I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

 

Venue:

 

Thursday, 19 May 2022

9.30am

Upper Harbour Local Board Office and via Microsoft Teams
30 Kell Drive
Albany

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Max Wilde

Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

 

11 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Max.Wilde@AucklandCouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Local Board views on a Notice of Requirement for a designation for a primary school and early childhood education centre at 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville.  7

12        Sanders Reserve Bike Facility Analysis and Development Strategy                    35

13        Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations                                                                                                                    55

14        Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023                                   63

15        Draft Auckland golf investment plan                                                                         71

16        Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grant for 2022/2023                                                                                                                                     109

17        Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)                          117

18        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes 147

19        Governance forward work calendar                                                                        153

20        Workshop records                                                                                                     157

21        Auckland Transport - West Hub Bulletin - May 2022                                             167

22        Local Board Members' Reports - May 2022                                                            181

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         confirm that the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 12 May  2022 will be confirmed at its meeting on 16 June 2022.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.


 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Local Board views on a Notice of Requirement for a designation for a primary school and early childhood education centre at 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville.

File No.: CP2022/05338

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local board views on a Notice of Requirement for a designation (NoR) by the Minister of Education for a new primary school and early childhood education centre (ECE) at 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a NoR to the Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part) (AUP(OP)) must consider local boards’ views on the NoR if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Each local board has a responsibility to communicate the interests and preferences of people in its area on Auckland Council policy documents, including NoRs. A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board.[1]

4.       The Minister of Education (MoE), as the Requiring Authority (RA), has lodged a NoR with Auckland Council (the council) for a designation at 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville. The NoR seeks a designation for educational purposes, including a primary school and early childhood education centre at this address.

5.       The NoR was notified on 24 February 2022 and submissions closed on 24 March 2022. Seven submissions were received. Four submissions were in support of the NoR, and one submission was in support subject to a request for an amendment to the conditions. Two submissions were neutral. This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on the NoR. Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on the Notice of Requirement for a new primary school and early childhood education centre at 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville.

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing (if one is held) on the Notice of Requirement if that is considered necessary by the local board.

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of Upper Harbour Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the hearing (if one is held).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents. Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents.[2]

7.       The MoE’s NoR seeks to include a new designation in the AUP (OP). Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views where any process proposes a change to the AUP(OP)

8.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the s42a hearing report. Local board views are included in the analysis of the NoR, along with all submissions.

9.       If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing, if one is held, to commissioners, who will make a recommendation on the NoR.

10.     Following receipt of the recommendation, the RA  is required to advise the council, within 30 working days, whether they accept or reject the recommendation in whole or in part. Once the council has received a decision from the RA, submitters will be advised and are then given an opportunity to lodge an appeal with the Environment Court if they are not satisfied with the outcome. Council will also have the opportunity at this stage to appeal the decision.

11.     This report provides an overview of the NoR and a summary of the key themes in submissions. 

12.     The report does not recommend what views the local board should convey. Staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Notice of Requirement overview

13.     The MoE has lodged a NoR for a designation under s168 of the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) for Educational Purposes – Primary School (Years 0-8) and Early Childhood Education (pre-school). The site that will be subject to the designation is located at 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville (refer to Figure 1 below).

14.     The designation will enable the establishment of a new full primary school catering for school age children from Year 0 to Year 8, as well as ECE facilities catering for pre-school children.

Diagram

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Figure 1: Site Location 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville (Source: MoE NoR and AEE, dated 29 November 2021).

15.     The school has a planned opening roll of approximately 350 students with a potential opening day in 2024/2025, with the potential to grow to the full roll of 1000 in the longer term. The ECE would operate independently from the school with its own teaching facilities within the designated land.

16.     The MoE has undertaken a study to confirm the feasibility of a school at this location, however no detailed design of the school and ECE has been undertaken at this stage. Proposed conditions include the requirement for an establishment outline plan of works (OPW) for the construction and development of the school and ECE which is required by the RMA. The OPW condition, as worded in the lodged NoR, along with the statutory requirements, shall include the following further information:

·    a design concept plan including:

general location of access points for vehicles, cyclists, scooters and pedestrians, on-site parking areas, and on-site pick up and drop off areas

treatments for access points to manage conflict between mode users

general location of building platforms, areas for proposed buildings and open space

indicative areas accommodating future education purpose growth on this site, including building platforms, car parking areas, vehicular access, manoeuvring and circulation areas.

·    a transport assessment,

·    a summary of consultation.

17.     The Ministry has advised that no regional resource consents are required at this stage. Any regional resource consents required will be sought concurrently with an application for approval of an outline plan of works once the educational facilities have been designed.

18.     The MoE’s Assessment of Environmental Effects (AEE) sets out the reasons for the new educational facilities as follows:

·    the current population growth that Hobsonville Point is experiencing

·    the current over-utilisation of the existing Hobsonville Point Primary School

·    the school demand projections in the wider area.

19.     The MoE’s AEE, in Section 1.1, states that since the existing Hobsonville Primary School and the Hobsonville Point Secondary School opened, Hobsonville Land Company’s anticipated housing yields in the area have increased. Based on the currently known yields, the MoE estimates that up to 2,600 primary aged students could be living in the new suburbs of Hobsonville and Scott Point by 2043. These yields exclude any additional private development and are beyond the MoE’s master-planned rolls for the existing schools. The pace and scale of development has already placed significant demand on Hobsonville Primary School which, as of October 2020, was at 120% utilisation.

Submissions received

20.     Submissions were made by seven people/organisations as set out in Table 1 below

Table 1:  Submissions received on NoR for 2 Waka Moana Drive, Hobsonville

Submissions

Number of submissions

In support

4

In support subject to amendments to conditions

1

Neutral

2

Oppose

0

 

21.     Four submissions in support were received from Hobsonville Point residents, one in support with amendments to conditions from Auckland Transport. Two neutral submissions were received from a Hobsonville Point resident and the New Zealand Defence Force.


 

 

22.     The key submission themes are listed below:

·    support for a new primary school

·    lack of capacity of the existing Hobsonville Primary School

·    combining the proposed new primary school with the current primary school to:

utilise resources efficiently and effectively

avoid separation of students of the same year who are living, and growing up in the same location

·    traffic congestion and safety issues for pedestrians

·    support for walking and cycling

·    amendment sought to one of the proposed NoR conditions for on-road interventions to ensure safe connections for active mode users

·    risk to aircraft safety at the Whenuapai Airbase, and in particular the approach and departure path, including glare, reflectivity and bird strikes, related to structures particularly during construction.

23.     Information on individual submissions and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters, will be reported on in the hearing report. A copy of each submission is included in Attachment A.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out Auckland’s climate goals:

·    to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation).

24.     The first of council’s climate goals is relevant because it relates to climate adaption. That goal aligns with the legal principle for RMA decision-makers to have particular regard to the effects of climate change (section 7(i) RMA). 

25.     However, the RMA currently precludes the second goal: consideration of climate mitigation.  Consequently any local board views on climate mitigation will be disregarded by the plan change decision-makers.

26.     RMA amendments coming into force at the end of 2022 will enable climate mitigation to be considered.  These effects cannot be considered now.


 

 

Implications for local board views

27.     Table 2 provides guidance as to what the local board may wish to consider in forming any view.

In scope for RMA decision-making

Out of scope for RMA decision-making

Climate adaption issues such as:

How should land be allocated to different activities when considering how climate change may affect our environment? How and where should physical resources be constructed?

For example:

·   will sea-level rise cause inundation of land where development is proposed? 

·   is the land in an area susceptible to coastal instability or erosion?

·   will Auckland be less- or better-prepared for flooding, stress on infrastructure, coastal and storm inundation?

·   is ecosystem resilience improved through ecological restoration or reduced by the loss of indigenous habitats?

Climate mitigation issues such as:

·        release of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere

·        increase in tail-pipe emissions from private car use, use of coal fired or natural gas burners

Table 2: Relevance of climate change to RMA decision-making

Submitters’ views

28.     There were no submissions that raised specific climate matters.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     Auckland Council’s Healthy Waters Department (Healthy Waters) reviewed the NoR prior to notification and will provide specialist advice for the section 42A hearing report.

30.     Auckland Transport made a submission in support of the NoR subject to an amendment to the conditions relating to on-road interventions. AT considers that on-road interventions will be critical in ensuring safe connection points for active mode users accessing the school and promoting the 48% mode share for active modes outlined in the Integrated Transport Assessment dated 29 November 2021.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

31.     The NoR falls within the Upper Harbour Local Board area.


 

 

32.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·        interests and preferences of people in the local board area

·        well-being of communities within the local board area

·        local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement responsibilities and operation of the local board.

33.     Section 9 of the AEE states that the Upper Harbour Local Board were sent project information on 30 July 2021. The AEE states that feedback from the local board chair on the proposed designation:

·    was supportive of the proposed components that the school is to be made up of in that there is recognition of the need for further learning spaces for primary school aged children, as well as the ECE provision 

·    encouraged the Minister of Education to look at partnership opportunities with council and Eke Panuku to develop the adjacent WASP Hangar[3], as a shared recreational facility for the school and wider community

·    encouraged that there is no reliance on local roads to provide for parking and that bus routes and appropriate safe crossing areas are provided

·    that the Minister of Education considers, at the detailed design stage, the heritage and character area in which the school will be built, including design elements that complement the art-deco look of surrounding.

34.     An information memo was also provided, on 8 December 2021, advising of the lodgement of the NoR. The memo also set out the statutory steps required to process the NoR and the method for providing the Upper Harbour Local Board’s views.

35.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when making a recommendation on the NoR.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the NoR, it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori people, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori world view). In the 2018 census results, 3,200 residents in the local board area identify as Māori.

37.     MoE has undertaken consultation with iwi authorities with an interest in the area. Section 5.0 of the AEE states that the consultation has not identified any specific adverse cultural effects that cannot be appropriately addressed as part of the detailed design, at the Outline Plan of Works stage, and during project implementation. Te Kawerau a Maki advised the MoE that they would like full engagement during the designation process. At the time of lodgement of the NoR, MoE followed up with Te Kawerau a Maki. No further correspondence has been received. MoE intend to continue to engage with interested mana whenua as the planning process progresses.

38.     The NoR was fully notified. Iwi authorities with an interest in the area were notified as part of that process. No submissions have been received from iwi authorities

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     There are no financial implications with the local board providing its views. 

40.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views.

41.     The cost associated with processing NoR requests is recoverable from the Ministry of Education. The effects of development associated with the NoR on infrastructure (and any associated funding/financing issues) is a matter that will be addressed in the hearing reports and at the hearing.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the NoR if it does not pass a resolution. This report provides:

·    the mechanism for the Upper Harbour Local Board to express its views and preferences

·    the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

43.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

44.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a NoR cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s).[4]  This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the section 42A hearing report. If a hearing is required, the local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

46.     The planner will advise the local board of the recommendation and decision on the NoR by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Submissions received on Notice of Requirement

15

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jo Hart - Senior Policy Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Sanders Reserve Bike Facility Analysis and Development Strategy

File No.: CP2022/05416

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the adoption the Sanders Reserve Bike Facility Analysis and Development Strategy (Sanders Reserve Service Provision Assessment: SharePoint ID #1249)

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A service provision assessment for Sanders Reserve was included in the approved Parks Sport and Recreation work programme in 2018/2019, SharePoint ID #1249.

3.       The purpose of this service assessment was to provide a development strategy to inform possible future mountain bike track development opportunities for Sanders Reserve in Paremoremo. 

4.       The study focuses on mountain biking but also identifies opportunities to improve the functionality of this network for all reserve visitors, including pedestrians and horse riders who share many of the tracks and areas of the reserve.

5.       The local board requested the service assessment be brought to a business meeting for formal adoption before further engagement is undertaken and developed design processes are initiated.

6.       Funding has been approved through the 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme (Activity ID 2793) to develop and implement a number of the design improvements identified in the service assessment over the coming years.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      Adopt the Sanders Reserve Bike Facility Analysis and Development Strategy (Attachment A).

Horopaki

Context

7.       Since the development of the track network in Sanders Reserve, concerns had been raised by stakeholders and the community that the experience provided by the current walking, cycle and equestrian facilities are not fully aligned with expectations of the user groups.

8.       In response to these concerns, the Upper Harbour Local Board requested that Parks Services undertake a review of the services provided for walking, cycling and equestrian activities as part of the 2018/2019 Parks, Sports, and Recreation Annual Work Programme (SharePoint ID #1249).

9.       Parks Services developed the Sanders Reserve Bike Facility Analysis and Development Strategy (Attachment A).  This study proposes a development approach to address identified issues and proposes opportunities for track network improvements to increase frequency of use and enhance user experience through consolidation and refinement of the track network.

10.     The local board requested the service assessment be brought to a business meeting for formal adoption before further engagement is undertaken and developed design processes are initiated.

11.     Community Facilities has initiated a project to undertake consultation and design, followed by physical works in subsequent financial years to implement these improvements through the work programme item: Sanders Reserve - track renewal (ID 2793).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Prior to developing the development strategy in 2018/2019 and to gain an understanding of user group patterns of use, the Sanders Reserve site was observed during weekdays over a period of two mornings (10am -12pm) and two afternoons (1-3pm) during fine weather. The site was also visited on the weekend between 9am - 2pm.

13.     The key site observations

·        Most patrons were using the loop connection to the south of the visitor kiosk with significantly fewer visitors using the wider recreational routes.

·        On average there were more individuals walking than cycling the tracks. Most of these users were adults.

·        Most dog walkers were observed in the morning, and they generally kept to the dedicated off leash area.

·        Equestrian users were using wider recreational routes outside of the designated equestrian area.

·        On weekends the most intensive activity was between 10.30am and 1pm with the predominant user groups were parents with children using the track and playground facilities associated with the entrance hub.

·        The recreational loop termed ‘The Road’ was well used by all user groups with most of the well maintained and highly visible tracks near the visitor centre being well patronised.

·        It was evident that all user groups share the ‘Recreational Loop’ with limited conflict. (Refer Attachment A. Page 01).

14.     Key issues with the network

·    Key entrances and exits off primary routes are not effectively signposted.

·    The extensive track network with multiple ‘scissor’ loops does not enhance user experience.

·    Too many tracks impact ability to maintain facilities effectively and to a high standard.

·    There is a lack of signage on route complexity i.e., ‘Beginner’ vs ‘Intermediate’.

·    Key intersections lack clarity for users. (Refer Attachment A. Page 01).


 

 

15.     Objectives to address key issues with the network:

·        Rationalisation of the track network by reducing the extent of track network with focus on quality rather than quantity.

·        Improve track wayfinding and interpretation by developing an appropriate signage hierarchy with improved legibility to improve site navigation, confidence levels and associated route selection.

·        Enhance user experience and character by providing various routes and complementary features for differing cycle skill levels.

·        Establish functional and maintenance improvements through better design solutions. (Refer Attachment A. Page 02).

 

16.     Network Improvement Opportunities

Four general areas of improvements to the network were identified in the study and these are summarised as: 

1)   Implement features such as low boardwalk, bridges, berms or ‘rollers’ utilising existing landforms.

2)   Provide a selection of routes that navigate or hug the periphery of vegetation providing shade and varied contrast between open grassed and vegetated areas.

3)   Installing wider berms on corners for routes that traverse steeper slopes to aid in controlling downhill speed, and to enable easier transition uphill.

4)   Rationalising the extent of beginner and intermediate routes to provide connecting loops through the site in lieu of multiple ‘area based’ alternatives. (Refer Attachment A. Page 02).

17.     More detailed analysis is contained in the development strategy (Attachment A) which includes a concept layout for rationalising tracks, opportunities for improvements and possible staging of the development of these tracks.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     A Coastal Management Framework (resolution ENV/2017/116) has been set up to provide a best practice operational framework for coastal management in Auckland to respond to the challenges of climate change and sea level rise in general. The Framework provides guidance on options to manage these risks and how they should be implemented. These must be consistent with:

·        Outcomes and policies in the New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement and national guides on climate change projections and adaptive planning.  

·        Any relevant coastal management plan and/or coastal asset management plan.

·        Any future council coastal erosion and land instability response policy, or implementation of the Auckland Climate Plan 2020.

·        Relevant hazard assessments.

19.     The sustainable design of any assets being implemented should be considered in the developed design stage as this will provide resilience to the impacts of climate change. Any planting to support these developments should have species chosen that tolerate the anticipated climatic conditions.


 

 

20.     Where proposed public access or infrastructure are vulnerable to natural hazards such as frequent flooding, erosion, land instability or potential for changes to access, consideration should be given to moving any proposed development away from these hazards. Implementation of planting and/or naturalisation of hazardous areas should be undertaken if suitable.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The Community Facilities team reviewed the document after it was presented to the board in June 2019 and initiated processes to identify funding options through the Upper Harbour Local Board work programme in 2019/2020 and in future years.

22.     Funding for a number of improvements identified in the report is allocated in the 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme. Refer Sanders Reserve - track renewal (ID 2793).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     The service assessment aligns to outcomes in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. This is most evident in the key initiative in Outcome three: Healthy and active communities stating ‘People of all abilities have access to a wide variety of sports and recreation opportunities with well-maintained parks and community facilities. As a local board, we also play a leading role in identifying gaps in provision based on the needs of each local area.

24.     Views expressed by the local board through previous workshops to develop and review the document in June 2019 and October 2021 have driven the analysis process. Feedback received has been integrated into the proposed network priorities contained in this report.

25.     Further engagement with the board was undertaken as part of the Community Facilities work programme process where funding for track upgrades has been approved.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Projects aligned to this service assessment will be presented to the North-Western Area Hui. as part of the Community Facilities Work Programme item: Sanders Reserve - track renewal (ID 2793).  Mana Whenua will have the opportunity to express interest in these projects and indicate how they would like to be involved.

27.     Matauranga Māori refers to the body of knowledge that Māori communities have accumulated in the time that Māori have lived in Aotearoa. Accessing this knowledge is a valuable management tool in council’s design and construction processes. Tangata whenua have detailed knowledge of Matauranga Māori as a living resource and, as the holders of this knowledge, it is important that consultation and engagement is undertaken thoroughly to ensure Te Ao Māori design principles are integrated into any development related to this service assessment.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The service assessment process is used as a tool to understand how funds may be allocated in the future. Funding has been allocated through the approved 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme.

29.     Financial implications of the approved 2021/2022 Community Facilities Work Programme have been addressed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     Given funding has been approved through the 2021/2022 Community Facilities work programme based on principles outlined in the service assessment, there is a risk associated with this not being formally adopted.

31.     Should amendments be proposed to the service assessment, appropriate mitigation would need to be considered and integrated into the work programme process. This could be achieved through the collaboration of the Parks Sports and Recreation and Community Facility teams to incorporate this detail into any planned works. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Continue the development of the Sanders Reserve track development processes through the Community Facilities Work Programme project by implementing the outcomes and track improvement opportunities identified in the Sanders Reserve Bike Facility Analysis and Development (Attachment A).

33.     The following phased implementation of these developments was outlined in the service assessment.

·    Phase 1: Consultation of the proposed development strategy with key stakeholders.

·    Phase 2: Investigation and analysis including an on-site review and confirmation of location and functional improvements required.

·    Phase 3 - Develop an improved wayfinding strategy.

·    Phase 4 - Functional Improvements through detailed design focusing on existing beginner level tracks followed by intermediate level facilities

·    Phase 5 - Detailed design focusing experiential improvements; new track links, gradient, drainage and wayfinding (Refer Attachment A. Page 08).

34.     To some extent these will be superseded by the phased allocation of funding outlined in the Community Facilities Work Programme. These steps are all necessary, but the delivery of these phases would all be managed as part of the funding allocations at a project management level. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Sanders Reserve Bike Facility Analysis and Development Strategy

41

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

John McKellar - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

      

Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/05889

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline applications received for Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

3.       This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (Attachment B to the agenda report) and Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (Attachments C to the agenda report).

4.       The Upper Harbour Local Board has set a total of $96,133 community grants budget for the 2021/2022 financial year. A further $8,000 was allocated to the community grants, from the Event Partnership Fud (Activity ID: 473), resolution number UH/2022/22 bringing the total funding to $104,133.

5.       At the 21 October 2021 business meeting, the local board allocated $33,000 for Local Grants Round One and Multiboard Grants Round One leaving a total of $71,133 to be allocated to Local Grants Round Two, Multiboard Grant Round Two and Quick Response Round One.

6.       Nineteen applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round Two, requesting $197,833.93 and twelve applications were received for Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022, requesting $40,714; a total of $238,547.93.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022, listed in the following table:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

LG2217-202

Trixi Pavey

Community

Towards venue hire of Meadowood Community House between 1st June 2022 till 23rd December 2022.

$1,000.00

LG2217-203

New Zealand Photographic Art Academy

Arts and culture

Towards printing photos, frames and editing of the photographic exhibition between 1st June 2022 and 30th June 2022.

$5,165.00

LG2217-204

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Community

Towards various aspects of project delivery between 1July 2022 till 30th September 2022.

$5,000.00

LG2217-205

Life Education Trust North Shore

Community

Towards take home resources for 'Heathy Harold programme' between 1st June 2022 and 31st December 2022.

$2,500.00

LG2217-206

Auckland Paraplegic and Physically Disabled Association Inc

Community

Towards venue hire, equipment, wages for sports officer and sport development manager and for Afterschool Athletics events.

$4,382.44

LG2217-207

East Coast Bays Hockey Club

Sport and recreation

Towards turf hire fees, umpiring fees and affiliation fees between 1st June 2022 and 28th August 2022.

$10,000.00

LG2217-209

Camp Maynard

Community

Towards replacement of 2 bunks and 60 foam mattresses.

$12,456.45

LG2217-210

Immerse Charitable Trust

Community

Towards travel costs, catering and overall expenses to run 20 days of events between 1st July 2022 and 30th June 2023.

$10,000.00

LG2217-212

East Coast Bays Association Football Club

Sport and recreation

Towards salary of the director, coach and junior affiliation fees for Junior development programme.

$9,900.00

LG2217-213

Salle Jean Louis Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards scoring machines, connection system of reels and connecting cables for fencing course.

$5,000.00

LG2217-214

Albany Junior High School

Community

Towards repurpose of building by haulage of structure and renovations to convert into community wharenui between 1st June 2022 to 20th December 2022.

$78,000.00

LG2217-215

Albany Badminton Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards venue hire and shuttle costs for the Albany Badminton Tournament 2022.

$5,913.00

LG2217-216

Waitemata Synchronised Swimming Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards underwater sound system, pool hire, coach fees and website costs between 1st August 2022 till 23rd December 2022.

$9,551.04

LG2217-217

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the professional fees for training and supervising volunteer counsellors.

$5,000.00

LG2217-218

Mass Sport Trust

Sport and recreation

Towards an inaugural football tournament for women on 25th September 2022.

$4,000.00

LG2217-219

Hobsonville Hall Society

Community

Towards hall insurance costs from 1st Dec 2022 till 1st Dec 2023

$3,000.00

LG2217-220

Badminton New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards Venue hire for Seniors North Island Inter-Association competition, between 30th July 2022 and 3rd September 2022.

$4,000.00

LG2217-221

Hobsonville Point Marine Sports Recreation Centre Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the costs of the Transition of Concept detailed design and drawings for Upper Harbour Marine Centre, that occur after the 1st of June 2022.

$20,000.00

LG2217-222

Greenhithe Community Trust

Community

Towards a tool shed, wheel barrow and two storage racks at Wainoni Park.

$2,966.00

Total

 

 

 

$197,833.93

 


 

 

b)      agree to fund, part fund, or decline each application in the Upper Harbour Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022, listed in the following table:

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

MB2022-202

Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards free or subsidised classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in various locations in Auckland (June 2022 - March 2023)

$5,697.00

MB2022-214

North Harbour Community Patrol

Community

Towards resources for mobile crime prevention patrols in suburbs in Devonport-Takapuna, Hibiscus and Bays, Kaipātiki, and Upper Harbour (June 2022 - May 2023)

$1,317.00

MB2022-215

The Reading Revolution

Community

Towards wages of the manager delivering the "Readers Leaders programme"

$3,000.00

MB2022-216

Assistance Dogs NZ Trust

Community

Towards wages of puppy development advisor and client instructor in Auckland (June 2022 - December 2022)

$3,500.00

MB2022-220

Bellyful New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards meal production, volunteer support, and delivery costs in Auckland (June 2022 - December 2023)

$3,000.00

MB2022-229

The StarJam Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the workshops costs of tutor fees, venue hire, tutor and volunteer training, regional programme coordinator`s salary and equipment between 1st June 2022 to 31st December 2022.

$3,000.00

MB2022-232

Garden to Table Trust

Community

Towards the salary, mileage and home office costs of three regional coordinators of the "Garden to Table Food Education Programme"

$3,500.00

MB2022-233

Aotearoa Multicultural Families Society

Community

Towards organized walking programme for families at different local trails, parks, and beaches in Devonport, Takapuna, Mission Bay, East Coast Bays, Unsworth Heights, and Hobsonville (July 2022 - December 2022)

$1,000.00

MB2022-236

Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

Community

Towards operational costs (such as wages, rent, transport, equipment) to recruit volunteer mentors for young boys with no father in their lives in Auckland (September 2022 - September 2023)

$10,000.00

MB2022-237

Pet Refuge New Zealand Charitable Trust

Community

Towards administration costs for the Pet Refuge shelter in Rosedale Auckland (June 2022 - December 2022)

$2,000.00

MB2022-243

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the marketing material costs and wages of co-ordinators and facilitators of the Community Education Webinars.

$2,500.00

MB2022-244

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the costs of youth worker wages, project coordination, external facilitation and administration fees to run 12 weekly recreational programmes between 6 June 2022 to 10 march 2023.

$2,200.00

Total

 

 

 

$40,714.00

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds, and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

13.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts.

14.     Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment, or heritage. Based on the focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice.

16.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Upper Harbour Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 50 of the Community Grants Policy states:
“We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

19.     A summary of each application received through 2021/2022 Upper Harbour Local and Multi-Board Grants Round Two is provided in Attachments B and C.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to the council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The Upper Harbour Local Board adopted the Upper Harbour Local Grants Programme 2021/2022 as presented in Attachment A. The document sets application guidelines for contestable community grants submitted to the local board.

22.     This report presents applications received in the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (Attachment B) and Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022 (Attachments C).

23.     The Upper Harbour Local Board had set a total of $96,133 community grants budget for the 2021/2022 financial year. A further $8,000 was allocated to the community grants, from the Events Partnership Fund (Activity ID: 473), resolution number UH/2022/22, bringing the total funding to $104,133

24.     At the 21 October 2021 business meeting, the local board allocated $33,000 for Local Grants Round One and Multiboard Grants Round One, leaving a total of $71,133 to be allocated to Local Grants Round Two, Multiboard Grant Round Two and Quick Response Round One.

25.     Nineteen applications were received for Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Round Two, requesting $197,833.93 and twelve applications were received for Multi-Board Grants Round Two 2021/2022, requesting $40,714.00 a total of $238,547.93

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following the Upper Harbour Local Board allocating funding for Round One Local and Multi-Board grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Upper Harbour Local Board Local Grants Round Two Applications Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Upper Harbour Local Board Multiboard Grants Round Two- Applications Summary (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ann Kuruvilla - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/05867

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023 for adoption (as provided in Attachment A to this report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      adopt the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023 in Attachment A to this agenda report.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grants programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

·        outcomes as identified in the local board plan

·        specific local board grants priorities

·        which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing dates

·        any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

·        other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The Upper Harbour Local Board Grants programme was workshopped with the local board and feedback has been incorporated into the programme for 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     The grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste, alternative transport methods, community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

12.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     All grants programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     An implementation plan is underway, and once adopted the grants programme will be locally advertised through local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023

67

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ann Kuruvilla - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Graphical user interface, text

Description automatically generated 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

Local Grants Programme 2022/2023

Our Local Grants Programme aims to provide contestable and discretionary community grants to local communities.

 

Priorities sought for Local Grant Programme applications

Our grants programme will be targeted towards supporting the priorities outlined in our local board plan, in particular:

·    Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities e.g., community workshops, events and projects that help build connections and resilience across diverse communities including youth, newcomers, and seniors.

·    Healthy and active communities e.g., Community Sports and Recreation including club and informal sport and recreation activities, events, facilities and equipment.

·    Our unique natural environment is valued, protected and enhanced e.g., ecological restoration, projects that include indigenous or culturally valued biodiversity.

·    A resilient local economy e.g., initiatives that eliminate waste and encourage reuse of resources, initiatives that grow local employment opportunities, projects that help enhance business resilience and youth entrepreneurship.    

 

Our priorities for contestable grants

The Upper Harbour Local Board welcomes grant applications that align with the local board plan priorities.  All applications will be measured on their merits and consideration will be given to initiatives that contribute to (in no order of priority):

·    Community participation and wellbeing.

·    Families

·    Newcomers

·    Sport and recreation

·    The environment

·    Youth

 

 

Eligibility

•     applicants with no legal structure applying for more than $1,000 must nominate an umbrella organisation or apply to have their funding released upon receipt of accountability.

•     initiatives must fit with at least one of the board’s priorities as stipulated in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan. (See the plan here: http://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/EN/AboutCouncil/representativesbodies/LocalBoards/Documents/upperharbourlocalboardplan.pdf)

•     preference will be given to initiatives which take place in the Upper Harbour Local Board area and/or are of benefit to Upper Harbour Local Board residents.

 

Exclusions

•     initiatives must not be a core service provided by central government (e.g. primary healthcare or education).

•     initiatives must not have already taken place before the board has the opportunity to consider the application (unless the board accepts there are genuine mitigating circumstances).

•     activities of debt repayment and promoting particular political goals are ineligible for funding

•     applicants must not have outstanding accountability obligations from previous council grants

•     applications for the same projects more than once in a financial year (excluding feasibility studies and concept planning)

•     activities that do not relate to one or more of the local board plan outcomes

 

Exclusions under the Community Grants Policy paragraph 86

•     Activities that promote religious ministry or political purposes

 

Lower priorities

•     legal costs, salaries and wages are deemed to be a low priority for funding.

•     schools and churches will only be funded if there is a significant community benefit.

 

Grants approach and application dates

The Upper Harbour Local Board has allocated budget within a limited funding envelope to support the communities needs through their grants programme. Communities are encouraged to consider all funding opportunities from a variety of funding agencies available to them.

 

 

Quick Response grants have a maximum amount per grant of $5,000.

Grant rounds for the 2022/2023 financial year will be as follows

 

2022/2023 grant rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Local Grant

Round one

04 July 2022

19 Aug 2022

8 Dec 2022

1 Jan 2023

Local Grant

Round Two

13 February 2023

31 March 2023

18 May 2023

1 June 2023

Quick Response

Round One

13 March 2023

14 April 2023

15 June 2023

1 July 2023

 

 

Multi-board funding

 

Upper Harbour Board will also consider funding multi-board grant applications in collaboration with other local boards. Applicants will need to clearly demonstrate how their intended project, event and/or activities will specifically benefit people and communities in the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

Multiboard grant rounds

Opens

Closes

Decision made

Projects to occur after

Round one

30 May 2022

8 July 2022

8 Dec 2022

1 Jan 2023

Round two

06 March 2023

07 April 2023

18 May 2023

1 June 2023

 

Obligations if you receive funding

 

In order to ensure that the Upper Harbour Local Board grant achieves positive results, recipients will be obligated to provide evidence that the assistance has been used for the agreed purpose and the stated outcomes have been achieved. Obligations will be outlined in a funding agreement that the applicant will be required to enter into.

 

The following accountability measures are required:

·    The completion and submission of accountability forms (including receipts), proving that grants have been used for the right purpose.

·    Any grant money that is unspent and not used for the project must be returned to the Upper Harbour Local Board.

·    Recognition of the Upper Harbour Local Board’s support of your initiative (e.g. using the Upper Harbour Local Board logo on promotional material).


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/05625

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

4.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

5.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)        increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)      tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

6.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[5]

7.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

8.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

9.       This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

10.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

11.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

12.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

13.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

14.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

15.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

16.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

17.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

18.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

 

 


 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

19.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

20.     It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

21.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

22.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

23.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[6]

24.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

25.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

26.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

27.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

28.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[7] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

29.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

30.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

31.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[8]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

32.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

33.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

34.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

35.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

 

 

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

36.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

37.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

38.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

39.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

40.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

41.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

42.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

43.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

44.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

45.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

46.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

47.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

48.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

49.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

50.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

51.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

52.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan


 

 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

53.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

54.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

·        Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

·        The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

55.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

56.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·     51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

·     59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

Description automatically generated

Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

Description automatically generated

People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 

Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 

Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 


28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

57.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

58.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

59.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

60.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

61.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

62.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

63.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

64.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

65.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

66.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

67.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

68.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

69.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

 

 

 


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

70.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

71.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

72.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

73.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

74.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

75.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

76.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

77.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

78.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

79.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

80.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

81.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

82.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

83.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

84.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

85.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

86.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

87.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

88.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Endorsing Business Improvement District (BID) targeted rate grant for 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/05540

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board endorsement to recommend that the Governing Body sets the targeted rate for Business North Harbour Business Improvement District (BID) programme for the 2022/2023 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Tāmaki Makaurau, where local business and property owners have agreed to work together to improve their business environment, encourage resilience and attract new businesses and customers.

3.       Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes, including Business North Harbour Incorporated, by collecting a targeted rate from commercial properties within a defined geographic area. The funds from the targeted rate are then provided by way of a BID target rate grant to the relevant business association.

4.       Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rates to the Governing Body.

5.       Each business association operating a BID programme sets the BID targeted rate grant amount at its Annual General Meeting (AGM) when members vote to approve an operational budget for the following financial year. This budget funds the implementation of a business plan that delivers programmes based on each association’s BID strategic priorities.

6.       Business North Harbour members approved a BID targeted rate grant sum of $732,403.52 for 2022/2023. This figure is an increase of 1% from the current financial year.

7.       The business associations operating BID programmes are incorporated societies that are independent of the council. However, to sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the business association and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

8.       For the council to be confident that the funds provided to the BID-operating business associations are being used appropriately, the council requires the BIDs to comply with the Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi), known as the BID Policy. 

9.       The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

10.     Staff are satisfied the Business North Harbour Incorporated sufficiently complies with the BID Policy.

11.     Staff propose the Upper Harbour Local Board receives this report and recommends to the Governing Body the striking (setting) of the BID targeted rate sought by Business North Harbour Incorporated as part of the council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023 decision-making.

12.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022. This enables Business North Harbour Incorporated to implement programmes that contribute to Outcome 5: A resilient local economy, thereby supporting the aspirations of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020.

13.     Upper Harbour’s BID programme, managed by the BID-operating business association, will continue to play an important role in supporting their members facing challenges from the pandemic. A BID programme can support local businesses to mitigate some of the flow-on effects from the lockdowns through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 for the following Business Improvement District (BID) programme:

i)        $732,403.52 for Business North Harbour Incorporated.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

BID programmes promote economic well-being and collaboration with the council

14.     The Auckland Council Growth Model 2021-2051 reports Tāmaki Makaurau is projected to include approximately 660,000 more people in the next 30 years. This level of population growth presents challenges and opportunities for Auckland town centres and commercial precincts.

15.     Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) are rohe within Auckland where local business and property owners have agreed to work together, with support from the council, to improve their business environment, promote innovation and attract new businesses and customers.

16.     The BID programme does not replicate services provided by the council but channels the capabilities and knowledge of the private sector to improve economic outcomes and achieve common goals.

17.     BID programmes provide the opportunity for the council group to support business associations to seize on the opportunities from Auckland’s growth. 

18.     BID programmes encourage collaboration to achieve greater local outcomes. They provide a mechanism to enable local boards to engage with the business sector in local town centres and business areas in a co-ordinated way.

BID programmes provide essential support in building business resilience

19.     The economy continues to be impacted by the flow-on effects from the pandemic and related lockdowns, affecting both retail-based town centres and industrial precincts.

20.     BID-operating business associations provide the local business leadership required to help their members to mitigate some of the economic effects of the pandemic through business resilience and recovery initiatives.

BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate on business ratepayers within a set area

21.     BID programmes are funded by a targeted rate applied to all commercially rated properties within a designated area around a town centre or commercial precinct.

22.     Auckland Council supports business associations operating BID programmes by collecting the targeted rates and providing these funds, in their entirety, by way of a BID grant to the relevant business association.

23.     This revenue is paid to the business association every quarter to provide a regular and sustainable income stream to implement an agreed work programme.

 

The BID Policy is the mechanism to ensure accountability for BID targeted rates

24.     Auckland Council’s Business Improvement District (BID) Policy (2016) (Kaupapa Here ā-Rohe Whakapiki Pakihi) ensures accountability for BID targeted rate funding and encourages good governance and programme management.

25.     The policy outlines the principles behind the council’s BID programme; creates the process for establishing, expanding, amalgamating and disestablishing BID programmes; determines rating mechanisms; prescribes operating standards and guidelines; and sets accountability requirements.

 

Diagram A: From calculation to approval, how the BID targeted rate is set.

Diagram

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The business association sets the BID targeted rate grant amount to deliver its work programme

26.       BID-operating business associations are provided with a rate modelling spreadsheet to help with their budget decision-making. The spreadsheet models any proposed changes to their current BID targeted rate grant amount and, most importantly, how that influences the BID targeted rate for everyone who will pay it. When considering a change to the BID grant amount, the association’s board must consider what the local business and property owners can afford.

27.     Each BID-operating business association prepares an annual business plan for the following financial year that will deliver programmes based on their strategic priorities and financial parameters.

28.     The cost of implementing that business plan is set out in an annual budget that the association’s board (governing committee) agrees will be recommended for approval by the business association membership.

29.     The AGM provides the forum where members vote to approve the operational budget and, in doing so, set the requisite BID targeted rate grant amount for the following financial year.

Local boards are responsible for recommending the BID targeted rate grant if a BID complies with the BID Policy

30.     Under the Auckland Council shared governance arrangements, local boards are allocated several decision-making responsibilities in relation to BID programmes. One of these is to annually recommend BID targeted rate grants to the Governing Body. The local board should recommend the setting of the targeted rate if it is satisfied that the BID is sufficiently complying with the BID Policy.

31.     The Upper Harbour Local Board approved a similar recommendation for the BID programme last year (resolution number UH/2021/54), as did 18 other local boards that have BID programmes operating in their rohe.

The Governing Body sets the BID targeted rate when it approves the Annual Budget

32.     The recommendation in this report is put into effect with the Governing Body’s approval of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and its striking (setting) of the targeted rates.

33.     In accordance with the provisions of the Local Government Act 2002 and the Local Government (Rating) Act 2002, the Governing Body is authorised to make the final decisions on what BID programme targeted rates, if any, to set in any particular year or property (in terms of the amount and the geographic area to be rated).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

34.     BID programmes are operated by independent business associations, and their programmes and services are provided according to their members’ stated priorities. In recognition of their independent status, the BID Policy does not prescribe standards for programme effectiveness. That is a matter for business association members to determine. Staff, therefore, cannot base recommendations on these factors, but only on the policy’s express requirements.

Business North Harbour Incorporated complies with the BID Policy

35.     Staff are satisfied that Business North Harbour Incorporated has sufficiently met the requirements of the BID Policy.

36.     Staff require BID-operating business associations to provide to the council the following documents, and stay in touch with their local board at least once a year:

·   Current strategic plan – evidence of achievable medium- to long-term opportunities.

·   Audited accounts – assurance that the BID-operating business association is managing its members’ BID targeted rate funds responsibly.

·   Annual report on the year just completed – evidence that programmes are addressing priority issues that benefit BID targeted ratepayers.

·   Business plan for the coming year – detailed one-year programme, based on the strategic plan, to be resourced and achieved.

·   Indicative budget for the following year – Auckland Council’s 10-year Budget 2021-2031 requires targeted rates to be identified a year in advance to inform the Annual Budget process which sets all rates.

·   Board Charter – establishes guidelines for effective board governance and positive relationships between the association and its members.

·   Annual Accountability Agreement – certification that these requirements have been met.

·   Programme Agreement – a good faith agreement between each BID-operating business association and the council that sets basic parameters of the council-business association relationship.

·   AGM minutes – the provisional minutes of each business association’s 2021 AGM meetings which contain the resolution, voted on by members, confirming the BID grant amount for the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

37.     In addition, BID-operating business associations are required to inform the council staff of progress with other compliance requirements, including:

·   Incorporated Society registration – a current registration of the business association along with all required documents up to date.

·   Resolving problems or issues, if any – problems or issues that have an impact on the governance or operation of the BID programme.

 

38.     The BID Policy sets an annual compliance deadline of 10 March for the information to be forwarded to the council, as summarised in the table below.

 

 

Table 1: Business association’s compliance with the BID Policy as of 10 March 2022

 

Requirement

Financial Year 2021/2022

 

Strategic Plan

2019-2023

Audited financials

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Report

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Business Plan

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Indicative budget

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Board Charter

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual Accountability Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Annual meeting w/ local board

17 March 2022

Programme Agreement

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Greenvalid to 2023

Incorporated society registration

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

2021 AGM minutes (provisional)

Tick, Mark, Ok, Perfect, Check, Done, Sign, Good, Green

Resolving problems or issues

Nothing to record

 

39.     As Business North Harbour Incorporated has sufficiently complied with the BID Policy, staff advise the local board to recommend to the Governing Body the setting of the targeted rate.

 

Business North Harbour Incorporated increased their BID grant amount for 2022/2023

40.     As shown in Table 2 below, Business North Harbour’s BID targeted rate for 2022/2023 - $732,403.52 – is an increase from the current financial year.

 

A Regional perspective

41.     Of Tāmaki Makaurau’s 50 BID-operating business associations, 26 increased their targeted rates with the percentage increase ranging from between 1.6% to 10% - for 2022/2023 while 24 BIDs maintained the fiscal status quo.

 

Table 2: BID targeted rates comparison: 2022/2023 c.f. 2021/2022

 

   BID

 

2021/2022

 

2021/2022

 

Increase / %

 

 

 

$732,403.52

 

 

 

$725,152

 

 

+$7,251.52 +1%

LAST INCREASED: 2020/2021

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

42.     Through targeted rate-funded advocacy and activities, BID-operating business associations, promote and often facilitate environmental sustainability programmes.

43.     BID programmes can impact on climate change through running carbon-reducing ‘shop local’ campaigns to promoting online channels and championing waste reduction and recovery programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     Advocacy is a key service provided by business associations and those with BID programme-funded personnel are at an advantage. BID-operating business associations ensure the views and ambitions of their members are provided to elected representatives and council teams, including CCOs, on those policies, plans, programmes and projects that impact them.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     The local board’s views are most frequently expressed by its appointed representative on the board of each BID-operating business association. This liaison board member (or alternates) can attend BID board meetings to ensure there is a direct link between the council and the operation of the BID programme.

46.     Each business association values its strong and enduring governance-to-governance relationship with their local board. The contributions by the local board’s BID appointees, alternatives and economic development portfolio-holders have, for many years, promoted mutual understanding, collaboration and aligned economic outcomes.

Visions, plans aligned

47.     The BID-operating business association and local board share an interest in the local rohe and are ambitious for its future and its people. They also share goals that include economic prosperity, community identity, placemaking and pride.

48.     The Business North Harbour BID programme tangibly support the vision and aspirations of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020, best expressed in Outcome 5: a resilient local economy.

Local rohe, local benefit, local funding

49.     Recommending that the Governing Body sets the targeted rate for Business North Harbour Incorporated means that the BID programme will continue to be funded from targeted rates on commercial properties within their respective rohe. They will provide services in accordance with its members’ priorities as stated in their members priorities as stated in their strategic plan.

50.     Upper Harbour Local Board is among several local boards which provides additional funding to local business associations, however accountability for any grants is set by funding agreements between the local board and each business association. Those contractual obligations are separate from the requirements of the BID Policy and are not covered in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     Māori make up more than 5.1% of the population living in the Upper Harbour Local Board area, compared to 11.5% of Auckland (SOURCE: 2018 CENSUS)Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their rohe.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     There are no financial implications for the local board. Targeted rates for BID-operating business associations are raised directly from commercial ratepayers in their district and used by the business association for improvements within that rohe. The council’s financial role is to collect the BID targeted rates and pass them directly to the association every quarter.

53.     The targeted rate is payable by the owners of the commercial properties within the geographic area of the individual BID programmes.  In practice, this cost is often passed on to the business owners who occupy these properties.

54.     If the Governing Body agrees with the BID targeted rates proposed by the local boards, the cost of grants will be met from the existing operational budget.

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     There are no direct financial risks to the local board or the council that could result from this recommendation to endorse the BID targeted rates for this business association.

56.     To sustain public trust and confidence in the council, there needs to be a balance between the independence of the BID-operating business associations and the accountability for monies collected by a public sector organisation.

57.     The rules and obligations of the BID Policy are intended to help minimise the potential for business associations to misuse BID targeted rate funds by requiring each BID to plan for their intended use, report on its activities to its members and to have its accounts audited.

58.     The council staff regularly monitor compliance with the BID Policy and this report is part of an active risk management programme to minimise inappropriate use of funds.

59.     Economic disruption created by the flow-on effects of the pandemic and lockdowns will continue to be felt, in Auckland’s town centres and business precincts. The BID programme is an internationally proven approach to engage and empower local businesses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

60.     If the local board supports this report, it will recommend to the Governing Body that the BID targeted rates be set as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

61.     After the Annual Budget is approved, the council collects the targeted rate funds and distributes them in quarterly BID targeted rate grant payments, effective from 1 July 2022, to Business North Harbour Incorporated. This enables the BID to implement programmes that improve their local business environment.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Gill Plume - BID Senior Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)

File No.: CP2022/05506

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022) including progress and completion of actions since 2015 and prioritisation of actions over the next three years.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) is a strategic document outlining how Auckland Council will invest in community facilities. It was approved by Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2015.

3.       The accompanying Action Plan prioritises actions and projects that will be undertaken to implement the CFNP. The CFNP contains criteria for identifying and prioritising actions. 

4.       Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions. The Action Plan was last updated in 2019.

5.       The Action Plan has been revised for 2022 using the methodology outlined in the CFNP. It contains 33 new actions.

6.       There are now 155 total actions in the Action Plan including:

·    65 completed actions

·    36 actions underway

·    50 actions to start

·    4 actions on hold.

7.       Implementation of priority actions within the revised Action Plan will initially focus on:

·    completing 36 actions that are already underway

·    starting four new area-based actions located in Investment Priority Areas

·    starting two network-wide strategic improvement actions.

8.       Feedback from local boards will be part of the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in August 2022 (when considering the adoption of the Action Plan).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)   support the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022), provided in Attachment A.

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

What is the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan?

9.       The Community Facilities Network Plan and its companion Action Plan were approved in 2015 by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (REG/2015/57).

10.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) guides the council’s investment in the provision of community facilities and services. It provides direction on the development of new facilities, major upgrades of existing facilities, optimisation, and potential divestment of facilities no longer meeting community needs.

11.     The CFNP addresses provision for:

·    arts and culture facilities

·    community centres

·    libraries

·    pools and leisure facilities

·    venues for hire (community or rural halls).

12.     The CFNP’s accompanying Action Plan prioritises projects to:

·    ensure existing facilities are fit for purpose

·    address gaps or duplication in provision and needs for community facilities

·    meet future demand arising from population growth and changing users’ expectations.

13.     Together the CFNP and its companion Action Plan support council’s goal to focus community service investment on:

·    quality over quantity

·    addressing service gaps where growth is significant

·    improving portfolio performance.

The Action Plan is revised every three years

14.     Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions.

15.     The Action Plan was last reviewed in 2018 and adopted by the Environment and Community Committee in April 2019 (ENV/2019/47).

16.     Progress on the Action Plan is reported annually to the relevant committees. The last update was provided to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in November 2021 (PAC/2021/58).

17.     A summary of progress on the revised 2022 Action Plan is provided in Attachment B. It shows that 65 actions are completed, 36 actions are underway, 50 actions have not started, and 4 actions are on hold.

Actions are structured by category, theme and progress 

18.     There are three categories and two themes of actions in the Action Plan (refer Table 1).

Table 1: CFNP Action Plan categories

19.     The 2022 Action Plan presents actions in two parts.

·    Part A – new actions (identified since the last review) and actions carried over from the previous review which have not been started.

·    Part B – actions underway at the time of the review and previously completed actions.

Departments work together to identify business and strategic improvement actions

20.     The development of new business and strategic improvements involved Community & Social Policy, Community Facilities, and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships. These departments worked together to support quality advice and to improve the way we plan and prioritise delivery of community services.

The identification of area-based actions follows a set process

21.     The process for the development of area-based actions in Part A of the 2022 Action Plan is set by the CFNP and shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Review process for 2022 CFNP Action Plan

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22.     Potential area-based actions for Part A were identified from a range of sources:

·    political resolutions requesting the addition of items to the Action Plan

·    work arising from completed actions in the Action Plan 2019

·    the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

·    local board plan initiatives and work programmes

·    input from business intelligence and across the Auckland Council organisation

·    actions not started in the Action Plan 2019.

Area-based actions are prioritised through the weighting of network, community, and building criteria

23.     Once identified, the master list of area-based actions was assessed based on the prioritisation criteria outlined in section 5.2 of the CFNP (refer Table 2).

Table 2: Prioritisation criteria for area-based actions as defined by the CFNP

24.     The tools used to conduct the assessment included population data, geospatial information, asset condition information, and in some instances needs assessments and business cases.

The priorities in the CFNP Action Plan guide the focus of our resources

25.     The impact of Covid-19 and the resulting economic slow-down has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. The 10-year Budget (Recovery Budget), adopted 29 June 2021, highlights:

·    a tight fiscal environment for the immediate future

·    the need to reduce capital expenditure across the council family

·    reprioritisation of projects

·    the unsustainability of maintaining the current community facility network while meeting the needs of growing and changing communities.

26.     The ‘focused investment’ approach for community investment, adopted as part of the 10-year Budget, means we must focus on renewing priority assets, reducing our asset portfolio, expanding provision of tailored/alternative service delivery models and exploring partnership opportunities.

27.     The approach for community investment supports the direction of the CFNP and in this constrained environment, priority actions determined by the criteria in the CFNP are guiding the focus of our resources.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The revised CFNP Action Plan 2022

28.     The revised Action Plan 2022 is provided in Attachment A.

29.     Table 3 shows the distribution of all actions in the Action Plan 2022 and progress of actions since the Community Facilities Network Plan was adopted in 2015.

Table 3: Summary of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan

30.     Attachment B shows the progress status of the revised 2022 Action Plan, as well as the distribution of actions across local boards, service type and priority status.

31.     The progress being made on actions demonstrates staff’s commitment to focusing resources on a collectively agreed and mandated programme of work, as well as the commitment to delivering agreed priorities in a constrained environment.

The focus of the CFNP Action Plan work programme 2022/2023

32.     The focus of next year’s work will be towards completing priority actions that; are already in progress, are located in Investment Priority Areas (identified in the 10-year Budget) or are strategic improvements with a network-wide reach (refer Table 4).

33.     This focus ensures our effort is scalable and our advice about investment in community facilities is more effective. The efficiency created will allow us to concentrate on the priority actions that have not yet been started.

Table 4: Summary of proposed work programme for 2022/2023

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Consideration of climate impact happens at a project level. There are no direct climate impacts arising from this report on the action plan.

35.     Future detailed business cases will include application of the Community Facilities – Sustainable Asset Policy. The regional policy, the first of three phases under the council’s Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS), commits council to:

·    achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development

·    achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on the development of all new assets with a budget over $10 million

·    incorporate decarbonisation principles into guideline documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets.

36.     The assessment of climate impacts in investigations and business cases will improve by applying learnings from across the organisation in its responsiveness to climate change. Staff will also seek to understand the allowances that need to be made to meet climate impact targets for Action Plan projects related to the development of new facilities, or the improvement of existing facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     During the development of the Action Plan 2022 input has been sought from the following departments:

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

·    Local Board Services

·    Parks Sports and Recreation

·    Financial and Business Performance

·    Connected Communities

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy.

38.     Delivery of the Action Plan 2022 is resourced by council’s Community & Social Policy and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships teams subject to capacity. Individual actions are delivered with participation from other departments and, where relevant, Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Local boards provided feedback on direction and specific content during the development of the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan prior to adoption in 2015. 

40.     Key initiatives from local board plans (2020) were an input of the review process for the development of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan (refer Figure 1).

41.     The CFNP’s prioritisation criteria applies the highest weighting of 15 per cent to local board priority to ensure local board’s views influence the overall assessment of actions. 

42.     Progressing area-based actions are reflected in relevant local board work programmes. Local boards provide feedback and input throughout the investigations and have decision making responsibilities as per schedule the 10-year Budget 2021-31

43.     Decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within funding parameters set by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The Community Facilities Network Plan outlines, in Section 2.2, how it will deliver on Māori outcomes. These outcomes include:

·    engage with Māori organisations to understand Māori expectations and investigate the community needs of Māori groups, and factor this into decision-making for community facilities

·    actively engage and consult to ensure the planning, development, and operations of facilities consider Māori needs and aspirations

·    work closely with Māori groups and key stakeholders, including local iwi, to develop appropriate cultural programmes to be delivered through facilities

·    investigate Māori demographic participation and usage trends, identifying opportunities to increase the attendance and use of facilities by Māori and developing appropriate business responses

·    provide visual representations of commitment to Māori to tell stories of their connections to the place (such as signage) and honouring tikanga

·    ensure that, in any exploration of potential future sites for facilities, Māori concerns about wāhi tapu are incorporated.

45.     Engagement with Māori is included as part of investigations and continues through the planning and delivery of responses. Examples include:

·    interviews and hui with mana whenua

·    interviews and hui with mataawaka in local settings to understand community needs

·    workshops and focus groups with local marae

·    intercept surveys with representative samples of the Māori population base

·    kanohi ki te kanohi interviews conducted in Te Reo Māori.

 

46.     Feedback provided from Māori is specific to the nature of the investigation for which the engagement occurred. This feedback is used to inform the delivery of options and responses.

47.     Staff will work with other relevant parts of the council to ensure effective engagement with Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     There are currently no identified financial implications for the delivery of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022 as work is delivered utilising existing resources.

49.     Investment decisions and associated funding implications are reported separately to the relevant decision-maker(s).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     There is a risk that development of the Action Plan 2022 may not match local board priorities, as implementation of the Action Plan involves understanding service needs and taking a network view. This risk is mitigated by:

·    continuing to socialise and reinforce the strategic objectives of the CFNP to elected members, key staff, and through all deliverables 

·    clarifying local board plans were reviewed and any potential community service-related content was considered for potential inclusion as an action

·    including One Local Initiative projects into the Action Plan 2022.

51.     There is financial risk that:

·    budget allocated in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 may be insufficient to deliver some of the action findings

·    the need for significant new investment identified from actions will be challenging due to the impact Covid-19 has had on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity

·    some investigations may require changes to the funding identified in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

52.     This financial risk is mitigated by:

·    ensuring investigations include looking at options for funding other than rates or debt

·    ensuring findings of investigations that require new investment are supported by indicative business cases

·    managing expectations by acknowledging budget constraints

·    managing expectations by acknowledging the delegation for decision-making on investment in new facilities is held by the Governing Body and is considered as part of long-term planning (decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within parameters set by the Governing Body).

53.     There is a timing risk that delivery of actions may take longer because of reduced operational capacity and may not align with elected members and/or local communities’ expectations.  This risk is mitigated by driving delivery to meet targeted timeframes for priority actions and managing expectations based on the principles and direction set by the CFNP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Local board resolutions will be included in the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider adoption of the Action Plan in August 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP)

127

b

Attachment B - Focus of Community Facilities Action Plan 2022

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Williams - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Angela Clarke - Head of Service Investment & Programming

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2022/05691

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on Phase Three (previously called Tranche 2B) of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport-related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe and appropriate speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. Evidence from changes made in 2020 demonstrates that safe and appropriate speed limits are effective in reducing road trauma.

4.       Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and recently completed public consultation on proposed Phase Three changes with the community. A list of changes proposed within this local board area is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Public consultation on changes proposed in Phase Three closed on 3 April 2022 and a summary of public responses is provided as Attachment B. Local boards are now invited to provide their feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on speed limit changes proposed as part of Phase Three of Auckland Transport’s Safe Speeds Programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use.

Alignment with Central Government Policy

7.       Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.


 

 

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

8.       Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

9.       Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the Auckland Transport Board, Auckland Transport has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speed limits on many roads.

10.     In this phase, the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools, high-risk rural roads, rural marae, and roads requested by the community.

11.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Phase Three took place from 28 February - 3 April 2022, and included the following measures:

·    flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes near roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

·    advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist, and ethnic media

·    radio advertising on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    radio interviews and adlibs on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

·    media releases

·    social media campaigns

·    an article published in OurAuckland

·    translation of consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Braille and NZ Sign Language

·    flyers, posters and hardcopy FreePost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

·    15 online webinars, including a Mandarin language webinar

·    a community drop-in session on Aotea Great Barrier.

12.     The community was able to provide their thoughts via a number of channels:

·    online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

·    a paper survey

·    a web-based mapping tool

·    emails direct to the Safe Speeds Programme Team

·    at public hearings held on 6 April 2022.

13.     Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May (Attachment B) and now have the opportunity to provide feedback on Phase Three proposed speed limit changes within their local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Transport manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. This includes setting speed limits, and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted Auckland Transport has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and local boards.

15.     Auckland Transport’s first phase of reviewing and setting new speed limits was developing the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) that enabled AT to set new speed limits for Auckland’s highest risk roads.

16.     The impact of the changes made in this bylaw have been significant and support the claim that by setting safe and appropriate speed limits in Auckland, we reduce community harm.

17.     Since 30 June 2020, in areas where speed limits were changed, fatal crashes have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) during the 18-month period since this action was taken.[9]

18.     This change was most significant on rural roads where roads with reduced speed limits recorded a 71 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and more than a 25 per cent reduction in serious injury crashes.

19.     In selected locations, speed limit changes are complemented by physical speed calming measures such as speed bumps, raised pedestrian crossings, kerb changes and road marking. These physical measures help reinforce the safe and appropriate speed limits and assist with pedestrians and cyclists crossing busy roads. Physical measures are installed based upon risk, with a focus on locations such as town centres, residential areas and roads near schools.

20.     It will take time to confirm that these trends are sustained, however this initial impact is promising and indicates the effectiveness of the ‘Vision Zero’ approach. Overseas data records a similar impact on harm reduction and Auckland Transport’s advice to local boards is that the programme is working and should be supported.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     In town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced during Phase One of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of people saying they now participate in at least one active mode (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Auckland Transport has held workshops with local boards throughout the various phases of the Safe Speeds programme.

25.     Summaries of local submissions on changes proposed in Phase Three were provided to local boards in early May to inform their consideration of this topic.

26.     This report seeks feedback from the local board on the proposed speed limit changes within Phase Three of the Safe Speeds Programme. Local board feedback will be reviewed and considered by our Safe Speeds team to inform the final speed change recommendation to the Auckland Transport Board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

28.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website at https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

29.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

30.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The Safe Speeds Programme is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

31.     Engagement with iwi at the AT northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui took place on the wider programme during 2021, and in early 2022 to introduce the Interim Speed Management Plan. Detailed engagement with individual rural marae as part of Phase Three commenced mid-2021 and is ongoing, with each marae typically requiring a tailored approach that takes into account localised safety issues.

32.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of Phase Three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme this programme has considerable financial implications.

34.     In 2017, the social cost of road harm in Auckland was about $1.1 billion.[10] These costs are paid by all Aucklanders. There is the cost of health care for those injured and - for some - lifetime rehabilitation and support. There is a cost to families, businesses and the region of those who can no longer live and work as they did before due to road deaths and serious injuries.

35.     Reducing the harm caused by road accidents impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that local boards represent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    The consultation length was extended from four to five weeks.

·    The number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased.

·    Digital advertising spend was increased and included Mandarin language public webinars and social media advertising.

37.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force at the end of November 2022.

39.     The November 2022 date may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept up to date if any changes are made.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Upper Harbour Local Board - Proposed speed limit changes - Phase 3. (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Attachment B - Safe Speed Programme public feedback on proposed speed limit changes March/April 2022. (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annie Ferguson – Communications and Engagement, Auckland Transport

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Members Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Nathan Cammock – Programme Dircetor, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Governance forward work calendar

File No.: CP2022/05197

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the updated governance forward work calendar for May 2022 – July2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A to the agenda report. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars were introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Upper Harbour Local Board governance forward work calendar for May 2022 – July 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance forward work calendar May 2022-July 2022

155

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Workshop records

File No.: CP2022/05198

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 14 and 28 April and 5 May 2022. Copies of the workshop records are attached (refer to Attachments A, B, and C).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the Upper Harbour Local Board workshops held on Thursday 14 and 28 April and 5 May 2022 (refer to Attachments A, B, and C to the agenda report).

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 14 April 2022.

159

b

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 28 April 2022.

163

c

Upper Harbour Local Board record of workshop - 5 May 2022.

165

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport - West Hub Bulletin - May 2022

File No.: CP2022/05479

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin for May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin for May 2022 for the Upper Harbour Local Board is in Attachment A of the agenda report.

3.       The Auckland Transport West Hub Bulletin is a monthly update to keep the local board informed about what is happening in the local board area during the previous month and about plans in the future. It includes:

·     information about current projects being undertaken in the local board area.

·     a list of projects that are being consulted on.

·     other transport related information about the local board area.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport West Harbour Bulletin for May 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board - West Hub Bulletin - May 2022.

169

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

19 May 2022

 

 

Local Board Members' Reports - May 2022

File No.: CP2022/06164

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Upper Harbour Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Upper Harbour Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the verbal and written local board members reports.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Max Wilde - Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 



[1] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, section 15(2)(c).

[2] Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009, ss15-16.

[3] Known as the WASP hangar for its historical use to house Wasp Helicopters in the 1940s and 1950s.

[4] Local Government Act 2002, Schedule 7, clause 36D.

[5] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[6] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[7] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[8] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy

[9] Annual figures for the 18-month period 30 June 2020 to 31 December 2021, when compared to the prior five-year baseline period.

[10] https://www.transport.govt.nz/statistics-and-insights/safety-annual-statistics/sheet/social-cost-of-road-crashes