I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 25 May 2022

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kylee Matthews

 

Members

Robin Tucker

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Dileeka Senewiratne

Democracy Advisor

 

20 May 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 840 914

Email: dileeka.senewiratne@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation - Golf New Zealand - Concerns regarding Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan                                                                                                    5

8.2     Deputation - Pam Oliver - Submission re stormwater drainage management    6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       9

12        Chairperson's report                                                                                                   21

13        Auckland Transport Report - May 2022                                                                    27

14        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes 33

15        Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 4 May 2022                                          299

16        Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report:Waiheke Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022                                                                                                          307

17        Waiheke Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023                                            355

18        Waiheke Local and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations 367

19        Draft Auckland golf investment plan                                                                       461

20        Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)                          501

21        Ngā Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa - New Zealand Geographic Board: recording of unofficial place names as official - Update                                                             531

22        Submission on Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan                                                                                                          533

23        Community Forum record of proceedings                                                             561

24        Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings                                      571

25        List of resource consent applications - 3 April to 7 May 2022                             581

26        Local board governance forward work calendar - June 2022 update                 587

27        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal) - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring the calm, bring all things good, bring peace… good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its additional meeting, Wednesday, 11 May 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

Acknowledgements will be considered at the board meeting.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Golf New Zealand - Concerns regarding Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the deputation from Golf New Zealand regarding the Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board have received a deputation request from Golf New Zealand regarding concerns about the Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan.

 

 

Te tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank representatives of Golf New Zealand for their attendance and presentation on the Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan.

 

Attachments

a          Deputation - Golf New Zealand - Concerns regarding Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan supporting material.................................................... 595

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Pam Oliver - Submission re stormwater drainage management

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To consider the deputation from Pam Oliver regarding stormwater drainage management.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board has received a deputation request regarding stormwater drainage management. Submission received can be found under Attachment A.

 

 

Te tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      thank Pam Oliver for her attendance and presentation regarding stormwater drainage management.

 

Attachments

a          Deputation - Pam Oliver - Submission re stormwater management supporting material....................................................................................... 597

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2022/06125

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom’s update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor's Update - May 2022

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2022/06127

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson, Cath Handley’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's Update - May 2022

23

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport Report - May 2022

File No.: CP2022/06128

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waiheke Local Board an update of May 2022 on transport related matters.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

This report covers:

2.       A general summary of operational projects and activities of interest to the Waiheke Local Board.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport May 2022 update.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report monthly to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the Waiheke Local Board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

6.       The current amount of funding proposed in the Regional Land Transport Plan is $400,000 per annum.

7.       The unspent budget of $71,493.50 from 2020/2021 is carried forward for the board to allocate as they see fit providing a total fund available for 2021/2022 of $471,493.50.

8.       The local board have prioritised four projects (WHK/2022/49) and asked AT to scope and provide a rough order of costs to determine what can best be achieved with the funds available to them. These projects are generally planned to fit in with future resealing programmes.

9.       AT is due to provide the scope and costing to the local board to enable them to approve the funding at the June business meeting.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

10.     The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

11.     This project is to provide a separated sealed shoulder from the Yacht Club to Shelly Beach Rd.            

12.     A planning specialist who is experienced with coastal work on the island has been engaged by the project team to:

·    Prepare plan showing proposed sealed shoulder over the topographical survey and the Mean High Water Spring line.

·    Design retaining structures where required (Reviewed by a Coastal Engineer) and finalise draft detailed design.

·    Start preliminary discussions with Auckland Council and start preparing Land Use and Coastal Permit application

·    Meet with Auckland Council Arborist to finalise tree consent and Tree Owner Approval process

·    Undertake Mana Whenua consultation.

13.     Indicative timelines will be provided upon completion of the initial planning discussions with Auckland Council.

Update on Auckland Transport operations:

14.     The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their status. Please note that:

·    All timings are indicative and are subject to change.

·    The Waiheke Operations Manager will update the local board in the event of any amendments or changes to the summaries provided for below.

Activity

Update

EV chargers

AT is working on the approval for applications from Vector (on behalf of Electric Island) for the installation of new EV charging stations in Orapiu and Onetangi.

 

Road Maintenance

Programmed works

May works includes routine cyclic maintenance of signs, drains and potholes.

Various Roadworks sites

Man O War Bay Road – ongoing unsealed road improvements

South Pacific Road (Rakino Island) – grading

Onetangi Road - cycle way remarking

Glen Brook Road (Rocky Bay) – retaining wall repair (boat ramp access)

O’Brien Road, Lannan Road, George Street – hotmix overlays – stop/go in place

102 Ostend Road.

Placemakers Corner

Design works are being completed to improve safety at the Placemakers / Ostend Road intersection. Improvements include widening the vehicle entrance into the centre, and provision of new line marking to move vehicles travelling westbound away from the shoulder. The new edge line provides an improved amenity for cyclists traveling westbound up the hill. New “Slow” marking and a VMS sign is planned to be installed at the end of the straight on the approach to the intersection.

The proposal is due to be presented to the ELT for approval at an upcoming meeting.

Metro Services

Financial accounts

HGI Wharves July 2021 to March 2022

 

Revenue ($000)                                 1,021

 

Expenditure

Maintenance                           186

Other operating costs             209

Depreciation                            1,150

Capex

Renewal                                              1,950

Personnel costs – direct         241

Administrative costs                64

Total Expenditure                 3,798

 

Surplus / (deficit)                                (2,777)

 

Items to note:

Renewals of $1,95m for Matiatia: wharf upgrade, new pontoon & gangway works and enabling works (backup berth).

Renewals of $22k for Rakino wharf design.

Te Huruhi School pedestrian crossing

The proposal is for a new pedestrian crossing to be constructed outside the school.

The project is on the ELT agenda for 13th May 2022 and if approved, external consultation will open for public feedback before end of May.

Upon completion of external consultation, the final design will be completed, whereafter procurement of a suitable contractor will take place to undertake the physical works.

Metro Services

Ferry Services

COVID restrictions continued to impact on patronage during March, but numbers held up well partly due to Sculpture on the Gulf.

 

Service performance in March for Fullers360 continued to be impacted by staff availability across all their routes. This was because of general on-board crew shortages.

 

Intersection upgrade - Donald Bruce Rd/Causeway Rd/Alison Rd

 

This project is for the construction of a new roundabout at the Donald Bruce Rd/Causeway Rd/Alison Rd intersection in Surfdale.

Scope of the project includes raised Swedish speed tables, changes to the traffic islands to accommodate new raised zebra crossings, footpath upgrades, pedestrian crossing lighting, and new road markings and signage.

1.         Works commenced on site 11 April.

2.         Traffic flow is now controlled by sensor lights 24/7 with the traffic management setup planned to shift to the next stage.

3.         We acknowledge there were issues with the width of the lanes for bus and truck tracking when the fencing was shifted in the first week of May. This was rectified by the contractor after this was brought to our attention and is a lesson learned that will be carried over to the next stages to avoid the issue repeating.  

4.         We are on track to switch over to the second stage in the week of the 23rd May. The switchover will be to the Alison Rd / Causeway Rd section. Photos below are from the week ending 6 May 2022.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

16.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

5.        Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20.     There are no financial implications of receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all their projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board at a future business meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard La Ville – Operations Manager – Waiheke and Gulf Islands Airfields – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

John Strawbridge – Group Manager Parking Services and Compliance – Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's proposed speed limit changes

File No.: CP2022/05869

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on Phase Three (previously called Tranche 2B) of Auckland Transport’s proposed speed limit changes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Auckland Council and Auckland Transport have adopted the Vision Zero goal of eliminating road transport-related deaths and serious injuries (DSI) within the Auckland road network by 2050.

3.       Setting safe and appropriate speed limits that recognise the function, safety, design, and layout of roads is a fast and cost-effective way to reduce DSI. Evidence from changes made in 2020 demonstrates that safe and appropriate speed limits are effective in reducing road trauma.

4.       Auckland Transport is conducting a phased review of speed limits and recently completed public consultation on proposed Phase Three changes with the community. A list of changes proposed within this local board area is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Public consultation on changes proposed in Phase Three closed on 3 April 2022 and a summary of public responses is provided as Attachment B. Local boards are now invited to provide their feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on speed limit changes proposed as part of Phase Three of Auckland Transport’s Safe Speeds Programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Auckland Transport (AT) is Auckland’s road controlling authority. Part of this role is reviewing and ensuring that speed limits across Auckland are set at levels that are safe and appropriate for road function, safety, design, and their use.

Alignment with Central Government Policy

7.       Waka Kotahi New Zealand Transport Agency adopted a ‘Vision Zero’ approach to road safety in 2019 when it launched the ‘Road to Zero’ national strategy that aims to reduce the number of people killed and injured on New Zealand’s roads to zero by 2050.

Alignment with Auckland Council Policy

8.       Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

9.       Since receiving endorsement from Auckland Council and from the Auckland Transport Board, Auckland Transport has progressively reviewed roads across Auckland and reduced speed limits on many roads.

10.     In this phase, the focus has been on town centres, roads near schools, high-risk rural roads, rural marae, and roads requested by the community.

11.     Public consultation on the Safe Speeds Programme Phase Three took place from 28 February - 3 April 2022, and included the following measures:

a)   flyer mailout to 340,257 properties and PO Boxes near roads where changes to speed limits are proposed

b)   advertising in the NZ Herald, community newspapers, specialist, and ethnic media

c)   radio advertising on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

d)   radio interviews and adlibs on Niu FM, Radio Samoa and Radio Waatea

e)   media releases

f)    social media campaigns

g)   an article published in OurAuckland

h)   translation of consultation materials into Te Reo Māori, Braille and NZ Sign Language

i)    flyers, posters and hardcopy FreePost feedback forms in multiple languages to every library and service centre in Auckland

j)    15 online webinars, including a Mandarin language webinar

k)   a community drop-in session on Aotea Great Barrier.

12.     The community was able to provide their thoughts via a number of channels:

a)   online via http://AT.govt.nz/haveyoursay

b)   a paper survey

c)   a web-based mapping tool

d)   emails direct to the Safe Speeds Programme Team

e)   at public hearings held on 6 April 2022.

13.     Local boards received localised reports on public feedback in early May (Attachment B) and now have the opportunity to provide feedback on Phase Three proposed speed limit changes within their local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Transport manages more than 7,300 kilometres of roads for Auckland Council. This includes setting speed limits, and since ‘Vision Zero’ was adopted Auckland Transport has been progressively reviewing and amending speed limits. Changes have been made only after engaging with both the community and local boards.

15.     Auckland Transport’s first phase of reviewing and setting new speed limits was developing the Speed Limits Bylaw 2019 (under the Land Transport Act 1998) that enabled AT to set new speed limits for Auckland’s highest risk roads.

16.     The impact of the changes made in this bylaw have been significant and support the claim that by setting safe and appropriate speed limits in Auckland, we reduce community harm.

17.     Since 30 June 2020, in areas where speed limits were changed, fatal crashes have almost halved (down by 47 per cent) during the 18-month period since this action was taken.[1]

18.     This change was most significant on rural roads where roads with reduced speed limits recorded a 71 per cent reduction in fatal crashes and more than a 25 per cent reduction in serious injury crashes.

19.     In selected locations, speed limit changes are complemented by physical speed calming measures such as speed bumps, raised pedestrian crossings, kerb changes and road marking. These physical measures help reinforce the safe and appropriate speed limits and assist with pedestrians and cyclists crossing busy roads. Physical measures are installed based upon risk, with a focus on locations such as town centres, residential areas and roads near schools.

20.     It will take time to confirm that these trends are sustained, however this initial impact is promising and indicates the effectiveness of the ‘Vision Zero’ approach. Overseas data records a similar impact on harm reduction and Auckland Transport’s advice to local boards is that the programme is working and should be supported.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The primary climate change benefit of safe and appropriate speed limits is that they support and encourage greater take-up of walking, cycling and micromobility by reducing the risk to vulnerable road users, making these modes more attractive. This supports emissions reductions.

22.     In town centres where speed limits were reduced and safety improvements introduced during Phase One of speed limit changes, there has been strong positive feedback, with 19 per cent of people saying they now participate in at least one active mode (e.g., walking or cycling) more often since the projects have been completed. This is a direct contribution towards encouraging people to walk or cycle instead of using cars that produce carbon emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Auckland Council is committed to road safety. The Auckland Plan envisages a transport network free of deaths and serious injuries by 2050. AT deliver the council’s policies in relation to transport. AT developed ‘Vision Zero for Tāmaki Makaurau’ in response to goals within the Auckland Plan and with the council’s Planning Committee’s direction (Resolution number PLA/2018/83).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Auckland Transport has held workshops with local boards throughout the various phases of the Safe Speeds programme.

25.     Summaries of local submissions on changes proposed in Phase Three were provided to local boards in early May to inform their consideration of this topic.

26.     This report seeks feedback from the local board on the proposed speed limit changes within Phase Three of the Safe Speeds Programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsive to and inclusive of Māori.

28.     AT’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua iwi in Auckland to deliver effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions. AT also recognises mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website at https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

29.     Safe speeds make our roads safer for active road users, which encourages more people to walk, cycle and use public transport. Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau is the well-being framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. Safer roads contribute to more people walking or cycling, which in turn supports this framework developed by Mana Whenua.

30.     Waka Kotahi’s 2021 study ‘He Pūrongo Whakahaumaru Huarahi Mō Ngā Iwi Māori – Māori Road Safety Outcomesprovides data demonstrating that Māori are disproportionately more likely to be hurt or killed on New Zealand roads. The Safe Speeds Programme is expected to result in significant positive impacts for Auckland’s Māori communities.

31.     Engagement with iwi at the AT northern, central and southern transport kaitiaki hui took place on the wider programme during 2021, and in early 2022 to introduce the Interim Speed Management Plan. Detailed engagement with individual rural marae as part of Phase Three commenced mid-2021 and is ongoing, with each marae typically requiring a tailored approach that takes into account localised safety issues.

32.     Mana whenua are, in general, supportive of the Safe Speeds Programme and positive safety, community and environmental outcomes arising through safe and appropriate speed limits. There is in particular strong engagement and support for the rural marae workstream which forms part of Phase Three.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     Although there are no specific financial implications arising from local boards providing feedback on the Safe Speeds Programme this programme has considerable financial implications.

34.     In 2017, the social cost of road harm in Auckland was about $1.1 billion.[2] These costs are paid by all Aucklanders. There is the cost of health care for those injured and - for some - lifetime rehabilitation and support. There is a cost to families, businesses and the region of those who can no longer live and work as they did before due to road deaths and serious injuries.

35.     Reducing the harm caused by road accidents impacts on the community by reducing hospital costs, insurance costs and Accident Compensation Corporation costs all of which are of direct financial benefit to the communities that local boards represent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     Delays due to Covid-19 and lockdown in the Auckland Region have added complexity to both public consultation and implementation timelines. The following measures were undertaken to ensure a quality engagement process:

·    The consultation length was extended from four to five weeks.

·    The number of online events during the consultation was significantly increased.

·    Digital advertising spend was increased and included Mandarin language public webinars and social media advertising.

37.     Steps have also been taken to ensure flexibility in the implementation timeline.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     The new speed limits are proposed to come into force at the end of November 2022.

39.     The November 2022 date may need to be revised due to the impacts of Covid-19 and to take into account consultation feedback. Local boards will be kept up to date if any changes are made.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Waiheke Local Board - Proposed speed limit changes - phase 3

39

b

Attachment B - Safe Speeds Programme Public feedback on proposed speed limit changes March/April 2022

45

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Annie Ferguson – Communications and Engagement, Auckland Transport

Ben Stallworthy – Elected Member Relationship Partner, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Nathan Cammock – Programme Director – Auckland Transport

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 4 May 2022

File No.: CP2022/06130

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To present an update and minutes from the business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum (the forum) held on 4 May 2022 to the Waiheke Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   The business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum was held on 4 May 2022 and minutes are included as Attachment A.

1.         The following items were discussed:

i.        Presentation on Climate Change Aspects of the Waiheke Climate Action Plan - Mark Inglis.

ii.       Transport Capital Projects – Mark Inglis.

iii.      Matiatia Landside Improvements Workshop – Grant Crawford, Robin Tucker, Richard La Ville.

iv.      Media coverage of the Forum meetings – Grant Crawford.

v.       Discussion Draft Parking Strategy – Grant Crawford.

vi.      Update from Board Members, ½ price fares, ongoing local board advocacy on Public Transport Operating Model – Robin Tucker.

vii.     Discussion about sleepers on seawardside between Onetangi 2 and 3rd Avenue to to enable improved pedestrian safety and access and protect side berm – Robin Tucker.

viii.    Note concerns raised by Cycle Action Waiheke about not being approached early in design of Causeway and Donald Bruce Roundabout improvements – Norm Robins.

 

3.   request the Waiheke Local Board ask Auckland Transport to ensure that Cycle Action Waiheke, as key stakeholders, are engaged early in roading projects so as they have opportunity to influence potential for improved cycling related outcomes.

           

2.          

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         note the minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum business meeting dated 4 

         May 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

4 May 2022 - Waiheke Transport Forum Minutes

301

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Auckland Council’s Quarterly Performance Report:Waiheke Local Board for quarter three 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/06476

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Waiheke Local Board with an integrated quarterly performance report for quarter three, 1 January – 31 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report includes financial performance, progress against work programmes, key challenges the board should be aware of and any risks to delivery against the 2021/2022  work programme.

3.       The work programme is produced annually and aligns with Waiheke Local Board Plan outcomes.

4.       The key activity updates from this quarter are:

·        Climate Action Programme (ID 732): The Climate Activator role is now appointed. The activator will drive implementation of the Waiheke Climate Action Plan including investment to support collaboration and amplify low carbon community action.

·        Catherine Mitchell Cottage - comprehensive renewal (ID 26682): The comprehensive renewal of Catherine Mitchell Cottage was completed during this quarter. This included re-piling and leveling the floor, insulation and ventilation installation, weatherboard replacement, balustrade replacement, renew fire alarms to meet building code, water proofing of shower and laundry tub.

·        Kayaks / Dinghies on beaches: The campaign for watercraft removal from beaches commenced in March. The Enclosure Bay campaign was deemed a success with only five vessels remaining after the deadline.

·        Island Bay Track, 80 Korora Road, Oneroa (ID 19879): Works commenced during this quarter including the construction of new stairs, a short section of boardwalk and gravel path to reinstate a section of the Owhanake Matiatia Walkway that was damaged by a landslip.  Works are now complete and the track reopened in April.

5.       All operating departments with agreed work programmes have provided a quarterly update against their work programme delivery. Activities are reported with a status of green (on track), amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed) or grey (cancelled, deferred or merged). The following activities are reported with a status of red (behind delivery, significant risk):

·        Swimming pool development fund (ID3103): This activity is on hold until the Feasibility Study for Swimming Pool project is completed.

·        Onetangi Sports Park - install lighting & upgrade to sand carpet on field 3 (ID23915): Concept design is complete, and the design is being revised to align water consumption with bore capacity. Growth funding has been deferred into future years and therefore the project has been deferred.

·        Conservation Advocate (ID794): Recruitment for the Conservation Advocate was initially delayed due to COVID-19. Due to this delay a carry forward request of $5,000 is expected which has resulted in a red status. The position has now been appointed.

·        Little Oneroa - Upper Catchment Restoration Programme (ID727): This project will not be able to be completed this financial year as the consent process to repair specific drainage issues has taken longer than anticipated. It is intended this project will be funded at a regional level for 2022/2023.

6.       There are 29 activities reported as amber (some risk or issues, which are being managed). These are primarily due to delays related to COVID-19. All are being managed however there is a risk some activities may not achieve all programmed outcomes by the end of the financial year. 

7.       Overall operating result for nine months of the year is tracking at 63 per cent of the budget due to higher revenue and lower expenditure. Operating revenue is 112 per cent above budget while expenditure is below budget by $1.9 million as delays in work programmes and rescheduling of projects until later in the year resulted in lower operating spend. Capital delivery was $876,000 million against a $1.2 million budget. Delays in capital projects, increasing costs for construction materials and supply chain issues resulted in lower capital expenditure.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the performance report for quarter three ending 31 March 2022.

b)      reallocate the following projects budgets to the Local Community Grants budget:

·    Waiheke Environmental Fund $13,562

·    Arts and culture response programme $10,000

·    Film Revenue $3,339

·    Community emergency resilience programme $1000

·    Business emergency resilience programme $1500

·    Local Community response fund $771

 

c)      reallocate $10,000 from the Little Oneroa-Upper Catchment Restoration Programme (now covered regionally) for the kayak/dinghy management project.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Waiheke Local Board has an approved 2021/2022 work programme for the following:

·        Customer and Community Services

·        Infrastructure and Environmental Services;

·        Plans and Places;

·        Auckland Emergency Management;

9.       The graph below shows how the work programme activities meet Local Board Plan outcomes. Activities that are not part of the approved work programme but contribute towards the local board outcomes, such as advocacy by the local board, are not captured in this graph.

Graph 1: Work programme activities by outcome

Chart, bar chart

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COVID-19 restrictions

10.     From 23 January 2022, Auckland moved back into traffic light red setting under the COVID-19 Protection Framework, which has impacted council and community-delivered event planning and programming.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu                                                        

Analysis and advice

Local Board Work Programme Snapshot

11.     The graph below identifies work programme activity by RAG status (red, amber, green and grey) which measures the performance of the activity. It shows the percentage of work programme activities that are on track (green), in progress but with issues that are being managed (amber), activities that have significant issues (red) and activities that have been cancelled/deferred/merged (grey).

Graph 2: Work programme performance by RAG status

Chart, pie chart

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12.     The graph below shows the stage of the activities in each departments’ work programmes. The number of activity lines differ by department as approved in the local board work programmes. 

Graph 3: Work programme performance by activity status and department

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Description automatically generated

 

Key activity updates from quarter three

Local Board Plan Outcome 1: : Sustainable development and liveable places

13.     Waiheke Area Plan (ID 1522):  The draft plan has been finalised and direct consultation is underway with the last of the three iwi groups which have been involved in the process to date.

Local Board Plan Outcome 2: A sustainable economy

14.     Waiheke Destination Management Plan (led by Auckland Unlimited): Due to COVID-19 the draft has been delayed. The board will receive an update shortly.

15.     Business emergency resilience programme (ID 1601): The business information packs are complete. Engagement with small business owners and key organisations on Waiheke will commence with a move from Red to Orange in the COVID-19 Protection Framework. It is recommended $1500 be reallocated to the Community Grants budget as it will not be required prior to year end.

16.     Waiheke Community Art Gallery (ID 562):  During this quarter there were 13 programmes attracting 14,737 participants. Exhibits presented included The Object as Poet, Mana Moana and Intergenerational in association with the Pride Festival 2022. In March the focus was on Guardian Sculpture on the Gulf 2022 (SOTG) and associated Gallery activities. This included an opening to SOTG Small Works showcase, archival presentation and SOTG Maquettes, guided walks. Approximately 17,000 visitors attended the SOTG this year.

17.     Artworks Theatre (ID 565):  Artwork Theatre had 17 programmes, and 19 sessions attracting 205 participants. Highlights have included the screening of Wyrd Sisters theatre production, a stand-up comedy show and local bands returning to rehearse in the space again. The highlight of February was the return of Kōrero Kids; a bilingual, weekly playgroup. Parents and their tamariki practise Te Reo Māori through waiata, games and storytelling. Local board funding allowed the group to receive new instruments, books and poi. The theatres’ ability to operate sustainably has been adversely impacted due to COVID-19 requirements.

Local Board Plan Outcome 3: Waiheke's environment is protected, restored and enhanced

18.     Ecological Community Partnership Programme (ID678): Although volunteer hours were just 16 for the quarter, the Love Our Wetlands Waiheke contract area was very well maintained by staff members working under the “Jobs for nature” government funding. This meant that the project area of 29,403m2 was maintained throughout each reserve area and was visited at least every three weeks resulting in 101,793 m2 of weed control by the Waiheke Resources Trust workforce.

19.     Waiheke Environmental Grant Fund (ID 954):  During this quarter $16,438 was allocated to environmental grant applications. Applications included: Newton Reserve Group Cliffside Weeding and Planting, Ōmiha Welfare and Recreation Society Rocky Bay Ratbusters, Waiheke Marine Project Rangatahi/Youth Actions. There have been no applications for the last round so it is recommended the remaining budget of $13,562 be reallocated to the Community Grants Round.

20.     Ngahere (Urban Forest) - Growing phase (ID 811) (Amber): A workshop with the local board has been scheduled for 18 May 2022. Input from the local board will be collated and included in an updated version of the Ngahere Action Plan which will provide recommendations for planting on the island. Timeframe to have action plan completed for endorsement at June business meeting is a risk.

21.     Little Oneroa - Upper Catchment Restoration Programme (ID 727): This project will not be able to be completed this financial year. The Healthy Waters consent process to repair specific drainage issues has taken longer than anticipated and earthworks will not be able to be carried out within this year’s earthworks season. Wai Ora Partnerships team have advised that they intend to fund this at a regional level and it will be withdrawn from the work program in 2022/2023. It is recommended $10,000 be reallocated to the kayak / dinghy project to continue momentum.

22.     Bike Hub (ID 733): The Waiheke Bike Box resumed regular bike hub operations from mid January 2022 and has been open a total of 52 hours during the reporting period to date. The bike hub had 28 visitors, 23 volunteer hours and fixed 25 bikes. The Hub handed out 24 bike locks as part of Auckland Transport’s Bikelock Amnesty Campaign. There have been several events in the reporting period including a Valentine's day pecha kucha night, social rides around the island, a pahikara te reo workshop day, a women’s workshop day and a kamishibai bike storytelling workshop.

23.     Beach Ambassadors programme (ID 1691): The Beach Ambassadors Project had great success this year, educating and engaging the community and visitors on how to enjoy our beaches sustainably. The Waiheke Resources Trust created a Beach Ambassadors stand at Little Oneroa and conducted beach clean-ups daily, with a prize drawn every week. 180kg of rubbish was removed from our beaches.

24.     Climate Action Programme (ID 732): Procurement for the role of the Climate Activator commenced in January 2022. Four proposals were assessed, the successful contractor has been selected, and contracts are being finalised. The activator started in late March with initial tasks being to develop a work programme and terms of reference for the advisory group.

25.     Conservation Advocate (ID 794) (Red):  Recruitment for the Conservation Advocate was undertaken in the first part of this quarter and interviews took place at the end of March 2022. This was initially delayed due to COVID-19 and a shortage of suitable applicants in the first round of advertising in quarter two last year. The position has now been appointed however a carry forward request of $5,000 is expected.

26.     Waiheke Water Quality Programme (ID 735): Due to COVID-19 restrictions onsite wastewater workshops were held online, bi-monthly reporting of the four Wai Care sites was delayed, Seaweek events were held online and new catchment surveys and updates to the survey database were unable to be completed door to door. Welcome packs for new residents were distributed to property managers, real estate agents, the local library, Citizens Advice Bureau and Waiheke Budgeting services (WRT) and at the WRT stall at the Ostend market. A monthly advert was placed in the Gulf News with information being added at the Ostend market stall and to newsletters to promote discounted septic tank inspections. Five households have signed up so far.

27.     Waiheke Ecological Restoration contracts (ID 1167): The key focus works for the third quarter included high value pest plant control, as well as pulse 3 of the rat control programme. Ropes control of moth plant was undertaken at Church Bay and moth plant compliance follow up on the Rangihoua tihi continues.

28.     Waiheke Arboriculture contracts (ID1168): Tropical Cyclone Dovi left very few streets or parks unscathed. Contractor resources focused on cleanup for three weeks of this quarter. Proactive inspections are being undertaken to capture any sites that have not been logged.  The third quarter has also seen the implementation of the Overhead Services Tree and Vegetation Management contract that runs in parallel with the General Arboriculture Maintenance Contract. This new contract enables a higher level of service to be applied as needed where trees are close to power lines.

29.     As per the board’s resolution in August 2021 relating to the review of Waiheke’s agrichemical dispensation and requesting a Programme of Works schedule and a Summary of Works Undertaken, the Q3 Agrichem report is attached (Attachment C).

Local Board Plan Outcome 4: Thriving, strong and engaged communities

30.     Arts and culture response programme (ID 480): COVID-19 continued to make face-to-face networking difficult for the Kāhui Creative Network, however a Kāhui presence was maintained at Zoom meetings for the Waiheke community groups. The monthly e-newsletter continues to reflect the diverse variety of creative activity on the Waiheke to an audience of 283 individual members and forwarded on to other networks to share. This work is being completed on FY21-20 funding. FY21-22 funding is unallocated. Staff have discussed possible options for future funding with the local board and services team and it is recommended this remaining budget be reallocated to Local Community Grants for reallocation.

31.     Community-led housing initiatives (ID 482): Waiheke Hope Centre has utilised the grant towards arborist costs for tree removal required to progress the new wastewater system for emergency and transitional housing at Living Waters in Surfdale. An ecology report has been completed and the next step is to finalise the resource consent.

32.     Community resilience and local economic development (ID 481): During this quarter Waiheke Island Tourism contracted a local film-maker to produce a video that showcased a wide range of experiences, voices, and island environments. The video encouraged visitors to stay longer and get involved with different types of activities. Ngāti Paoa provided input and reo Māori subtitles. The video had good reach through NZME and social media, and is still circulating. Allocation of the remaining $10,000 will be reported in Q4.

33.     Youth Development (ID 484): In Q3 Waiheke Adult Learning delivered several successful practical workshops for local youth aged 16-24. These included a first aid course and road code workshops to support people prior to sitting their learner licence.

34.     Community emergency resilience programme (ID1600):  AEM will recommence Waiheke Island community resilience building workshops as alert level shift to orange allows for more flexible hui (meeting) environments. Rakino community finalised draft plan with support of AEM and FENZ has been circulated to wider community and agencies for review. It is recommended $1000 be reallocated to the Community Grants budget as it is unlikely to be required before year end.

Local Board Plan Outcome 5:  Māori Outcomes

35.     Māori Responsiveness Waiheke (ID 485): Possible projects have been workshopped with the local board and staff are now working with the relevant organisations to further develop their proposals. Decisions are expected in Q4.

Local Board Plan Outcome 6: Vibrant places for people

36.     Feasibility study for swimming pool (ID 3106) Amber: Staff and local board members met onsite with Te Huruhi School and Waiheke Pool Society representatives to view the existing facility and understand aspirations for upgrades. Staff follow up on actions will be circulated in Q4

37.     Rangihoua Onetangi Park Management Plan (ID 1557):  Draft plan has been developed and final consultation with mana whenua is currently being undertaken. Further workshops with local board development committee to be scheduled for Q4.

38.     Local Parks Management Plan (ID 1556): Public consultation on the draft plan was underway during this quarter. Submissions closed on 16 May 2022. Staff will report back in Q4.

39.     Kayaks / Dinghies on beaches: The campaign for watercraft removal from beaches commenced in March. The Enclosure Bay campaign was deemed a success with only five vessels remaining after the deadline. These were transported to Waiheke Community Resource Recovery Park and disposed of as seen fit. Staff propose that the work continues, building on the momentum of the success achieved at Enclosure Bay. It is recommended that $10,000 be reallocated to expand this project to further beaches. 

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40.       Rangihoua / Onetangi Reserve - Golf Club - renew - driveway and culvert (ID 20720): Alternative access has been finalised and contract has been awarded. Construction is scheduled between March 2022 - June 2022.

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41.     Open space toilets - develop and renew (ID 31032): A location at Oneroa Beach Reserve for a new toilet block has been confirmed and additional capacity at the local waste water treatment plant was purchased from Watercare. Engineers are currently undertaking detailed design. Consents to be lodged by March 2022. Construction is expected to be completed completed by September 2022.

42.     Catherine Mitchell Cottage - comprehensive renewal (ID 26682): The comprehensive renewal of Catherine Mitchell Cottage was completed during this quarter. This included re-piling and leveling the floor, insulation and ventilation installation, weatherboard replacement, balustrade replacement, renew fire alarms to meet building code, water proofing of shower and laundry tub.

43.     Little Oneroa Reserve - renew play space, stairs and pathways (ID 15451) (Amber): Concept design was presented to members for feedback in March 2022. The project will now proceed with detailed design according to feedback and purchase play equipment.

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44.     Onetangi Sports Park - general renewals (ID30690) (Amber): Internal stakeholder consultation has established preferred options to include renewal of the changing rooms (painting, flooring, wall tiles and shower drainage), replacing shower heads and exploring relocatable container changing rooms. The engineer is currently investigating costs of a relocatable style changing room and consenting requirements to proceed with physical work.

45.       Rakino Hall (ID 20645): The Rakino community presented their proposal with two options to members during this quarter. The board will consider options during FY23 Annual Budget planning.

46.       Island Bay Track, 80 Korora Road, Oneroa (ID 19879): Works commenced during this quarter including the construction of new stairs, a short section of boardwalk and gravel path to reinstate a section of the Owhanake Matiatia Walkway that was damaged by a landslip.  Works are now complete and the track reopened in April.

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47.       Pohutukawa Reserve Waiheke (Omiha Rocky Bay) (ID 25986): Project to install fencing, pathway and planting following track damage. Minor repair underway and first sign installed. Further signage will be installed shortly.

48.     Albert Crescent to Wharf Road - renew walkway and retaining wall (ID 18438):  Detailed design is complete and consent documentation underway. Following approval of relevant consents, physical works will commence.

49.     Church Bay - purchase adjacent land and stabilize (ID 19993) (Amber): The offer of an easement through private property was declined. Council sought a right of way agreement from the private landowner which is currently pending acceptance. Next steps: Confirm acceptance of the right of way and plan for relocation of fencing and planting plan.

50.     Hekerua Bay Reserve - renew path and install retaining wall (ID 20494) (Amber): The Land Information New Zealand approved survey is being reviewed on how best to approach neighboring land owners assets. Staff will then work with Council legal advisors and the neighboring land owners to mitigate landslip risk.

51.     Tracks and pathways – renew (ID 24149) and (ID 25167) (Amber): Track design completed and consent application being drafted for the following track renewals: Glenbrook Reserve, Wharetana Bay (Starts off at Rothschild Terrace to the bay), Omiha Beach Reserve, Matiatia to Owhanake side track, Te Aroha Walkway, Trig Hill to Awaawaroa Bay, Church Bay from Matiatia to Church Bay Road, Te Wharau Bay, and Park Point.

Local Board Plan Outcome 7:  Resilient transport and Infrastructure

52.     Waiheke Pathways Plan - prioritisation review (ID 680): Staff have initiated consultation with Community Facilities, Bike Auckland and Auckland Transport for input into the assessment. A workshop to discuss the draft prioritisation plan with the local board will take place in Q4.

53.     Matiatia Gateway Masterplan (ID 1664) (Amber): Non-transport outcomes will be advanced in partnership with Ngāti Pāoa and cannot proceed until Ngāti Pāoa mandate issues are resolved. This will enable the proposed governance relationship with the Waiheke Local Board to be confirmed.

Activities with significant issues

·        Swimming pool development fund (ID3103): This activity is on hold until the Feasibility Study for Swimming Pool project is completed.

·        Onetangi Sports Park - install lighting & upgrade to sand carpet on field 3 (ID23915): Concept design is complete, and the design is being revised to align water consumption with bore capacity. Growth funding has been deferred into future years and therefore the project has been deferred.

·        Conservation Advocate (ID794): Recruitment for the Conservation Advocate was initially delayed due to COVID-19. Due to this delay a carry forward request of $5,000 is expected which has resulted in a red status.

·        Little Oneroa - Upper Catchment Restoration Programme (ID727): This project will not be able to be completed this financial year as the consent process to repair specific drainage issues has taken longer than anticipated. It is intended this project will be funded at a regional level for 2022/2023.

Activities on hold

54.     The following work programme activities have been identified by operating departments as on hold:

·        Church Bay track - purchase adjacent land and stabilise (ID19993): After the offer of an easement through private property was declined, Council sought a right of way agreement from the private landowner which is currently pending acceptance.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

55.     Receiving performance monitoring reports will not result in any identifiable changes to greenhouse gas emissions.

56.     Work programmes were approved in June 2021 and delivery is already underway. Should significant changes to any projects be required, climate impacts will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

57.     The local board is currently investing in a number of sustainability projects, which aim to build awareness around individual carbon emissions, and changing behaviour at a local level. These include:

·        Climate Action Programme (ID732) - a three-year community-based climate action programme to guide design, prioritisation and implementation of mitigation actions as identified in the Climate Action Plan (adopted in December).

·        Bike Hub (ID733) - funding to Cycle Action Waiheke to operate a bicycle repair, cycling education, and advocacy centre based in Alison Park.

·        Environmental Fund (ID954) - fund supports ecological restoration and management outcomes, aligned with the local board's environmental priorities.

·        The Marine Education Initiative (ID729) - to support experiential learning, citizen science and student-led action to restore and protect the marine environment.

·        Urban Ngahere Growing stage (ID811) - the action plan identifies the need to plant new trees across the local board area to increase the tree canopy coverage on publicly owned land.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

58.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to the local board.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     This report informs the Waiheke Local Board of the performance for quarter three ending 31 March 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

60.     The Matiatia planning project aims to prepare a strategic plan for Matiatia which reflects the aspirations of the Waiheke community and respects the interests and rights of mana whenua for the future use of that land. Ngāti Paoa has representation on the project working group and are working to identify their aspirations for the site. 

61.     Engagement with mana whenua is underway for the draft Waiheke Area Plan and draft Rangihoua Onetangi Park Management Plan.

62.     During this quarter staff connected with local Māori organisations to understand priorities and scope possible projects for the Māori Responsiveness budget line.

63.     The Waiheke Library continues to coordinate a variety of programmes which provide opportunities to engagement with local iwi and mana whenua and collaborate on initiatives.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     This report is provided to enable the Waiheke Local Board to monitor the organisation’s progress and performance in delivering the 2021/2022 work programme.

65.     The following reallocations are recommended as it is unlikely they will be required prior to year end:

·        Waiheke Environmental Grant Fund $13,562

·        Arts and culture response programme $10,000

·        Little Oneroa-Upper Catchment Restoration Programme $10,000

·        Community emergency resilience programme $1000

·        Business emergency resilience programme $1500

·        Local Community response fund $771

66.     The board also have film revenue of $3,339 which is available for reallocation.

Financial Performance

67.     Operating revenue of $119,000 is above the budget by $13,000. Revenue is from the Waiheke library, community and commercial leases and general local parks.

68.     Operating expenditure of $3.5 million is below the budget by nearly $2 million. In asset-based services, lower level of schedule maintenance was provided during lock down. Full facility maintenance resumed as normal in the third quarter.

69.     In Locally Driven Initiatives, expenditure is below budget by $327,000. Several projects are delayed by COVID-19 restrictions. Some projects are at risks of achieving full delivery by year end and are identified for budget reallocation.

70.     Capital spend is $876,000 against a budget of $1.2 million. Capital delivery was focused on local asset renewals programme.

71.     The Waiheke Local Board Financial Performance report can be found under Attachment B.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

72.     While the risk of non-delivery of the entire work programme is rare, the likelihood for risk relating to individual activities does vary. Capital projects for instance, are susceptible to more risk as on-time and on-budget delivery is dependent on weather conditions, approvals (e.g. building consents) and is susceptible to market conditions.

73.     The approved Customer and Community Services capex work programme include projects identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).  These are projects that the Community Facilities delivery team will progress, if possible, in advance of the programmed delivery year. This flexibility in delivery timing will help to achieve 100 per cent financial delivery for the financial year if projects intended for delivery in the current financial year are delayed due to unforeseen circumstances.

74.     Information about any significant risks and how they are being managed and/or mitigated is addressed in the ‘Activities with significant issues’ section.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

75.     The local board will receive the next performance update following the end of quarter four (30 June 2022).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board - 1 January – 31 March 2022 Work Programme Update

319

b

Waiheke Local Board - Operating Performance Financial Summary

345

c

Waiheke Q3 Agrichem Summary of works undertaken and Programme of works

351

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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25 May 2022

 

 

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25 May 2022

 

 

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25 May 2022

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/05250

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Waiheke Grants Programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

3.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt their own local grants programme for the next financial year.

4.       This report presents the Waiheke Grants Programme 2022/2023 for adoption (as provided in Attachment A to this report).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      adopt the Waiheke Grants Programme 2022/2023 in Attachment A.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy guides the allocation of local, multi-board and regional grant programmes to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders.

6.       The Community Grants Policy supports each local board to review and adopt its own local grants programme for the next financial year. The local board grants programme guides community groups and individuals when making applications to the local board.

7.       The local board community grants programme includes:

· outcomes as identified in the local board plan

· specific local board grant priorities

· which grant types will operate, the number of grant rounds and opening and closing         dates

· any additional criteria or exclusions that will apply

· other factors the local board consider to be significant to their decision-making.

8.       Once the local board grants programme 2022/2023 has been adopted, the types of grants, grant rounds, criteria and eligibility with be advertised through an integrated communication and marketing approach which includes utilising the local board channels.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. The new Waiheke Grants Programme has been workshopped with the local board and feedback incorporated into the grants programme for 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through the support of projects that address food production and food waste; alternative transport methods; community energy efficiency education and behaviour change; build community resilience and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

12.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant council unit will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The grants programme has been developed by the local board to set the direction of its grants programme. This programme is reviewed on an annual basis.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     All grant programmes respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to organisations delivering positive outcomes for Māori. Applicants are asked how their project aims to increase Māori outcomes in the application process.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-Term Plan 2018 -2028 and local board agreements.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy. Therefore, there is minimal risk associated with the adoption of the grants programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

17.     An implementation plan is underway and the local board grants programme will be locally advertised through the local board and council channels, including the council website, local board Facebook page and communication with past recipients of grants.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Programme 2022-2023

359

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Boyd - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Waiheke Local and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/05828

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted the Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 (refer Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

3.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Sixteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $52,782.00. $31,282 was allocated, leaving a total of $58,319 for one local grant round and three quick response rounds.

4.       The environmental grants budget was set at $30,000. The Environmental Grants Round One 2021/2022 received four applications requesting a total of $30,188.00. $16,438 was allocated, leaving a total of $13,562 for one remaining round.

5.       Fourteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round one 2021/2022, requesting a total of $26,739.28. $13,032 was allocated, leaving a total of 45,287 remaining for two quick responses and one local grant round.

6.       Five applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $7,574.50. $5,500 was allocated, leaving a total of $39,787 remaining for one quick response and one Local Grant round.

7.       $13,562 was transferred to the community grants round as no applications were received for the Waiheke Environmental Grant Round 2, leaving a total of $53,349 for one remaining Local Grant round and one remaining Quick Response round.

8.       15 applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Local and Multiboard grant round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $62,036. This report presents applications received in Waiheke Local and Multiboard round two 2021/2022 (refer to attachment B and C).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round Two 2021/2022 listed in the following table

Table One: Local Grant Round Two 2021/2022

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2218-201

The Artworks Theatre Incorporated

Community

Towards wages, venue hire and resources at Artworks Theatre from 21 June 2022 to 4 November 2022

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2218-203

Te Arai Roa Manaaki

Community

Towards workshop, venue hire and ferry costs at 2 Kororoa Road on 11 June 2022

$3,692.00

Eligible

LG2218-204

Waiheke Playgroup

Community

Towards venue hire and salaries on Rata Street from 2 June 2022 to 31 May 2023

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2218-205

Waiheke Community Art Gallery

Arts and culture

Towards facilitation costs, installation, marketing and venue hire at Te Whare Taonga O Waiheke | Waiheke Community Art Gallery from 20 June 2022 to 12 August 2022

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2218-206

Waiheke Adult Literacy Inc

Community

Towards driver instructor training at The Learning Centre from 6 June 2022 to 16 December 2022

$3,995.00

Eligible

LG2218-207

Omiha Welfare and Recreation Society

Sport and recreation

Towards tennis court sealing at 19 Valley Road from 1 July 2022 to 1 December 2022

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2218-208

EJay Strickson

under the umbrella of Community Networks Waiheke

Community

Towards bringing the Shot Bro show to Waiheke at Surfdale Community Hall from 23 June 2022 to 25 June 2022

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2218-209

The Waiheke Resource Trust

Community

Towards wages at Ostend Market from 1 June 2022 to 31 May 2023

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2218-210

Waiheke Surf Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards high visibility vests at Onetangi Beach from 1 November 2022 to 15 April 2023

$3,381.00

Eligible

LG2218-213

Waiheke Island Playcentre

Community

Towards purpose at Waiheke Island Playcentre from 1 June 2022 to 31 March 2023

$2,203.92

Eligible

LG2218-214

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards ongoing costs for the Youthline Helpline from 1 June 2022 to 31 March 2023

$2,000.00

Ineligible

LG2218-215

Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

Community

Towards wages, transportation and reporting at Te Huruhi Primary School from 17 October 2022 to 23 December 2022

$3,925.00

Eligible

LG2218-217

Waiheke Amateur Radio Club

under the umbrella of Community Networks Waiheke Incorporated

Community

Towards solar panels, cables and batteries from 4 July 2022 to 30 September

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2218-218

Waiheke Rudolf Steiner Education Trust

Community

Towards playground slide at Fossil Bay Kindergarten from 6 June 2022 to 6 August 2022

$2,400.00

Eligible

LG2218-219

Waiheke Musical Museum Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards story performances at Whittaker's Musical Museum from 9 July 2022 to 24 July 2022

$4,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$53,596.92

 

 

 

Table Two: Multiboard Grant Round Two 2021/2022

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2022-243

Anxiety New Zealand Trust

Community

Towards the marketing material costs and wages of co-ordinators and facilitators of the Community Education Webinars.

$2,500.00

Eligible

MB2022-252

Communities Against Alcohol Harm

Community

Towards community navigator project in Auckland communities and online from June 2022 to June 2023.

$1,939.08

Eligible

MB2022-255

Habitat for Humanity Northern Region Limited

Community

Towards healthy homes interventions and winter warmer essentials from June 2022 to August 2022.

$4,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$8,439.08

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

10.     The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

11.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements

12.     The Waiheke Local Board adopted their grants the Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 and will operate three quick response, two local grants and two environmental rounds for this financial year

13.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

14.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year and an environmental grants budget of $30,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through support of projects that address food production and food waste, support alternative transport methods, support community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience, and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     According to the main focus of the application, each one has received input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. The main focuses are identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

18.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waiheke Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme

20.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

23.     This report presents applications received in Waiheke Quick Response Round One 2021/2022 (refer Attachment B).

24.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Sixteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $52,782.00. $31,282 was allocated, leaving a total of $58,319 for one local grant round and three quick response rounds.

25.     The environmental grants budget for the 2021/2022 financial period was set at $41,881. The Environmental Grants Round One 2021/2022 received four applications requesting a total of $30,188.00. $16,438 was allocated, leaving a total of $25,443 for one remaining round.

26.     Fourteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round one 2021/2022, requesting a total of $26,739.28. $13,032 was allocated, leaving a total of 45,287 remaining for two quick responses and one local grant round.

27.     $13,562 was transferred to the community grants round as no applications were received for the Waiheke Environmental Round 2, leaving a total of $53,349 for one remaining Local Grant round and one remaining Quick Response round.

28.     Five applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $7,574.50. $5,500 was allocated, leaving a total of $39,787 remaining for one quick response and one Local Grant round.

29.     $13,562 was transferred to the community grants round as no applications were received for the Waiheke Environmental Grant Round 2, leaving a total of $53,349 for one remaining Local Grant round and one remaining Quick Response round.

30.     15 applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Local and Multiboard grant round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $62,036. This report presents applications received in Waiheke Local and Multiboard round two 2021/2022 (refer to attachment B and C).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following the Waiheke Local Board allocating funding for the round, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Grants Round 2 2021 2022 Application Summary

377

b

Waiheke Multiboard Grants Round 2 2021 2022 Application Summary

441

c

Waiheke Local Board programme 21-22

457

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

James Boyd - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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25 May 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/05875

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that you support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid-2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)        increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)      tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[3]

8.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.     This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.     It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[4]

25.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

26.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[5] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[6]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

33.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

34.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

35.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

36.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

 

 

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

37.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

38.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

39.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

40.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

41.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

42.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

43.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

44.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

45.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

46.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

47.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

48.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

49.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

50.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

51.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

52.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

53.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan


 

 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

54.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

55.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

·     Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

·     The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

56.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings runs until 27 May 2022.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

57.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·     51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

·     59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

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Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

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People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 


Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 


Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 

28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

58.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

59.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

60.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

61.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

62.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

63.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

64.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

65.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

66.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

67.     Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

68.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

69.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

70.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

71.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

 

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

72.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

73.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

74.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

75.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

76.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

77.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

78.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

79.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

80.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

81.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

82.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

83.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

84.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

85.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

86.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

87.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

88.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

89.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

475

     

 

 

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager - Community and Social Policy

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Community Facilities Network Plan revised Action Plan (2022)

File No.: CP2022/06154

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022) including progress and completion of actions since 2015 and prioritisation of actions over the next three years.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) is a strategic document outlining how Auckland Council will invest in community facilities. It was approved by Regional Strategy and Policy Committee in August 2015.

3.       The accompanying Action Plan prioritises actions and projects that will be undertaken to implement the CFNP. The CFNP contains criteria for identifying and prioritising actions. 

4.       Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions. The Action Plan was last updated in 2019.

5.       The Action Plan has been revised for 2022 using the methodology outlined in the CFNP. It contains 33 new actions.

6.       There are now 155 total actions in the Action Plan including:

·    65 completed actions

·    36 actions underway

·    50 actions to start

·    4 actions on hold.

7.       Implementation of priority actions within the revised Action Plan will initially focus on:

·    completing 36 actions that are already underway

·    starting four new area-based actions located in Investment Priority Areas

·    starting two network-wide strategic improvement actions.

8.       Feedback from local boards will be part of the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in August 2022 (when considering the adoption of the Action Plan).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)   support the revised Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan (2022), provided in Attachment A.

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

What is the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan?

9.       The Community Facilities Network Plan and its companion Action Plan were approved in 2015 by the Regional Strategy and Policy Committee (REG/2015/57).

10.     The Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP) guides the council’s investment in the provision of community facilities and services. It provides direction on the development of new facilities, major upgrades of existing facilities, optimisation, and potential divestment of facilities no longer meeting community needs.

11.     The CFNP addresses provision for:

·    arts and culture facilities

·    community centres

·    libraries

·    pools and leisure facilities

·    venues for hire (community or rural halls).

12.     The CFNP’s accompanying Action Plan prioritises projects to:

·    ensure existing facilities are fit for purpose

·    address gaps or duplication in provision and needs for community facilities

·    meet future demand arising from population growth and changing users’ expectations.

13.     Together the CFNP and its companion Action Plan support council’s goal to focus community service investment on:

·    quality over quantity

·    addressing service gaps where growth is significant

·    improving portfolio performance.

The Action Plan is revised every three years

14.     Every three years the Action Plan is reviewed and updated to recognise progress, revise priorities of existing actions and assess potential new actions.

15.     The Action Plan was last reviewed in 2018 and adopted by the Environment and Community Committee in April 2019 (ENV/2019/47).

16.     Progress on the Action Plan is reported annually to the relevant committees. The last update was provided to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in November 2021 (PAC/2021/58).

17.     A summary of progress on the revised 2022 Action Plan is provided in Attachment B. It shows that 65 actions are completed, 36 actions are underway, 50 actions have not started, and 4 actions are on hold.

Actions are structured by category, theme and progress 

18.     There are three categories and two themes of actions in the Action Plan (refer Table 1).

Table 1: CFNP Action Plan categories

19.     The 2022 Action Plan presents actions in two parts.

·    Part A – new actions (identified since the last review) and actions carried over from the previous review which have not been started.

·    Part B – actions underway at the time of the review and previously completed actions.

Departments work together to identify business and strategic improvement actions

20.     The development of new business and strategic improvements involved Community & Social Policy, Community Facilities, and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships. These departments worked together to support quality advice and to improve the way we plan and prioritise delivery of community services.

The identification of area-based actions follows a set process

21.     The process for the development of area-based actions in Part A of the 2022 Action Plan is set by the CFNP and shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1: Review process for 2022 CFNP Action Plan

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22.     Potential area-based actions for Part A were identified from a range of sources:

·    political resolutions requesting the addition of items to the Action Plan

·    work arising from completed actions in the Action Plan 2019

·    the 10-year Budget 2021-2031

·    local board plan initiatives and work programmes

·    input from business intelligence and across the Auckland Council organisation

·    actions not started in the Action Plan 2019.

Area-based actions are prioritised through the weighting of network, community, and building criteria

23.     Once identified, the master list of area-based actions was assessed based on the prioritisation criteria outlined in section 5.2 of the CFNP (refer Table 2).

Table 2: Prioritisation criteria for area-based actions as defined by the CFNP

24.     The tools used to conduct the assessment included population data, geospatial information, asset condition information, and in some instances needs assessments and business cases.

The priorities in the CFNP Action Plan guide the focus of our resources

25.     The impact of Covid-19 and the resulting economic slow-down has had a significant impact on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. The 10-year Budget (Recovery Budget), adopted 29 June 2021, highlights:

·    a tight fiscal environment for the immediate future

·    the need to reduce capital expenditure across the council family

·    reprioritisation of projects

·    the unsustainability of maintaining the current community facility network while meeting the needs of growing and changing communities.

26.     The ‘focused investment’ approach for community investment, adopted as part of the 10-year Budget, means we must focus on renewing priority assets, reducing our asset portfolio, expanding provision of tailored/alternative service delivery models and exploring partnership opportunities.

27.     The approach for community investment supports the direction of the CFNP and in this constrained environment, priority actions determined by the criteria in the CFNP are guiding the focus of our resources.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The revised CFNP Action Plan 2022

28.     The revised Action Plan 2022 is provided in Attachment A.

29.     Table 3 shows the distribution of all actions in the Action Plan 2022 and progress of actions since the Community Facilities Network Plan was adopted in 2015.

Table 3: Summary of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan

30.     Attachment B shows the progress status of the revised 2022 Action Plan, as well as the distribution of actions across local boards, service type and priority status.

31.     The progress being made on actions demonstrates staff’s commitment to focusing resources on a collectively agreed and mandated programme of work, as well as the commitment to delivering agreed priorities in a constrained environment.

The focus of the CFNP Action Plan work programme 2022/2023

32.     The focus of next year’s work will be towards completing priority actions that; are already in progress, are located in Investment Priority Areas (identified in the 10-year Budget) or are strategic improvements with a network-wide reach (refer Table 4).

33.     This focus ensures our effort is scalable and our advice about investment in community facilities is more effective. The efficiency created will allow us to concentrate on the priority actions that have not yet been started.

Table 4: Summary of proposed work programme for 2022/2023

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

34.     Consideration of climate impact happens at a project level. There are no direct climate impacts arising from this report on the action plan.

35.     Future detailed business cases will include application of the Community Facilities – Sustainable Asset Policy. The regional policy, the first of three phases under the council’s Sustainable Asset Standard (SAS), commits council to:

·    achieve carbon neutrality in operations for new asset development

·    achieve a minimum 5-Star Green Star rating (or equivalent certification) on the development of all new assets with a budget over $10 million

·    incorporate decarbonisation principles into guideline documents for renewals and new asset development of all community assets.

36.     The assessment of climate impacts in investigations and business cases will improve by applying learnings from across the organisation in its responsiveness to climate change. Staff will also seek to understand the allowances that need to be made to meet climate impact targets for Action Plan projects related to the development of new facilities, or the improvement of existing facilities.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     During the development of the Action Plan 2022 input has been sought from the following departments:

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

·    Local Board Services

·    Parks Sports and Recreation

·    Financial and Business Performance

·    Connected Communities

·    Community Facilities

·    Community and Social Policy.

38.     Delivery of the Action Plan 2022 is resourced by council’s Community & Social Policy and Regional Service Planning, Investment & Partnerships teams subject to capacity. Individual actions are delivered with participation from other departments and, where relevant, Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Local boards provided feedback on direction and specific content during the development of the Community Facilities Network Plan and Action Plan prior to adoption in 2015. 

40.     Key initiatives from local board plans (2020) were an input of the review process for the development of the 2022 CFNP Action Plan (refer Figure 1).

41.     The CFNP’s prioritisation criteria applies the highest weighting of 15 per cent to local board priority to ensure local board’s views influence the overall assessment of actions. 

42.     Progressing area-based actions are reflected in relevant local board work programmes. Local boards provide feedback and input throughout the investigations and have decision making responsibilities as per schedule the 10-year Budget 2021-31

43.     Decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within funding parameters set by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     The Community Facilities Network Plan outlines, in Section 2.2, how it will deliver on Māori outcomes. These outcomes include:

·    engage with Māori organisations to understand Māori expectations and investigate the community needs of Māori groups, and factor this into decision-making for community facilities

·    actively engage and consult to ensure the planning, development, and operations of facilities consider Māori needs and aspirations

·    work closely with Māori groups and key stakeholders, including local iwi, to develop appropriate cultural programmes to be delivered through facilities

·    investigate Māori demographic participation and usage trends, identifying opportunities to increase the attendance and use of facilities by Māori and developing appropriate business responses

·    provide visual representations of commitment to Māori to tell stories of their connections to the place (such as signage) and honouring tikanga

·    ensure that, in any exploration of potential future sites for facilities, Māori concerns about wāhi tapu are incorporated.

45.     Engagement with Māori is included as part of investigations and continues through the planning and delivery of responses. Examples include:

·    interviews and hui with mana whenua

·    interviews and hui with mataawaka in local settings to understand community needs

·    workshops and focus groups with local marae

·    intercept surveys with representative samples of the Māori population base

·    kanohi ki te kanohi interviews conducted in Te Reo Māori.

 

46.     Feedback provided from Māori is specific to the nature of the investigation for which the engagement occurred. This feedback is used to inform the delivery of options and responses.

47.     Staff will work with other relevant parts of the council to ensure effective engagement with Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     There are currently no identified financial implications for the delivery of the Community Facilities Network Plan Action Plan 2022 as work is delivered utilising existing resources.

49.     Investment decisions and associated funding implications are reported separately to the relevant decision-maker(s).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     There is a risk that development of the Action Plan 2022 may not match local board priorities, as implementation of the Action Plan involves understanding service needs and taking a network view. This risk is mitigated by:

·    continuing to socialise and reinforce the strategic objectives of the CFNP to elected members, key staff, and through all deliverables 

·    clarifying local board plans were reviewed and any potential community service-related content was considered for potential inclusion as an action

·    including One Local Initiative projects into the Action Plan 2022.

51.     There is financial risk that:

·    budget allocated in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 may be insufficient to deliver some of the action findings

·    the need for significant new investment identified from actions will be challenging due to the impact Covid-19 has had on the council’s revenue and borrowing capacity

·    some investigations may require changes to the funding identified in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

52.     This financial risk is mitigated by:

·    ensuring investigations include looking at options for funding other than rates or debt

·    ensuring findings of investigations that require new investment are supported by indicative business cases

·    managing expectations by acknowledging budget constraints

·    managing expectations by acknowledging the delegation for decision-making on investment in new facilities is held by the Governing Body and is considered as part of long-term planning (decision-making for service provision and location sits with local boards within parameters set by the Governing Body).

53.     There is a timing risk that delivery of actions may take longer because of reduced operational capacity and may not align with elected members and/or local communities’ expectations.  This risk is mitigated by driving delivery to meet targeted timeframes for priority actions and managing expectations based on the principles and direction set by the CFNP.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Local board resolutions will be included in the report to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider adoption of the Action Plan in August 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Community Facilities Network Plan (CFNP)

511

b

Attachment B - Focus of Community Facilities Action Plan 2022

527

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Tracey Williams - Service Programmes Lead

Angela Clarke - Head of Service Investment & Programming

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager - Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Ngā Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa - New Zealand Geographic Board: recording of unofficial place names as official - Update

File No.: CP2022/05537

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To update the local board on the progress of the Ngā Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa New Zealand Geographic Board project to record unofficial place names as official.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2022, a report was considered regarding the Ngā Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa New Zealand Geographic Board project to record unofficial place names as official.

3.       The board resolved as follows.

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)        support the use of Māori place names and dual Māori and English naming across the Waiheke Local Board area.

b)      acknowledge the work done in identifying and collating the unofficial names and proposed corrections in the attachments to this report and the opportunity being identified to expediate the standard naming process.

c)      do not support the current fast track proposal as it stands.

d)      seek guidance from mana whenua on the endorsement of the use and spelling of the listed (Attachments A, B, C to the report) Māori place names.

e)      note the local board are currently not in an informed governance position to make any comment on the proposals until mana whenua engagement has occurred and has been clearly presented to the local board.

4.       The New Zealand Geographic Board have recently advised they will be deferring making decisions on changing the status of Auckland’s recorded (unofficial) place names to official in order to further consult with Auckland’s 19 mana whenua groups.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the advice from Ngā Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa New Zealand Geographic Board that they will be deferring making decisions on changing the status of Auckland’s recorded (unofficial) place names to official in order to further consult with Auckland’s 19 mana whenua groups.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Submission on Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan

File No.: CP2022/06467

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local boards with:

·    a brief overview of the draft National Adaptation Plan (the Plan), including a strategic overview, roles and responsibilities for local government, and a summary of critical and supporting actions

·    a brief overview of proposals for managed retreat and flood insurance

·    likely themes for Auckland Council’s submission

·    the timeframes for developing Auckland Council’s submission and opportunities to provide input.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council is preparing for a submission on the draft National Adaptation Plan which was released by the Ministry for the Environment on 27 April 2022 for public consultation. The deadline for submissions is 3 June 2022.

3.       The submission will be informed by the council’s adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan,  Auckland Council’s climate change commitments and previous relevant consultation submissions.

4.       The submission will focus on the extent to which the draft National Adaptation Plan enables and/or inhibits climate change adaptation action for Auckland Council. The submission is likely to  set out potential gaps and concerns for Auckland Council. In particular, the role and responsibilities of local government in relation to the Plan, and the extent to which critical actions outlined in the Plan support Auckland Council to fulfil its defined legislative roles and responsibilities. Both risks and opportunities for central government will be highlighted.

5.       In addition, views and perspectives on managed retreat, flood insurance and associated critical issues to be considered in the development of new legislation will be explored.

6.       To meet the submission deadline of 3 June 2022, delegated authority to approve the council’s final submission outside a scheduled committee meeting will be sought at a Governing Body meeting on 26th May.

7.       A draft submission will be circulated on 18 May 2022 to Environment and Climate Change Committee members, local board members, the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs.

8.       Feedback received from Environment and Climate Change Committee members by 25 May will be considered for incorporation into the final submission.

9.       Feedback received from local boards, the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs by 27 May 2022 will be appended to the final submission.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat to be appended to Auckland Council’s submission.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): draft national adaptation plan (NAP) is the first central government-led adaptation plan for Aotearoa/New Zealand. The NAP presents an all-of government approach, that maps out a range of ‘critical actions’, ‘supporting actions’ and ‘proposed actions’ for the next six years.

12.     The NAP will prepare central government, local government, businesses, industry, iwi/Māori and communities to adapt to effects associated with unavoidable climate change that are occurring and will continue to occur. The NAP will sit alongside the Emission Reduction Plan, which Auckland Council has already made a submission on. 

13.     The NAP is required under the Climate Change Response Act 2002, to set out government’s approach to adapting to the effects of climate change. Under this Act, the NAP must take into account:

·    the economic, social, health, environmental, ecological, and cultural effects of climate change, including effects on iwi and Māori

·    the distribution of the effects of climate change across society, taking particular account of vulnerable groups or sectors

·    the ability of communities or organisations to undertake adaptation action, including how any action may be funded

·    scientific and technical advice.

14.     The NAP is preceded by several pivotal government climate reports, namely the Climate Change Adaptation Technical Working Group Report (2018) and National Climate Change Risk Assessment 2020 (NCCRA).

15.     The NAP responds to both reports with a particular emphasis on shaping regulatory frameworks and institutions to align with the changing climate context, aligning statutory and policy directions to account for changing risks, establishing coordination across government and with sectors, bringing together scattered climate information and supporting access to climate data sets and information.

16.     The NAP also responds directly to the forty-three priority climate risks outlined in the NCCRA. Of these forty-three risks, the NCCRA identified ten most significant risks that require urgent action within the next six years to reduce their impacts. The key risk areas of focus include, natural environment, homes, buildings and places, infrastructure, communities, economy and financial systems, and governance. A summary of the NCCRA can be found at https://environment.govt.nz/what-government-is-doing/areas-of-work/climate-change/adapting-to-climate-change/first-national-climate-change-risk-assessment-for-new-zealand/

17.     Consultation is also being undertaken on problems and key policy issues in relation to flood insurance and managed retreat. This report also gives a brief overview of these two issues.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of National Emissions Reduction Plan discussion document

Purpose

18.     The overarching vision of the NAP is:

·    ‘our people, places and systems are resilient and able to adapt to the effects of unavoidable climate changes in a fair, low-cost and ordered manner’

19.     The goals of the NAP are threefold:

·    reduce vulnerability to the impacts of climate change

·    enhance adaptive capacity and consider climate change in all decisions at all levels

·    strengthen resilience to climate change.

20.     The above goals have three key areas of focus:

·    reform institutions to be fit for a changing climate

·    provide data, information, tools and guidance to allow everyone to assess and reduce their own climate risks

·    embed climate resilience across government strategies and policies.

21.     The actions identified in the NAP focus on six outcome areas discussed further below.

·    system-wide

·    natural environment

·    homes, buildings and places

·    infrastructure

·    communities

·    economy and finance.

22.     Each outcome area has a set of objectives to address the risks for that area. Each objective has one or more actions to achieve that objective. The actions are categorised as critical actions, supporting actions and future actions.

23.     Treaty of Waitangi responsiveness is included through the support for a Māori based framework, known as Rauora (appended). This is complemented by a series of actions that specifically target Māori and others that will be significant to Māori. Notably, one key action is ‘establishing a foundation to work with Māori on climate actions’. There are three main components to this action. Firstly, funding for Māori partnership and representation. The purpose of this is to enable strategic input from Māori and to advance equitable governance arrangements over the emissions reduction plan and the NAP. Additionally, there is funding to support Māori to define, measure and implement a national Māori climate strategy and action plan. Lastly, support will be afforded to kaupapa Māori, tāngata Māori actions and solutions for the climate emergency.

24.     An Interdepartmental Executive Board is being established to oversee the emissions reduction plan and NAP. The Board will monitor and report on overall progress. The Climate Change Response Ministers Group will oversee the plan and drive progress.

25.     The NAP will be monitored by He Pou a Rangi – Climate Change Commission. A bi-annual monitoring and evaluation report will be submitted by the Commission to the Minister of Climate Change.  This process provides an opportunity for the Government to review and adjust the actions and manage changing uncertainty and risk. Beyond, the findings will also contribute to New Zealand’s international commitments to report on New Zealand’s progress towards building resilience.

Roles and responsibilities for local government outlined in the draft National Adaptation Plan

26.     Responsibility shared by all: The NAP identifies that responsibility for adaptation will be shared by all New Zealanders and that central government will not bear all the risks and costs. Risk and costs will be shared between asset or property owners, their insurance companies, their banks, local government and central government.

27.     Roles of different sector groups: The NAP provides an overview of the roles that different sectors of society including central government, local government, iwi/Māori, private sector, community and individuals and academia play.

28.     Local government at front line: The NAP recognises that local government (city, regional, district and unitary councils) is on the front line in preparing for and dealing with climate impacts and risks. The role of local government is outlined in the NAP as being centred around the following:

·    local government have statutory responsibilities to make key decisions on how to use and manage land and other natural resources to avoid and/or mitigate impacts of natural hazards

·    responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience

·    local government own a significant amount of assets, including infrastructure and forests that are all at risk

·    for most communities, local authorities are the government bodies that are closest to their needs and represent local views. Examples of this connection include the role of local authorities in land-use planning, water resources, three waters services, flood risk management, biodiversity and biosecurity, roading and emergency management

·    local government enhances community resilience through public education and local planning processes

·    responsiveness to iwi and Māori groups and other community groups

·    links to the private sector with a reliance on supply chains, production systems and a thriving economic environment.

29.     Priority risks for local government: The plan outlines water security, communities and natural ecosystems as priority risk areas for local government. Additionally, new and changing legislation will impact the role of local government.

30.     Central role: Local government plays a central role in managing natural hazard risks, which the impacts of climate change are contributing to increasing risk and vulnerability. Councils also have responsibilities for civil defence and emergency management and provide a critical link between climate change adaptation policy and communities. These links are established through its planning and emergency management functions and community engagement.

31.     NAP response: In response to the above priority risk areas for local government, the NAP responds in the following ways:

·    supports local government to take adaptation action, and outlines a programme of work to provide guidance and resources to encourage action

·    aims to help local government plan for future impacts and not just respond to events as they occur

·    takes a long-term view by ensuring governance and decision-making frameworks are fit for purpose and climate resilience is integrated into government strategies and policies

·    aims to build coordination and collaboration between central and local government, communities, iwi/Māori and businesses as we work together on innovative and effective adaptation solutions.

32.     The objectives and actions which respond to the various risk areas are summarised in the following section of this memorandum.

Critical and supporting climate actions

33.     The climate actions are organised under six main sections: System-wide; Natural Environment; Homes, Buildings and Places; Infrastructure ; Communities and Economy and Finance . A full detailed outline of actions is included in Appendix 3 of the NAP.

34.     The actions are categorised as critical actions, supporting actions and future actions.

35.     System-Wide Actions (p 25- 38)

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions in this chapter. The objectives are centred around appropriate frameworks and settings to enable people and communities enabling access to information and data sets to manage their own risks, the development of tools and guidance governance; and the embedding of climate resilience. These actions seek to establish the foundation for adaptation action in this first NAP

·    critical actions include legislative changes over the next six years: reform of the resource management system (2022-2023); legislation to support managed retreat (2022-2025), reform institutional arrangements for water services (2022-2025); modernise the emergency management system (2022-2028); and a review of the future of local government (2022-2023)

·    a range of supporting actions are also outlined in the following areas: establishing a foundation to work with Māori on climate actions; natural hazards; natural disaster resilience; emergency management; and establishment government oversight and coordination.

36.     Natural Environment (p 43-51) 

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions of this chapter. The objectives are centred around healthy ecosystems, robust biosecurity to reduce new pests and diseases and working with nature to build climate resilience

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the natural environment risks in the NCCRA. In particular, they address the risks to:

§ risks to coastal ecosystems, including the intertidal zone, estuaries, dunes, coastal lakes and wetlands, due to ongoing sea-level rise and extreme weather events

§ risks to indigenous ecosystems and species from the enhanced spread, survival and establishment of invasive species due to climate change.

37.     Homes Buildings and Places (p53-60)

·    there are four main objectives to this chapter that shape the actions. The objectives are centred around climate resilient homes and buildings that meet social and cultural needs, new and existing places are planned and managed to minimise risks to communities, strengthening of Māori connection to whenua and places of cultural significance, threats to cultural heritage sites are understood and impacts minimised

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the risk to buildings due to extreme weather events, drought, increased fire weather and ongoing sea  level rise

·    other risks addressed through these actions include risks to:

§ Māori social, cultural, spiritual and economic wellbeing from loss and degradation of lands and waters, as well as cultural assets such as marae

§ Māori and European cultural heritage sites due to projected ongoing sea-level rise, extreme weather events and increasing fire weather.

38.     Infrastructure (p63-70)

·    there are three main objectives that shape the actions to this chapter. The objectives are centred around reducing vulnerabilities to assets exposed to climate change, ensuring all new infrastructure is fit for climate change, and the use of renewal programmes to improve climate adaptative capacity

·    the actions in this chapter are designed to achieve these objectives and address the built environment risks in the NCCRA

·    in particular, they address the risk to potable water supplies (availability and quality) due to changes in rainfall, temperature, drought, extreme weather events and ongoing sea-level rise.

39.     Communities (p74-81)

·    there are four main objectives that shape the actions to this chapter. The objectives are centred around enabling communities to adapt, supporting vulnerable people and communities, support communities when disrupted and displaced, a health system that is prepared and can support vulnerable communities affected by climate change

·    the actions are designed to achieve these objectives and address the human domain risks in the National Climate Change Risk Assessment (NCCRA). In particular:

§ social cohesion and community wellbeing are at risk due to displacement of individuals, families and communities due to climate change impacts

§ that climate change could exacerbate existing inequities and creating new and additional inequities due to differential distribution of climate change impacts.

40.     Economy and Finance (p84-88)

·    there are two main objectives that shape the actions of this chapter. The objectives are centred around supporting sectors, businesses and regional economies to adapt and economic stability and growth through a resilient financial system. The actions are varied and include for example a focus on freight and supply chain, fisheries reform, aquaculture, climate-related disclosure and the regulating financial entities.

Managed retreat

41.     The Ministry for the Environment is also consulting on a high-level framework for a managed retreat system, and related insurance matters.

42.     These two issues relate to the following critical actions within the NAP:

·    reform the Resource Management System

·    pass legislation to support managed retreat

·    develop options for home flood insurance issues.

43.     Five key objectives and six principles have been identified to guide the development of managed retreat legislation (the Climate Adaptation Act). The consultation documentation also identifies:

·    a high-level process for managed retreat

·    roles and responsibilities, with specific reference to local government

·    issues associated with property transfer (including consideration for Māori land)

·    implications for Māori.

44.     Feedback is also sought on the interaction of insurance with managed retreat.

45.     For local government, the potential risks and costs associated with managed retreat and liabilities associated with flood insurance are likely to be key discussion points.

 

Likely themes for Council’s submission

46.     Council’s submission on the NAP will focus on the extent to which the NAP enables and/or inhibits climate adaptation for Auckland Council.

47.     In particular, the role and responsibilities of local government in relation to the NAP, and the extent to which critical actions outlined in the NAP support Auckland Council to fulfil their defined legislative roles and responsibilities. Both risks and opportunities will be highlighted.

48.     The submission will also consider council’s views and perspectives in relation to the extent that the NAP enables and/or inhibits their current and future commitments to mana whenua.

49.     The submission will also consider managed retreat, insurance and associated critical issues to be considered in the development of new legislation for managed retreat.

Timeframe for development of the National Emissions Reduction Plan

Milestone

Date

Discussion document released

27 April 2022

MfE Local Government Workshop

10 May 2022

MfE Local Government Workshop

17 May 2022

Draft submission available

18 May 2022

Deadline for appended feedback

27 May 2022

Consultation period closes

3 June 2022

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     The National Adaptation Plan has the potential to strongly influence Auckland’s ability to take a precautionary approach to preparing for climate change, as adopted by council through Te Tāruke -ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

51.     Council’s submission to the NAP consultation document can reiterate its position and advocate for a NAP that places Auckland in the best position to achieve its, and Aotearoa’s adaptation goals.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

52.     Feedback from relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations on the draft submission will be sought. The council-group was involved in establishing existing council positions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Local authorities will play are key role in implementation of the proposed National Adaptation Plan, as they:

·    are the closest government bodies to communities and represent local views

·    have a responsibility to plan for and invest in improving community resilience

·    enhance community resilience through public education and local planning processes.

Local board views are being sought on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat and will be appended to council’s final submission.

54.     The consultation documentation Kia urutau, kia ora: Kia āhuarangi rite a Aotearoa – Adapt and thrive: Building a climate-resilient New Zealand, which summarises consultation on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat, is appended to this document and can be downloaded at https://environment.govt.nz/publications/adapt-and-thrive-building-a-climate-resilient-aotearoa-new-zealand-consultation-document/. 

55.     Additional information on engagement, including a video summary of the draft National Adaptation Plan can be found at https://environment.govt.nz/what-you-can-do/have-your-say/climate-change-engagement/

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     The National Climate Change Risk Assessment and the NAP acknowledge that all risks are relevant to Māori and some may disproportionately affect certain whānau, hapū and iwi, as well as Māori interests, values, practices and wellbeing. They also recognise the Government’s responsibility to give effect to Te Tiriti principles.

57.     The NAP draws on key concepts of the Rauora framework (Attachment 3) that brings together Māori values and principles into an indigenous worldview (te ao Māori) of climate change, and is complemented by a series of actions that specifically target Māori to enable strategic input and advance equitable governance. This aligns well with the direction in Te Tāruke -ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

58.     Feedback on the draft National Adaptation Plan and managed retreat is being sought from the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Forum and Iwi Chairs, and will be appended to the council’s final submission.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     To work effectively, the future system requires appropriate funding mechanisms for its different roles and activities.

60.     The MfE is exploring what provisions and guidance can be provided in the future system, to set clear expectations regarding who should pay for what, and to support the availability and use of appropriate funding tools. Proposals will use existing guidance on charging in the public sector and look at applying this to the context of the future central government-led adaptation plans.

61.     Implementation and operation of the national adaptation plan will require significant investment from the council. Central government’s approach to sharing these costs is unclear. These costs will be driven by factors such as the transition from the current system, establishment and support of joint committees, development of new plans and strategies, changed workforce needs, and increased legal action. In addition, there are likely to be impacts on the ways the council approaches financial and infrastructure planning.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

62.     There is little risk in making a submission on the consultation on the NAP.

63.     Risks in relation to local government’s role in implementation of the NAP, e.g., funding and financing, will be considered as part of council’s response.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

64.     Local board resolutions on the draft National Adaptation Plan will be appended to the Auckland Council submission on this matter.

65.     Below are the key dates for input into the submission:

·    18 May 2022: draft submission circulated to local board members

·    27 May 2022: final date for any formal local board feedback to be appended to the submission.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te mahere urutaunga ā-motu (tuhinga hukihuki): Draft National Adaptation Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Consultation document: Kia urutau, kia ora: Kia āhuarangi rite a Aotearoa – Adapt and thrive: Building a climate-resilient New Zealand. Draft National Adaptation Plan and Managed Retreat (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Insight into the Rauora Indigenous Worldview Framework for the National Climate Change Adaptation Plan

543

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy – Local Board Services

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Community Forum record of proceedings

File No.: CP2022/06135

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Providing a record of proceedings from the Community Forum session held 11 May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community forums are held monthly on the second Wednesday of the month. They provide opportunity for the public to raise and discuss local issues with board members.

3.       The forum also provides an opportunity to provide feedback on workshop agenda items.

4.       Further information and copies of presentations can be found at the link below:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the Community Forum record of proceedings dated 11 May 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Community Forum record of proceedings

563

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2022/06137

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held 20 and 27 April and 4 and 11 May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on 20 and 27 April and 4 and 11 May 2022 are appended to the report.

5.       These can also be viewed, together with workshop agendas, at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 20 and 27 April and 4 and 11 May 2022. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 20 April 2022

573

b

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 27 April 2022

575

c

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 4 May 2022

577

d

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 11 May 2022

579

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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25 May 2022

 

 

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25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

List of resource consent applications - 3 April to 7 May 2022

File No.: CP2022/06141

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Attached is the list of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 3 April to 7 May 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the list of resource consents applications related to Waiheke Island. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Weekly Resource Consents Applications

583

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

Local board governance forward work calendar - June 2022 update

File No.: CP2022/06143

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Waiheke Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar is appended to the report as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive its Governance Forward Work Calendar dated June 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance foward work calendar - June 2022

589

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Deputation - Golf New Zealand - Concerns regarding Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan supporting material                                                          Page 595

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Deputation - Pam Oliver - Submission re stormwater management supporting material.                 Page 597


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator


Waiheke Local Board

25 May 2022

 

 

PDF Creator 



[1] Annual figures for the 18-month period 30 June 2020 to 31 December 2021, when compared to the prior five-year baseline period.

[2] https://www.transport.govt.nz/statistics-and-insights/safety-annual-statistics/sheet/social-cost-of-road-crashes

[3] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[4] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[5] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[6] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy