lunar New Year, Pride week, World of Cultures and more.

·        Ruapōtaka Marae finalized its Business Plan 2022 and significant progress has been made towards the land exchange.

·        Riverside Community Centre comprehensive renewal was completed in March 2022.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        Service Improvement: Panmure Community Hall Activation (#1506)

·        Low Carbon Lifestyles (#884)

·        Jordan Recreation Centre – refurbish stadium and changing room (#18088)

·        Onehunga Bay Reserve - develop dog agility area (#26478)

6.       Other activities that anticipate an underspend for the 2021/2022 financial year include:

·        Event Partnerships (#342)

·        Advancing Māori Prosperity (#1741)

·        Legacy Rates Grants (#3166)

7.       Underspent funds can be reallocated to the following activities:

·        Waikaraka Park Master Plan (#2452)

·        Local Community Grants (#347)

8.       There is an additional report on the local boards 24 May 2022 agenda, Allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Transport Capital Fund, that will consider the remainder of the local boards underspent funds, totalling $38,250.

9.       Overall operating results for the first nine months of the year is 88 per cent of the budget due to lower revenue and expenditure.  The COVID-19 lockdowns impacted revenue from facility hire and libraries. Operating expenditure is below budget by $1.6 million as delays in work programmes and rescheduling of projects until later in the year resulted in lower operating spend. Capital delivery was $2.5 million against a $3.5 million budget. Delays in capital projects, increasing costs for construction materials and supply chain issues resulted in lower capital expenditure.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2022.

b)      approve the reallocation of underspent 2021/2022 locally driven initiatives operating expenditure funds as follows:

i)        $7,000 from Event Partnerships (#342) to Waikaraka Park Master Plan (#2452)

ii)       $736 from Event Partnerships (#342) to Local Community Grants (#347)

c)      note the following underspends will be considered in the Allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Transport Capital Fund report on this 24 May 2022 agenda:

i)        $25,000 from Service Improvement: Panmure Community Hall Activation

ii)       $5,000 from Advancing Māori Prosperity (#1741)

iii)      $4,564 from Event partnership (#342)

iv)      $3,686 from Legacy Rates Grants (#3166)

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

·        Auckland Unlimited.

11.     The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

COVID-19 restrictions

12.     From 23 January 2022, Auckland moved back into traffic light red setting under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, which has impacted council and community-delivered event planning and programming.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu                                                        

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

13.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

14.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Key activity updates from quarter three

15.     Youth Empowerment (#337): Te Karanga Trust launched their Creative Pathways mentoring programme in Glen Innes (with a further Riverside launch planned imminently). Creative Pathways engages ‘high-risk’ rangatahi aged 14-16 years attending alternative education in activities supporting pastoral care, growth of personal passions, entrepreneurial skills, and educational/ employment pathways.

16.     Libraries, Tātou Belonging – we bring communities together (#1355): All three libraries supported cultural events in the library and online. This included a Lunar New Year art exhibition; Love is Love reading promotion for Pride week; World of Cultures with a Mexican craft activity, a Sri Lankan cooking demonstration, and a Thai dance performance; and International Women's Day and Pasifika history with informative displays, including an installation in collaboration with Tamaki Regeneration Community Art Project (Pou Ora).

17.     Ruapōtaka Marae Support (#335): Ruapōtaka Marae finalised its Business Plan 2022, which documents the strategic vision for the Marae, its governance and management structure, existing and future services to the community, and the marae infrastructure re-development programme. Significant milestones have also been met regarding the land exchange.

18.     Local Small Business Mentors Programme (#1622): All 30 of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board funded mentoring places have been filled.

Completed activities

19.     Riverside Community Centre – comprehensive renewal (#26082): Full facility refurbishment completed March 2022.

20.     Safeswim digital sign – Point England (#3269): All payments are complete and the sign is installed. An article was written for OurAuckland about the sign.

21.     LDI minor capex fund (#20576):

·    Apirana Reserve – installation of bollards to prevent vehicle access

·    Wai-o-Taiki – installation of bollards

·    Riverside Community Centre – installation of heat pumps

Activities with significant issues

22.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as having significant issues:

23.     Service Improvement: Panmure Community Hall Activation (#1506): Due COVID-19 levels, partners have come back to use the Panmure Hall but we have been unable to run activations due to the risk of Omicron. Due to a lack of staff resource, we are looking to recruit a new role in Q4 that supports activation and engagement in the spaces of both Panmure Hall and Riverside Community Centre. This activity is anticipated to be underspent.

24.     Low Carbon Lifestyles (#884): Door-knocking and delivery of the programme will commence in quarter four as delivery of home energy advice is best suited to the winter months. Due to concerns regarding COVID-19, there is a risk that this programme will not complete delivery prior to the end of the financial year.

25.     Jordan Recreation Centre – refurbish stadium and changing room (#18088): Roof requires some work (waterproofing) before any works can commence on the interior of the building.

26.     Onehunga Bay Reserve - develop dog agility area (#26478): There have been delays in the delivery of this activity. It will not be delivered this financial year and has been deferred into the 2022/2023 work programme through the Community Facilities risk adjusted programme.

Activities on hold

27.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

28.     Te Oro Business Plan Initiatives (#330): this project has been paused due to reduced staffing capacity.

29.     Point England Reserve Service Assessment (#1236): this project is on hold until the treaty settlement is finalised.

30.     Develop location and service provision options for Panmure Library and Hall (#1562): delivery of indicative business case is delayed while Eke Panuku reassess options.

31.     Fergusson Hall - renew full facility (#30645): Project budget allocation currently in Financial Year 2023/2024.

32.     Pearce Street Community Hall - refurbish interior (#18877): Budget allocation currently in Financial Year 2023/2024.

33.     Taurima Reserve - develop general park (#24239): This project will commence in financial year 2023/2024 and expected to be completed by June 2025.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

34.     These activities are deferred from the current work programme into future years:

35.     Thompson Park – New lease for Mt Wellington Rugby League Football Club Incorporated (#1003): At the tenant's request, this matter will be deferred to the 2022/2023 work programme.

36.     Captain Springs Reserve - renew park assets (#28377): This project has been deferred to FY23 & FY24.

Cancelled activities

37.     These activities are cancelled:

38.     Movies in Parks (#1509): This event was cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions.

39.     Local Civic Events (#345): No activity occurred as no civic events were scheduled for the remainder of financial year. Funds were reallocated.

Activities with changes The following work programmes activities have changes which been formally approved by the board.

Table 1: Work programmes change formally approved by the board

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Summary of Change

Resolution number

1509

Customer and Community Services

Movies in Parks

Reallocated $18,932 underspent budget, following event cancellation.

MT/2022/30

331

Customer and Community Services

Building Resilient Whānau

Increased budget by $18,932.

MT/2022/30

 

40.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

2428

Customer and Community Services

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki – renew carparks and roading

Change the activity description from renewing the following carparks: Thompson Park, Gloucester Park and Simson Reserve to prioritizing Waikaraka Park carpark and Point England Reserve instead.

These other carparks will be dealt with in the future works programme carparking bundle, as they are not as high priority in comparison.

 

None.

2422

Customer and Community Services

Lagoon Pool – renew aquatic facilities and pool infrastructure

Name change to “Maungakiekie-Tamaki – renew aquatic facilities and pool infrastructure”.

There are no current projects for the other pool facilities in this years work programme. By changing the name and creating a bundle project there is less risk of changing the current work programme should a sudden failure occur.

None.

2422

Customer and Community Services

Maungakiekie-Tamaki – renew aquatic facilities and pool infrastructure

Budget increase by $417,000

Due to under-delivery in other project lines, the aquatic facilities can deliver elements of renewal within this financial year with the budget. Renewal works that can be delivered this financial year include: Glen Innes Pool – partial roof renewal, architectural redesign of the remainder of the roof, renew outdoor pool shades, leisure and teaching pool retile, renew sauna a steam room, refurbish kitchen and changing rooms, renew PA surround sound system. Lagoon Pool – renew roof membrane. Onehunga Pool – Renew pool grates, renew spa pool tiles, refurbish outdoor changing rooms.

26068

Customer and Community Services

Glen Innes Pool and leisure centre – develop carpark extension

Budget decrease by $180,000

The project manager is unable to deliver the full allocated budget this financial year due to Covid-19 delays. The amount is up for reallocation to another project that can deliver this financial year. It is important to note, that the amount will be reallocated back into the project in future years for final delivery.

18088

Customer and Community Services

Jordan Recreation Centre – refurbish stadium and changing room

Budget decrease

by $62,000

The project manager is unable to deliver the full allocated budget this financial year due to Covid-19 delays. The amount is up for reallocation to another project that can deliver this financial year. It is important to note, that the amount will be reallocated back into the project in future years for final delivery.

18776

Customer and Community Services

Maungakiekie-Tamaki – renew play spaces

Budget decrease by $60,000

The project manager is unable to deliver the full allocated budget this financial year due to Covid-19 delays. The amount is up for reallocation to another project that can deliver this financial year. It is important to note, that the amount will be reallocated back into the project in future years for final delivery.

18013

 

         

Customer and Community Services

Dunkirk Activity Centre – renew facility

Budget decrease by $52,000

The project manager is unable to deliver the full allocated budget this financial year due to Covid-19 delays. The amount is up for reallocation to another project that can deliver this financial year. It is important to note, that the amount will be reallocated back into the project in future years for final delivery.

30168

Customer and Community Services

Panmure Basin – renew play space – stage 2

Budget decrease by $38,000

The project manager is unable to deliver the full allocated budget this financial year due to Covid-19 delays. The amount is up for reallocation to another project that can deliver this financial year. It is important to note, that the amount will be reallocated back into the project in future years for final delivery.

24226

Customer and Community Services

Maungakiekie-Tamaki Coast to Coast Walkway – renew walkway signage

Budget decrease by $25,000

The project manager is unable to deliver the full allocated budget this financial year due to Covid-19 delays. The amount is up for reallocation to another project that can deliver this financial year. It is important to note, that the amount will be reallocated back into the project in future years for final delivery.

Reallocating underspent funds

41.     Staff have identified additional activities within the operational work programme that will deliver an underspend for the 2021/2022 financial year. The total underspend amount available to reallocate is $45,986.00.

42.     The following table provides a breakdown of the underspend against each activity.

  Table 1: Work programme underspend for reallocation by the local board

ID

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Reason for underspend

Underspend

amount

342

Customer and Community Services

Event Partnerships

Due to COVID-19 the Glow in the Park event was cancelled ($10,000). Funds for event survey have not been spent due to many events being disrupted by COVID-19.

$12,300

1506

Customer and Community Services

Service Improvement: Panmure Community Hall Activation

Due COVID-19 restrictions we have been unable to run activations. We are looking to recruit a new role in Q4 that supports activation and engagement in the spaces of both Panmure Hall and Riverside Community Centre.

$25,000

1741

Customer and Community Services

Advancing Māori Prosperity

Funds were not required for the delivery of this year’s programme.

$5,000

3166

Customer and Community Services

Legacy Rates Grants

Remaining funds were not uplifted by eligible groups.

$3,686

 

 

 

TOTAL

$45,986

 

Activities to reallocate budget

43.     The following activities have been identified as currently underfunded and can be delivered by the end of the 2021/2022 financial year.

44.     There is an additional report on the local boards 24 May 2022 agenda, Allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Transport Capital Fund, that will consider the remainder of the local board’s underspent funds, totalling $38,250.

  Table 2: Activities to reallocate toward

ID

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Activity Description / how budget will be spent

Reallocation

amount

2452

Customer and Community Services

Waikaraka Park Master Plan

Additional funds required to deliver project as intended.

$7,000

347

Customer and Community Services

Local Community Grants

Funds will be utilised to top up funding pool for final grant round.

$736

 

 

 

TOTAL

$7,736

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

45.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

46.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

47.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

48.     Climate action programme: a three-year community-based climate action programme to guide design, prioritisation and implementation of mitigation actions.

49.     Ope: Empowering local schools and students with sustainability skills through mentoring and buddying.

50.     Low Carbon Lifestyles: To provide targeted advice, resources practical interventions and elicit behavioural change within community to support households to create warmer, drier homes, and to reduce household energy use and associated carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     This report informs the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     The local board remains committed to integrating and supporting work that contributes to outcomes for Māori. This includes enhancing partnerships and collaborative ways of working with mana whenua and mataawaka.

54.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan 2020 has the lens of Te Ao Māori woven throughout, as well as an outcome that focuses on: Te ao Māori is thriving and visible. The local board plan guides local board decision making, including through the development and delivery of the 2021/2022 work programme.

55.     Some of the activities in the local board’s 2021/2022 work programme (Attachment A) have specific impact on the wider Māori community, this includes:

·    Maori Responsiveness: Ruapōtaka Marae (#355) -- continued collaboration with Ruapōtaka Marae and their marae redevelopment

·    Whakatipu i te reo Māori - we grow the Māori language Celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori (#1351) -- libraries across the local board promoted bilingual stories, songs and rhymes for children in Te Reo and English on their online platforms such as Facebook. Waitangi Day was marked with informative displays, online children's activities, and a postcard giveaway. Glen Innes Library has started a monthly cross in Te Reo. Onehunga Library hosted a performance by Te Rēhia Theatre as part of their Front Yard Festival.

·    Apply the Empowered Communities Approach: Connecting communities (#334) -- working with Ruapotaka Marae, Heart, Te Karanga Trust, Flipping East, 312 Hub Tāmaki Youth Council how do we get better outcomes for our rangatahi. An example is financial literacy, future planning and wellbeing are areas where each of these organisations help our rangatahi to thrive.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     This report is provided to enable the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programme.  

57.     There is a recommendation to reallocate Locally Driven Initiative Operating Expenditure (LDI Opex) funds of $45,986 from underspent activities to top up selected existing work programmes. Reallocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise its locally driven initiatives (LDI) opex budget for the 2021/2022 financial year. The reallocation recommendation has no financial impact on the overall LDI Opex budget.

58.     Should the local board choose not to support the reallocation of the funding from the initiatives identified above, the funding would be offered up as budget savings.

Financial Performance

59.     Operating revenue of $207,000 is below the budget by $347,000 due to a decrease in facility hire and lower library services revenue.

60.     Operating expenditure of $9.2 million is below the budget by $1.6 million overall. In asset- based services there were lower levels of schedule maintenance during COVID-19 restriction in the first six months of the year.  Locally Driven Initiatives expenditure is below the budget by $350,00 as projects were delayed and rescheduled.

61.     Capital spend is $2.5 million and is below budget by $968,000 due to COVID-19 disruption. The expenditure is mainly on Jubilee Bridge upgrade, local asset renewals programme and coastal asset renewals.

62.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Financial Performance report is in Appendix B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

63.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

64.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

65.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2022).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board - 1 January – 31 March 2022 Work Programme Update

113

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary

149

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Samantha Tan Rodrigo - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/06449

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022 allocations.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board provides strategic partnerships grants to support local community groups and organisations to build capacity and capability, upskill staff and volunteers and become more sustainable to deliver on initiatives which align to the local board’s priorities and outcomes.

3.       The 2021/2022 Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships work programme line 336 has a total budget of $250,000.

4.       After the distribution of $130,000 supporting the implementation of the Strategic Partnerships programme, the residual amount available for allocation is $120,000.

5.       The grant round opened on 16 April 2022 and closed on 29 April 2022.

6.       Four applications were received and assessed by a panel of staff for alignment to the criteria outlined in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022 framework (Attachment A).

7.       The applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 17 May 2022 to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities and outcomes for the grant round.

8.       Four applications, totalling $120,000, are identified as having high alignment with the criteria and are recommended for funding.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      approve the following applications for strategic partnerships grants:

Application ID

Applicant

Proposal

Recommended funding

MTSG20202101

TGTB Charitable Trust

Contribution to funding, media and administration roles to work alongside the Creative Director.

$20,000

MTSG2022-102

Te Karanga Charitable Trust

Contribution to a business support role to develop and implement a 5-year plan.

$20,000

 

MTSG2022-103

The Synergy Projects Trust

Contribution to build the capacity of three groups to transition from the organization to become sustainable.

$20,000

 

MTSG2022-104

Tāmaki WRAP Charitable Trust

Contribution to an Operations Lead role and improved professional standards of operation.

$60,000

 

Total

 

      $120,000

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The purpose of the strategic partnerships grant is to support local community organisations to deliver against the following outcomes identified in the Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Our diverse communities are active, involved and engaged

·    Te ao Māori is thriving and visible

·    Our social and physical infrastructure is future-proofed

·    Our transport choices are accessible, sustainable and safe

·    Our built, natural and cultural taonga / treasures are protected and celebrated

·    Our people and businesses prosper economically and socially.

10.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships has a total budget of $250,000. The budget funds the services of a Partnerships Broker role, building capacity and capability for identified organisations, delivering funding workshops and drop-in sessions held across the local board area and the development of a collaborative funding pilot, with the balance distributed through non-contestable grants.

11.     After the distribution of $130,000 supporting the implementation of the Strategic Partnerships programme the remaining amount available for allocation to the non-contestable grant round in 2021/2022 is $120,000.

12.     The non-contestable grant round opened for applications on 16 April 2022 and closed on 29 April 2022. Targeted community organisations were invited to submit an expression of interest application.

13.     The Partnerships Broker and staff met with each of the four local community groups and organisations that had registered their interest to participate in the assessment process to discuss their proposal and support them as it was developed for submission. 

14.     Four applications were received (Attachment B) and following round table meetings with all the applicants, the applications were assessed by a panel of staff for alignment to the criteria outlined in the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022 framework.

15.     Four applications were presented to the local board at a workshop on 17 May 2022 to discuss their alignment with the local board’s priorities and outcomes for the grant round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.     Local community groups and organisations are able to apply for up to $20,000 per year, up to a total of $60,000 for multi-year funding for up to three years. This included contributions to wages and salaries, ongoing operational costs and access to organisational capacity and capability building support throughout implementation.

17.     The four applications received are requesting a total of $120,000 and have been assessed as having high alignment to the local board’s priorities and outcomes criteria.

18.     Staff recommend allocating a total of $120,000 to the following applicants, outlined in table 1.

 

 

 

Table 1: Applications recommended for funding

Application ID

Applicant name

Proposal

Requested funding

Recommended funding

Staff analysis

MTSG2022-101

TGTB Charitable Trust

Contribution to a Strategic Lead role and improved professional standards of operation.

$20,000

$20,000

For Year 3

A previous recipient from the 2019/2020 grant round this proposal is highly aligned with the purpose of the fund to strengthen and support the organisation to continue to improve and develop solid governance foundations, leverage funding, implement strategy, policies, processes, and community engagement plans to achieve sustainability of the organisation.

MTSG2022-102

Te Karanga Charitable Trust

Contribution for 1 mentor and 1 leader and programme costs for 4 terms of the school year.

$20,000

$20,000

For Year 3

 

A previous recipient from the 2019/2020 grant round this proposal is highly aligned with the purpose of the fund to strengthen and support the organisation to further build its capacity to match the growth and increased program funding secured and enable it to continue and sustain high quality, safe and responsive mahi through implementation of a realistic and sustainable 5-year strategic plan

MTSG2022-103

The Synergy Projects Trust

Contribution for 2 part-time Administrator roles, support for the steering group and a communication platform.

$20,000

$20,000 

For Year 3

A previous recipient from the 2019/2020 grant round this proposal is highly aligned with the purpose of the fund to strengthen and support the organisation to build the capacity and capability of three groups to transition out from under Synergy. To operate and thrive as successful and sustainable organisations in their own right by building up the knowledge and resilience of local leaders so they can develop community-led programmes and projects.

MTSG2022-104

Tāmaki WRAP Charitable Trust

Contribution to an Operational Resource role and improved professional standards of operation.

$60,000

$60,000 

$20,000 p.a. for Years 1,2 and 3

This proposal is highly aligned with the purpose of the fund to strengthen and support the organisation to focus on redefining their role going forward, as to be identified through engagement with community and key stakeholders and to transition the organisation to different ways of working to further build their governance, operations and practice.

If the grant is approved, the applicant has agreed to work with staff to build the applicant's capabilities.

 

Total

                                                                                                $120,000

 

 

 

19.     Funding these entities will enable the local board to:

·        strengthen its strategic partnerships with more local community groups and organisations

·        invest in capacity and capability building so that the entities are better able to deliver their services effectively, demonstrate impact, become more sustainable and strengthen their funding position to attract diverse funding opportunities

·        improve people’s connectedness and wellbeing so that they are engaged in the community and have access to a wide range of support through the Covid-19 recovery period

·        strengthen support to the voluntary and community sector

·        enable social innovation and enterprise

·        work in a holistic and integrated way.

 

20.     As part of the implementation support provided, staff work with the recipients to utilise ‘The Community Impact Toolkit’. This is a five-step process from planning for change through to reporting. This will form part of the funding agreement to ensure good practice measures and evaluation processes are in place and to enable full accountability and report back to the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The four applications determined to highly align with the criteria and recommended for funding have developed and deliver online content. This will have a positive impact on climate change due to the reduced need for people to travel to access these services.

22.     The four applications determined to highly align with the criteria and recommended for funding are helping to develop community resilience and adaptation including in the areas of natural environment, economy, food and Te Puāwaitanga ō te Tātai. This will broadly contribute toward community readiness for changes in the future such as those caused by climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     In the lead up to and during the grant round process, work programme development and implementation, staff collaborate with the Community and Social Innovation Youth Empowerment and Youth Economy teams, the Community Programme Delivery Central/ East team and the Waste Solutions team to ensure a coordinated approach, best utilisation of the budgets available and a shared commitment to the outcomes and success of the programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The local board is responsible for the allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022.

25.     The aim of the strategic partnerships grant is to support local community groups and organisations to build capacity and capability, upskill staff and volunteers so that the entity becomes more sustainable, is able to leverage the investment and attract diverse funding opportunities to achieve outcomes identified in the Local Board Plan 2020.

26.     The four applications determined to highly align with the criteria provide a geographical balance of delivery across the local board area. Online delivery methods may have a positive impact on reach and participation rates for local board residents and target populations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Māori make up 13 percent of the local board population, which is higher than the Auckland average by two per cent.

28.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022 aims to respond to council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to local community groups and organisations who deliver positive outcomes for Māori.

29.     All four of the applicants recommended for funding demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the Treaty of Waitangi and Te ao Māori for inclusivity, connectedness and decision making and have identified outcomes for Māori. Their mahi is underpinned by values of aroha, manākitanga, rangatiratanga, kotahitanga, whanaungatanga and kaitiakitanga. Tikanga and Mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge) are embedded in their programmes as a tool for wellness and transformation.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022 has a total budget of $250,000.

31.     The amount available for allocation to the strategic partnerships grant round is $120,000

32.     Staff recommend allocating $120,000 across four applications for the grant round.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grant 2021/2022. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Staff will notify all successful applicants of the outcome and create funding agreements.

35.     Staff will provide the local board with six monthly progress reports on the funded local community groups and organisations and the grant recipients will be invited to present their mahi at a local board community forum or local board workshop annually during the term of the agreement.


 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Strategic Partnerships Grants 2021.2022 framework

161

b

Summary of applications 2021-2022

163

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Carole Blacklock - Specialist Advisor

Morgan Borthwick - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Nici Painter - Senior Advisor

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/06187

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2022/2023 for adoption (as provided in Attachment A to this report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      adopt the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2022/2023 in Attachment A.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

·      outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·      specific local board grant priorities

·      which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing     dates

·      any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·      other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the local board grants programme 2022/2023 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility will be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

12.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2021 -2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Grants Programme 2022/2023

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three and Multi-Board Round Two 2021/2022, grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/06196

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three (Attachment B) and Multi-Board Round Two 2021/2022(Attachment C).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three (Attachment B) and Multi-Board Round Two 2021/2022(Attachment C).

3.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $94,592.00 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $17,930.00 to be allocated to one local grants and one multiboard round.

5.       Twenty-five applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three 2021/2022, requesting a total of $173,284.35 and twenty-two multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $108,004.89.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Three 2021/2022, listed in Table One below:

Table One: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three 2021/2022

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2211-304

Pukepuke 'o Tonga Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of delivering a free ten-week programme "Ako faiva" for children aged 3 to 18 years, including the cost of the two choreographers, marketing, uniforms, videographer, catering, administration, and logistics.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-305

Marama Aotearoa Limited

Arts and culture

Towards the teaching materials, tutors, facilitation, catering, and administration costs for the six-week "Te Reo Circle" programme.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-314

City of Sails Pipe Band Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of drum cases for storage and transporting of the Band's pipe drums.

$1,643.90

Eligible

LG2211-303

Manukau Cruising Club Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of three barrier arms and six bollards to ensure security in the carpark area.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-306

Oranga Kai Ora Gardens

Synergy Project

Community

Towards the cost of advertising, fencing, materials, equipment, and purchase of plants, herbs, and fruit trees.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-309

The Period Place

Community

Towards the storage unit rental cost, purchase of reusable period underwear and menstrual cups and disposable period products.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-311

The Scout Association of New Zealand - Aotea Sea Scouts

Community

Towards the printing and mounting cost of the photographs including the presentation boards for a historic photographic exhibition on Onehunga's changing foreshore 1840s to present.

$1,961.65

Eligible

LG2211-312

Onehunga Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the Onehunga town centre Closed Circuit Television cameras infrastructure upgrade.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-313

Kidz Need Dadz Charitable Trust New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of an Education Consultant for the "Kidz Need Dadz Education Programme".

$3,500.00

Eligible

LG2211-320

Maths for Juniors

Community

Towards resources and stationery to run free mathematics classes and competitions every Saturday for low decile Primary and Secondary schools students in the local board including software applications subscription fees for games and meetings, whiteboards, paper books, dusters, leaf pad, pencils, pen, catering, whiteboards and whiteboard markers.

$2,000.00

Ineligible

LG2211-321

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of training and clinical supervision of the youth worker team and counsellors from 1 June 2022 to 31 March 2023.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-322

Onehunga Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire (Pearce Street Hall), website design and maintenance, volunteer expenses, administration, Christmas celebration and other activity costs.

$9,550.00

Eligible

LG2211-323

Ellerslie Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of seven Montessori play boxes for children aged between 3 to 36 months.

$1,910.00

Eligible

LG2211-324

Graeme Dingle Foundation Auckland

Community

Towards two Kiwi Can Leaders' wages for the delivery of the "Kiwi Can" programme in Glen Innes School.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-325

Road Safety Education Limited

Community

Towards the venue hire, and the facilitators' costs to deliver the “Road Safety” programme for the students from the Tamaki College.

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-327

Melanoma New Zealand

Community

Towards the costs of Melanoma NZ free mobile spot check van activations at two locations within the local board area, including the wages of the Nurse Educator and Administrator for 2 days between 1st July 2022 and 30 September 2022.

$1,260.00

Eligible

LG2211-328

Belong Aotearoa(ARMS)

Community

Towards the purchase of indoor gross motor movement play equipment for the Safari playgroup.

$5,792.00

Eligible

LG2211-329

Mount Wellington Playcentre

Community

Towards the cost of creating an extended deck and a new ramp for the Mt Wellington Playcentre to reduce trip hazards during outdoor and gross motor skill plays.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-330

Dance Therapy NZ

Community

Towards the venue hire, programme facilitation, equipment and materials, coordination, office overheads, client support, and liaison costs for the "Arts 4 Us", "Stars", and "Dance 4 Us" programme from 26 July 2022 to 13 December 2022.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-334

Solomon Islands Auckland Wantok Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire, resources, stationery, refreshments, microphone, portable speakers, sports equipment, and sports uniforms for the "Iumi Tugeda" programme.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-301

Glen Innes Chinese Groups Incorporated

Events

Towards venue hire, purchase of a projector, and memory sticks, a musical keyboard, purchase and delivery charges for costumes from China, venue hire, and administration costs for “Dragon Boat Festival, Mid-Autumn Festival, Christmas, and Chinese New Year celebrations".

$8,440.00

Eligible

LG2211-332

Auckland King Tides Initiative

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Inc

Environment

Towards the design, production, and installation of CoastSnap device in Taumanu Reserve beaches, including the coordination and delivery of the public launch.

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2211-310

East Skate Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the venue hire at the Sonskate Indoor Skatepark, coaching, facilitation, and coordination cost of "learn to skate" programmes in the local board area.

$16,250.00

Ineligible

LG2211-316

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards the coaching fees and basketballs balls for the "Junior Development Program" in the local board area from 1 June 2022 to 21 February 2023.

$9,976.80

Eligible

LG2211-331

Riverside Sports Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Request is to cover the cost of purchasing a padel court.

$10,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$173,284.35

 

 

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round Two 2021/2022, listed in Table Two below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table Two: Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round Two 2021/2022

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2022-234

Fiji Girmit Foundation

Arts and culture

Towards the Girmit musical festival and Girmit seniors’ recognition event in Mangere.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-239

The Operating Theatre Trust t/a Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards Gift a Seat funding for 2,700 children to attend The Whale Rider in their local area for free from September 2022 to December 2022

$6,522.50

Eligible

MB2022-241

Crescendo Trust of Aotearoa

Arts and culture

Towards programme costs to deliver Mahi Waiata (The Gig) at Crescendo Studio

$6,758.31

Eligible

MB2022-202

Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards free or subsidised classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in various locations in Auckland from June 2022 to March 2023

$9,485.00

Eligible

MB2022-210

LifeKidz Trust

Community

Towards sensory/play equipment and support worker wages.

$5,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-215

The Reading Revolution

Community

Towards wages of the manager delivering the "Readers Leaders programme"

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-220

Bellyful New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards meal production, volunteer support, and delivery costs in Auckland from June 2022 to December 2023

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-221

Kiwi Harvest Ltd

Community

Towards the operating costs of the food rescue project in Highbrook from June 2022 to June 2023.

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-225

Outline Aotearoa Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of the peer support service programme`s volunteer training, clinical supervision, advertising, stationery, insurance, and information technology service.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-229

The StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the workshop’s costs, including tutor fees, venue hire, tutor and volunteer training, regional programme coordinator`s salary and equipment between 1st June 2022 to 31st December 2022.

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-230

Recreate NZ

Community

Towards volunteer expenses, youth facilitators, and activities to run the 'Urban Youth' programme from June 2022 to April 2023

$2,800.00

Eligible

MB2022-232

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards the salary, mileage and home office costs of three regional coordinators of the "Garden to Table Food Education Programme"

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-236

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards operational costs including wages, rent, transport, and equipment.

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-237

Pet Refuge New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards administration costs for the Pet Refuge shelter in Auckland from June 2022 to December 2022

$1,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-240

Age Concern Auckland Incorporated

Community

Towards delivering specialized Asian services to Chinese, Korean and Japanese people aged 65 and older across Auckland.

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-243

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the marketing material costs, the coordinators and facilitators wages

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-248

KidsCan Charitable Trust

Community

Towards items to deliver the KidsCan programme in schools and early childhood centres

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-252

Communities Against Alcohol Harm

Community

Towards community navigator project from June 2022 to June 2023.

$1,939.08

Eligible

MB2022-255

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards healthy home interventions and winter warmer essentials from June 2022 to August 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-256

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the delivery of “Covid Recovery - Supporting Well Being and Resilience” programme in Sandringham, St Lukes, Mt Roskill, New Lynn, Henderson, Te Atatu, Waitakere and Royal Oak

$1,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-203

Howick Pakuranga Youth Academy

Sport and recreation

Towards gym equipment and purchase of a van.

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-204

The Auckland Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards ongoing operating expenses from July 2022 to December 2022.

$6,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$108,004.89

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·     local board priorities

·     lower priorities for funding

·     exclusions

·     grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·     any additional accountability requirements.

 

9.       The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board adopted the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 27 April 2021 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

17.     A summary of each application received through Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three 2021/2022 and multi-board applications is provided in Attachment B and Attachment C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

19.     Thirteen applicants applying to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three and thirteen applicants applying to the multiboard round two 2021/2022 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

21.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $112,522.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year. A total of $94,592.00 was allocated in the previous grant rounds. This leaves a total of $17,930.00 to be allocated to one local grants and one multiboard round.

22.     Twenty-five applications were received for Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants, Round Three 2020/2021, requesting a total of $173,284.35 and twenty-two multiboard applications were also received requesting a total of $108,004.89.

23.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Following the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board allocating funding for round three of the local grants and round two of multiboard grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022

189

b

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Grants Round Three 2021/2022 -  grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Multiboard Round Two 2021/2022 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Allocation of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2022/06760

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek direction from the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board about investigation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Transport manages the LBTCF on behalf of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.  On an as-required basis, Auckland Transport provides advice to support local board decision-making. A decision confirming priorities for investigation of projects is requested.

3.       In this electoral term, the Local Board Transport Capital Fund has a total of $1,922,645 to spend on transport projects.  In November 2021, the local board allocated $850,000 of this total to two projects:

a)         Jubilee Shared Bridge costing $700,000.

b)         A Second Tripoli Road raised crossing costing $150,000

4.       This leaves $1,072,645 available and Auckland Transport seeks a decision about which projects should be investigated in detail.

5.       At the April 2022 meeting Auckland Transport presented advice about options and passed Resolution Number MT/2022/43 which did not provide sufficient direction about local board’s intent. Then on 17 May 2022, Auckland Transport discussed this matter at a workshop and is now returning to the local board requesting a decision about which LBTCF projects should be investigated.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      request Auckland Transport to start the investigation of making all or part of the Eastview ‘Innovating Streets’ permanent and installing traffic-calming on Victoria Street, Onehunga.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Local Board Transport Capital Fund is an Auckland Transport fund established in 2012, to allow local boards to deliver small projects in their local area that would not normally be prioritised by Auckland Transport. Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board receives approximately $926,065 per annum.

7.       In November 2021, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board by Resolution Number MT/2021/192 decided to deliver two projects, work has already been completed on some of them:

a)         Jubilee Shared Bridge costing $700,000

b)         A Second Tripoli Road raised crossing costing $150,000.

8.       After releasing $850,000 from the LBTCF the board had $1,072,645 available for transport projects and Auckland Transport provided advice about a range of projects, including estimates of cost.

9.       The process of planning how to use Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board’s transport funding started with written advice in memo format and an initial workshop on 21 October 2021. 

10.     Auckland Transport’s key advice was that the board should start by reviewing projects that are already in the programme. This ensures that historic investments are not lost, maintains the integrity of the board’s previous decision-making and maximizes efficiency of delivery.

11.     At this workshop, the local board also confirmed that they would like two existing projects to be delivered as quickly as possible, the Jubilee Bridge and second, Tripoli Road crossing projects and subsequently this instruction was confirmed by Resolution Number MT/2021/192.

12.     Further, the board over a series of workshops requested advice about project feasibility and costs for a number of projects. After the projects being considered were confirmed, Auckland Transport’s advice was provided in a detailed memo with cost estimates for each project. This memo was sent to the local board on 28 March 2022.

13.     At a workshop on 5 April 2022, Auckland Transport officers discussed the memo with the local board and three projects were identified that the members wished to investigate further:

a)   building a roundabout and safer crossings at the Onehunga Mall Road-Grey Street Intersection costing $870,000

b)   making the changes tested during the Eastview Road Innovating Streets project permanent, costing between $385,000 and $605,000

c)   installing traffic calming in Victoria Street, Onehunga costing $160,000.

14.     Auckland Transport was concerned about the cost of detailed investigation and requested that the local board identify options for investigation.

15.     The estimated cost of ‘Investigation and Design’ has been provided to the local board and is:

a)   Onehunga Mall Road-Grey Street Intersection approximately $43,500

b)   Eastview Road Innovating Streets being made permanent, approximately $30,250

c)   installing traffic calming in Victoria Street, Onehunga approximately $8,000

d)   overall project management approximately $8,175.

16.     In April 2022, Auckland Transport provided advice in a report to the local board and requested a decision, asking the local board to select between two options:

a)   investigate building a roundabout at the intersection of Grey Street and Onehunga Mall; or

b)   investigate finishing the project in Eastview and build speed calming on Victoria Street.

17.     After completing the investigation either of these options can be delivered within the local board’s remaining LBTCF budget.

18.     Unfortunately, Auckland Transport’s request may not have been communicated clearly because in Resolution Number MT/2022/43 the local board asked that all three projects be investigated.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Auckland Transport’s advice is that within its LBTCF budget the local board can pursue either of the two options. Both options contribute to the local board’s long-term goals and have been advocated for by members for a long time.  Further, Auckland Transport’s advice is that both options will contribute to the local board area’s connectivity and safety objectives stated on Page 23 of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Plan, “Support people-centred road design improvements that promote the safety of all road users” all are people focussed, improving safety encouraging movement on bikes, electric scooters and on foot.

20.     Unfortunately, the local board cannot deliver all three projects within this electoral term’s LBTCF budget. Auckland Transport’s advice is that it is not financially prudent to investigate and design projects without enough budget to deliver them. So Auckland Transport is again asking the local board to provide its direction about which option of the two presented it would like to proceed with.

21.     The ‘investigation and design’ stage of a project involves detailed consideration of the proposed project and costs a relatively significant amount. On 3 May 2022, at the Council Controlled Organisation (CCO) Engagement Plan workshop, all CCO’s highlighted to Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board members that operational funding was very constrained. Auckland Council (including its CCOs) is struggling to manage the economic impact of COVID and other international financial problems. Therefore, it is important public money is not used investigating projects that cannot be delivered.

22.     Regarding delivery, the project that is most advanced in planning is the Eastview Project, simply because of the work already completed by the ‘Innovating Streets’ project team. There is not a significant difference in difficulty and deliverability between the other projects. 

23.     Auckland Transport’s advice is therefore based on deliverability of this project, and this factor means that the recommendation is that the board prioritises the second option completion of the Eastview ‘Innovating Streets’ project and traffic-calming in Victoria Street.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

 

24.     Auckland Council declared a climate emergency, Auckland Transport therefore urges the Maungakiekie-Tamaki Local Board to consider prioritisation of projects that help reduce carbon emissions. Both of the proposed options will encourage walking and cycling, reducing carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Both options will be delivered completely within the road corridor and do not require liaison with council other than business-as-usual discussions with Healthy Waters, arborists and other staff that manage assets in the road corridor.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board provided feedback at the workshop on 5 April 2022, selecting the three proposed projects from which the options in this report are derived from the following list:

a)         Beachcroft Avenue Traffic Calming

b)         Onehunga Mall Road-Grey Street Intersection

c)         Beachcroft Avenue-Arthur Street Intersection

d)         Victoria Street Traffic Calming

e)         Eastview Road ‘Innovating Streets’.

27.     At the April 2022 meeting the local board passed Resolution Number MT/2022/43, requesting that Auckland Transport investigate all three projects rather than the options presented.

28.     At a workshop on 17 May 2022, Auckland Transport discussed the options with the local board and Resolution Number MT/2022/43 and listened to the local board’s insights.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     The actions being considered do not have specific impacts on Māori.  Both Auckland Transport and Auckland Council are committed to meeting their responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Treaty of Waitangi) and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori. Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

30.     Any Auckland Transport project that requires consultation with iwi will include that activity within its project plan.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     This report requires consideration of a significant financial commitment of up to $870,000 by the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board.

32.     The recommended course of action will commit $765,000 leaving will leave $307,645 available for other uses or to be transferred to the next electoral term.  

33.     Local Board Transport Capital Fund allocated by the local board is considered committed, requiring a new decision before it could be reallocated.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The most significant risk that the local board faces in this decision relates to time. The electoral term is in its final year, this means that in July the LBTCF will not be available for use until next electoral term.  Auckland Transport cannot start work on any project until a decision is recorded by the local board.

35.     Therefore, the risk mitigation for this risk is quick decision-making.

36.     The other risk that has been highlighted by the LBTCF Programme Manager, is the rising cost of construction. This is a universal issue related to COVID, the war in Ukraine and a number of other factors.

37.     The recommendation will leave $307,645 available providing a reserve that can be used if the project’s costs escalate. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     If the local board provides direction, about either of the two options possible within the budget, then Auckland Transport will immediately commence detailed investigation. The aim being to confirm plans with the local board as quickly as possible so that a commitment to construction can be made before the end of the electoral term.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Stallworthy, Auckland Transport Elected Member Partner

Authorisers

Stephen Rainbow, Auckland Transport Central Hub Manager

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/06575

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the board with the governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board is in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar is updated every month. Each update is reported to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the attached Governance Forward Work Calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar

201

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Amoa - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Table

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Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

File No.: CP2022/06576

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board workshops for 26 April, 3, 10 and 17 May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local board workshops are held to give board members an opportunity to receive information and updates or provide direction and have discussion on issues and projects relevant to the local board area. No binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board:

a)      note the local board record of workshops held on for 26 April, 3, 10 and 17 May 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Record of Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board Workshops

205

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lisa Amoa - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Maungakiekie-Tāmaki Local Board

24 May 2022

 

 

Table

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[1] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[2] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[3] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[4] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy

[5] Annual figures for the 18-month period 30 June 2020 to 31 December 2021, when compared to the prior five-year baseline period.

[6] https://www.transport.govt.nz/statistics-and-insights/safety-annual-statistics/sheet/social-cost-of-road-crashes