I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 May 2022

3.00pm

Online via Microsoft Teams and at the Ōrākei Local Board Office, 25 St Johns Road
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairman

Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairman

Troy Elliott

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Sarah Powrie

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jade Grayson

Democracy Advisor

 

13 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027 443 0342

Email: jade.grayson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Deputation - Fraser Brothers - Presentation on Redevelopment Plans for Lilliput                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       6

11        Lease to Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Incorporated for part of Hakumau Reserve at 3-55 Tamaki Drive                                                    7

12        Ōrākei Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023                                                             85

13        Ōrākei Local Grants Round Two and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations                                                           97

14        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022                                                           161

15        Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)                                             209

16        Draft Auckland golf investment plan              239

17        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes                        277

18        Chairman and Board Members' Report         383

19        Governance Forward Work Calendar             397

20        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings 401

21        Resolutions Pending Action report                413

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

23        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                         425

C1       The Landing Physical Services Agreement  425


1          Welcome

 

Chairman Scott Milne will welcome those present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 12 May 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Fraser Brothers - Presentation on Redevelopment Plans for Lilliput

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the Board during the deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Fraser Brothers (Hamish and Ollie) will be in attendance to present to the board on redevelopment plans for Lilliput.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Fraser Brothers for their attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Lease to Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Incorporated for part of Hakumau Reserve at 3-55 Tamaki Drive

File No.: CP2022/06413

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive submissions following the public notification of the proposed lease to Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Incorporated (OBC); and

2.       To provide an opportunity for the full Ōrākei Local Board to hear and consider the submissions and make a decision on the proposed lease.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Ōrākei Local Board at its business meeting on 18 November 2021, approved an Agreement to Lease to OBC for part of Hakumau Reserve.

4.       The Agreement to Lease was conditional on Auckland Council undertaking public notification and consulting with iwi on the proposal to grant a lease to OBC in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977.

5.       Following the public notification and iwi engagement of the proposed lease to OBC, the council received 72 submissions including three objections.

6.       In terms of the statutory process governing recreation reserves, the local board, as the administering body will need to hear submissions and give full consideration to all submissions and objections and to make a final determination regarding the lease.

7.       All eight submitters who indicated in their written submissions that they wished to be heard have been invited to provide an oral submission at the public forum section of the 12 May 2022 local board business meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive this report and information in relation to the granting of a lease to Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Incorporated for part of Hakumau Reserve at 3-55 Tamaki Drive

b)      note that all eight submitters who indicated that they wished to be heard were invited to attend and speak at the 12 May 2022 business meeting during the public forum item in accordance with the requirements of the Reserves Act

c)       review submissions and consider the oral submissions heard from submitters during public forum in relation to the lease to Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Incorporated for part of Hakumau Reserve

d)      consider all submissions and make a final determination on the lease to Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Incorporated for part of Hakumau Reserve

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Ōrākei Local Board at its business meeting on 20 August 2020, resolved to offer, subject to conditions, a commercial lease for part of Hakumau Reserve to the Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Incorporated (Resolution number OR/2020/71, Attachment A).

9.       In its resolution, the local board directed that staff enter into lease discussions with the Outboard Boating Club Incorporated (OBC), based on the following principles:

·    a long term (33 year) commercially based lease with the rental guided by an independent market valuation

·    OBC securing and controlling entry to the leased area with fencing and a vehicle barrier arm

·    re-design and relocation of OBC’s Tāmaki Drive fence to southern side of the Pohutukawa trees in alignment with the proposed lease boundary

·    OBC undertaking adequate marketing including clearly visible entrance signage and online information to enable public use of at least two ramps in accordance with the resource consent conditions

·    providing pedestrian access over the leased area via a pedestrian gate that is open during daylight hours

10.     The report presented to the local board on 20 August 2020 addressing the occupancy agreement for the OBC outlined a series of next steps. This included:

·    obtaining a market valuation

·    negotiating with OBC

·    procuring a survey plan to define the lease area

·    reporting to the board

·    public notification and iwi engagement

·    hearing on submissions, negotiation with submitters, analysis and reporting back to board for further decisions

11.     At its business meeting on 18 November 2021 the local board approved an Agreement to Lease to OBC for part of Hakumau Reserve comprising of 5,168m2 (Resolution number OR/2021/181, Attachment B).

12.     The Agreement to Lease was conditional on Auckland Council undertaking public notification and consulting with iwi on the proposal to grant a lease to OBC in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977. The additional conditions in the Agreement to Lease were to reflect the principles prescribed in the local board’s August 2020 decision as listed in paragraph 8.

Reserves Act 1977

13.     The land at 3-5 Tamaki Drive Auckland is owned by Auckland Council and classified as recreation reserve under the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

14.     The Ōrākei Local Board is the allocated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including leasing of parts of local parks and reserves. Consequently, the local board is the administering authority for Hakumau Reserve for the purposes of the Reserves Act 1977.

15.     As the administering body for Hakumau Reserve, the local board holds governance oversight for managing, controlling and administering the reserve, in accordance with the Reserves Act. The general purpose of recreational reserves as defined under the Act is “providing areas for the recreation and sporting activities and the physical welfare and enjoyment of the public, and for the protection of the natural environment and beauty ...”[1].

16.     This definition accords with the local board’s decision on 20 August 2020 (OR/2020/71) where the board acknowledged that the general purpose of Hakumau Reserve is “for the preservation and management of the reserve for the benefit and enjoyment of the public in particular active and passive recreational use of the Reserve”.

17.     Section 54(1) of the Reserves Act authorises the local board, as administering body, to grant leases over recreation reserves and may set apart any area under section 53(1)(h) for a parking place. The proposed leased area is intended to be used for car and trailer boat parking associated with the activities of OBC.

18.     Under the Reserves Act and in the absence of an approved management plan for Hakumau Reserve, the administering body is required to publicly notify the proposed lease in accordance with section 119 of the Act. In addition, under section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 which gives effect to the Treaty of Waitangi principles and underpins the Reserves Act, iwi consultation is required.

19.     The proposed lease to OBC was publicly notified on Monday, 22 November 2021. The public noticed was published in the New Zealand Herald and on the council website. The notice requested written submissions in relation to the proposal and submitters were requested to state in their submission if they wished to be heard in person (Attachment C). In accordance with the Reserve Act requirements, public notification was open for one calendar month. The deadline for submissions was 5:00pm on Wednesday, 22 December 2022.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Overview of submissions

20.     A total of 72 submissions were received following the public notification of the proposed lease to OBC. There were 69 submissions in support of the proposal and three opposed as reflected in figure 1 below.

 

21.     There were several local organisations that supported the proposal including the Auckland Water Ski Club Incorporated, Tamaki Yacht Club, Royal Akarana Yacht Club and Whakatakakata Bay Sport Fishing Club. Additionally, a number of social and charitable organisations provided submissions in support, including Coastguard New Zealand and Mussel Reef Restoration Trust.

22.     The submitters supporting the proposed lease to OBC generally indicated its long-standing presence at the site and within the locality, the strong connection that OBC has with the boating community, access to its modern and functional facilities, OBC’s affiliation with a number of community groups and its focus on safety, sustainability and preservation of the environment. Eleven submitters also expressed a view that the level of rent should recognise the community benefit.

23.     The starting point for the level of rent was determined on a market valuation with the agreed level of rent recognising the significance of the site on Tamaki Drive, the long-term nature of the lease of 33 years and the broader recreational outcomes achieved through OBC’s activities.

24.     The three objections to the proposal indicated the following:

a)   two objectors opposed the use of any part of the reserve for occupancy by OBC and indicated that this should be available to the wider community to undertake passive recreational activities. One of the objectors suggested that any occupancy only proceed following an assessment of the public value once the public had an opportunity to experience unfettered access to the reserve.

b)   one submission was a partial objection to the proposal indicating that the submitter would like to see the activities of OBC continuing at the reserve and provision made for ‘non-boatees’ and wider community to enjoy the reserve.

25.     The local board’s resolution of 20 August 2020 (Resolution number OR/2020/71), approved in principle a proposed lease footprint of no more than half of Hakumau Reserve. The proposed lease area is shown shaded blue in figure 1 below.

A picture containing text, stadium, road, highway

Description automatically generated

Fig 1. Proposed lease footprint shaded blue; mixed recreation area green shaded area; Lilliputt development area shaded yellow

26.     The lease area is 5168m2 being half of the total reserve area of 10,337m2. The area shaded in green in figure 1 is to be used as open space for passive recreational use. This accords with the aspirations expressed by the submitter in the latter objection.

27.     None of the objectors indicated that they wish to be heard. However, eight submitters supporting the proposal indicated that they wished to speak to their submissions.

Hearings process

28.     Generally, where there are submissions that need to be heard, a hearing may be required.

29.     Section 120(1)(c) of the Reserves Act 1977 provides that where a submitter has requested an opportunity to be heard, the administering body shall give them a reasonable opportunity of appearing before the administering body or a committee or panel nominated by the administering body tasked with hearing submissions.

30.     In hearing submissions, the local board can choose whether the full local board, certain members and/or independent commissioners will hear submissions and make a decision on the proposal. The table below describes the various options.

Option

Description

Option 1 - Local board only

The full local board hears submissions and makes decision on the proposed lease.

Option 2 - Local board panel with an independent commissioner as chair

The local board appoints a commissioner to chair a panel comprising of all or some of the local board to hear the submissions and make recommendations to the local board following hearings.

The local board would then make the decision whether to support the panel recommendations.

Option 3 - Independent commissioners hear submissions and make recommendations to the local board

The local board appoints an independent panel comprising two or more commissioners to hear and consider the submissions and make recommendations to the local board.

The local board would make the decision whether to support the panel recommendations.

Option 4 - Appoint a committee to hear submissions and make decisions

The local board appoints a committee and delegates the decision-making to that committee.

The committee would have a minimum of three members, at least one of whom is a member of the local board.

The committee would hear submissions and make decisions on the proposed lease.

31.     All options except option 1 involve the use of commissioners. Commissioners provide varying levels of independent consideration of submissions and decision-making, or in circumstances where there is the need for specialist or independent advice. 

32.     In assessing which of the above option to recommend, staff have considered the following factors:

·    retaining local knowledge, input and decision-making in hearing submissions

·    the authority to make the final determination

·    compliance with the Reserves Act

·    cost

33.     Option 1 is the preferred option, with the full local board hearing submissions and making a decision on the proposed lease on the basis that:

·    the local board brings local knowledge and is well informed of the history surrounding the occupancies at Hakumau Reserve

·    the local board has made a series of decisions as noted in paragraphs 4 and 8 in relation to OBC’s occupancy at Hakumau Reserve

·    the final decision to approve the lease will remain with the local board even in circumstances where a committee or independent commissioners are appointed

·    the ability of the local board to hear and consider submissions accords with the Reserves Act requirements and sits within the local board’s governance on leasing of parts of local parks and reserves

·    the decision process to regularise the occupancy for OBC at Hakumau Reserve commenced during this electoral term and it is prudent that this be completed in this term

·    There are no additional costs to the local board in hearing and considering the submissions

34.     The eight submitters who indicated that they wish to be heard have been invited to speak to their submission at the public forum section of the 12 May 2022 business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     There are no climate impacts arising from the hearing process.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.     There are no council group impacts arising from the hearing process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

37.     The Ōrākei Local Board resolved at its meeting on 18 November 2021 to grant the Agreement to Lease conditional on the public notification of the proposed lease in accordance with the Reserves Act and as an opportunity for the community to provide their views.

38.     Community views were sought through the public notification process.

39.     At its workshop on 14 April 2022, the Ōrākei Local Board was briefed on the hearings process. The local board provided direction to staff that the full local board should hear from those submitters who requested to speak to their submission and that submitters be invited to speak to their submission at the local board’s business meeting on 12 May 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under the Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the Reserves Act 1977.

41.     Consultation with iwi was undertaken simultaneously as part of the public notification process.

42.     Iwi identified as having an interest in the land were consulted on the proposal. The iwi consulted were Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua, Te Ahiwaru, Ngāti Whanaunga, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Pāoa, Te Patukirikiri, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Te Ata, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Kawerau ā Maki, and Waikato-Tainui.

43.     Council received two responses from iwi on the proposal.

44.     Ngāti Tamaoho requested information on current environmental protection measures in place. OBC’s current stormwater consent requires the filtration of groundwater and treatment of discharge. This information was provided to Ngāti Tamaoho and no subsequent engagement was required.

45.     Ngāti Whanaunga opposed the lease stating that the council consider “a future opportunity for Ngāti Whanaunga”. Officers communicated with Ngāti Whanaunga seeking clarity on the aspirations that Ngāti Whanaunga have for Hakumau Reserve and to ascertain if the Iwi wished to make oral submissions. Ngāti Whanaunga did not outline its aspirations for the reserve and did not indicate its preference to make oral submissions.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The costs for public notification is covered by Community Facilities.

47.     There are no financial implications in circumstances where the local board considers the submissions. However, costs will be incurred where the board chooses an independent panel or committee comprising of independent commissioners.

48.     The decision on granting the lease will have a financial impact. The level of rent has been assessed on a market basis and the agreed rental recognises the significance of the site on Tamaki Dr, the long-term nature of the lease, the recreational outcomes supported through the lease and that part of the reserve will be for the exclusive use of OBC.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Any risk of a judicial review of council decision-making processes is minimised if the process follows the statutory requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.

50.     Additionally, while the Agreement to Lease provides some certainty around the board’s intention to grant a lease to OBC in accordance with the board’s previous decisions, the risk is mitigated through the specific conditions articulated in the Agreement to Lease, one of the conditions being the requirement to undertake public notification of the proposed lease. A formal lease is triggered only once all the conditions under the Agreement to Lease are satisfied.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

51.     Subject to the local board hearing submissions and making a final determination on the lease, council staff will notify OBC on the outcome following the local board’s deliberations.

52.     The final determination will either trigger the fulfilment of the remaining conditions under the Agreement to Lease or extinguish the progress of the proposed lease.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Resolution OR-2020-71

15

b

Attachment B - Resolution OR-2021-181

17

c

Attachment C - Public Notice

19

d

Attachment D - Submissions (Rpt)

21

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Yusuf Khan - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/05134

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Ōrākei Grants Programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Ōrākei Grants Programme 2022/2023 for adoption (as provided in Attachment A to this report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the Ōrākei Grants Programme 2022/2023 in Attachment A.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

· outcomes as identified in the local board plan

· specific local board grant priorities

·        which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing dates

· any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

· other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the local board grants programme 2022/2023 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Ōrākei Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2022/2023.

10.     The new grant programme includes the requirement for applications to provide quotes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

13.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

14.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021 -2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     An implementation plan is underway, and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Community Grants Programme 2022/2023

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Ōrākei Local Grants Round Two and Multiboard Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/05053

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Ōrākei Local Grants and Multi-board round two 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Ōrākei Local Grants round two 2021/2022 (Attachment A).

3.       This report also presents applications received in Ōrākei Multi-board Grants round two 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

4.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 15 April 2021. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants (Attachment C).

5.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $279,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

6.       Twenty-seven applications have been received for Local Grants round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $209,678.84 and ten applications have been received for Multi-board Grants round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $471,570.64.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Ōrākei Local Grants round one, listed in Table One:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2212-228

Akarana Marine Sports Charitable Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards the costs of the Safer Pathways to the Ocean

$8,140.00

Eligible

LG2212-234

Anne Corbett

Community

Towards venue hire

$1,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-211

Auckland Basketball Services Limited

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire of the Barfoot and Thompson Hall

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-242

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Incorporated

The Institution of Professional Engineers New Zealand Incorporated

Environment

Towards the costs of the Auckland King Tides Initiative Community CoastSnap Beach Monitoring

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-214

Auckland Paraplegic and Physically Disabled Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards six months wages of the Junior Sport Development office

$825.00

Eligible

LG2212-227

Dance Therapy NZ

Arts and culture

Towards venue hire, marketing, facilitation, coordination, supervision, client support, liaison and equipment for the Arts 4 Us Specialty programme

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-236

Community Patrols Of New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community Patrols Of New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of car insurance and petrol

$6,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-240

Eastern Bays Songbird Project Incorporated

Environment

Towards the cost of the "Community Re-engagement" project

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-221

Ellerslie Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards costs for the Fairy Festival and the Santa Parade

$20,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-208

Ellerslie Sports Club Incorporated

Community, Sport and recreation

Towards a contribution to the total cost of the Michaels Ave Community Centre

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-246

Ellerslie Theatrical Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the costs of billboards, flyers and awards to writers and directors of the 2022 Ellerslie Festival of One Act Plays

$3,300.00

Eligible

LG2212-202

Maungarei Community Christian Trust

Maungarei Community Christian Trust

Community

Towards venue hire

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-205

Kohimarama Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of renovating the toilet facilities

$4,335.00

Eligible

LG2212-238

Mission Bay Business Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of new security cameras, logo, christmas flags

$9,193.74

Eligible

LG2212-216

Mission Bay Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of exterior clubrooms painting - stain cedar

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-210

The Scout Association of New Zealand

Community

Towards the cost of purchasing two optimist boats

$9,481.25

Eligible

LG2212-213

Komiti Marae Orakei Trust

Komiti Marae Orakei Trust

Historic Heritage

Towards the cost of the ERUINI waka ama restoration project

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-226

Orakei Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of tennis balls

$3,182.60

Eligible

LG2212-237

Parnell Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards coaching costs of the Parnell CC College Age Academies

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-209

Remuera Chinese Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire and administration, volunteer expenses and Christmas party associated costs

$8,760.00

Eligible

LG2212-239

The Royal Akarana Yacht Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of safety equipment

$6,580.00

Eligible

LG2212-207

St Heliers Bay Croquet Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of turf renovation and lawn maintenance

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-206

St Heliers Business Association Incorporated

Events

Towards costs of the Christmas family night by the sea event

$10,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-203

The Scout Association of New Zealand

Historic Heritage

Towards the cost of restoration of the flay pole, including labor and materials

$8,349.00

Eligible

LG2212-217

St Heliers/Glendowie Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of venue hire, website upgrades, advertising, flag signs,

$6,532.25

Eligible

LG2212-225

St Thomas's School Board of Trustees

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of a concrete bike track including a bikes and helmets as well as a storage container

$15,000.00

Eligible

LG2212-224

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the total budget of counsellor helpline training, management, and support between June 2022 to March 2023

$5,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$209,678.84

 

 

b)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Ōrākei Multi-board Grants round two 2021/2022, listed in Table Two:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2022-233

Aotearoa Multicultural Families Society

Community

Towards organized walking programme for families at different local trails, parks, and beaches in Devonport, Takapuna, Mission Bay, East Coast Bays, Unsworth Heights, and Hobsonville (July 2022 - December 2022)

$6,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-220

Bellyful New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards meal production, volunteer support, and delivery costs in Auckland (June 2022 - December 2023)

$46,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-236

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards operational costs (such as wages, rent, transport, equipment) to recruit volunteer mentors for young boys with no father in their lives in Auckland (September 2022 - September 2023)

$160,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-252

Communities Against Alcohol Harm

Community

Towards community navigator project in Auckland communities and online from June 2022 to June 2023.

$15,512.64

Eligible

MB2022-228

HomeDish Limited

Community

Towards verification costs, courses, and marketing of home-cook businesses in Auckland (June 2022 - March 2023)

$16,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-203

Howick Pakuranga Youth Academy

Sport and recreation

Towards gym equipment and purchase of van in Pakuranga Heights.

$52,000.00

Eligible

MB2022-225

Outline Aotearoa Incorporated

Community

Towards cost of the peer support service programme`s volunteer training, clinical supervision, advertising, stationery, insurance and information technology service.

$25,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-226

Social Enterprise Auckland/ Impact Hub Auckland

Community

Towards business events with a focus on equity and climate from June 2022 to June 2023.

$31,115.00

Eligible

MB2022-239

The Operating Theatre Trust t/a Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards Gift a Seat funding for 2,700 children to attend The Whale Rider in their local area for free (September 2022 - December 2022)

$74,943.00

Eligible

MB2022-215

The Reading Revolution

Community

Towards wages of the manager delivering the "Readers Leaders programme"

$44,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$471,570.64

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   higher priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

 

10.     The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 15 April 2021. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

13.     Due to the current COVID-19 crisis, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed. For example, under alert level two, only gatherings of up to 100 people can take place. Events and activities have been assessed according to these criteria.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Ōrākei Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

19.     A summary of each application received through Ōrākei Local Grants round two 2021/2022 (Attachment A) and the Multi-board round two 2021/2022 (Attachment B) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

21.     Eight applicants applying to Ōrākei Local Grants round two indicate their projects target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

23.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $279,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

24.     Twenty-five applications were received for Local Grants round one 2021/2022 requesting a total of $175,042.78 and nine applications were received for Multi-board Grants round one 2021/2022, requesting a total of $395,627.00.

25.     A total of $111,900.00 was allocated to the Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one. This leaves a total of $167,100.00.

26.     Eight applications have been received for Quick Response round one 2021/2022 requesting a total of $20,290.94.

27.     A total of $12,815.00 was allocated to the Quick Response round one leaving a total of $154,285.00 of the Ōrākei Community Grants budget.

28.     Twenty-seven applications have been received for Local Grants round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $209,678.84 and ten applications have been received for Multi-board Grants round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $471,570.64.

29.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

31.     Due to COVID-19, this risk is low as assessors would consider the implications of COVID restrictions as part of assessment. Where projects are impacted by changes in alert level the grants and incentives team, work with recipients on amended project plans so that the number of projects not delivered is minimised.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following the Ōrākei Local Board allocation of funding for the local grant and multi-board grant round two, Grants and Incentives staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Grant round two - application summary

109

b

Ōrākei Multi-board Grant round two - application summary

117

c

Ōrākei Local Grants Programme 2021/2022

157

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report: Ōrākei Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/06148

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Ōrākei Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        The activity status of the work programme is as follows – one project is at red status (significant delays), nine projects are at orange status (some issues that are being managed) and 100 projects are at green status (on track).

·        Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association engaged professional services to progress a community-led design for 9 Tagalad Road and to organise the Tagalad Reserve Open Day scheduled for 14 May (Placemaking neighbourhood development – 350).

·        The lookout area at Churchill Park is now complete and is open for public use. A new pathway leading to the lookout also replaced the old asphalt driveway from Riddell Road (Churchill Park – develop and enhance lookout site – 28404).

·        Public consultation on The Landing concept refresh occurred from 1 February to 28 February 2022. A total of 856 submissions were received. Staff have been analysing the findings and feedback obtained through public consultation and are scheduled to present these to the local board at a workshop in April 2022. (The Landing Concept Plan refresh carry over – 3053).

 

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        Ellerslie War Memorial Hall feasibility study (1747) – staff presented some options to the board on options for digital signage. The board requested that further investigation be undertaken. This is now at red status as further investigation needs to be completed under the feasibility study, therefore staff have requested to carry this budget forward for FY22/23.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2022.

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Ōrākei Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services

·        Auckland Unlimited

7.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Chart, bar chart

Description automatically generated

COVID-19 restrictions

8.       From 23 January 2022, Auckland moved back into traffic light red setting under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, which has impacted council and community-delivered event planning and programming.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

9.       The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey), which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

10.     There is one project at red with significant delays and nine projects at amber with some issues that are being managed. 100 projects are at green and on track.

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

 

Chart, pie chart

Description automatically generated 

11.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

Chart, bar chart, waterfall chart

Description automatically generated

Key activity updates from quarter three

Customer and Community Services

12.     In Q3, the Ōrākei Local Board approved $15,000 (OR/2022/8) towards supporting the Mission Bay Kohimarama Residents Association to engage professional services to progress a community-led design for Tagalad. A working group has been formed to organise the Tagalad Reserve Open Day on 14 May and engage community in formulating the community-led design (Placemaking neighbourhood development – 350).

13.     The lookout area at Churchill Park is now complete and is open for public use. A new pathway leading to the lookout also replaced the old asphalt driveway from Riddell Road. Some areas of new planting are scheduled for Q4 (Churchill Park – develop and enhance lookout site – 28404).

14.     At the time of reporting, Liston Park clubrooms removal was scheduled for completion in April 2022. At the time of writing the report, this is now complete with some minor works remaining, including hydroseeding of the social and recycling reuse reporting. The contractor will commence a tidy up of the remaining carpark area in Q4 (Liston Park renew park assets – 26331).

15.     Physical works to renew the skate bowl at Little Rangitoto Reserve skatepark renewal progressed during this quarter. Its completion and reopening for public use are expected at the end of April 2022 (Open space play space equipment renew – 18822).

16.     Staff presented the concept plan for the eastern section of Crossfield Reserve in January 2022 for input and direction. The plan currently consists of new footpaths to improve park accessibility and connectivity, play space renewal, riparian planting, park furniture and resurfacing of the basketball court and skate bowl. Staff have acquired community feedback on the plan and will present the outcomes to the board in Q3. Staff are currently investigating health and safety issues at the main skate facility and will advise the board and stakeholders of the works programme (Crossfield Reserve implement eastern section masterplan priorities – 26329, Open space play space equipment renew – 288670).

17.     The Selwyn Reserve playspace renewals experienced some COVID-19 related delays which pushed the completion date out two weeks later than planned. This is now scheduled for 14 June. Staff have commenced investigations of whether the play equipment that was removed from Selwyn Reserve can be relocated and utilised at Ascot Park and Bonnie Brae Reserve (Selwyn Reserve renew and improve playspace – 24166, Open space play space equipment renew – 288670).

18.     Revisions to the draft concept plan for Nehu Triangle were completed in Q3. Community engagement has been rescheduled to take place in Q4. The plan and service assessment will also be finalised in Q4 (Ōrākei local parks services assessment carry over – 3058).

19.     Initial stakeholder engagement and the detailed design stage was completed for the renewal and automation of the sluice gates at Ōrākei Basin. Testing works will be undertaken in April 2022 (Ōrākei Basin renew and automate sluice gates – 20606).

20.     Construction of Ellerslie Sports Club continued in Q3 with some of the Stage 1 works completed. There have been some COVID-19 related delays in the construction programme, and the estimated completion date of Stage 1 is now mid-August (Ellerslie Sports Club Facility Development – 3101).

21.     Community weeding events took place at Pourewa Valley in February and March. The Pourewa Valley website was launched and the local board approved additional funding to advance wayfinding to the detailed design phase beginning in Q4 (Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan Programme Management carry over – 755).

22.     Public consultation on The Landing concept refresh occurred from 1 February to 28 February 2022. A total of 856 submissions were received. Staff have been analysing the findings and feedback obtained through public consultation and are scheduled to present these to the local board at a workshop in April 2022 (The Landing Concept Plan refresh carry over – 3053).

23.     After experiencing some initial delays, scheduled quarterly rabbit control took place in Waiatarua, Colin Maiden and Ngahue Reserve. Staff are currently exploring options for controls at Remuera Golf Course for Q4 (Ōrākei rabbit eradication implementation – 31002).

 

Infrastructure and Environmental Services

24.     The resource consent for selective mangrove removal works at Tahuna Torea has been granted and a consultant has been employed to prepare a mangrove management plan. Once the plan is complete, works will begin, and contractors will be procured. This is likely to begin in the 2022/2023 financial year. Staff are scheduled to bring this update to Local Board workshop on 28 April (Tahuna Torea shorebird habitat restoration – 1449).

25.     The moth plant competition was launched across schools and closed in March. The contractor Whai Maia Ltd from Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei, has been overseeing the project and organising the prizegiving. The competition will finish in May and the prizes will be paid as grants to schools (Ōrākei sustainable schools moth planting competition – 857).

26.     Pest monitoring and trapping at Middleton Stream took place in January. In March, pest monitoring works began on the Ada Street side of the stream (Newmarket/Middleton stream restoration – 854).

Auckland Unlimited

27.     Young Enterprise Scheme (1483) – Glendowie College, Sacred Heart College, Baradene College participated in the Kick Start Day in February.

Activities with significant issues

28.     Feasibility study – Ellerslie War Memorial Hall (1747) – there have been delays with this project. Staff presented some examples and options for digital signage to the board at a workshop in Q3. The board requested staff to undertake further investigations. Staff have requested to carry this budget forward to 2022/2023. This is the only item with a red status.

Activities with some issues

29.     There are eight projects with an amber status.

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Description

3133

Ōrākei community arts programmes carry forward

This project is amber because $10,000 of it intended for Te Matatini Kapa Haka Champions was not used due to the event being postponed a second year as a result of COVID-19. Staff will request this budget to be carried forward. 

59

Ellerslie Recreation Centre operational management

Ellerslie Leisure Centre gym visits are down by 30 per cent and group fitness visits are down 31 per cent this quarter. 8 per cent of members have their membership on suspension. This is being managed by recent membership promotions, with daily visits starting to increase. As physical and economic recovery from the COVID-19 peaks progress, visits and participation is expected to steadily increase.

806

Urban Ngahere Growing FY22

This project is amber due to some delays however the project is largely on track with draft planting plans developed and ready to present to the board for input at a workshop in May.

3054

Hakumau Reserve Concept Plan

There have been some delays with finalising lease negotiations which have impacted on the timeframe for consultation on a proposed concept plan for the reserve. There is a risk the consultation will not be able to proceed this financial year.

358

Citizenship ceremonies Ōrākei

This is amber due to the cancellation of onsite citizenship ceremonies which were scheduled for Q3. The candidates received certificates in absentia and an online citizenship celebration. The Ōrākei Local Board Chairman played a MC role for this online event.

364

Enviro Forum

This is amber due to COVID-19 related delays causing multiple postponements. However, the event is now scheduled for 29 May 2022.

3203

Business Awards

This is amber due to COVID-19 related delays resulting in a postponed delivery of the celebration event. This has now been scheduled for mid-May.

31002

Ōrākei rabbit eradication implementation

This is amber due to the initial delays pushing out the original timelines.

16172

Shore Road Reserve – install sand carpet and lighting on field 3

This is amber due to some delays; however, works are progressing with lateral drains installed and irrigation installation underway.

 

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

30.     None

Cancelled activities

31.     These activities are cancelled:

·        Movies in the Park (362)

·        Carols on the Green (361)

Activities merged with other activities for delivery

32.     None

Activities with changes

33.     The following work programmes activities have been amended to reflect minor change, the implications of which are reported in the table below. The local board was informed of these minor changes and they were made by staff under delegation.

Table 2: Minor change to the local board work programmes

ID/Ref

Work Programme Name

Change

Reason for change

Budget Implications

364

Enviro Forum

Date postponed to 29 May 2022

To host more people at orange level of traffic light system

None

359

ANZAC Day

Contactless memorial service with loop tribute video

To adjust to covid requirements and have an event that was safe and open

None

 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

35.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

36.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·    Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan – Programme Management (755) delivers a community-led vision to restore and enhance Pourewa Valley. Weeding events scheduled in Q3 will be in collaboration with Sustainable Schools

·    Ōrākei sustainable schools moth plant competition (857) delivers on a moth plant competition with schools in partnership with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     This report informs the Ōrākei Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 December 2021.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     In Q3 Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei confirmed their concept and delivery plans for Matariki activities. These included a Pourewa Valley planting day and an exhibition celebrating Māori weaving (Ōrākei community arts programmes – 348).

40.     The $10,000 toward the site scoping exercise for local public art opportunities was carried forward from FY21. The project team has confirmed the interest of a contractor of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Ngāti Pāoa descent to lead this work with an expected output delivered by June 2022 (Ōrākei community arts programmes carry forward – 3133).

41.     Weekly Te Reo and Te Ao Maori sessions were held for Ōrākei Local Board members and staff. The sessions are well attended and garnered positive feedback from participants. In Q3, the Ōrākei Local Board approved the allocation of $5,000 (OR/2022/8) towards funding an additional 10 Te Reo and Te Ao Māori sessions. This will allow for continuous weekly sessions until the end of the financial year (Māori responsiveness Ōrākei – 354).

42.     Remuera Library and St Heliers Library created a Tiriti o Waitangi display for two weeks during the Waitangi Day celebrations to promote the collections and increase public understanding of Waitangi (Whakatipu i te reo Māori – celebrating te ao Māori and strengthening responsiveness to Māori – 1380).

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

43.     This report is provided to enable the Ōrākei Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programme. There are no financial implications associated with this report.  

Financial Performance

44.     Net operating performance overall for Ōrākei Local Board area is 16 percent below the budget for the nine months ended 31 March 2022. Operating revenue is 36 percent below budget and operating expenditure is 18 percent below budget. Capital expenditure is 11 percent over budget year to date.

45.     Operating expenditure of $8.7 million is nearly $2.0 million below year-to-date budget. The Asset Based Services (ABS) is $1.7 million below budget and the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) is $240,000 below budget. In March, $51,624 was identified as underspend, of which $36,000 was reallocated to other projects.

46.     Operating revenue of $805,000 is $460,000 below year-to-date budget. COVID-19 restrictions impacted on revenues from the landing operations, community facilities, libraries and commercial lease at Colin Maiden Park.

47.     Capital expenditure of $2.5 million is below budget by $320,000 year to date budget focusing on local renewal programmes. COVID-19 lockdowns, rising construction costs and supply chain constraints affected all capital programmes.

48.     The financial report for the nine months ended 31 March 2022 for Ōrākei Local Board area is in Appendix B attached.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

50.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

51.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2022).

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board - 1 January - 31 March 2022 Work Programme Update

171

b

Ōrākei Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary

205

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rachel Cho - Local Board Advisor

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager



Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)

File No.: CP2022/05761

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022) including progress and completion of actions since 2015 and prioritisation of actions over the next three years.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) is a strategic document outlining how Auckland Council will invest in community facilities. It was approved by Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2015.

3.       The accompanying Action Plan prioritises actions and projects that will be undertaken to implement the CFNP. The CFNP contains criteria for identifying and prioritising actions. 

4.       Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions. The Action Plan was last updated in 2019.

5.       The Action Plan has been revised for 2022 using the methodology outlined in the CFNP. It contains 33 new actions.

6.       There are now 155 total actions in the Action Plan including:

·    65 completed actions

·    36 actions underway

·    50 actions to start

·    4 actions on hold.

7.       Implementation of priority actions within the revised Action Plan will initially focus on:

·    completing 36 actions that are already underway

·    starting four new area-based actions located in Investment Priority Areas

·    starting two network-wide strategic improvement actions.

8.       Feedback from local boards will be part of the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in August 2022 (when considering the adoption of the Action Plan).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)   support the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022), provided in Attachment A.

Horopaki

Context

What is the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan?

9.       The Community Facilities Network Plan and its companion Action Plan were approved in 2015 by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (REG/2015/57).

10.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) guides the council’s investment in the provision of community facilities and services. It provides direction on the development of new facilities, major upgrades of existing facilities, optimisation, and potential divestment of facilities no longer meeting community needs.

11.     The CFNP addresses provision for:

a)   arts and culture facilities

b)   community centres

c)   libraries

d)   pools and leisure facilities

e)   venues for hire (community or rural halls).

12.     The CFNP’s accompanying Action Plan prioritises projects to:

a)   ensure existing facilities are fit for purpose

b)   address gaps or duplication in provision and needs for community facilities

c)   meet future demand arising from population growth and changing users’ expectations.

13.     Together the CFNP and its companion Action Plan support council’s goal to focus community service investment on:

a)   quality over quantity

b)   addressing service gaps where growth is significant

c)   improving portfolio performance.

The Action Plan is revised every three years

14.     Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions.

15.     The Action Plan was last reviewed in 2018 and adopted by the Environment and Community Committee in April 2019 (ENV/2019/47).

16.     Progress on the Action Plan is reported annually to the relevant committees. The last update was provided to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in November 2021 (PAC/2021/58).

17.     A summary of progress on the revised 2022 Action Plan is provided in Attachment B. It shows that 65 actions are completed, 36 actions are underway, 50 actions have not started, and 4 actions are on hold.

Actions are structured by category, theme and progress 

18.     There are three categories and two themes of actions in the Action Plan (refer Table 1).

Table 1: CFNP Action Plan categories

19.     The 2022 Action Plan presents actions in two parts.

a)   Part A – new actions (identified since the last review) and actions carried over from the previous review which have not been started.

b)   Part B – actions underway at the time of the review and previously completed actions.

Departments work together to identify business and strategic improvement actions

20.     The development of new business and strategic improvements involved Community & Social Policy, Community Facilities, and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships. These departments worked together to support quality advice and to improve the way we plan and prioritise delivery of community services.

The identification of area-based actions follows a set process

21.     The process for the development of area-based actions in Part A of the 2022 Action Plan is set by the CFNP and shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Review process for 2022 CFNP Action Plan

 

22.     Potential area-based actions for Part A were identified from a range of sources:

a)   political resolutions requesting the addition of items to the Action Plan

b)   work arising from completed actions in the Action Plan 2019

c)   the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

d)   local board plan initiatives and work programmes

e)   input from business intelligence and across the Auckland Council organisation

f)    actions not started in the Action Plan 2019.

Area-based actions are prioritised through the weighting of network, community, and building criteria

23.     Once identified, the master list of area-based actions was assessed based on the prioritisation criteria outlined in section 5.2 of the CFNP (refer Table 2).

Table 2: Prioritisation criteria for area-based actions as defined by the CFNP

24.     The tools used to conduct the assessment included population data, geospatial information, asset condition information, and in some instances needs assessments and business cases.

The priorities in the CFNP Action Plan guide the focus of our resources

25.     The impact of Covid-19 and the resulting economic slow-down has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. The 10-year Budget (Recovery Budget), adopted 29 June 2021, highlights:

a)   a tight fiscal environment for the immediate future

b)   the need to reduce capital expenditure across the council family

c)   reprioritisation of projects

d)   the unsustainability of maintaining the current community facility network while meeting the needs of growing and changing communities.

26.     The ‘focused investment’ approach for community investment, adopted as part of the 10-year Budget, means we must focus on renewing priority assets, reducing our asset portfolio, expanding provision of tailored/alternative service delivery models and exploring partnership opportunities.

27.     The approach for community investment supports the direction of the CFNP and in this constrained environment, priority actions determined by the criteria in the CFNP are guiding the focus of our resources.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The revised CFNP Action Plan 2022

28.     The revised Action Plan 2022 is provided in Attachment A.

29.     Table 3 shows the distribution of all actions in the Action Plan 2022 and progress of actions since the Community Facilities Network Plan was adopted in 2015.

Table 3: Summary of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan

30.     Attachment B shows the progress status of the revised 2022 Action Plan, as well as the distribution of actions across local boards, service type and priority status.

31.     The progress being made on actions demonstrates staff’s commitment to focusing resources on a collectively agreed and mandated programme of work, as well as the commitment to delivering agreed priorities in a constrained environment.

The focus of the CFNP Action Plan work programme 2022/2023

32.     The focus of next year’s work will be towards completing priority actions that; are already in progress, are located in Investment Priority Areas (identified in the 10-year Budget) or are strategic improvements with a network-wide reach (refer Table 4).

33.     This focus ensures our effort is scalable and our advice about investment in community facilities is more effective. The efficiency created will allow us to concentrate on the priority actions that have not yet been started.

Table 4: Summary of proposed work programme for 2022/2023

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Consideration of climate impact happens at a project level. There are no direct climate impacts arising from this report on the action plan.

35.     Future detailed business cases will include application of the Community Facilities – Sustainable Asset Policy. The regional policy, the first of three phases under the council’s Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS), commits council to:

a)   achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development

b)   achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on the development of all new assets with a budget over $10 million

c)   incorporate decarbonisation principles into guideline documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets.

36.     The assessment of climate impacts in investigations and business cases will improve by applying learnings from across the organisation in its responsiveness to climate change. Staff will also seek to understand the allowances that need to be made to meet climate impact targets for Action Plan projects related to the development of new facilities, or the improvement of existing facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     During the development of the Action Plan 2022 input has been sought from the following departments:

a)   Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

b)   Local Board Services

c)   Parks Sports and Recreation

d)   Financial and Business Performance

e)   Connected Communities

f)    Community Facilities

g)   Community and Social Policy.

38.     Delivery of the Action Plan 2022 is resourced by council’s Community & Social Policy and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships teams subject to capacity. Individual actions are delivered with participation from other departments and, where relevant, Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Local boards provided feedback on direction and specific content during the development of the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan prior to adoption in 2015. 

40.     Key initiatives from local board plans (2020) were an input of the review process for the development of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan (refer Figure 1).

41.     The CFNP’s prioritisation criteria applies the highest weighting of 15 per cent to local board priority to ensure local board’s views influence the overall assessment of actions. 

42.     Progressing area-based actions are reflected in relevant local board work programmes. Local boards provide feedback and input throughout the investigations and have decision making responsibilities as per schedule the 10-year Budget 2021-31

43.     Decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within funding parameters set by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The Community Facilities Network Plan outlines, in Section 2.2, how it will deliver on Māori outcomes. These outcomes include:

a)   engage with Māori organisations to understand Māori expectations and investigate the community needs of Māori groups, and factor this into decision-making for community facilities

b)   actively engage and consult to ensure the planning, development, and operations of facilities consider Māori needs and aspirations

c)   work closely with Māori groups and key stakeholders, including local iwi, to develop appropriate cultural programmes to be delivered through facilities

d)   investigate Māori demographic participation and usage trends, identifying opportunities to increase the attendance and use of facilities by Māori and developing appropriate business responses

e)   provide visual representations of commitment to Māori to tell stories of their connections to the place (such as signage) and honouring tikanga

f)    ensure that, in any exploration of potential future sites for facilities, Māori concerns about wāhi tapu are incorporated.

45.     Engagement with Māori is included as part of investigations and continues through the planning and delivery of responses. Examples include:

a)   interviews and hui with mana whenua

b)   interviews and hui with mataawaka in local settings to understand community needs

c)   workshops and focus groups with local marae

d)   intercept surveys with representative samples of the Māori population base

e)   kanohi ki te kanohi interviews conducted in Te Reo Māori.

46.     Feedback provided from Māori is specific to the nature of the investigation for which the engagement occurred. This feedback is used to inform the delivery of options and responses.

47.     Staff will work with other relevant parts of the council to ensure effective engagement with Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     There are currently no identified financial implications for the delivery of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022 as work is delivered utilising existing resources.

49.     Investment decisions and associated funding implications are reported separately to the relevant decision-maker(s).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     There is a risk that development of the Action Plan 2022 may not match local board priorities, as implementation of the Action Plan involves understanding service needs and taking a network view. This risk is mitigated by:

a)   continuing to socialise and reinforce the strategic objectives of the CFNP to elected members, key staff, and through all deliverables 

b)   clarifying local board plans were reviewed and any potential community service-related content was considered for potential inclusion as an action

c)   including One Local Initiative projects into the Action Plan 2022.

51.     There is financial risk that:

a)   budget allocated in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 may be insufficient to deliver some of the action findings

b)   the need for significant new investment identified from actions will be challenging due to the impact Covid-19 has had on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity

c)   some investigations may require changes to the funding identified in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

52.     This financial risk is mitigated by:

a)   ensuring investigations include looking at options for funding other than rates or debt

b)   ensuring findings of investigations that require new investment are supported by indicative business cases

c)   managing expectations by acknowledging budget constraints

d)   managing expectations by acknowledging the delegation for decision-making on investment in new facilities is held by the Governing Body and is considered as part of long-term planning (decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within parameters set by the Governing Body).

53.     There is a timing risk that delivery of actions may take longer because of reduced operational capacity and may not align with elected members and/or local communities’ expectations.  This risk is mitigated by driving delivery to meet targeted timeframes for priority actions and managing expectations based on the principles and direction set by the CFNP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Local board resolutions will be included in the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider adoption of the Action Plan in August 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP)

219

b

Attachment B - Focus of Community Facilities Action Plan 2022

235

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Williams - Service Programmes Lead

Angela Clarke - Head of Service Investment & Programming

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/05763

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that you support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)       increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)       tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[2]

8.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.     This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

a)   a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

b)    a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.     It proposes three policy objectives:

a)   increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

b)   increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

c)    best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[3]

25.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

26.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[4] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.


 

 

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[5]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

34.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

35.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

36.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

37.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

38.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

39.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

40.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

41.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

42.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

43.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

44.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

45.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

46.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

47.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

48.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

49.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

50.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

51.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

52.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

53.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

54.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.


 

 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan


 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

55.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

56.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

a)      Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

b)    The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

57.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

58.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

a)   51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

b)    59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

Description automatically generated

Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

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People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 


Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 


Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 

28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

59.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

60.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

61.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

62.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

63.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

64.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

65.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

66.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

67.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

68.     Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

69.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

70.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

71.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

72.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

73.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

74.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

75.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

a)   ecology

b)   landscape and cultural heritage

c)   energy consumption and waste reduction

d)   water resource

e)   climate change

f)    pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

76.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

77.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

a)   there is inequity for people living with disabilities

b)    Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

c)    women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

78.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

79.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

80.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

81.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

82.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

83.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

84.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

a)      Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

b)    Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

c)    Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

d)    Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

e)    Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

85.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

86.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

87.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

88.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

89.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

90.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

91.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

251

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2022/05767

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on Phase Three (previously called Tranche 2B) of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.     Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport-related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe and appropriate speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. Evidence from changes made in 2020 demonstrates that safe and appropriate speed limits are effective in reducing road trauma.

4.       Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and recently completed public consultation on proposed Phase Three changes with the community. A list of changes proposed within this local board area is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Public consultation on changes proposed in Phase Three closed on 3 April 2022 and a summary of public responses is provided as Attachment B. Local boards are now invited to provide their feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on speed limit changes proposed as part of Phase Three of Auckland Transport’s Safe Speeds Programme.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use.

Alignment with Central Government Policy

7.       Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

8.       Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

9.       Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the Auckland Transport Board, Auckland Transport has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speed limits on many roads.

10.     In this phase, the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools, high-risk rural roads, rural marae, and roads requested by the community.

11.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Phase Three took place from 28 February - 3 April 2022, and included the following measures:

a)   flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes near roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

b)   advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist, and ethnic media

c)   radio advertising on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

d)   radio interviews and adlibs on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

e)   media releases

f)    social media campaigns

g)   an article published in OurAuckland

h)   translation of consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Braille and NZ Sign Language

i)    flyers, posters and hardcopy FreePost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

j)    15 online webinars, including a Mandarin language webinar

k)   a community drop-in session on Aotea Great Barrier.

12.     The community was able to provide their thoughts via a number of channels:

a)   online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

b)   a paper survey

c)   a web-based mapping tool

d)   emails direct to the Safe Speeds Programme Team

e)   at public hearings held on 6 April 2022.

13.     Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May (Attachment B) and now have the opportunity to provide feedback on Phase Three proposed speed limit changes within their local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Transport manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. This includes setting speed limits, and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted Auckland Transport has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and local boards.

15.     Auckland Transport’s first phase of reviewing and setting new speed limits was developing the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) that enabled AT to set new speed limits for Auckland’s highest risk roads.

16.     The impact of the changes made in this bylaw have been significant and support the claim that by setting safe and appropriate speed limits in Auckland, we reduce community harm.

17.     Since 30 June 2020, in areas where speed limits were changed, fatal crashes have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) during the 18-month period since this action was taken.[6]

18.     This change was most significant on rural roads where roads with reduced speed limits recorded a 71 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and more than a 25 per cent reduction in serious injury crashes.

19.     In selected locations, speed limit changes are complemented by physical speed calming measures such as speed bumps, raised pedestrian crossings, kerb changes and road marking. These physical measures help reinforce the safe and appropriate speed limits and assist with pedestrians and cyclists crossing busy roads. Physical measures are installed based upon risk, with a focus on locations such as town centres, residential areas and roads near schools.

20.     It will take time to confirm that these trends are sustained, however this initial impact is promising and indicates the effectiveness of the ‘Vision Zero’ approach. Overseas data records a similar impact on harm reduction and Auckland Transport’s advice to local boards is that the programme is working and should be supported.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     In town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced during Phase One of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of people saying they now participate in at least one active mode (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Auckland Transport has held workshops with local boards throughout the various phases of the Safe Speeds programme.

25.     Summaries of local submissions on changes proposed in Phase Three were provided to local boards in early May to inform their consideration of this topic.

26.     This report seeks feedback from the local board on the proposed speed limit changes within Phase Three of the Safe Speeds Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

28.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website at https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

29.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

30.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The Safe Speeds Programme is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

31.     Engagement with iwi at the AT northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui took place on the wider programme during 2021, and in early 2022 to introduce the Interim Speed Management Plan. Detailed engagement with individual rural marae as part of Phase Three commenced mid-2021 and is ongoing, with each marae typically requiring a tailored approach that takes into account localised safety issues.

32.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of Phase Three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme this programme has considerable financial implications.

34.     In 2017, the social cost of road harm in Auckland was about $1.1 billion.[7] These costs are paid by all Aucklanders. There is the cost of health care for those injured and - for some - lifetime rehabilitation and support. There is a cost to families, businesses and the region of those who can no longer live and work as they did before due to road deaths and serious injuries.

35.     Reducing the harm caused by road accidents impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that local boards represent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    The consultation length was extended from four to five weeks.

·    The number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased.

·    Digital advertising spend was increased and included Mandarin language public webinars and social media advertising.

37.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force at the end of November 2022.

39.     The November 2022 date may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept up to date if any changes are made.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Phase 3 Speed Limit Changes - Orakei Local Board

283

b

Safe Speeds Programme Public feedback on proposed speed limit changes March/April 2022

285

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annie Ferguson – Communications and Engagement, Auckland Transport

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relatiobship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Nathan Cammock – Programme Director, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Chairman and Board Members' Report

File No.: CP2022/05349

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Members with the opportunity to provide an update on projects, activities, and issues in the local board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      that the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Board Members’ Report for April 2022 be received.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairman and Board Members' Report - April 2022

385

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/05350

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōrākei Local Board with a governance forward work calendar as at 19 May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at 19 May 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calender - May 2022

399

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2022/05352

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 07, 14 and 28 April 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board records for the workshops held on 07, 14 and 28 April 2022 be noted.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Proceedings - 07 April 2022

403

b

Workshop Proceedings - 14 April 2022

407

c

Workshop Proceedings - 28 April 2022

409

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action report

File No.: CP2022/05353

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the Ōrākei Local Board Resolutions Pending Action report as at 19 May 2022.

b)      agree that Resolution number OR/2021/82 has been completed, which requested “Parks, Sports and Recreation staff investigate and report back on the feasibility of a nine hole disc golf course in Churchill Park”.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolutions Pending Action Report - May 2022

415

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 



Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Ōrākei Local Board

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       The Landing Physical Services Agreement

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(b)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information where the making available of the information would be likely unreasonably to prejudice the commercial position of the person who supplied or who is the subject of the information.

In particular, the report contains a decision that impacts on a third-party operator.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] Reserves Act 1977, section 17

[2] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[3] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[4] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[5] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy

[6] Annual figures for the 18-month period 30 June 2020 to 31 December 2021, when compared to the prior five-year baseline period.

[7] https://www.transport.govt.nz/statistics-and-insights/safety-annual-statistics/sheet/social-cost-of-road-crashes