I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Wednesday, 18 May 2022

3.00pm

via Microsoft Teams

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Deputy Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Steve Garner

 

 

Danielle Hancock

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Vicki Kenny

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Natasha Yapp

Democracy Advisor

 

13 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: +64 27424 5648

Email: natasha.yapp@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

Auckland Shooting Club

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

President

Member

Member

Steven Garner

Warkworth Tennis and Squash Club

Sandspit Yacht Club

Warkworth Gamefish Club

President

Member

Member

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Vicki Kenny

International Working Holidays Ltd

Nannies Abroad Ltd

Director/Owner/CEO

Director/Owner/CEO

Danielle Hancock

Kaukapakapa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Pest Free Kaukapakapa

New Zealand Biosecurity Services Limited

Member

 

Pest Free Coordinator

Operations Manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Protection Association

Agricultural & Pastoral Society - Warkworth

Vice Chairman

 


Committee member

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Boating Club

Springboard Advisory Board

Matakana Coast Trail Trust

Committee Member

Member

Contractor

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director

Manager

Colin Smith

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: Pest Free Coatesville                                                                      5

8.2     Deputation: Mahurangi College Living Classroom                                          6

8.3     Deputation: Joshua Hill - Bus Services                                                             6

8.4     Deputation: Te Araroa Trail                                                                                 6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

9.1     Public Forum: Omaha Beach Golf Club                                                            7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan                                                                          9

12        Rodney Local Parks Management Plan - approval of draft plan for public notification and establishing the hearings panel                                                    49

13        Grant a community lease to Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, Huapai                                                                                       59

14        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) target rate grants for 2022/2023 71

15        Commissioning an assessment of reallocating Ngāroto Lakes reserves and seeking local board views on reclassification of part of Muriwai Regional Park               81

16        Auckland Transport update on additional footpaths for delivery under the Rodney Transport Targeted Rate and cost increase for Rodney Street footpath            111

17        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes 119

18        Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022                                                                                                          125

19        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                                                              135

20        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        141

21        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                                                 147

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 20 April 2022 and the extraordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday 11 May 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: PestFree Coatesville

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Gary Langridge has requested a deputation to discuss pest free Coatsville.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      Thank Mr Langridge for his presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Mahurangi College Living Classroom

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Catherine Wynne, Deputy Principal of Mahurangi College, has requested a deputation to present Mahurangi College’s Living Classroom Project.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      Thank Ms Wynne for her presentation and attendance.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation: Joshua Hill - Bus Services

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Joshua Hill has requested a deputation to discuss the lack of bus services for Kumeū.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Hill for his presentation and attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Lack of bus services presentation................................................................ 161

b          Lack of public transportation in suburban Auckland speech....................... 169

 

 

8.4       Deputation: Te Araroa Trail

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Clayton Wakefield, Chairperson of the Te Araroa Auckland Trust, has requested a deputation to provide an overview of aspects of the trail and what it means for the Rodney area. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      thank Mr Wakefield from the Te Araroa Auckland Trust for his presentation.

 

Attachments

a          Te Araroa Trail.............................................................................................. 171

 


 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of three minutes per speaker is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Public Forum: Omaha Beach Golf Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Richard Brabant from Omaha Beach Golf Club has requested public forum time.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      Thank Mr Brabant from the Omaha Beach Golf Club for his attendance at the meeting.

Attachments

a          Omaha Beach Golf Club Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan.................. 177

b          Omaha Beach Golf Club Coaching Programmes April 2019 - Present....... 181

c         Omaha Beach Golf Club Player Data.......................................................... 185

d         Omaha Beach Golf Club Briefing Paper 2018............................................. 187

e          Omaha Beach Golf Club New Tees Foreground Images............................ 193

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan

File No.: CP2022/05623

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklanders’ access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that you support the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land (Attachment A to the agenda report)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)        increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)      tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[1]

8.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.     This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.     It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[2]

25.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

26.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[3] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[4]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

33.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

34.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

35.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

36.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

Timeline

Description automatically generatedFigure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

37.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

38.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

39.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

40.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

41.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

42.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

43.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

44.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

45.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

46.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

47.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

48.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

49.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

50.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

51.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

52.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

53.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

54.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

55.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback

·        Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas

·        The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

56.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

57.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·     51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

·     59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

Description automatically generated

Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

Description automatically generated

People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 

Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)


Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 


28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

58.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

59.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

60.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

61.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

62.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

63.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

64.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

65.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

66.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

67.     Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

68.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

69.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

70.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

71.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi
Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

72.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

73.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

74.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera
Council group impacts and views

75.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe
Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

76.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

77.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

78.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

79.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

80.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

81.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

82.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori
Māori impact statement

83.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

84.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea
Financial implications

85.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

86.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

87.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga
Risks and mitigations

88.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

89.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

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Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

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Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Rodney Local Parks Management Plan - approval of draft plan for public notification and establishing the hearings panel

File No.: CP2022/05337

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve public notification of the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan.

2.       To establish a hearings panel and appoint independent commissioners to undertake the hearings process.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This report seeks approval from the Rodney Local Board to publicly notify the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan.

4.       The draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan includes most local parks held under the Local Government Act 2002 and Reserves Act 1977 in the local board area except for a small number of reserves identified as out of scope (such as active cemeteries). The draft plan has been prepared with significant input from the local board and mana whenua between June 2018 and April 2022.

5.       The Rodney Local Parks Management Plan, once approved, will provide a policy framework to manage use, protection and development of parks within the local board area.

6.       The draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan is presented in two volumes, with appendices:

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7.       In line with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977, public consultation on the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan will be open for two months, planned from late-May 2022 until late-July 2022.

8.       The report recommends that the local board delegate approval of minor amendments to the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan prior to public notification, to the local board chairperson and deputy chairperson.

9.       This report also recommends establishment of a hearings panel, consisting of independent hearings commissioners; this panel would hear submissions, consider amendments, and make recommendations on submissions to the local board following the hearings process.

10.     Independent commissioners will ensure Reserves Act 1977 expertise and a high level of independence on the panel during the 2022 election period.

11.     Subject to the local board chairperson and deputy chairperson being delegated the power to select independent hearing commissioners, a shortlist of commissioners will be prepared with the required expertise to select from.

12.     The decision to approve the final Rodney Local Parks Management Plan remains with the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan for public consultation (Attachments A to F to the agenda report, dated May 2022) 

b)      delegate to the local board chairperson and deputy chairperson approval of minor amendments to the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan, prior to public notification

c)      appoint a hearings panel consisting of independent hearings commissioners to:

·    hear objections and comments from submitters

·    consider the extent to which objections and comments should be allowed or accepted, or disallowed or not accepted

·    make recommendations to the local board about amendments to the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan following the hearings process.

d)      delegate to the local board chairperson and deputy chairperson the power to select independent hearings commissioners

e)      note that the decision to approve the final Rodney Local Parks Management Plan will remain with the local board.

Horopaki

Context

13.     Rodney Local Board (the local board) has delegated decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the local board area.

14.     The Reserves Act 1977 (the RA) requires a reserve management plan be developed for most types of reserves administered by the local board.

15.     The draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan (the draft plan) is a statutory reserve management plan prepared in accordance with section 41 of the RA.

16.     The scope of the draft plan is shown in the table below:

 

 

 

In scope

Out of scope

ü Land held under the   Reserves Act 1977

ü Land held under the Local Government Act 2002

û Parkland included in the Kaipātiki Reserve Management Plan

û Land for which the local board does not have allocated decision-making power e.g., roads, active cemeteries

û Regional parks land

û Crown owned land for which there is no management agreement, and the local board does not wish to advocate for such agreement e.g., marginal strips.

 

17.     The final plan, once adopted:

·    will replace existing reserve management plans in the local board area as outlined in the plan’s appendices

·    means council will comply with the requirements of the RA to have a reserve management plan for most types of reserves held under the Act

·    will provide a policy framework to manage use, protection and development of parks within the local board area.

18.     The timeline below gives an overview of key decisions in developing the draft plan:

Engagement with mana whenua occurred throughout development of plan
(Refer to paragraphs 52 to 60 for more information)

 

19.     This report is seeking approval from the local board to publicly notify the draft plan (see Attachment A to F) and make a decision about establishing the hearings panel.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan

20.     The draft plan covers 338 parks that extend over approximately 1,400 hectares of land.

21.     Volume 1 contains background information, Rodney Local Board context, the management planning framework and general policies.

22.     Volume 2 contains the individual parks information for all local parks under the local board’s jurisdiction.

23.     The draft plan is presented in two volumes, with appendices:

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24.     We recommend that the local board delegate approval of minor amendments to the draft plan prior to public notification, to the local board chairperson and deputy chairperson.

25.     Minor amendments are required to include local park imagery, hyperlinks, and make formatting improvements.

Public notification

26.     Section 41 of the RA outlines the obligations of an administering body to prepare and publicly notify a reserve management plan. The Rodney Local Board is the administering body for the reserves included in the draft plan.

27.     As per the requirements of section 41(6) of the RA, the draft plan will be open for public consultation for a period of at least two months. Public consultation is planned to start in late-May 2022 and close in late-July 2022, subject to approval of the draft plan by the local board. All submitters have the option of requesting the opportunity to speak to their submission at a hearing.

Hearings and decision-making on the plan

28.     In terms of hearing submissions, the local board can choose whether the full local board or certain members of the local board, and/or independent commissioners or a committee will hear submissions and make decisions on the draft plan. The table below describes these options:

Options

Description

Option 1 - Appoint a committee to hear submissions and make decisions

The local board appoints a committee and delegates the decision-making on the management plan to that committee.

The committee would have a minimum of three members, at least one of whom is a member of the local board. The local board could decide whether to have a committee with a commissioner.

The committee would hear and make decisions on submissions and approve the final plan.

Option 2 - Independent commissioners hear submissions and make recommendations to the local board

The local board appoints an independent panel comprising of at least two commissioners to hear and consider submissions and make recommendations to the local board.

The local board would make the decision whether to accept the recommendations of the hearings panel and approve the final plan.

Option 3 - Local board panel with an independent commissioner as chair

The local board appoints a commissioner to chair a panel comprising all or some of the local board, to hear submissions and make recommendations to the local board.

The local board would make the decision whether to accept the recommendations of the hearings panel and approve the final plan.

Option 4 - Local board only

The local board appoints all or some of the local board to hear submissions and makes recommendations to the local board.

The local board would make the decision whether to accept the recommendations of the hearings panel and approve the final plan.

 

29.     All options except Option 4 would involve the use of commissioners.

30.     The council uses commissioners in a variety of situations, to provide varying levels of independent consideration of submissions and decision-making, or where specialist advice is required.

31.     Under Options 1 to 3, commissioners with knowledge and experience of the RA and te ao Māori could assist in guiding the decision-making for the draft plan.

32.     In assessing which of the above option to recommend, staff have considered the following factors (see Attachment G to the agenda report for the full options assessment):

·    retaining local knowledge, input and decision-making in hearing submissions and approving the final plan

·    ensuring RA expertise on the panel

·    ensuring a level of independence during the hearings process

·    cost

·    impacts of the upcoming local board election on timeframes.

Option 2 is recommended for the hearings panel

33.     Staff recommend that Option 2 is progressed, with the local board chairperson and deputy chairperson appointing independent commissioners to:

·    hear objections and comments from submitters

·    consider the extent to which objections and comments would be allowed or accepted or disallowed or not accepted

·    make recommendations to the local board on amendments to the draft plan following the hearings process.

34.     Option 2 is recommended because it is the only option which enables the hearings process to take place during the 2022 election period; this is due to the independence commissioners will bring to the process.

35.     The alternative options are not recommended because they delay the hearings process until February 2023 at the earliest. This would result in a long delay between when the public submits on the draft plan and when they could be heard by the hearings panel.

36.     It is not feasible to pursue the hearings panel Options 1, 3 and 4 during the election period because of the high likelihood of changes to panel composition after the local board election.

37.     The main disadvantage with choosing Option 2 is the perceived loss of local knowledge on the hearings panel, however, this risk can be mitigated. Please refer to risks and mitigations in paragraph 63 for more detail.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The decisions in this report are largely administrative and are unlikely to cause any direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions. However, the future management direction set in the plan for local parks, emphasises the role of local parks in climate change mitigation and adaptation.

39.     Volume 1 of the draft plan includes a climate change and natural hazards policy, which sets objectives to manage parks in a way that minimises and mitigates the impacts of climate change and improves the resilience of parks by adapting to the effects of climate change, especially in coastal areas.

40.     Other policies which aim to manage the impacts of climate change are:

·    access and parking - by not providing for peak use parking and encouraging active forms of transport

·    plants and animals - by encouraging native plantings to increase urban canopy cover and manage riparian margins

·    park development - by encouraging utilising green building practices in design, construction and operation of park facilities.

41.     Volume 2 of the draft plan identifies potential coastal hazards at an individual park level and in some cases includes management intentions which aim to address potential hazards.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     Council departments and council controlled organisations (CCOs) have provided specialist input into the development of the draft plan including Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation, Community and Social Policy, Infrastructure and Environmental Services, Heritage, Legal Services, Local Board Services, Auckland Transport and Eke Panuku Development Auckland. 

43.     Council’s governance department provided advice about holding the hearings process during the election period. Their advice informed the hearings panel options and the assessment of these options.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Local impacts

44.     Once approved for notification, the draft plan is intended to convey to the public how the local board intends to manage Rodney local parks over the next 10 years.

45.     The public will have the opportunity to make written submissions on the draft plan and to speak to the hearings panel about their submission.

Local board views

46.     Regular workshops were held with the local board between February 2020 and December 2021 to inform plan drafting.

47.     The final draft plan was discussed with the local board at workshops on 15 February, 24 March and 14 April 2022. At these workshops local board members provided additional feedback to staff, which has been incorporated into the final draft.

48.     The hearings process, including options for the hearings panel and decision-making on the final plan, were discussed with the local board on 14 April 2022.

49.     Local board members expressed a preference for Option 2, to establish a hearings panel consisting of two independent commissioners.

50.     The hearings panel would conduct the hearings, deliberate on submissions and make recommendations to the local board on submissions amendments to the draft plan. The decision to approve the final plan will remain with the local board.

51.     Since the workshop with local board members on 14 April, further amendments have been made to the draft plan. Attachment H outlines key feedback themes (primarily from Legal Services) and subsequent amendments made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

52.     The Reserves Act is one of the Acts in the First Schedule to the Conservation Act 1987. In performing functions and duties under the Reserves Act, the local board must give effect to the principles of Te Tiriti o Waitangi / The Treaty of Waitangi.

53.     Treaty obligations are overarching and not something to be considered or applied after all other matters are considered.

54.     The draft plan acknowledges council’s obligation to iwi under the Te Tiriti o Waitangi / The Treaty of Waitangi in local parks management planning. In developing the draft plan council aimed to honour these obligations.

55.     We invited mana whenua to be involved in the development of the draft plan. This opportunity was taken up by Ngaati Whanaunga, Ngā Maunga Whakahii O Kaipara Development Trust, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Paoā Trust Board, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Patukirikiri and Te Uri o Hau.

56.     Points of interest and input from mana whenua relate to the management of natural and coastal areas, sites and areas of cultural significance and the ability for mana whenua to provide input into future decisions on local parks.

57.     The draft plan seeks to embed te ao Māori / the Māori world view and values throughout the document. Section 7 of the draft plan outlines core Māori values and how they should be considered in the management of local parks.

58.     Mana whenua priorities for local parks are:

·    kaitiakitanga – ecological management: the ongoing health of wetlands, waterways and bush areas; biocontrol of pest species; the impact on water quality of current and planned infrastructure on and near the park

·    living Māori presence: ensuring that signage and narratives on the park reflect iwi past and present

·    protecting cultural landscapes and ensuring connections between parks and other sites are recognised and managed in a respectful and culturally appropriate way

·    providing mana whenua with the opportunity to give input into future decisions on local parks particularly where implications for the environment and culturally significant sites and landscapes potentially exist.

59.     Many of the above can also contribute to the hauora (well-being) of both mana whenua and mataawaka.

60.     Mana whenua and mataawaka will have the opportunity to provide further feedback on the draft plan during the public consultation period.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     There are no cost implications from the decision to notify the draft plan. Costs for advertisements and engagement tools are covered through the project budget.

62.     The cost for appointing two commissioners to the hearings panel would be met from existing operational budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

63.     The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations:

Risk

Risk level

Mitigation

IF

The draft plan is a high-level plan that does not contain the same level of detail as previous reserve management plans.

THEN

The community perceives the management plan does not contain sufficient detail to inform park management in the future.

 

Low

This risk could be mitigated by including information in the consultation material about the benefits of having an omnibus plan such as consistency and ease of decision-making for parks across the local board area.

 

IF

Due to lack of awareness of the public consultation taking place or potential submitters being discouraged from making a submission by the size of the document.

THEN

A low number of submissions are received.

 

 

Low

This risk could be mitigated by working with the local board communications and engagement staff to let people know that the consultation is happening. We can encourage feedback by offering different ways to do this e.g., paper, online, email, drop-in sessions, open days.

IF

Independent commissioners are selected for the hearings panel.

THEN

The hearings panel is perceived as having high independence but lacking local knowledge.

Low

This risk could be mitigated by including information in the consultation material about the local board’s role approving the final plan.

Public submissions will contribute local knowledge to the hearings process and will help inform the hearings panel’s recommendations to the local board.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

64.     Subject to approval from the local board to notify the draft plan:

·    The local board chairperson and deputy chairperson will receive the final draft plan with minor amendments for approval prior to public notification.

·    Public consultation will aim to start in late-May 2022 for two months in accordance with the RA.

65.     Subject to making the decision about the hearings panel, as outlined in this report, the chairperson and deputy chairperson will receive a shortlist of commissioners with the required expertise to select from.

66.     It is anticipated that the hearing will be held in September or October 2022, with the local board considering recommendations on submissions and approving the final plan in February or March 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan Volume 1 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan Volume 2 - Individual Parks in Dairy Flat (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan - Volume 2 - Individual Parks in Kumeū subdivision (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan Volume 2 - Individual parks in Warkworth subdivision (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan - Individual parks in Wellsford subdivision (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan - Appendices (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Options for hearings and decision-making on the final plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

h

Key amendments made to draft plan following local board workshop on 14 April 2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kiri Le Heron - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Grant a community lease to Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, Huapai

File No.: CP2022/05784

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, located at 2 Tapu Road, Huapai.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The club currently holds a lease for land on which its clubrooms and associated improvements are located. The lease reached final expiry on 31 December 2019. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis on its existing terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is granted.

3.       Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated has formally applied for a new community lease to continue its occupation and operations at Huapai Recreation Reserve, 2 Tapu Road, Huapai.

4.       The new lease was identified (item number 1058) and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at its local board business meeting of 16 June 2021 (resolution RD/2021/265).

5.       The club provides the facilities that directly support the activities that are involved in the game of cricket. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome five “our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community.”

6.       The club has provided all required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds and it is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

7.       As the club owns its building and associated improvements, it has an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of its occupancy term.

8.       In recent years, the club (along with other sports clubs in the Huapai/Kumeū areas) has tabled the potential to co-locate on Huapai Recreation Reserve.

9.       To allow for any future co-location, a new lease agreement needs to include an early termination clause for the benefit of the club to provide for this eventuality.

10.     This report recommends the local board grant a new community lease to Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, terms and conditions to include as follows:

·        a term of 10 years commencing from 19 May 2022 with one 10 year right of renewal

·        an early termination clause to provide for any future shared facility.

11.     If the local board resolves to grant the lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreement.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated a new community lease for land comprising 408 square metres (more or less) located at Huapai Recreation Reserve, Huapai legally described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 54548 and Part Lot 25 Deposited plan 14792 (Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)        term – 10 years, commencing 19 May 2022, with one 10 year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      an early termination clause for the benefit of the club to provide council as landlord with 12 months written notice to allow for any future multi-sports facility on the reserve

iv)      a community outcomes plan will be appended as a schedule to the lease agreement

b)      approve the Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan (Attachment B to the agenda report)

c)      note that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

13.     The Rodney Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at its local board business meeting of 16 June 2021 (resolution RD/2021/265).

14.     The progression of a new lease to Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated at Huapai Recreation Reserve, Huapai was listed on the approved work programme as item 1058. This report recommends the grant of a new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building and lease

15.     Huapai Recreation Reserve is located at 2 Tapu Road, Huapai. The reserve comprises 12 land parcels totalling 17.0629 hectares. The land parcels occupied by the club are owned by the Crown and held through the Department of Conservation, legally described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 54548 and part Lot 25 Deposited Plan 14792. The parcels are subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and classified as recreation reserve.

16.     Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated originally constructed a single-level pavilion adjacent to the cricket pitch on the reserve. The premises comprised change rooms, storage and an office. In 2013, the club constructed an additional level on its original pavilion comprising a toilet, well-appointed kitchen, lounge and wrap-around viewing deck.

17.     The club’s improvements are well managed and maintained. The club has plans to install an accessibility lift to enable people with physical impairments to easily enjoy the activities.

18.     Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated has a community lease for the land it occupies at Huapai Domain Recreation Reserve. The lease commenced 1 January 2000 and provided for one term of 19 years. While the lease has expired, the agreement is holding over on a month-to-month basis on its existing terms and the terms and conditions.

19.     The club has formally applied to council for a new lease term in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. For groups that own their improvements, council staff recommend an initial term of 10 years with one right of renewal for 10 years.

20.     In this instance, staff has also recommended any new lease agreement contain an early termination clause to provide for the potential for the club and other sports groups to co-locate on the reserve in the future.

Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated

21.     Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated has been domiciled on Huapai Domain Reserve for decades, having formed in 1943. In the 1960s the club joined the Auckland Cricket Association and has been affiliated since, while providing and promoting the game of cricket and physical activity in the North-West communities for over 75 years.

22.     The club has a strong committee, is financially healthy and in 2020, its membership comprised 710. On 4 August 1966, the club was duly incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

23.     Under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. Kumeū Cricket Club has exercised this right by applying for a new lease.

24.     The lease to the club is contemplated and in conformity with the operative reserve management plan for Huapai Recreation Reserve adopted by the Rural and Townships Committee of the former Rodney District Council on 4 November 1998. As such, public notification was not required. Engagement with mana whenua has also been undertaken as Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities to build relationships with Māori.

Assessment of the lease application

25.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting its request for a new lease and is able to demonstrate its ability to manage and maintain its facility. 

26.     The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet its liabilities. The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

27.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with Kumeū Cricket Club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. Subject to local board approval, the plan will be appended as a schedule to the new lease agreement. 

28.     Staff recommend that the local board grant Kumeū Cricket Club a new lease for a term of 10 years commencing from 19 May 2022 with one 10 year right of renewal. Additionally, staff recommend that a new lease agreement contains an early termination clause to provide for any potential multi-sports co-location on the reserve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·    use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·    use eco labelled products and services

·    seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·    include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

30.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

31.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone (Attachment C to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted on the proposed new lease. The table below contains detailed feedback: 

Relevant team

Feedback

Sport and Recreation Lead, Parks Sports and Recreation

No objection to a standard 10 x 10 term. The building is in good condition and the club has solid membership numbers. Like all the clubs at Huapai Recreation Reserve, they are positioned to increase membership as population grows around them. To retain some flexibility in the lease arrangements in order to effect improvements on the park, suggest an early termination clause.

Service and Asset Planning Specialist, Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

This lease is consistent with the direction of the park in terms of providing for active sport and recreation in the Kumeū-Huapai area. Cricket activity for this park is being considered in the Rodney Local Parks Management Plan.

Other information gathered as part of the Rodney Local Parks Management Plan development in case it’s useful context:

·    The club reconfirmed it needs to stay where it is because of the terrain overlooking the field.

·    We recently engaged mana whenua about this site and they’re supportive of groups sharing facilities which I assume is part of standard lease terms.

·    The cricket club submitted on the intention to prepare the Rodney Local Parks Management Plan - key themes were about maintenance of cricket pitches, further wickets and storage capacity.

 

33.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

a)      Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need (outcome four).

b)      Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community (outcome five).

35.     On 15 December 2020, leasing staff provided the local board with a memorandum on progressing the proposed new community lease to Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated at which time the local board provided informal positive feedback.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     At the Mana Whenua Forum held via Skype on 4 March 2021, staff presented to mana whenua representatives in attendance about the proposed new lease to Kumeū Cricket Club. During the presentation, mana whenua representatives did not voice any concerns with the proposal.

37.     Mana whenua groups were represented at the forum as follows: Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngaati Whanaunga, Te Patukirikiri, Te Uri o Hau and Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki.

38.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. Council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

39.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     There is no direct cost to council associated with the grant of a new lease. Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated will continue to take responsibility for all operational and renewal costs involved with its building located on Huapai Recreation Reserve.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to Kumeū Cricket Club Incorporated at Huapai Recreation Reserve, this may negatively impact the club’s ability to undertake all current and future activities. This would have an adverse impact on the achievement of the respective local board plan outcome.

42.     A new lease would afford the club security of tenure, enabling it to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the club vacate its building, consequently there would be a risk associated with lack of maintenance. In this scenario, council would be liable for the club’s building and other improvements regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals. Similarly, the required building renewals would not appear in the annual work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with Kumeū Cricket Club to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

GIS aerial view showing lease area outlined in red

65

b

Community Outcomes Plan

67

c

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

A picture containing text

Description automatically generated


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

A picture containing table

Description automatically generated


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Graphical user interface, application

Description automatically generated


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) target rate grants for 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/00326

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request the local board to recommend that the Governing Body sets the targeted rates for the North West Country and One Mahurangi Business Improvement District programmes for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts are areas within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating Business Improvement District programmes, including North West Country Incorporated and One Mahurangi Business Association by collecting a targeted rate from business rated properties within a defined geographic area.  The funds from the targeted rates collected are then provided by way of a Business Improvement District targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to Business Improvement District programmes. One of these is to annually recommend Business Improvement District targeted rate grants to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a Business Improvement District programme sets the Business Improvement District targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year, see Attachment A to the agenda report. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each Business Improvement District’s strategic priorities.

6.       North West Country Incorporated members approved a Business Improvement District targeted rate grant of $180,000 for 2022/2023. This figure is unchanged from the current financial year.

7.       One Mahurangi Business Association members approved a Business Improvement District targeted rate grant of $142,000 for 2022/2023. This figure is an increase of $7,000 from the current financial year.

8.       The business associations operating Business Improvement District programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

9.       For the council to be confident that the targeted rate grant funds provided to the Business Improvement District -operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the Business Improvement Districts to comply with the Business Improvement District Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

10.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

11.     Staff are satisfied the North West Country Incorporated and One Mahurangi Business Association sufficiently comply with the BID Policy.

12.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the Business Improvement District targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly Business Improvement District grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022. This enables OMBA and NWCI to implement programmes that contribute to Outcome 3: Infrastructure and development meets the needs of our growing communities. Thereby supporting the aspirations of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020.

13.     Rodney’s Business Improvement District programmes, managed by the two Business Improvement District - operating business associations, will continue to play an important role in supporting its members facing two global challenges. A Business Improvement District programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the economic flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives. A Business Improvement District programme can also facilitate opportunities that address the climate change emergency, with a focus on sustainability.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      recommends to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rates for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 for the following Business Improvement District programmes:

i)  $180,000 for North West Country Incorporated

ii)  $142,000 for One Mahurangi Business Association Incorporated.

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

 

14.     The Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 reports Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

 

15.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

16.    The Business Improvement District (BID) programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

 

17.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to work with business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth.

 

18.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

 

 

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience and aiding economic recovery

19.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects from the COVID-19 pandemic, affecting both retail-based town centres and commercial precincts.

20.     BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

 

21.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all business rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or business precinct.

 

22.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID targeted rate grant to the relevant business association.

 

23.     This revenue is paid to the business associations every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rate grants

 

24.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate grant funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

 

25.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing a BID programme; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

Diagram

Description automatically generatedDiagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The business association sets the BID targeted rate grant amount to deliver its work programme

 

26.     BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID targeted rate grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When weighing up a change to the BID targeted rate grant amount, business associations must consider what the local business and property owners can afford.

 

27.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

 

28.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the BID’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

 

29.     The Annual General Meeting (AGM) provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID targeted rate grant amount for the following financial year.

 

Local boards are responsible for recommending the targeted rate grant if a BID complies with the BID Policy

 

30.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rate grants to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is substantially complying with the BID Policy.

 

 

31.     The Rodney Local Board approved similar recommendations for the rohe’s three BID programmes last year (resolution number RD/2021/250), as did 17 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe. 

The Governing Body sets the targeted rates when it approves the Annual Budget

 

32.     The recommendations in this report are put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

 

33.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

34.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for the business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

 

 

 

North West Country and One Mahurangi comply with the BID Policy

 

35.     Staff are satisfied the North West Country Incorporated (NWCI) and One Mahurangi Business Association (OMBA) have sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

36.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board(s) at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium to long-term opportunities

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate grant funds responsibly

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers 

·   Business plan for the coming year – one-year programme with key performance indicators, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s Annual Budget requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the budgeting process which sets all rates

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship

·   AGM minutes - provisional minutes of each business association’s 2021 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID targeted rate grant amount for the 2022/2023 financial year.

37.     In addition, BID-operating business associations must inform the council of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration of the business association and all required documents up to date and filed

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any, that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

38.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Business associations’ compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2022

Requirement

Financial Year 2020/2021

Logo, company name

Description automatically generated

Logo

Description automatically generated

Strategic Plan*

·   2021 - 2023

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green2020 - 2025

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting with local board

6 April 2022

6 April 2022

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to December 2023

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to December 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2021 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2022 SGM minutes confirming approval of the $142,000 for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

Nothing to record

 

39.     OMBA had a Special General Meeting (SGM) on 20 April 2022. This meeting was for members to approve the amended BID targeted rate grant amount from $135,000 (approved at the 2021 AGM) to $142,000.

40.     The OMBA BID targeted rate is collected using the BID Policy (2016) BID flat rate mechanism of $575.00 (incl GST) per BID ratepayer. The number of BID ratepayers has increased from 273 to 278 for the 2022/2023 financial year. This means the OMBA needed to present the amended BID targeted rate grant of $142,000 (no GST applied) to members for approval at an SGM.

41.     The SGM was held on 20 April 2022 and staff have received the 2022 SGM minutes confirming members approval of $142,000 (no GST applied) BID targeted rate grant for 2022/2023.

42.     As the NWCI and OMBA have sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

43.     North West Country Incorporated retained its BID targeted rate grant amount for 2022/2023. One Mahurangi Business Associations increased its BID targeted rate grant amounts for 2022/2023

 

 

44.     As shown in Table 2 below:

·    North West Country has maintained its BID targeted rate grant at $180,000 for the next financial year. Records show this business association has not increased the sum since 2014.

 

 

·    One Mahurangi voted to increase its 2022/2023 BID targeted rate grant to $142,000, an increase of $7,000.

A regional perspective    

45.     Across Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 26 increased their targeted rates between 1.6 per cent to 10 per cent for 2022/2023, while 24 maintained the fiscal status quo.

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2022/2023 c.f. 2021/2022

 

   BID

 

2022/2023

 

2021/2022

 

Increase / %

 

 

Logo, company name

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

$180,000

 

 

 

 

$180,000

 

 

 

Nil

 

Logo

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

$142,000

 

 

 

 

$135,000

 

 

 

Increase due to number of BID ratepayers reaching 278

 


Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

47.     From running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to transitioning to energy-efficient lighting and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes, there are many examples of BIDs leading the local sector’s responses to the climate change emergency.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

48.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. The BIDs ensure the views and ambitions of their members are communicated to elected representatives and staff across the council family, including CCOs, on those plans, policies, projects and programmes which impact them.

49.     The BID-operating business associations work with Auckland Unlimited (AU) on economic development initiatives, events and sustainability programmes.

50.     The BID-operating business associations also work constructively with both Eke Panuku and Auckland Transport on often controversial proposals and projects.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

51.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternate) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

52.     North West Country and One Mahurangi BIDs value their strong and enduring governance-to-governance relationship with the Rodney Local Board. The contributions by the local board’s ‘BID representatives’, past and present, have promoted mutual understanding, collaboration and aligned economic outcomes.

Visions, plans aligned

53.     Rodney’s BIDs and local board share an interest in the rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

54.     The BID programmes tangibly support the aspirations of the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 3: Infrastructure and development meets the needs of our growing communities.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

55.     Recommending that the Governing Body strikes the BID targeted rate grants for NWCI and OMBA means that these BID programmes will continue to be funded from BID targeted rates on business properties in their rohe. They will provide services in accordance with their members’ priorities as stated in their strategic plans.

56.     Rodney Local Board is among several local boards which provides additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and the business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     Māori make up more than 11.4 per cent of the population living in the Rodney Local Board area, compared to 11.5 per cent of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS).  Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

58.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from business ratepayers in the district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

59.     The BID targeted rate is payable by the owners of the business rated properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes. In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties. 

60.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rate grants proposed by the local boards, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rate grants for the three business associations.

 

62.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

 

63.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

 

64.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

 

65.     Economic disruption created by the extended flow-on effects of the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to be felt in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses. The BID programmes in this local board area can, through business resilience and recovery initiatives, help to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

66.     If the board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rate grants be set as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

 

67.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate grant funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022, to NWCI and OMA to implement programmes that improve the local business environment, support businesses to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic and help address the climate change emergency through sustainability initiatives.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Commissioning an assessment of reallocating Ngāroto Lakes reserves and seeking local board views on reclassification of part of Muriwai Regional Park

File No.: CP2022/05952

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To request the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to commission an assessment of the merits of reallocating decision-making for Ngāroto Lakes reserves to the governing body to incorporate the reserve into Te Ārai Regional Park.

2.       To provide feedback following receipt of a submission opposing a proposed reclassification of reserve at Ōtakamiro Point / Maukatia Bay, Muriwai Regional Park from recreation to scenic (s.19(1)(b)) reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Ngāroto Lakes reserves

3.       In developing the draft Regional Parks Management Plan, staff identified that the Ngāroto Lakes reserve comprising reserves adjacent to Slipper, Spectacle and Tomorata Lakes would be best managed as part of Te Ārai Regional Park.

4.       The Parks, Arts and Community Events Committee has decision-making power to determine whether a park is a regional park or asset. Regional parks and assets are governed by the Governing Body.

5.       Staff workshopped a potential re-allocation of the reserves with the local board on 13 April 2022. 

6.       To consider a potential re-allocation, the local board must request that the Parks, Arts and Community Events Committee commission an assessment of the merits of the reserves becoming regional parkland.

7.       If the assessment goes ahead, staff would report back to the local board, which would consider whether to support a re-allocation.

Muriwai Regional Park land reclassification

8.       Classification of land held under the Reserves Act 1977 was reviewed as part of the Regional Parks Management Plan review and 30 parcels were proposed for reclassification including part of Muriwai Regional Park.

9.       One submission, from the Auckland Hang Gliding and Paragliding Club, was received through consultation on the reclassification proposals.

10.     The submission opposes reclassification of six land parcels at Ōtakamiro Point / Maukatia Bay, Muriwai Regional Park from recreation to scenic (s.19(1)(b)) reserve.

11.     Staff advise that recreational activities can continue to occur under a classification as scenic reserve, and that scenic reserve better fits the high natural and cultural values of this area.

12.     The submission and reclassification were discussed with the local board at a workshop on 13 April 2022. Staff seek the local board’s view on the proposed reclassification before taking the proposal to the Parks, Arts and Community Events Committee’s June 2022 meeting for a decision.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      Request / not request that the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee commission an assessment of the merits of reallocating Ngāroto Lakes Reserve as regional park land to become part of Te Ārai Regional Park.

b)      Support / not support the proposed reclassification of land at Ōtakamiro Point / Maukatia Bay, Muriwai Regional Park from recreation to scenic (s.19(1)(b)) reserve, noting that one submission from the Auckland Hang Gliding and Paragliding Club opposes this proposed reclassification.

Horopaki

Context

Background: Ngāroto Lakes reserves

13.     Rodney Local Board has delegated decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the local board area.

14.     The Ngāroto Lakes reserves comprise three separate local parks (see map at Attachment A to the agenda report) being:

·   Slipper Lake Reserve (Lots 5 and 6 DP 102835 classified as a local purpose (esplanade) reserve and Lot 3 DP 189437 classified as a scenic reserve s.19(1)(b))

·   a small unnamed reserve adjoining Spectacle Lake (Allotment 112 Parish of Arai) classified as recreation reserve; and,

·   Tomorata Lake Reserve classified as recreation reserve.

15.     These land parcels form part of the foreshore of each of the lakes mentioned. The bodies of the lakes themselves are not part of the reserve.

16.     As local parks, they are in the Draft Local Parks Management Plan (LPMP) which is being presented to this business meeting for approval for public notification.

17.     In November 2021 Te Ārai Regional Park was extended through a property transfer of 165ha of land to the south of Te Ārai Point. The new southern portion of regional parkland is now adjacent to the local parks at Slipper and Tomorata Lakes. The local park at Spectacle Lake is also nearby the expanded regional park, with a potential connection through an unformed legal road.

18.     The proximity of the local parks to the new portions of Te Ārai Regional Park and the development of a new regional parks management plan prompted discussion as to whether these local parks would be best managed as part of the enlarged regional park.

19.     The Draft Regional Parks Management Plan (RPMP), released on 10 December 2021, foreshadowed the possibility that the Ngāroto Lakes Reserve could become part of Te Ārai Regional Park.

20.     The draft RPMP proposed that their incorporation into the regional park “is being contemplated to provide integrated management with the regional park.” (Draft RPMP Book Two, Te Ārai chapter, page 166).

21.     The draft RPMP proposed some management intentions for this parkland, subject to their reallocation and incorporation into the regional park. These management intentions are reflected consistently within the draft LPMP.

Background: Reclassification of land at Muriwai Regional Park

22.     As part of the Regional Parks Management Plan review, land parcels within the regional parks held under the Reserves Act 1977 were identified and their classification under the Reserves Act checked.

23.     From that programme of work 30 parcels of land were proposed to be reclassified. The Parks, Arts and Community Events (PACE) Committee approved the public notification of these proposals as required under the Reserves Act (resolution number PAC/2021/68 c). Consultation occurred from 10 December 2021 to 14 February 2022.

24.     These proposals included reclassification of land parcels from recreation reserve to scenic under s. 19(1)(b) at Ōtakamiro Point / Maukatia Bay at Muriwai Regional Park. This area includes and surrounds the gannet colony.

25.     The rationale put forward for reclassification is:

·   the land at Ōtakamiro Point / Maukatia Bay is partly covered in coastal broadleaved forest and has the gannet colony and unique coastal geological features. It also has a high natural character and Significant Ecological Area overlay in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

·   reclassification of this land to scenic reserve under s.19(1)(b) of the Reserves Act better aligns with their primary value than the existing classification of recreation reserve.

·   historic heritage includes pā site, midden, terraces and in terms of European heritage a historic dam, swimming pool, and quarry site will be protected through the Auckland Unitary Plan and Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga Act 2014.

26.     One objection was received from the Auckland Hang Gliding and Paragliding Club (Attachment B to the agenda report).

27.     The parcels that they object to being reclassified are: Lot 102 DP 37374, Section S2 Blk IX Kumeu SD, Section 43 Blk IX Kumeu SD, Pt Lot 136 DP 37374 and Part Section N2 Blk IX Kumeu SD (Attachment C to the agenda report).

28.     In their submission they state:

·   Given the current excellent classification as Recreation Reserve, providing for a multitude of recreational activities, conforming to its intended primary purpose in trust, ecological values already able to be protected under the current classification, the dubious reasoning for reclassification or practicality under S19(1)(b), we strongly object to the proposed reclassification and wish to see these remain as Recreation Reserves subject to Section 17 of the Reserves Act 1977.”

29.     In order to report back to the PACE Committee with a final recommendation on the reclassification, staff request the local board confirm either its support or opposition to the proposed reclassification in light of the opposing submission.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Ngāroto Lakes reserves

The process for considering re-allocation of decision making for parkland within Auckland Council

30.     The PACE Committee has decision-making power to determine whether a park is a regional park or asset. Regional parks and assets are governed by the Governing Body.

31.     The decision-making responsibilities for parks are set out in the Auckland Council Long-term Plan 2021-2031: Volume 2 listed in Table 1 below.

 

 

 

 

            Table 1: Decision-making responsibilities for parks and open spaces

            (Long-term Plan 2021-2031: Volume 2)

 

 

 

Group of activities

Local Board non-regulatory responsibilities

Local boards are allocated decision-making responsibility for the following non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council

Governing body non-regulatory responsibilities

The governing body is allocated decision-making responsibility for the following non-regulatory activities of Auckland Council

Local council services

 

and

 

Regionally delivered council services

Parks including:

·      the specific location of new local parks (including the prioritisation for acquisition)

·      reserve management plans for local parks

·      local parks improvements and place shaping

·      the use of and activities within local parks, such as community events and community planting programmes

·      cemeteries that are no longer in regular active use and are functioning as local parks.

Parks including:

·      any new parks acquired for an Auckland-wide purpose or function

·      regional open space strategy and policy, including open space network plan and volcanic cones strategy

·      reserve management plans for regional parks

·      the number and general location of all new parks and the prioritisation of major upgrades

·      the use of and activities within regional parks

·      coordination of the use of all sports fields on a regional basis

·      open cemeteries.

 

32.     The process for considering reallocating a local park to the Governing Body to be managed as a regional park is as follows.

·   Step 1: The local board requests the PACE Committee to commission assessment of the proposal (this is the recommendation in this report).

·   Step 2: The PACE Committee, on behalf of the governing body, decides whether to commission the assessment.

·   Step 3: The local board considers the findings of the assessment and resolves to support or not to support re-allocation.

·   Step 4: The PACE Committee considers the re-allocation of park land to a regional park for decision.

33.     Reallocating the Ngāroto Lakes reserves as a part of Te Ārai Regional Park would mean that decision-making for the reserves would be allocated to the governing body.

34.     For the avoidance of doubt, this is an assessment of a reallocation of decision making from one arm of the council to another, and no other parties are involved. Ownership, governance and management of the parkland at all steps in this process remains solely with Auckland Council.

Assessment methodology

35.     Auckland Council does not have a policy providing a framework to assess whether a local park should be reallocated to the Governing Body as a regional park. 

36.     The assessment of Colin Dale Park’s designation in March 2021, as well as the assessment of Chelsea Estate Heritage Park’s designation in March 2022, provide examples of previous assessments.

37.     Staff have developed the following three factors to guide the assessment for reallocation of a local park to regional parkland:

 

 

·     Values: compared to values in the Regional Park Management Plan 2010.

·     Outcomes: management and user impacts  

·     Decision-making allocation principles: through the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009.

38.     The matter was raised at Rodney Local Board’s Draft Regional Parks Management Plan workshop on 13 April 2022. Staff will address the questions raised by local board members at the April workshop, as part of the assessment.

39.     Relevant mana whenua will be invited to provide their views. No public consultation is required as part of the assessment.

Muriwai land reclassification

40.     The underlying concern of the opposing submission appears to be that recreation activities may be compromised by the reclassification. The area receives a large volume of visitors to the gannet colony, as well as being a site for recreation activities such as hang gliding.

41.     In response, staff can confirm that recreational activities including specifically hang and paragliding and viewing of the gannet colony are compatible with the reclassification as a scenic reserve. These activities will not have to stop or be compromised due to the reclassification.

42.     What changes is the emphasis of the way the land is managed.

43.     At the workshop on 13 April, the local board sought advice on the effect of changing from recreation to scenic reserve s.19(1)(b) in respect of development of infrastructure and commercial activities.

44.     When considering the development of infrastructure (such as visitor facilities) or commercial activities, the decision-maker will need to consider to a greater extent (than for a recreation reserve) whether and how they might impact the preservation of flora and fauna, the natural environment and its scenic values.

45.     Leases and licences may also be granted for commercial activities on scenic reserves subject to the provisions of the Regional Parks Management Plan. Any assessment of a proposal for commercial activity would consider the impacts on natural and scenic values, and would give greater weight to these over recreation values particularly if there was a conflict between the them. 

46.     In summary, the activities that currently occur in this area will be able to continue under classification as a scenic reserve, but greater weight will be placed on managing impacts of those activities, infrastructure and leases and licences on natural and cultural values.

47.     Notwithstanding the arguments put forward in the opposing submission, staff consider the reclassification should occur for the original reasons put forward.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     The decisions in this report are completely administrative and do not in themselves impact on the climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     This report is prepared by the Service Investment and Programming team who prepares the regional and local parks management plans, as the matters have arisen through the Regional Parks Management Plan review.

50.     Staff in the Community and Social Policy department have provided advice on the reallocation process for local parks to the governing body. If this report is accepted, they will conduct the Ngāroto Lakes reserves assessment and report to both the local board and the PACE Committee. Staff will canvas the views of different parts of council as part of the assessment, including Healthy Waters which is running a programme in the wider lacustrine environment adjoining the Ngāroto Lakes reserves.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

Ngāroto Lakes reserves

51.     The timing of the proposed reallocation process coincided with the recent consultation on the draft RPMP (from 10 December 2021 to 4 March 2022) which foreshadowed a possible reallocation, and the draft LPMP which is being presented to the local board for a decision to publicly notify at the same meeting as this report.

52.     Submitters to the draft RPMP who commented on Ngāroto Lakes reserves will receive communications to avoid confusion at seeing the same parkland in the draft LPMP.

53.     One submission to the draft RPMP directly addressed the foreshadowed reallocation of decision making. The submitter stated they had gifted land adjacent to Slipper Lake to Rodney District Council. They supported the land’s reallocation to governing body and incorporation into Te Ārai Regional Park, and asked that it be quickly progressed.

54.     The public will have the opportunity to make written submissions again on Ngāroto Lakes reserves through the draft LPMP consultation process.

55.     An initial workshop on this topic was held with Rodney Local Board on 13 April and members’ views are reflected in this report.

Muriwai land reclassification

56.     Public consultation was held from 10 December 2021 to 14 February 2022, with one submission as discussed. The matter was raised at the Draft Regional Parks Management Plan workshop with Rodney Local Board on 13 April 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

Ngāroto Lakes reserves

57.     The Ngāti Manuhiri Claims Settlement Act 2012 includes a statutory acknowledgement of association over the Ngāroto Lakes and Ngāti Manuhiri are actively involved in restoration work on the lakes which the local parks border. Te Uri o Hau also have strong spiritual, traditional and historical connections with the area.

58.     Ngāti Manuhiri and Te Uri o Hau have commented favourably earlier in the process of preparing the local and regional parks management plans on a potential reallocation of decision making for Ngāroto Lakes reserves to the governing body. Their views will be canvassed again as part of the assessment.

Muriwai Reserves Act reclassification

59.     Mana whenua views on the proposal were sought before the proposal was put out for public consultation. Mana whenua supported the proposed reclassification.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

60.     There are no cost implications from the decisions in this report. The staff time required for the assessment and following reports is covered within existing budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

61.     There are no key risks associated with the decisions in this report.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

Ngāroto Lakes reserves

62.     Subject to a positive recommendation from Rodney Local Board through this report, the PACE Committee, on behalf of the governing body, will consider whether to commission the assessment at its June 2022 meeting.

63.     If the assessment goes ahead, staff will report the findings to the local board in July 2022.

Muriwai Reserves Act reclassification

64.     Staff will include the local board’s feedback on the proposed reclassification in a report to the PACE Committee, who will decide on the reclassification at its meeting in June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ngaroto Lakes Map

89

b

Auckland Hang Gliding and Paragliding Club submission on land reclassification

91

c

Maps of land parcels at Muriwai

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Mackay - Project Manager

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport update on additional footpaths for delivery under the Rodney Transport Targeted Rate and cost increase for Rodney Street footpath

File No.: CP2022/05906

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek a resolution from the Rodney Local Board to approve the following initiatives they wish Auckland Transport to deliver from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate:

·        deliver an additional 12 footpaths at an estimated cost of $7.68 million from the existing balance of funds

·        allocate an additional $1.574 million to deliver the Rodney Street footpath project, which is currently in the design phase, from the existing balance of funds.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In December 2020 (RD/2020/181) and March 2021 (RD/2021/205), the Rodney Local Board approved funding to deliver 22 footpaths across the Rodney region under the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate. These footpaths are currently being delivered by Auckland Transport and are at varying stages within their project life cycles.

3.       There is a further list of footpaths that the local board wishes to deliver across the region (these will be the final tranche of footpaths to be delivered under the current Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate).

4.       Auckland Transport has visited each site, investigated rough order cost estimates, carried out an analysis of remaining targeted rate funds and finalised the list for delivery across the Rodney region.

5.       The Rodney Street footpath project was approved in December 2020 by the local board for $1.43 million. This estimate has since been revised to $3.4 million ($400,000 of which is being funded by Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency).

6.       Due to the safety benefits identified, the project team recommends an additional $1.574 million be approved by the local board to progress the Rodney Street footpath which is currently in the design phase with construction planned to start in October 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve an additional $7.68 million for investigation, design and construction of 12 new footpaths

b)      approve an additional $1.574 million to complete detailed design and construction of the Rodney Street footpath (inclusive of a pedestrian bridge over the rail corridor).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

New Footpaths

7.      In December 2020, the Rodney Local Board approved funding to deliver 12 footpaths from Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate (RLBTTR) funds. The current phases of these projects are noted below.

Footpath

Subdivision

Current Phase

Hudson Road

Warkworth

Completed

Omaha Drive

Warkworth

Completed

Dairy Flat Highway - outside Dairy Flat School

Dairy Flat

Completed

School Rd

Wellsford

Design

Alice Street (including King Street), Riverhead

Kumeū

Design

Leigh Road, Leigh

Warkworth

Design

Coatesville Riverhead Hwy

Dairy Flat

Design

Newton Road, Riverhead

Kumeū

Design

Goodall Road

Warkworth

Design

Puhoi Road

Warkworth

Design

Rodney Street

Wellsford

Design

Dairy Flat Highway - from the school to Postman Rd

Dairy Flat

Design

 

8.       In March 2021, the local board approved funding to deliver a further 10 footpaths from RLBTTR funds. The current phases of these footpaths are noted below.

Footpath

Subdivision

Current Phase

Coatesville Riverhead Highway including Bus Stops

Dairy Flat

Construction

Albert St Footpath

Warkworth

Design

Cambridge Road and Queen Street, Riverhead

Kumeū

Design

Duke Street, Riverhead

Kumeū

Design

Matua Road and Tapu Road, Huapai

Kumeū

Design

Princes Street, Riverhead

Kumeū

Design

Queen Street/York Terrace, Riverhead

Kumeū

Design

Pakiri Road, Leigh

Warkworth

Investigation

Waimauku Station Rd, Waimauku

Kumeū

Investigation

Wech Drive

Warkworth

Investigation

 

9.      After carrying out a detailed budget analysis with targeted rates revenue, past expenses on these projects and future forecasted costs, there is still approximately $11 million available to be allocated to the next tranche of footpaths within the Rodney region. This $11 million is allocated across the four subdivisions as follows:

Subdivision

Budget per subdivision ($)

No of footpaths that can be delivered

Dairy Flat

22,000

Insufficient funds for further delivery

Kumeū

2,635,000

3

Wellsford

2,200,000

1

Warkworth

6,550,000

8

 

10.     The Dairy Flat subdivision will only have $22,182 of RLBTTR funds left after the current projects are completed. This remaining amount is insufficient to deliver any further footpath projects within this subdivision.

11.     The cost to complete a project is different from one project to another. These costs are derived after considering the terrain of the footpaths, services associated with the proposed footpath and the safety aspects that need to be included into each project.

Rodney Street Footpath

12.     In addition to the delivery of the proposed future tranche of footpaths above, Auckland Transport is also carrying out investigations, scheme design and detailed design of a new footpath and ancillary infrastructure (including a bridge) on Rodney Street (SH1N) in Wellsford on behalf of the local board (Attachment A to the agenda report).

13.    The purpose of this project is to create safer pedestrian access from the town of Wellsford to Centennial Park. The existing route requires crossing Rodney Street (SH1N) twice as well as a local road - Davies Road - with no traffic calming measures in place along this route.

14.    Several options have been explored, including the construction of the new eastern footpath from 28-68 Rodney Street, and a new footbridge to Centennial Park Road, upgrading the existing western footpath and providing two crossings to connect to Centennial Park Road. 

15.    The preferred option involves creating a new footpath along the eastern side of Rodney Street and constructing a footbridge over the existing rail line. Scheme design for the preferred option was undertaken to further develop the design and detailed design of the footpath and footbridge is now underway.

16.    Cost estimates were carried out on the scheme design, with the initial estimate coming back at $3.81 million. Since then, a value engineering exercise involving reducing the width of the footbridge from 3 to 2.5 metres has reduced the estimated cost down to $3.4 million.

17.    The Rodney Street footpath project was approved at a cost of $1.426 million in December 2020, from RLBTTR funds. Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency has confirmed $400,000 can be allocated to this project from the Low Cost, Low Risk State Highways activity class, bringing the current total budget to $1.826 million.

18.    This leaves a shortfall of $1.574 million, which the local board will need to fund in order to progress this project.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     Based on the funding available, staff are seeking approval from the local board at its 18 May 2022 business meeting to allocate RLBTTR funding for the following final tranche of footpaths.

20.     The list of new footpaths are as follows:

Footpath

Subdivision

Rough Order of Costs ($)

Karoha Road

Kumeū

977,000

Riverhead Road

Kumeū

283,000

Sussex Terrace

Kumeū

970,000

Olympus Road

Wellsford

100,000

Falls Road

Warkworth

580,000

Point Wells Road

Warkworth

108,000

McKinney Road

Warkworth

1,191,000

Mason Heights

Warkworth

1,208,000

Kaipara Flats Road

Warkworth

757,000

School Road

Warkworth

753,000

Old Woodcocks Road

Warkworth

343,000

Ahuroa Road

Warkworth

410,000

Total

7,680,000

 

21.     Based on the safety improvements and the funding available, staff are seeking support from the local board to approve additional funding of $1.574 million from the RLBTTR to complete the detailed design and construction of the Rodney Street footpath, including the rail line bridge.

22.     The preferred option is the construction of a new footpath along the eastern side of Rodney Street and construction of a footbridge over the existing rail line. The $3.4 million estimate includes contingency of 30 per cent, to allow for any change in costs due to an escalation in construction materials or other unforeseen circumstances.

23.     The available budgets, contributions, latest cost estimates, the budget deficit and remaining Wellsford funds can be illustrated in a table as follows:

Cost Element

Budget Allocation ($)

Notes

Current Cost Estimate

3,400,000

This includes a 30 per cent contingency

Waka Kotahi NZTA Contribution

400,000

This is confirmed by Waka Kotahi

Rodney Local Board Approved Budget in December 2020

1,426,000

Approved through a resolution

Budget Deficit to Deliver the Project

1,574,000

Amount requiring budget approval by the Rodney Local Boad

Remaining Wellsford funds available

2,200,000

There is sufficient RLBTTR funding within the Wellsford subdivision to fund this amount deficit


Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate supports the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan, and Auckland Council priorities regarding mitigating the effects of climate change and reducing council’s carbon emissions. The RLBTTR funds projects that enable better access to active and public transport, namely footpaths, bus services, bus infrastructure and community transport hub facilities.

25.     Auckland Transport strives to provide attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reduce the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian and/or cyclist safety therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The appropriate council group inputs were sought by Auckland Transport in the formulation of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     At the workshop with the Rodney Local Board and Auckland Transport on 14 April 2022, a list of footpath options and associated required budgets was presented including the Rodney Street Footpath project. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The investigation, design, construction, and reporting on all 12 new footpaths would be at an estimated cost of $7.68 million to be funded from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

30.     The continuation of design works, and construction of Rodney Street would be at an estimated cost of an additional $1.574 million to be funded from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate. 

31.     Funding approved by the local board for project implementation, will be used in a proportional manner from the respective subdivision allocation from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There is a risk that the costs associated with the new tranche of footpaths may increase further at the detailed design and construction phases. To mitigate this risk, a programme level contingency has been applied to reallocate funds to projects where cost escalation occurs.

33.     Any changes resulting from cost escalations will need formal approval from the local board through a business meeting prior to reallocating funds to individual projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Auckland Transport will commence work on the direction resolved by the Rodney Local Board.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Street Footpath Project Footprint _ Aerial View

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duminda Wijayasinghe – Programme Director – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Paul Thompson – Head of Community Engagement – Auckland Transport

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Map

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2022/05749

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on Phase Three (previously called Tranche 2B) of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport-related deaths and serious injuries within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe and appropriate speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce deaths and serious injuries. Evidence from changes made in 2020 demonstrates that safe and appropriate speed limits are effective in reducing road trauma.

4.       Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and recently completed public consultation on proposed Phase Three changes with the community. A list of changes proposed within this local board area is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       Public consultation on changes proposed in Phase Three closed on 3 April 2022 and a summary of public responses is provided as Attachment B to the agenda report. Local boards are now invited to provide their feedback.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on speed limit changes proposed as part of Phase Three of Auckland Transport’s Safe Speeds Programme.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use.

Alignment with Central Government Policy

7.       Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

8.       Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

9.       Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the Auckland Transport Board, Auckland Transport has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speed limits on many roads.

10.     In this phase, the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools, high-risk rural roads, rural marae, and roads requested by the community.

11.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Phase Three took place from 28 February - 3 April 2022, and included the following measures:

a)   flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes near roads where changes to speed limits are proposed.

b)   advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist, and ethnic media.

c)   radio advertising on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea.

d)   radio interviews and ad libs on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea.

e)   media releases.

f)    social media campaigns.

g)   an article published in OurAuckland.

h)   translation of consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Braille and NZ Sign Language.

i)    flyers, posters and hardcopy FreePost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland.

j)    fifteen online webinars, including a Mandarin language webinar.

k)   a community drop-in session on Aotea Great Barrier.

12.     The community was able to provide their thoughts via a number of channels:

a)   online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay.

b)   a paper survey.

c)   a web-based mapping tool.

d)   emails direct to the Safe Speeds Programme team.

e)   at public hearings held on 6 April 2022.

13.     Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May (Attachment B) and now have the opportunity to provide feedback on Phase Three proposed speed limit changes within their local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Transport manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. This includes setting speed limits, and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted Auckland Transport has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and local boards.

15.     Auckland Transport’s first phase of reviewing and setting new speed limits was developing the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) that enabled AT to set new speed limits for Auckland’s highest risk roads.

16.     The impact of the changes made in this bylaw have been significant and support the claim that by setting safe and appropriate speed limits in Auckland, we reduce community harm.

17.     Since 30 June 2020, in areas where speed limits were changed, fatal crashes have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) during the 18-month period since this action was taken.[5]

18.     This change was most significant on rural roads where roads with reduced speed limits recorded a 71 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and more than a 25 per cent reduction in serious injury crashes.

19.     In selected locations, speed limit changes are complemented by physical speed calming measures such as speed bumps, raised pedestrian crossings, kerb changes and road marking. These physical measures help reinforce the safe and appropriate speed limits and assist with pedestrians and cyclists crossing busy roads. Physical measures are installed based upon risk, with a focus on locations such as town centres, residential areas and roads near schools.

20.     It will take time to confirm that these trends are sustained, however this initial impact is promising and indicates the effectiveness of the ‘Vision Zero’ approach. Overseas data records a similar impact on harm reduction and Auckland Transport’s advice to local boards is that the programme is working and should be supported.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     In town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced during Phase One of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of people saying they now participate in at least one active mode (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Auckland Transport has held workshops with local boards throughout the various phases of the Safe Speeds programme.

25.     Summaries of local submissions on changes proposed in Phase Three were provided to local boards in early May to inform their consideration of this topic.

26.     This report seeks feedback from the local board on the proposed speed limit changes within Phase Three of the Safe Speeds Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

28.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website at https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

29.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

30.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The Safe Speeds Programme is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

31.     Engagement with iwi at the AT northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui took place on the wider programme during 2021, and in early 2022 to introduce the Interim Speed Management Plan. Detailed engagement with individual rural marae as part of Phase Three commenced mid-2021 and is ongoing, with each marae typically requiring a tailored approach that takes into account localised safety issues.

32.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of Phase Three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme this programme has considerable financial implications.

34.     In 2017, the social cost of road harm in Auckland was about $1.1 billion.[6] These costs are paid by all Aucklanders. There is the cost of health care for those injured and - for some - lifetime rehabilitation and support. There is a cost to families, businesses and the region of those who can no longer live and work as they did before due to road deaths and serious injuries.

35.     Reducing the harm caused by road accidents impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that local boards represent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Delays due to COVID-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    the consultation length was extended from four to five weeks.

·    the number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased.

·    digital advertising spend was increased and included Mandarin language public webinars and social media advertising.

37.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force at the end of November 2022.

39.     The November 2022 date may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept up to date if any changes are made.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board Phase 3 Speed Limit Changes (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Safe Speeds Programme public feedback on proposed speed limit changes March/April 2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annie Ferguson – Communications and Engagement, Auckland Transport

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Nathan Cammock – Programme Director, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Council's Quarterly Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/05893

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Rodney Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022 work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Rodney Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Placemakers and urban design consultants have submitted proposals in response to the project brief for the Warkworth Town Centre Enhancement Plan (ID1759). Staff are in the final stages of negotiating the respective roles and responsibilities of the project team that will develop and deliver the plan. Ngati Manuhiri are engaged with the process and will be hosting the next planning sessions with consultants

·        The two community compliance wardens employed since the beginning of February 2022 (ID1760) have made a total of 630 site visits and completed a Signage Assessment Report on the Kumeū/Huapai main road. The main issues they have been dealing with have included freedom camping, erosion, sediment control, obstruction and dogs on beaches. The number of site visits doubled in March compared to February 2022.

·        Library customers have valued the libraries being open and available throughout the COVID-19 red level setting (ID1330). Customers, regardless of vaccination status, throughout this period have also been able to order items and have had full access to services on-line, contactless pick-up and service 'at the door'.

·        Public engagement is underway for the development of a Park Service Assessment (ID 1771) in anticipation of a draft assessment completion in April 2022. This will be followed by a workshop with the local board in quarter four.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes, have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk)

·     Warkworth Library – remediate roof component and report of structural development options (ID30772). Weathertightness and Structural Assessment Report received following site investigations carried out in November 2021. Numerous defects to the library building identified, mostly with the roof fabric resulting in water ingress into the internal areas. The report provides details for recommended remedial maintenance works to be undertaken in the short term while a development strategy is compiled in the longer term based on whether the current buildings are fit for purpose.  The report includes a Detailed Seismic Assessment (DSA) that rates the building as a medium risk (Grade C) and safe for continued occupancy with no immediate work required

·     Big Omaha Wharf – rebuild toilet block (ID18275). Consultation completed. Order placed for the supply and delivery of the prefabricated Permaloo single cubicle dry vault toilet in September/October 2022.This project is being delivered in a collaborative manner with the heritage team

·     William Fraser Reserve – rebuild toilet amenity block (ID24249). Contract has been awarded for the new toilet block construction which is now expected to be completed in late July/early August 2022. Meeting held with Building Consent staff to discuss the outstanding issues and to reach a solution.

6.       Overall, the net operational financial performance of the local board is tracking below the revised year to date budget (80 percent). Revenue is slightly above budget for the year to date and is likely to be on target for the full financial year.  From the local boards’ Locally Driven Initiatives funding, the majority of projects are underway and on track to be completed during the year, although some projects may need to have budget carried forward to 2022/23. Capital projects completed or underway include the play space and walkway at Cabeleigh Drive Pond Reserve, the concept plan for Helensville Town Centre, renewal of the Mahurangi East Library, refurbishment of the Omaha Community Centre, and renewal of the toilet block and wastewater system at Whangateau Hall Grounds.

7.       This report proposes reallocating $5000 from the work programme ID2708: Deliver community-led projects – professional services to work programme ID2673: Green Road – deliver outcomes identified in the masterplan. This reallocation will optimise the use of Rodney local board Local Driven Initiatives (LDI) operational budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Council Quarterly Performance Report: Rodney Local Board for quarter three ending 31 March 2022.

b)      approve the reallocation of $5000 of Locally Driven Initiative operating funding from the following project to complete additional work on ‘Green Road – deliver outcomes identified in the masterplan’ (project ID 2673),

i)     Project ID 2708 – Rodney – deliver community-led projects – professional services

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Rodney Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services.

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet local board plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

 

 

 

 

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Chart, bar chart

Description automatically generated

COVID-19 restrictions

10.     From 23 January 2022, Auckland moved back into traffic light red setting under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, which has impacted council and community-delivered event planning and programming.

11.     Impacts on individual activities are reported in the work programme update (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

12.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

Chart, pie chart

Description automatically generated

13.     The graphs three and four below show the activity status – or stage of the activity – for the activities in the work programme. Graph three shows tis breakdown by department programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

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Description automatically generated

Chart

Description automatically generatedGraph 4: Status of activities within the work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key activity updates from quarter three

14.     The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Placemakers and urban design consultants have submitted proposals in response to the project brief for the Warkworth Town Centre Enhancement Plan (ID1759). Staff are in the final stages of negotiating the respective roles and responsibilities of the project team that will develop and deliver the plan. Ngati Manuhiri are engaged with the process and will be hosting the next planning sessions with the consultants

·        The two community compliance wardens employed since the beginning of February 2022 (ID1760) have made a total of 630 site visits and completed a Signage Assessment Report on the Kumeū/Huapai main road. The main issues they have been dealing with have included freedom camping, erosion, sediment control, obstruction and dogs on beaches. The number of site visits doubled in March compared to February.

·        Library customers have valued the libraries being open and available throughout the COVID-19 red level setting (ID1330). Customers, regardless of vaccination status, throughout this period have also been able to order items and have had full access to services on-line, contactless pick-up and service 'at the door.

·        Public engagement is underway for the development of a Park Service Assessment (ID 1771) in anticipation of a draft assessment completion in April 2022. This will be followed by a workshop with the local board in quarter four.

Activities with significant issues

·     Warkworth Library – remediate roof component and report of structural development options (ID30772). Weathertightness and Structural Assessment Report received following site investigations carried out in November 2021. Numerous defects to the library building were identified, mostly with the roof fabric resulting in water ingress into the internal areas. The report provides details for recommended remedial maintenance works to be undertaken in the short term while a development strategy is compiled in the longer term based on whether the current buildings are fit for purpose.  The report includes a Detailed Seismic Assessment (DSA) that rates the building as a medium risk (Grade C) and safe for continued occupancy with no immediate work required.

·     Big Omaha Wharf – rebuild toilet block (ID18275). Consultation completed. Order placed for the supply and delivery of the prefabricated Permaloo single cubicle dry vault toilet in September/October 2022.This project is being delivered in a collaborative manner with the heritage team.

·     William Fraser Reserve – rebuild toilet amenity block (ID24249). Contract has been awarded for the new toilet block construction which is now expected to be completed in late July/early August 2022. Meeting held with Building Consent staff to discuss the outstanding issues and reach a solution.

Activities on hold

15.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·    Point Wells Recreation Reserve – renew carpark, driveway and walkway (ID4230). This project will be delivered next financial year and will be delivered in conjunction with other Rodney area carpark renewals.

·    Point Wells Reserve Foreshore – renew seawall (ID2739). This project falls within the Shoreline Adaptation Plan programme. The project is paused to liaise with the Shoreline Adaptation Planning team. A site visit with this team and the consultant is planned for early quarter four.

·    Whangateau Harbour Omaha Estuary - investigate and renew coastal assets (ID 2474). This project falls within the Shoreline Adaptation Plan programme. The project is paused to liaise with the Shoreline Adaptation Planning team. A site visit with this team and the consultant is planned for early quarter four.

Changes to the local board work programme

Deferred activities

16.     These community leasing activities are deferred from the current work programme into future years:

·     124 Green Road, Dairy Flat: North Shore Model Aero Club Incorporated – New licence to occupy (ID 1054) - During quarter three leasing staff prepared and sent a memorandum to the local board seeking feedback on progressing the new licence to occupy. The feedback from local board was to the effect that staff defer processing the licence until after the formal adoption of the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan. Leasing staff will prepare a subsequent memorandum to the local board seeking informal approval to defer to next year’s work programme.

·     124 Green Road, Dairy Flat: North Harbour Pony Club Silverdale Branch Incorporated – New lease and licence to occupy (ID 1050) - During quarter three leasing staff prepared and sent a memorandum to the local board seeking feedback on progressing the new licence to occupy. The feedback from local board was to the effect that staff defer processing the licence until after the formal adoption of the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan. Leasing staff will prepare a subsequent memorandum to the local board seeking informal approval to defer to next year’s work programme

·     Coatesville Recreation Reserve: New lease and licence to occupy to Waitematā Branch Pony Club Incorporated (ID1061). Project deferred until after the formal adoption of the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan.

·     Glasgow Park Waimauku: New lease and licence to occupy to Waimauku Pony Club Incorporated (ID1067). Project deferred until after the formal adoption of the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan.

·     Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve: New lease to Warkworth Pony Club Incorporated (ID1059). Project deferred until after the formal adoption of the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan.

·     Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve: New lease to Warkworth Rodeo Club Incorporated (ID 1070). Project deferred until after the formal adoption of the Rodney Local Board Local Parks Management Plan.

Reallocation of funding

17.     Delivery staff have identified an underspend of allocated locally driven initiatives operational budget, which can be reallocated to other projects.

18.     The following table provides a breakdown of the amount of underspend, and the reason for this.

ID

Activity name

Reason for underspend

Total underspend

 

2708

 

Rodney - deliver community-led projects - professional services

There were no projects that met the criteria for use of this funding.

 

$5,000

 

 

TOTAL

$5,000

 

19.     Staff have also identified another project in the adopted 2021/2022 work programme which could use reallocated funding and can be completed this financial year. This is reflected in the following table.

ID

Activity name

Reason additional funds can be used

Additional budget required

 

2673

Green Road - deliver outcomes identified in the masterplan

There is a lot of tree maintenance work required at Green Road to prepare it for future use. Additional funding can further progress this work.

 

$5,000

 

 

 

TOTAL

$5,000

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

21.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is well underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

22.     The local board has approved a number of projects in its current year work programme that contribute to climate change mitigation, including:

·     Rodney Healthy Harbours Riparian Restoration Fund (ID617), which provides landowners with financial assistance to protect and restore the riparian margins of Rodney waterways through planting and stock exclusion initiatives. Community groups can also apply for funding to protect and restore public areas such as esplanades and reserves.

·     Restore East Rodney Coordinator (ID587), which funds a role to support landscape-scale environmental restoration and conservation activities by the community in eastern Rodney.

·     Restore West Rodney Coordinator (ID596), which supports community-led initiatives for a Predator Free Kaipara. The coordinator encourages and supports landowners to undertake pest animal control in blocks of native bush.

·     Helensville construction and demolition waste minimisation programme (ID736), which supports local builders and developers to achieve waste diversion from construction and demolition projects. In year one, this funding will provide bins for the Helensville Community Recycling Centre to establish a waste collection service, allowing the recycling centre to reuse, recycle and upcycle the recovered materials. Funding will also support education for builders and developers to help them overcome barriers to waste diversion.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     This report informs the Rodney Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Rodney's libraries continue to incorporate Te Reo Māori and Te Ao Māori across programmes and events, including a language learning component in children and youth programmes, and staff using greetings when welcoming customers. The Skinny Jump programme has been beneficial to whānau Māori across the region, enabling access to affordable broadband at home, including rural areas with poor internet access.

26.     A number of initiatives in the work programme involve engagement and collaboration with iwi, including the renewal of the play space and minor assets and Sandspit Reserve, renewal of minor assets at Omeru Scenic reserve, the revitalisation of Warkworth and Helensville town centres, and initiatives supporting strong and resilient communities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     This report is provided to enable the Rodney Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programme.

28.     A total of $5000 is recommended for reallocation due to underspend of locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget.

29.     Reallocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to optimise the use of its locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget for the 2021/2022 financial year.

30.     It is recommended that the local board reallocate this funding at the earliest opportunity to allow operational staff to deliver the activities that have received this funding.

31.     Should the local board choose not to support the reallocation of the funding from the initiatives identified above, the funding would be offered up as savings to Auckland Council.

Financial Performance

37.     Operating expenditure relating to Asset Based Services (ABS) is below budget by $2.2 million for the year to date, while the LDI operational projects are currently $473,000 below budget.  This is due to a variety of projects yet to draw down on financial allocations. 

38.     Capital spend of $3.5 million represents investment in the play space and walkway at Cabeleigh Drive Pond Reserve, the concept plan for Helensville Town Centre, renewal of the Mahurangi East Library, refurbishment of the Omaha Community Centre, and renewal of the toilet block and wastewater system at Whangateau Hall Grounds.

39.       The complete Rodney Local Board Financial Performance report can be found in Attachment B to the agenda report

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

39.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

40.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP). These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

41.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2022).

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Work Programme update (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Rodney Local Board Quarterly Performance Report March 2022 - Financial Appendix (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes – Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2022/00208

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive Councillor Sayers’ update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ward Councillor update March - May

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Natasha Yapp - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2022/00209

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Rodney Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Rodney Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

2.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·           ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board                                  priorities

·           clarifying what advice is required and when

·           clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Natasha Yapp - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/00210

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 13, 14 April, and 4, 11 May 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 13, 14 April, and 4, 11 May 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board Workshop Record 13 April

149

b

Rodney Local Board Workshop Record 14 April

151

c

Rodney Local Board Workshop Record 4 May

153

d

Rodney Local Board Workshop Record 11 May

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Natasha Yapp - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Lack of bus services presentation                 Page 161

Item 8.3      Attachment b    Lack of public transportation in suburban Auckland speech                                                           Page 169

Item 8.4      Attachment a    Te Araroa Trail                                               Page 171

Item 9.1      Attachment a    Omaha Beach Golf Club Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan                                             Page 177

Item 9.1      Attachment b    Omaha Beach Golf Club Coaching Programmes April 2019 - Present                                       Page 181

Item 9.1      Attachment c    Omaha Beach Golf Club Player Data           Page 185

Item 9.1      Attachment d    Omaha Beach Golf Club Briefing Paper 2018 Page 187

Item 9.1      Attachment e    Omaha Beach Golf Club New Tees Foreground Images                                                           Page 193


Rodney Local Board

18 May 2022

 

 

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[1] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[2] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[3] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[4] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy

[5] Annual figures for the 18-month period 30 June 2020 to 31 December 2021, when compared to the prior five-year baseline period.

[6] https://www.transport.govt.nz/statistics-and-insights/safety-annual-statistics/sheet/social-cost-of-road-crashes