I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

 

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 21 June 2022

2.00pm

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Office and Microsoft Teams
1 The Strand
Takapuna

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Ruth Jackson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jan O'Connor, QSM

 

Members

Aidan Bennett,QSM

 

 

Trish Deans

 

 

Toni van Tonder

 

 

George Wood, CNZM

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness

Democracy Advisor

 

15 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 815 313

Email: rhiannon.guinness@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

6.1     2022 Queens Birthday Honors in New Zealand                                                5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          6

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

8.1     Auckland Canoe Polo Society Inc - Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022                                                                                                              6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

9.1     Takapuna Boating Club - Bayswater Boating Club Proposed Legislation Change                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           7

12        Notice of Motion - Chairperson Ruth Jackson - Resolutions Pending Action report  9

13        Bayswater Boating Club - Proposed Legislation Change                                      23

14        Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 - Local Board views       39

15        Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022, grant allocations 49

16        Variation of Community Lease to Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated and a Licence to Occupy to Rotary Club of Devonport Incorporated, at Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Narrow Neck, Devonport                                                                               125

17        Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change                                                                                        139

18        Local board feedback on the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021                                  163

19        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022) 187

20        Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                  349

21        Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme                                                             419

22        Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme                                                               429

23        Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme                                                                                435

24        Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme                                                                                      441

25        Adoption of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Agreement 2022/2023        447

26        Chairpersons' Report                                                                                                459

27        Elected Members' Reports                                                                                        461

28        Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops May 2022                463

29        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                      473

30        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The meeting will open with a karakia.

 

Whakataka te hau ki te uru

Whakataka te hau ki te tonga

Kia mākinakina ki uta 

Kia mātaratara ki tai         

E hī ake ana te atakura   

He tio 

He huka 

He hau hū  

Tīhei mauri ora

Cease o winds from the west

Cease o winds from the south

Bring calm breezes over the land

Bring calm breezes over the sea

And let the red-tipped dawn come

With a touch of frost

A sharpened air

And promise of a glorious day.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

 

  1. A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member

 

  1. A non-financial conflict interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

 

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

 

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 17 May 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1       2022 Queens Birthday Honors in New Zealand

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To acknowledge and congratulate those who reside or are known in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area who have received appointments in the Queen’s Birthday Honors 2022 in New Zealand

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      acknowledges and congratulates the following people who reside or are known in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area who have received appointments in the Queens Birthday Honors 2022 in New Zealand:

i)        Dr Judith Helen McGregor, Devonport – NZ Order of Merit Dames Companion (DNZM), for services to human rights and health

ii)       Margaret Ann Tod, Takapuna – Member of NZ Order of Merit (MNZM), for services to netball

iii)      Patrick John Walsh, Devonport – Member of NZ Order of Merit (MNZM), for services to education

iv)      Julie Read, Devonport – Queen’s Service Order (QSO), for services to the state

v)      Hans van Ess, Hauraki – Honorary Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit (HMNZM) for services to ju-jitsu

 

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Auckland Canoe Polo Society Inc - Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Amber Nell of Auckland Canoe Polo Society Inc. will be in attendance to address the board in support of their application to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Auckland Canoe Polo Society Inc. and thank Amber Nell for her attendance.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

9.1       Takapuna Boating Club - Bayswater Boating Club Proposed Legislation Change

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       James Jordan of the Takapuna Boating Club will be in attendance to address the board in support of the Bayswater Boating Club Proposed Legislation Change report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Takapuna Boating Club and thanks James Jordan for his attendance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from <Member Names>  for consideration under item 12.

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Notice of Motion - Chairperson Ruth Jackson - Resolutions Pending Action report

File No.: CP2022/08450

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Chairperson Ruth Jackson has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Chairperson Ruth Jackson and Member Jan O’Connor as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment B

 

Motion

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      request that local board staff provide a Resolutions Pending Action report at each business meeting of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board as shown in the example in Attachment A to this Notice of Motion from the Orakei Local Board agenda of 19 May 2022, noting

i.        the need for local board decision-making to be open and transparent to satisfy the requirements of the Local Government Act, and to meet the expectations of our residents

ii.       that this will keep the board and our communities fully updated on the progress made on previous local board resolutions

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Ruth Jackson - Resolutions pending action report

11

b

Notice of Motion - Ruth Jackson - Resolutions pending action report: Example report from Orakei Local Board

13

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Bayswater Boating Club - Proposed Legislation Change

File No.: CP2022/06300

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To inform board members of the issues relating to the Takapuna Boating Club building at 17 Sir Peter Blake Parade Bayswater.

2.       To inform board members of options and seek feedback which will be included in a report to the Governing Body.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Takapuna Boating Club (TBC) owns the land and boat club building at 17 Sir Peter Blake Parade, Bayswater.

4.       The land is subject to a local act of Parliament, the Auckland Harbour Board and Takapuna Borough Council Empowering Act 1923 (the Act). A full copy of the Act id provided Attachment A to this report. The Act requires that the land be used for the purposes of boating sheds, public swimming baths, social hall, or for any similar or incidental purpose, but requires that the land or any part of it, or any building on it must not be used for private gain.

5.       The uses permitted by the Act have over time become redundant with the swimming baths ceasing operation in the 1950s and the club moving to new premises in the 1960’s. The stipulation that the use of the building may not be for private gain means TBC is unable to enter in-to complying commercial leases with tenants who could provide the club with the income necessary to upgrade and maintain the building. TBC wishes to retain and restore the building, but the restrictions that the Act imposes prevents TBC from securing the commercial income necessary to fund restoration and, more importantly, provide an income necessary for the club to maintain the building into the future. The building, which is a heritage listed building, currently sits in disrepair.

 

6.       TBC is seeking an amendment to the legislation that would allow the club to use a portion of the building for commercial purposes (for example, to lease part of the building to a commercial party), while continuing to use the remainder of the site for boating and community use.

7.       Only the council can promote a local bill to amend a local Act. Therefore, TBC is seeking council support to amend the Act. Staff have identified and assessed the relevant options which include doing nothing, council acquisition of the property, council supporting an amendment of the Act or advocating for full repeal of the legislation. The recommended option is for council to support an amendment of the Act to allow TBC’s proposal to lease some of the property to a commercial party.

8.       The Governing Body holds allocated decision-making authority for decisions that involve the acquisition or disposal of a property right.  This report seeks the Devonport-Takapuna local board’s views which will be included in the report to the Governing Body seeking a decision.  The local board is also asked to provide its views and preferences as to a preferred option, and to request staff to consult on that preferred option with persons likely to be affected by (or may have an interest in) the matter.  Any feedback received will be reported to the Governing Body alongside the recommendation of the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)         support the recommended option of amending the Auckland Harbour Board and Takapuna Borough Council Empowering Act 1923 (the Act) to facilitate the Takapuna Boating Club’s proposal to lease part of the building on a commercial basis as follows:

 Proposed amended Section 5 of the Act:

 

1.             The Auckland Council or any body or person claiming through or under it shall use the land described in Schedule1 hereto as a site of and for the principal purposes of boat sheds, public swimming baths, social hall or any similar community purpose.

 

2.             Nothing in subsection (1) shall prevent the use of part of the land described in schedule 1 for commercial purposes as long as the land and any buildings on it are principally used for community purposes.

 

3.             Where any part of the land described in Schedule 1 is subject to a lease or other arrangement for use in accordance with subsection (2), any proceeds received under any such lease or other arrangement must be used towards the maintenance of the land and any building or other capital improvements situated thereon, and/or for community purposes.

 

b)         consider recommending to the Governing Body that staff consult on the preferred option expressed in resolution a) above in order to ascertain the views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by (or may have an interest in) the matter.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       The Takapuna Boating Club (TBC) building is located on a parcel of land located at 17 Sir Peter Blake Parade Bayswater. Adjacent to the TBC building are the remains of saltwater swimming baths which were originally owned and managed by council up until the 1950s.

10.     The area of land comprising the boat club building and the swimming baths is subject to a local act of Parliament, the Auckland Harbour Board and Takapuna Borough Council Empowering Act 1923 (the Act). A full copy of the Act is provided as Attachment A to this report. The Act requires that the land only be used for the purposes of boating sheds, public swimming baths, social hall, or for any similar or incidental purpose, and requires that the land or any part of it, or any building on it, must not be used for private gain.

11.     The land was originally owned by the Auckland Harbour Board and vested in the Takapuna Borough Council in 1923. The land that the boat club building sits on was sold to TBC in 1926 for a nominal amount with the current title (NA455/236) issued in 1927. The borough council held title to the swimming baths until the introduction of the Marine and Coastal Area (Takutai Moana) Act 2011 then, in accordance with Section 11(3) of that act, the land became part of the common marine and coastal area and council was divested of title.

12.     In the 1920s TBC purchased and disassembled an old tannery building in Panmure, barging it to Bayswater where it was transformed into a three-storey clubhouse using their own funds.  The clubhouse building is now recognised as a Category A* Heritage building in the Schedule of Historic Heritage in the Auckland Unitary Plan.

13.     Saltwater swimming baths were constructed and managed by the Takapuna Borough Council in 1923/24 and were in use up until the 1950’s. The clubhouse was used for changing and toilet facilities for the baths, and this right is recorded in the transfer of the land to the TBC.

14.     TBC utilised the whole building as clubrooms before relocating to new premises at Takapuna in the 1960s, but it has continued to utilise the boat club building for small boat regattas, wind surfing, kayaking and gear storage.

15.     In 2002 TBC commissioned a conservation plan to ensure the long-term preservation of the building. In more recent times it has spent over $600,000 renewing the roof and foundations of the building but the club does not have the ongoing financial means to restore the building any further and it has fallen into disrepair.

16.     The restrictions in the Act around not using the land or any buildings on it for private gain prevent TBC from securing a commercial lease over any part of the building. Currently the top two floors of the building are vacant, and in their current state, cannot be used. Consequently, TBC receives no income from the building which would, under normal circumstances, fund maintenance and upkeep. A portion of the ground floor is currently used for boating, windsurfing and equipment storage but is well below a condition acceptable for ongoing occupation.

17.     TBC has sought support from council in exploring and evaluating options that might allow sale or lease of the property. TBC’s preference is to retain ownership of the land and building and to see the building restored and jointly utilised by a commercial party and the club. The lease proposal would remove a significant financial burden from the club.

18.     To proceed with the leasing proposal, the restrictive uses and the not to be used for private gain requirements of the Act will need to be amended. The Act is a local act and any amendment to it must be introduced as a local bill in Parliment promoted by a local authority.

19.     If an amendment is proposed, the wording of the bill will be finalised by the Parliamentary Counsel Office as part of the legislative process, but the proposed amendment is suggested to be along the lines of the following:

Current Section 5 of the Act:

 

‘The Auckland council or anybody or person claiming through or under it shall use the land described in schedule 1 hereto as a site of and for the purposes of boating sheds, public swimming baths, social hall, or for any similar or incidental purpose, but so that the said parcel of land or any part thereof or any building thereon shall not be used for private gain.’

 

Suggested amended section 5 of the Act:

 

1.       ‘The Auckland Council or any body or person claiming through or under it shall use the land described in Schedule1 hereto as a site of and for the principal purposes of boat sheds, public swimming baths, social hall or any similar community purpose.

2.       Nothing in subsection (1) shall prevent the use of part of the land described in schedule 1 for commercial purposes as long as the land and any buildings on it are principally used for community purposes.

3.       Where any part of the land described in Schedule 1 is subject to a lease or other arrangement for use in accordance with subsection (2), any proceeds received under any such lease or other arrangement must be used towards the maintenance of the land and any building or other capital improvements situated thereon, and/or for community purposes.’

 

20.     The intention of the amendment would be to allow TBC to lease a portion of the property to a private commercial party but the restrictions in the Act will continue to apply to the club’s use of the balance of the land and/or building.

21.     Staff have identified and assessed three additional options available to the council and have set out the advantages and disadvantages in the ‘Options Review’ section of the report below. Options 1-3 are not recommended for various reasons, primarily due to the council not having the financial resources or need to acquire the boat club building and land.

22.     The recommended option (option four) is for the council to promote a local bill to amend the Act to allow TBC the option of leasing a portion of the property to a commercial party.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Heritage issues

23.     The TBC building falls within the Coastal Marina Zone and is part of the Bayswater Marina sub-precinct under the Auckland Unitary Plan.

24.     The sub-precinct provides for the development and operation of established marinas including both land and water components and covers the land and coastal marine area to promote integrated management of activities and effects that cross mean high water springs. The Bayswater sub-precinct zone specifically refers to the TBC building in ensuring that activities do not detract from the character of the “scheduled historic heritage Takapuna Boating Club”.

25.     The building is further identified under the Historic Heritage overlay as Category A* - of outstanding significance well beyond the immediate environs. “Heritage values” are categorised in the Unitary Plan as.

A – Historical

B – Social

C – Mana Whenua

D – Knowledge

E – Technology

F – Physical Attributes

G – Aesthetics

H – Context

 

26.     The TBC building is identified as having heritage values A (Historical), B (social), F  (Physical Attributes), and G (Aesthetics).

27.     The TBC building is not recorded in the Historic Places Trust Register. The Marina sub-precinct zone and the heritage values of the building highlight the need for the building to remain as an integrated part of the future Bayswater Marina development.

28.     Initial discussions with council’s heritage team indicate strong support for restoration of the building and the saltwater swimming baths. TBC have indicated willingness to work with the heritage team to ensure that the redevelopment is in keeping with the style and heritage of the building.

 

 

 

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Options review

29.     In addition to the proposal from TBC to promote a local bill to amend the Act, staff have identified and assessed three additional options for consideration. The advantages and disadvantages of all relevant options are set out in the table below:

 

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

1.   Do nothing

Council declines to support TBC in promoting a local bill to amend the Act or to assist by any other means in dealing with the issues with the building.

·    No cost to Council

·    Possible community backlash at lack of support – potential loss of heritage building

·    The building will continue to sit in a state of disrepair as TBC does not have funding to upgrade and maintain

2.   Council acquires the property from TBC

·    Council secures land and building

·    Council inherits the same legislative restrictions.

·    No known requirement for an additional community facility in this area.

·    No funding available for restoration or maintenance

·    Heritage status of building also restricts potential development

3.   Promote a local Bill to amend the Act to allow TBC to lease a portion of the building for commercial activities

·    Enables TBC to enter into a commercial leasing activity

·    Supports restoration and preservation of a heritage building and enables a funding source for its ongoing maintenance

·    Commercial operations might overshadow any potential community uses

·    Reputational -- council seen as supporting private control of part of what was intended to be a club-owned community facility

4.   Advocate for full repeal of the Act

·    Property is unencumbered and can be sold/leased and developed by TBC as of right

·    Potential sale and loss of heritage building

 

30.     Option 1 does not allow TBC to secure an income from the property that would enable redevelopment and restoration.  The building will remain unusable and continue to deteriorate.

31.     Option 2 involves a substantial cost to council in purchasing and restoring the building. The council would also inherit the same legislative restrictions that apply to the site under the Act.

32.    Option 3 is the recommended option as it removes potential costs for council and enables TBC to secure a commercial rental, which may ultimately enable restoration of the building and provide boating amenities to the community.

33.     Option 4 is not supported as, while it would remove all legislative restrictions, repeal of the legislation in its entirety is not in keeping with the original intention of the Act to ensure the ongoing provision of boating and recreational facilities for the community. The property could be lost to private development.

34.     All of the options considered involve either disposing or acquiring a property right. In terms of the Act, council is able to acquire the land back if the club breaches the Act. Consideration of the options is council exercising that property right. The Governing Body is the allocated decision maker for decisions that involve the acquisition or disposal of a property right. This report seeks the Devonport-Takapuna local board’s views and preferences on the proposal, which will be included in the report to the governing body seeking a decision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland’s climate action plan sets out two core goals to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

36.     The council is not the property owner.

37.     This is an administrative report and the feedback from the local board does not have any direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

38.     The proposal outlined in this report, if it succeeds, will enable changes in the use of the land and activity on the land.

39.     Climate change will have the ability to impact this property given its proximity to the sea.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     The proposal has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group and there is no requirement for additional community facilities in this location.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     This report seeks to inform members of the issues relating to the Takapuna Boating Club  building; explain the options that are available, and to seek the views and preferences of the  local board which will be included in a report to Governing Body, who will consider whether and what form of public consultation is appropriate should the preferred option be accepted.

42.     Although there is no statutory obligation on council to consult on the proposal, it must still comply with its decision-making obligations under Part 6 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA).  In particular, council has a duty under section 78 of the LGA to give consideration to the ‘views and preferences of persons likely to be affected by, or have an interest in, the proposal.’ 

43.     Council has discretion as to how to comply with Section 78, and how it complies should be largely in proportion to the significance of the matters affected by the decision as determined in accordance with council’s Significance and Engagement Policy.   

 

44.     If council does not consider it has enough information on the views and preferences, then it will be appropriate to seek that information through a type of targeted engagement with the affected community and any other identified key stakeholders.

 

45.     It is unclear to what degree the Bayswater community are aware of the proposal to amend the Act, or if there have been any public views and preferences expressed about TBC’s intended desire to pursue a commercial lease for part of the building.  If the Governing Body was to consider consultation on the matter, it is suggested that such consultation be limited to the Bayswater community and contained to the proposed amendment to the Act (assuming that is the option preferred).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti 0 Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

47.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2012-2022, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tamaki Makaurau – Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework and Local Board Plans.

48.     The council is not the property owner in this instance, but changes to the legislation will require both public and iwi consultation. The Governing Body will consider what form of iwi consultation is appropriate should the preferred option be accepted.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     Capital costs in respect to Options 2 and 3 are estimated at between $4-6 million, the bulk of these being in restoration of the building. Ongoing operational costs would be expected to be in the order of $100,000 - $150,000 per annum.

50.     Option 4 requires council to bear the cost of promoting a local bill which includes a $2,000 filing fee. The legal work and legislative drafting will be completed by council’s Legal Services team with assistance from the Parliamentary Counsel Office. The TBC will be asked to contribute to the cost of any public/iwi consultation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

51.     Option 1 has no financial risk for council but offers some reputational risk, in that council may be perceived as preventing TBC from being able to manage and restore the building.

52.     Option 2 has significant financial risk for council, both in restoration costs and ongoing maintenance.  Legislative change would also likely be required also as, council would still be bound by the restrictions on use set out in the Act.

53.     Option 3 has minimal risk for council.  It would enable the TBC to secure a commercial tenant which would provide the TBC with an income that could be used towards restoration of the building.

54.     Option 4 has no financial risk for council but frees the property for sale and potential loss of a heritage building.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     If the council wants to take some action in relation to the issues raised in this report, a report will be submitted to the Governing Body incorporating local board views and recommendations.

56.     If the Governing Body agree with the recommended option of promoting a local bill to amend the Act, it is recommended that council consult with the local community, iwi and any identified stakeholders.

57.     Following consultation staff will work with Parliamentary Counsel Office to finalise the wording of the bill to be introduced to Parliament. The legislation change is supported by Simon Watts, National MP for the North Shore, who will introduce the bill.

58.     A summary of the process is attached at Attachment B to this report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Harbour Board and Takapuna Borough Council Empowering Act 1923

31

b

Process for amending TBC draft bill v2

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Wendy Morrice - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 - Local Board views

File No.: CP2022/08226

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board views on applications to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund is a regionally contestable fund allocated through the Long-term Plan 2021 – 2031.

3.       The fund supports the development of community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland, looks to address gaps in provision, and allows the council to proactively respond to changing trends in sport and recreation.

4.       There is $15.3 million available in the current funding round.

5.       Allocation of the fund will be decided by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee at its meeting in September 2022.

6.       Local board views will inform recommendations to the PACE Committee.

7.       Information relating to applications received organisations from within the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area are included at Attachment A and B.

8.       Local board views will be included with materials for an independent assessment panel scheduled to sit in July 2022. The recommendations from the assessment panel will be presented to the PACE Committee at the September meeting. If approved, the grant allocations and funding agreements with successful applicants will be developed in late 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      consider endorsement of the application from Auckland Canoe Polo Society for Quarry Lake canoe polo court improvements at a value of $705,000 for investment through the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022.

Horopaki

Context

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022

9.       The Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund was established through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 to support development of sport and recreation facilities in the Auckland region.

10.     The regionally contestable fund will invest approximately $140 million over the next ten years to proactively address sport and recreation infrastructure shortfalls, respond to changing participation preferences, and to get more Aucklanders more active more often.

11.     There is $15.3 million available in the current funding round. This funding envelope is a combined allocation from two financial years (2021/2022 and 2022/2023).

12.     The fund will be allocated by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee in September 2022.

13.     Further information relating to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund and the current funding round can be found in the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 Guidelines.

Communication to local board

14.     Memos dated 29 October 2021 and 13 April 2022 were circulated to local boards to provide information on the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022, outline the approach to local board engagement, and provide information on applications to the fund from within the local board area.

15.     In workshops during May/June 2022 local boards were provided with further information on application(s) to the fund from within their areas. Local boards had the opportunity to ask questions for clarification and provide local insights.

16.     Information relating to applications received from organisations within the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area are included at Attachments A and B.

17.     Local board views will inform consideration of applications by an independent assessment panel whose recommendations will go to the PACE Committee in September 2022.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Local boards may endorse an application to be considered for investment through the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022, or instead decline to endorse and raise concerns about the application.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Local board endorsement of the application(s) is not in itself considered to carry a climate impact.

20.     Mitigation of potential environmental impacts arising from individual projects will be examined as one of the assessment criteria for the fund.

21.     Should an application to the fund be successful, potential emissions and environmental impacts (e.g.: through construction) will be further considered in land-owner approval and resource consent processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Decision-making on the fund sits with the PACE Committee.

23.     Local board views will inform recommendations to the committee.

24.     No other council group impacts are identified as arising from the local board expressing views on applications to the fund.

 

 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Workshops were held with local boards during May and early June 2022 where applications(s) have been received from their area.

26.     During those workshops, local boards had the opportunity to:

·    learn more about the application(s) and ask questions; and

·    provide their views supporting or opposing the applications.

27.     Local board direction taken from the workshops inform the recommendations in this report

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Māori outcomes are a priority criteria for the fund in the social and community theme. The social and community criteria are weighted to align with the equity focus in the Increasing Aucklanders Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2018-2038. Scoring will reflect applications displaying strong Māori outcomes.

29.     An initial presentation on the fund was provided to the Mana Whenua Forum in October 2021. In response to mana whenua feedback, staff have ensured that the independent assessment panel assessing applications in July 2022 will include a specialist with a Māori outcomes perspective.

30.     Applications to the fund will be presented to Mana Whenua Forum in June 2022. Mana whenua views will be sought to inform the assessment panel and recommendations to the PACE Committee. Where it is desired by mana whenua, fund recipients will be required to engage with iwi about their projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget established through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028. The PACE Committee allocates budget following a regionally contestable process.

32.     Local board views on applications will inform discussions with the assessment panel and ultimately recommendations to the PACE Committee.

33.     Local board endorsement of the application(s) will have no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The following risks and mitigations have been identified:

Risk

Mitigation

Applicants may consider the endorsement by the local board to be an indication that a grant will be forthcoming.

The applicant will be advised by staff that any endorsement at this stage is an endorsement to progress their application for further consideration.

Applicants may consider the endorsement by the local board to be an indication that the local board will provide necessary approvals (e.g. land owner approval, agreement to lease).

The applicant will be advised by staff that any local board endorsement at this stage does not affect future local board decisions.

The applicant may not have the capability to lead delivery of a successful project.

The applicant’s ability to deliver a successful project is a key weighting within the criteria to be used by the assessment panel.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Local board views will be included with materials for an independent assessment panel scheduled to sit in July 2022.

36.     Recommendations from the assessment panel will be presented to the PACE Committee at the September meeting.

37.     Should the PACE Committee approve grant allocations, funding agreements with successful applicants will be developed in late 2022.

38.     Local boards will be advised of the PACE Committee decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

DTLB Applications to the Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2022 Memo

43

b

Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund 2022 Project Summary for DTLB

47

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nick Harris - Sport & Recreation Team Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Manoj Ragupathy - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022, grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/08145

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received for the Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two as shown in Attachment B to the agenda report.

3.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 20 April 2021 as shown in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $218,331 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Additional amounts of $5,000 from the Seabins – Milford Marina rubbish removal project (resolution number DT/2022/17) and $5,000 from the Devonport-Takapuna Anzac Services budget (resolution number DT/2022/23) were allocated to the community grants budget. A total of $207,305.47 was allocated in the previous rounds. A total of $21,025.53 remains to be allocated to this quick response round.

5.       Seventeen applications were received for Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $38,092.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 listed in the following table:   

Table One: Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 grant applications.

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2202-203

Victoria Theatre Trust Board

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of venue hire, lighting, technician cost, actors, and director's fee for a play reading series (three performances) at "the Victoria Theatre" in September 2022.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-210

The Operating Theatre Trust - Tim Bray Theatre Company

Arts and culture

Towards the performance and rehearsal venue hire for the production "The Whale Rider " at the Pumphouse Theatre.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-213

Sarah Burrell

Arts and culture

Towards the sound system hire, technician fees, and signage for the "Sounding Publics" installation from 11 to 17 July 2022.

$913.00

Eligible

QR2202-218

Show Me Shorts Film Festival Trust Board

Arts and culture

Towards the programming, communication, and marketing costs for the Devonport -Takapuna season of the "Show me Shorts" film festival at "The Vic" and the "Monterey Cinemas.

$1,079.00

Eligible

QR2202-202

The Upside Downs Education Trust

Community

Towards the speech-language therapy fees for two children with Down Syndrome in the local board area.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-207

Rotary Club of Milford (Incorporated)

Community

Towards the purchase of a pot(planter) for Milford square, plants for existing planters, a blower, and a battery support kit for the "Milford Beautification" maintenance.

$1,800.00

Eligible

QR2202-211

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the helpline telecommunication cost from 1 July 2022 to 31 March 2023.

$1,500.00

Ineligible

QR2202-217

PHAB Association (Auckland) Incorporated

Community

Towards the cost of delivering the "PHAB Mid-Winter Matariki Celebration" including the cost of project coordination, youth workers’ wages, art materials, catering, and administration.

$2,000.00

Ineligible

QR2202-220

North Shore Brass Incorporated

Community

Towards the repairs to the outside cladding of the building at the Taharoto Community Facility.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-222

Stanley Bowling & Petanque Club Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase of 130 plants for the "Stanley Bay Planting and Restoration" programme.

$800.00

Eligible

QR2202-212

New Zealand China Understanding Association ("NZCUA") Incorporated

Events

Towards the cost of running the "Māori and Chinese Day" events and classes, including the costs of venue hire, equipment hires, art materials, stationery, administration, printing, marketing, and promotion.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-214

Northshore Rowing Club Incorporated

Events

Towards the cost of sound equipment hire, security, waste management and portable toilets hire for the "Bennett Shield Memorial Regatta 2022".

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-201

North Shore Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the Takapuna Grammar School indoor cricket net hire for the "Winter and preseason" coaching programme

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-209

Milford Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of tennis balls.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-215

AFL New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of footballs, uniforms, and medals to run a youth programme at the Sunnynook Park from 30 October 2022 to 11 December 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-219

Takapuna District Cricket Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of a large pitch cover.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2202-221

Ngataringa Tennis Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of building, plumbing, electrical services, labour, and materials for the renovation and repair of the Ngataringa Tennis Club changing rooms.

$10,000.00

Ineligible

Total

 

 

 

$38,092.00

 

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board adopted the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 20 April 2021 as shown in Attachment A to the agenda report. The document sets application guidelines for community contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $218,331 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Additional amounts of $5,000 from the Seabins – Milford Marina rubbish removal project (resolution number DT/2022/17) and $5,000 from the Devonport-Takapuna Anzac Services budget (resolution number DT/2022/23) were allocated to the community grants budget. A total of $207,305.47 was allocated in the previous rounds. A total of $21,025.53 remains to be allocated to this quick response round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·    local food production and food waste reduction

·    decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·    home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·    local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·    education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as either arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grants programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, Round Two 2021/2022 is provided in Attachment B.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Six applicants applying to Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted 10-year Budget 2021/2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $218,331 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Additional amounts of $5,000 from the Seabins – Milford Marina rubbish removal project (resolution number DT/2022/17) and $5,000 from the Devonport-Takapuna Anzac Services budget (resolution number DT/2022/23) were allocated to the community grants budget. A total of $207,305.47 was allocated in the previous rounds. A total of $21,025.53 to be allocated to this quick response round.

23.     Seventeen applications were received for Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response, round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $38,092.

24.       Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board allocating funding for round two of the quick response grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Grants Programme 2021/2022

55

b

Devonport-Takapuna Quick Response Round Two 2021/2022 - grant applications

59

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

 

Variation of Community Lease to Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated and a Licence to Occupy to Rotary Club of Devonport Incorporated, at Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Narrow Neck, Devonport

File No.: CP2022/04485

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a variation of the community lease to enable a surrender part of the area leased to Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated at Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Devonport.

2.       To grant a Licence to Occupy to Devonport Rotary Club Incorporated for the site occupied by the Woodall Pump Track that includes the land surrendered by Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated at Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Devonport.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated (golf club) holds two community leases over Alison Park.  Each lease has a term of 33 years, and both will fully expire on 31 July 2027.

4.       Since 2019 Community Facilities staff have been working with Devonport Rotary Club Incorporated (rotary club), Devonport BMX Club, the golf club and other council teams on the development of Woodall Pump Track.

5.       Devonport-Takapuna Local Board approved the development of a pump track at Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Devonport at its meeting of 14 December 2021 (resolution DT/2021/199). This enabled the improvement and further development of the site that had been used for some time by members of the community for biking/pump track purposes.

6.       As the BMX club does not have legal status with the New Zealand Companies Office the rotary club is acting as the BMX club’s umbrella group and is partnering with council to maintain and develop the track. The rotary club has applied for a Licence to Occupy for the Pump Track.

7.       This report recommends that Devonport-Takapuna Local Board grants a variation of the Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated lease area A and supports the public notification and iwi consultation of its intention to grant a Licence to Occupy to Devonport Rotary Club Incorporated for the site occupied by the Pump Track. The site to be held under licence will include the land surrendered by the golf club and be offered for a term of five years with one five-year right of renewal. This is the recommended term in the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve, under section 54 (1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, a variation of the lease held by Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated to enable a surrender of 1765 square meters (more or less) of Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Devonport described as Part Lot 2 Deposited Plan 19288 (outlined and hatched in red in Attachment B)

i.    note the remainder of the area leased to the golf club will retain all terms and conditions in accordance with the original lease agreement dated 1 May 2009

b)      support the public notification and iwi consultation of the local boards intention to grant, a Licence to Occupy to Devonport Rotary Club Incorporated for 2100 square meters (more or less) at Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Devonport, described as Part Lot 2 Deposited Plan 19288, as identified on Attachment B to the agenda report, subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        Term – five (5) years commencing 1 February 2022 with one right of renewal for a further five (5) years, and final expiry on 31 January 2032

ii)       rent -$1.00 plus GST per annum, if requested

iii)      request that a community outcomes plan be prepared for approval by the local board and that this be attached as a schedule to the Licence to Occupy document

iv)      the signed Memorandum of Understanding on the maintenance responsibilities of council and the tenant to be included as a schedule to the occupancy agreement

v)      note all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

c)      appoint a hearings panel comprising three local board members or alternatively an independent commissionaire, to deal with any requests to be heard in relation to the proposal to grant the Licence to Occupy to The Devonport Rotary Club Incorporated

d)      grant, in the absence of any submissions or objections received to the proposal, a Licence to Occupy to the Devonport Rotary Club Inc in accordance with the terms and conditions publicly notified

Horopaki

Context

8.       This report considers a lease variation to one of the agreements held by the Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated to enable a partial surrender of land at Alison Park, Old Lake Road, Devonport, that will subsequently be offered under the terms of a licence to occupy to Devonport Rotary Club Incorporated.

9.       Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is the allocated authority for local, recreation, sport, and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Background

10.     Devonport-Takapuna Local Board approved the development of a pump track at Alison Park, Old Lake Road Devonport at its business meeting on 14 December 2021, (resolution DT/2021/199).

11.     Community Facilities staff have been working with the rotary club, Devonport BMX Club, the golf club, and other council teams on the project.

12.     The clubs held a public information day on 30 June 2020 to showcase the project. There was support from the local community for the development and improvement to the pump track area.

The land

13.     The land under discussion at Alison Park is owned by Auckland Council and legally described as being Part Lot 2 Deposited Plan 19288.  The land is held under the Reserves Act 1977 as a classified recreation reserve.

14.     Alison Park is covered by the former North Shore City Council Woodall Park Management Plan of September 1997. The use of the land for BMX bike riding is not contemplated in the management plan and therefore iwi consultation and public notification of the intention grant a licence to occupy is required.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Waitemata Golf Club Incorporated

15.     The golf club holds two community lease agreements. Area A and Area B are located at Alison Park, Narrow Neck shown in Attachment C to the agenda report. This variation applies to Alison Park (Area A) only.

16.     The original lease agreement, granted by the former North Shore City Council commenced on 1 August 1994. The lease provides for an initial term of 11 years with two rights of renewal of 11 years each (33-year total term). The lease is in its last renewal term. Final expiry is 31 July 2027.

17.     The pump track will be located partially in the golf club’s leased area. Varying the lease to record the surrender of 1765 m2 will reduce the total area leased to the golf club to 5.5442 hectares (more or less) as shown in Attachment D to the agenda report.

18.     The golf club has written in support of the proposed pump track and wishes to surrender this portion of leased area so it can become available for the pump track.

Rotary Club of Devonport Incorporated

19.     The rotary club is a service club which aims to support the local community by raising funds to support local charities and groups by initiating community projects and creating and maintaining a network of community-minded individuals to further those aims. The rotary club was set up in 1977 and since then has played a significant role in supporting the local Devonport community.  The club registered with the New Zealand Companies Office as an incorporated society in January 2004.

20.     The BMX club, under the umbrella of the Rotary Club of Devonport, and in conjunction with Community Facilities staff, will maintain the pump track.

21.     The BMX club will be responsible for the aggregate track, shaping, topping up aggregate, maintaining geotextile barrier and minor drainage maintenance.

22.     Auckland Council Community Facilities team will map, maintain, and renew the track structures including the built structures, timber launch ramp, timber retained tabletop feature, drainage culverts, signs, seats, and trees. These assets will be added to the full facilities and tree maintenance contracts.

23.     A Memorandum of Understanding stating each parties’ responsibilities and expectations will be signed by each party and attached to the Licence to Occupy.

24.     In December 2021, the rotary club applied for, and was granted, landowner approval for the development of the pump track.

25.     The rotary club has submitted a comprehensive application for a Licence to Occupy for the pump track.

Project background

26.     Community Facilities staff, along with other council teams, have been working on the pump track project with the rotary club, Devonport BMX Club, and the golf club on the project.  

27.     A letter outlining the project and the partnership with the rotary club was sent to neighbours of Alison Park in January 2020. Five responses were received, all supporting the development.

28.     A public information day was held at the park on 30 June 2020. Approximately 100 people came to view the project plans and discuss them with the project team. At least 30 individuals have registered their support to help with the construction. News items have been included in the community newspaper, The Flagstaff, and other information about the project included in local social media, where the response has been very supportive.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net-zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

30.     It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions. The rotary club is committed to using local contractors; this will reduce carbon emissions during construction.

31.     The nature of this project should be of relatively low impact since most of it will be dirt track shaping.

32.     The ongoing operation of the BMX bicycle track is expected to generate minimal carbon emissions.

33.     The site is located within a coastal inundation and flood sensitive area. Resource consent has been granted. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     Council staff from Community Facilities, and Parks, Sports and Recreation and Finance have been consulted, and several site meetings were organised. Staff support the project as it will improve the quality of the park and the recreational outcomes. Their feedback was incorporated as part of the concept design development process.

35.     The proposed variation of the lease and the Licence to Occupy has no other identified impacts on parts of the council group.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     The lease variation to enable the surrender by the golf club and development of the pump track by the rotary club was discussed with the local board at a workshop in May 2020. The local board indicated support in principle.

37.     The recommendations support the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome 2: Parks, facilities, and open spaces
Our parks, sports fields, community facilities, beaches and open spaces are well maintained to meet the recreation and social need of our growing population.

·    Outcome 3: Community participation and wellbeing
Our communities, including mana whenua, feed connected and supported to plan, deliver, and participate in activities and services in their local area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, and local board plans.

39.     The development discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the broader community by providing a place to undertake physical activity, socialise and learn through play.

40.     Iwi engagement will be undertaken as part of the notification and consultation process

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     The golf club’s rent is $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested. The current rent will continue after the variation to the lease is approved.

42.     The proposed rent to the rotary club for the Licence to Occupy, in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, is $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested.

43.     All costs involved in the preparation of the lease documents are borne by Community Facilities.

44.     All cost of public notification and any subsequent hearings will be borne by Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     The site is located within a coastal inundation and flood sensitive area. Resource Consent has been granted.

46.     The pump track has been onsite for a number of years, it has now been further developed by Devonport Rotary Club. The local board’s support for the proposed Licence to Occupy ensures security of tenure and makes clear the obligations and responsibilities of each party.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     Subject to the local board granting the variation to the golf club’s lease staff will work with the golf club to finalise the documentation in accordance with the decision of the local board.

48.     If there are no objections received that cannot be resolved following the public notification and iwi consultation process staff will work with the rotary club to finalise the new licence agreement in accordance with the decision of the board.

49.     If there are objections that cannot be resolved the local board will work with staff to facilitate a hearings process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Att A Site area, Alison Park, WGC Lease, BMX Pump Track

131

b

Att B Pump Track

133

c

Att  C WGC Original Lease site map Area A & B

135

d

Att D Updated WGC Leased Area A

137

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

 

Attachment A:  Site plan for BMX Pump Track

 

Location Map and Lease Area

 

Alison Park Land outlined in green

Waitemata Golf Club lease areas A&B outlined in red.

BMX Pump Track in yellow

 

 

 

 

Map

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

 

Attachment C:  Site plan for BMX Pump Track

 

Location Map and Lease Area

 

BMX Pump Track in yellow approx. 21007 sqm more or less

Alison Park contribution approx. 335 sqm more or less

Waitemata Golf Club lease Area A, surrendered area: approx. 1765 sqm more or less

 

 

 

 

Diagram, map

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

PDF Creator


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

 

Attachment D:  Updated Site plan for Waitemata Golf Club Leased Area A

 

Location Map and Lease Area

 

Alison Park, Updated Waitemata Golf Club lease area A outlined in red

 

 

Map

Description automatically generated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change

File No.: CP2022/08644

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of the report is to seek feedback from local boards on the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) that are to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument (IPI) on medium density residential standards (MDRS) and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 (NPS-UD). These are:

·        Transport-related changes to promote safe and efficient access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites, and to address additional parking issues that were identified following the mandatory removal of car parking minimums from the AUP (Auckland-wide chapters E24 Lighting, E27 Transport, and E38 Subdivision – Urban   access and parking provisions).

·        Additions to scheduled items to enable their protection when the IPI is notified (Schedule 10 Notable Tree Schedule and Maps, and Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps).

·        Mandatory variations to incomplete plan changes (council-initiated and private) required by the government to ensure MDRS are applied in all relevant residential zones.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

3.       Auckland Council is required to publicly notify its IPI in August 2022 to implement the NPS- UD and MDRS in relevant residential zones.  The council’s IPI must now re-write residential objectives, policies and rules to include MDRS, as well as making other changes to implement NPS-UD intensification directives, like increasing height to at least six stories within walkable catchments of certain zones and the rapid transit network stations.

4.       Additional plan changes and variations are necessary to address related matters and are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI.

5.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the policy approach and content of these draft plan changes and variations prior to the Planning Committee’s August 2021 meeting where notification will be considered.

6.       The specific text of each plan change and variation is likely to be amended as these changes progress towards notification as a result of feedback received from local boards, iwi authorities, key stakeholders, internal specialists and legal review.

Transport

7.       Auckland Council has already removed minimum car parking requirements from the AUP as required by NPS-UD and is completing a technical plan change to address gaps created by those removals.  In doing so, other more complex additional parking matters need to be addressed in the AUP.

8.       Greater intensification across Auckland brings forward the need to address gaps and inconsistencies in the residential access provisions in chapters E27 Transport and E38 Subdivision - Urban.

Notable trees and Historic Heritage Places

9.       Additional notable trees and historic heritage places are proposed to be added to the AUP schedules 10 and 14 following staff-evaluation and these will be qualifying matters in the IPI. Historic heritage places and notable trees are qualifying matters that will be set out in the IPI to limit intensification so those values can be accommodated.  Amendments to the notable tree and historic heritage places schedules are required to both update and add in newly assessed items for protection. It is important to protect qualifying matters by including items that are not presently scheduled to avoid the loss of those items through intensification.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

10.     The government requires that the council prepare a variation for each plan change commenced, but not completed, at the time the December 2021 amendments to the Resource Management Act (RMA) came into force, where a change relates to a relevant residential zone.  The government’s MDRS will apply for up to six private plan change requests, and one council-initiated change. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the content outlined in the agenda report relating to the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument on medium density residential standards and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020.

b)      provide feedback as the local board’s response to the matters discussed in this report:

i)        Transport

ii)       Notable trees - Schedule 10

iii)      Historic heritage - Schedule 14

iv)      Variations to incomplete plan changes

Horopaki

Context

Decision-making authority

11.     Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

12.     Local boards have a critical role in helping shape the council’s policy response to the NPS-UD. Plan changes and variations are required to address issues arising from implementing government policy and in terms of access matters in the Transport plan change, to address gaps and inconsistencies in the AUP provisions.  

13.     The plan changes and variations relate to:

Transport

1. · Addressing access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites to prioritise pedestrian access and safety and to improve access efficiency and convenience for all user groups.

2. · Developing parking provisions to:

3.    o    provide safe and convenient pedestrian access to dwellings that have no vehicle access 

4.    o    require accessible parking so that people with disabilities can participate in everyday life 

5.    o    ensure the loading/unloading of goods can occur in a manner that does not compromise the safe and efficient functioning of the road network (including accessways)

6.    o    cater for emerging changes in transport, including greater use of e-bikes, micro-mobility devices and electric vehicles.   

Notable Trees and Historic Heritage Places

·    Updating the Auckland Unitary Plan notable tree schedule 10 and adding new notable trees

·    Adding new historic heritage places to the AUP historic heritage schedule 14, and removing one place from schedule 14.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

14.     The government requires variations so that all relevant residential zones include MDRS.  Variations will be complementary to the approach taken in the IPI. These mandatory variations must be processed alongside council’s IPI and will use the same fast-track process.  Council staff will prepare variations for:

 

Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

Local board area in which land is located

PC 49 Drury East

Franklin

PC 50 Waihoehoe

Franklin

PC 51 Drury 2

Franklin

PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

Upper Harbour

PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

Upper Harbour

PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

Suburbs in which land is located

 

PC 60 Open space

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

 

15.     Addressing access and parking matters must be addressed alongside the IPI so that the development community responds to growth opportunities appropriately. The rule changes are required to implement standards for assessing resource consent applications.

16.     Protecting historic heritage places and notable trees is important to comprehensively address qualifying matters in the AUP and protect these for future generations. The IPI will acknowledge historic heritage places (and other values) and notable trees as qualifying matters, but a separate change is necessary for those historic heritage places and trees that are not already scheduled but whose known values are significant, and eligible for scheduling.

17.     Local board feedback is an important input to help develop the plan changes and variations that are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI in August 2022.

18.     Local boards will have a second opportunity to express views after submissions close on the changes.  Views expressed after submissions close in a resolution will be included in the analysis of the plan changes and submissions received.  If a local board chooses to provide its views, a local board member will be invited to present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who make the decision on the plan changes.

19.     This report provides an overview of the IPI-supporting plan changes related to transport matters, and additional and corrected historic heritage places and notable trees and mandatory variations to incorporate MDRS. This report does not include a recommendation. Planning staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views as part of reporting to the Planning Committee.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Transport

20.     The Plans and Places department maintains a ‘Residential Issues Register’ and is currently finalising the draft 2021 ‘Section 35 Monitoring: B2.3 Quality Built Environment’ report. The register and the draft section 35 report identify the need for changes to the AUP to achieve better-quality access outcomes. As noted above, the identified parking issues are a consequence of the mandatory removal of car parking minimums.

21.     Attachment A outlines a summary of the potential changes at this stage in the process and the principal reasons for the changes.

Notable Trees

22.     The AUP protects and retains notable trees with significant historical, botanical or amenity values. Trees or groups of trees in Schedule 10 were evaluated using a set of criteria based on historical association, scientific importance or rarity, contribution to ecosystem services, cultural association or accessibility and intrinsic value. These factors are considered in the context of human health, public safety, property, amenity values and biosecurity.

23.     Tree schedules are highly dynamic and are not as easily maintained as other AUP schedules which are static (e.g. Outstanding Natural Landscapes Overlay Schedule, Outstanding Natural Features Overlay Schedule) meaning that they fall out of date over time. This is because subdivision, development and consents for removal/alteration as well as emergency works affect the description of listings on the Schedule. The health of trees can also naturally deteriorate. Given the number of listings contained in the Schedule, errors will continue to be identified and further updates will therefore be required. To update Schedule 10 requires a plan change. These changes cannot be addressed through any other process.

24.     There is a database of nearly 600 nominations received as submissions through the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan process and further unsolicited nominations received through the current nomination process. These nominations have been received for trees right across the region and are not limited to any specific geographical area. There is an expectation from the community that the council will evaluate and progress a plan change to add trees to the Schedule. There is a large volume of nominations and due to resourcing constraints, it has not been possible to evaluate them all at once. There will however be a portion of these nominations which have been evaluated and some of these trees may be found to meet the criteria for scheduling.

25.     Notable tree nominations are being investigated in the Albert-Eden, Franklin, Howick, Ōrākei, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. There are also more general amendments required to ensure the Schedule is accurate and operating as originally intended (for example, removals of listings where the tree has been physically removed, updating legal descriptions as a result of subdivision).

26.     Options relating to notable trees were presented to the Planning Committee on 5 November 2020 which resolved to review or make changes to the notable tree schedule as resources permit (PLA/2020/96). This included addressing existing nominations. It is important to note the scope of this work would not include calling for additional nominations.

27.     In accordance with the resolution discussed in paragraph 22, the Notable Trees Plan Change will amend Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule of the AUP as follows:

·        Add those nominated trees which merit inclusion to the schedule

·        Amend the schedule to address known inaccuracies/inconsistencies.

28.     The IPI will recognise notable trees as qualifying matters, including the newly proposed notable trees. A separate change is needed to schedule these additional trees as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Historic Heritage

29.     Historic heritage is a matter of national importance that decision makers must consider under section 6 of the RMA. Significant historic heritage places are identified in Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps of the Unitary Plan. Places identified in the schedule are subject to the provisions of the Unitary Plan Historic Heritage Overlay, which seeks to protect scheduled historic heritage places from inappropriate subdivision, use and development and enable the appropriate use of scheduled historic heritage places.

30.     For a place to qualify to be included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, each place must meet the criteria and thresholds for scheduling that are outlined in the Regional Policy Statement (RPS) section of the AUP. Historic heritage places must be at least of considerable significance to their locality or beyond.

31.     Historic heritage places have been identified in the Albert-Eden, Henderson-Massey, Howick, Ōrakei, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. A list of these places is included in Attachment B.

32.     Most of these places were identified as a result of the survey of the special character values that was part of the council’s response to the NPS-UD. Other places were identified via public nominations.  This work is supported by a Planning Committee resolution:

where significant historic heritage values are identified within the Special Character Areas Overlay, develop a plan change for places or areas to be added to the Auckland Unitary Plan historic heritage schedule.[1]

33.     Each identified historic heritage place’s evaluation demonstrates the criteria and thresholds for scheduling set out in the RPS are satisfied. It is important that places with significant historic heritage values are included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, so that these values can be appropriately managed. The historic heritage places listed in Attachment B are proposed to be included in Schedule 14 via a plan change. 

34.     Two historic heritage places are proposed to be deleted.  The former St Andrews Sunday School Hall at 40 Rankin Avenue, New Lynn (Schedule 14.1 ID 189) was demolished in 2019.  The Residence at 147 Sturges Road, Henderson (ID 75). This historic heritage place has been identified as not meeting the RPS thresholds for scheduling. It is not appropriate for a historic heritage place without sufficient value to remain in the AUP historic heritage Schedule 14.

35.     The IPI will recognise scheduled historic heritage places as qualifying matters, by limiting intensification to the extent necessary to continue to provide for the scheduled values. A separate change is needed to schedule the newly identified historic heritage places and to remove the place at 147 Sturges Road, as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Variations

36.     Amendments made to the RMA in December 2021 came into force immediately and require tier 1 local authorities (including Auckland) to incorporate the government’s MDRS into all relevant residential zones.

37.     The government’s intention is that all plan changes relating to relevant residential zones also incorporate MDRS.  Transitional provisions inserted into the RMA require the council to prepare variations where changes commenced, but were not completed, when the RMA was amended.  Up to seven variations are required to be notified at the same time as the council’s IPI, and to be processed alongside it.  Work is commencing on variations to these changes:

7.         Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

8.         Local board area in which land is located

9.         PC 49 Drury East

10.      Franklin

11.      PC 50 Waihoehoe

12.      Franklin

13.      PC 51 Drury 2

14.      Franklin

15.      PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

16.      Upper Harbour

17.      PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

18.      Upper Harbour

19.      PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

20.      Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

21.       

Suburbs in which land is located

22.       

PC 60 Open space

23.       

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

24.       

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out Auckland’s climate goals:

a)      to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

b)      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation).

39.     The first of the council’s climate goals is relevant because it relates to climate adaptation. That goal aligns with the legal principle for RMA decision-makers to have regard to the effects of climate change (section 7(i) RMA).

40.     However, the RMA currently precludes the second goal: consideration of climate mitigation. The council may only consider climate adaptation and resilience.

41.     Several plan changes have some bearing on climate change. The transport plan change addresses the car parking design for new developments and access to residential car parking spaces and rear sites. How sites are designed and accessed provides for climate resilience, particularly by encouraging people to walk and cycle and facilitating sustainable modes of transport. Adding notable trees to the AUP schedule provides statutory protection for trees, adds to biodiversity and improves urban amenity for residents.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     The draft transport plan change has been consulted on with internal advice from Auckland Transport, Watercare and all relevant council departments including Auckland Plans Strategy and Research, Resource Consents, Regulatory Services, Infrastructure & Environmental Services, and the Tāmaki Makurau Design Ope (formerly the Urban Design Unit).

43.     Key specialists are also involved in the review of the draft transport provisions and their feedback will be considered in the ongoing development of this plan change.

44.     In addition, the planning team is also working with the Infrastructure and Environmental Services technical standards team in their development of an Access Technical Guidance document for the construction and design of residential, business and rural accesses.  This is to ensure the plan change and the technical guidance document are consistent with each other.  It is anticipated the technical guidance will be completed later this year, after the notification of the transport plan change.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     The extent of intensification anticipated by NPS-UD and RMA amendments will affect all local boards, except Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke.  Hauraki Gulf Islands are excluded from the application of MDRS and lie outside Auckland’s urban environment (where intensification is directed).

46.     Workshops were held with local boards on the draft transport plan change in November 2021 and in February 2022. Local boards’ feedback sought to address the access and parking matters by changing the operative AUP standards and/or creating new standards.  The draft section 32 report (which is being developed) also concurs that the issues are best addressed through statutory methods (e.g. a plan change). However, some matters could be supported by a non-statutory design guidance (e.g., cycle parking).  Other matters such as the access requirements for fire and emergency services are best addressed by additional staff training and amendments to the access Practice and Guidance Note. Attachment C provides a summary of what staff heard from local boards during workshops earlier in the year.

47.     This report and related briefings provide an opportunity for local board views to inform policy development.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau is council’s framework for measuring performance in delivering on the strategic priorities identified by Māori.

49.     Policy 9 of NPS-UD directs the council to particularly involve iwi and hapū in the NPS-UD during the preparation of planning documents. The proposed plan changes to implement the intensification provisions is one planning document.

50.     All mana whenua entities recognised by the council receive ongoing invitations to engage and provide feedback on the NPS-UD programme including the supporting draft transport plan change. All representatives (including those electing not to participate in collective meetings or workshops) receive information, updates and hui notes.

51.     Relevant common themes identified to date include:

a)      Universal access provided in residential design for less able whānau members

b)      Safe and connected whānau and communities.

52.     Staff provide regular updates on all plan changes to mana whenua and specific briefings are planned for late May and June on these changes and the IPI.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views on policy development.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a draft plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s). This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Any views provided by the local board will be included in the August 2022 report to the Planning Committee seeking decisions on the IPI plan changes and the IPI-supporting plan changes and variations.  Following the close of submissions, local boards will have the opportunity to express views on the notified changes.

56.     If resolutions are passed after submissions close, the relevant local boards will be informed of the hearing date and invited to speak at the hearing in support of their views. Planning staff will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

22 June 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Attachment A: Summary of key potential changes to the draft transport plan change

149

b

22 June 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Attachment B: Historic heritage places proposed to be added to Schedule 14

157

c

22 June 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Attachment C: Summary of what we heard from local board during workshops

159

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

Michele Perwick - Senior Principal Planner

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Emma Rush - Senior Advisor Special Projects

Teuila Young - Policy Planner

Authoriser

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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21 June 2022

 

 

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21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021

File No.: CP2022/08646

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek feedback from the local board on the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 (NPS-UD) and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021 (RMA amendments).

2.       This report includes an overview of the feedback on the council’s preliminary response received through the public consultation from 19 April to 9 May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The council’s preliminary response to the NPS-UD and RMA amendments are set out in the NPS-UD and the Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS).  Some of these are not optional. Council must change the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) to put these new rules in place.

4.       However, the NPS-UD allows council to make some limited decisions to help shape the future of Auckland. Council can determine:

i)        the distances of walkable catchments, where buildings of six storeys or more are required. These are the areas around the city centre, rapid transit stops, and the ten metropolitan centres (Albany, Takapuna, Westgate, Henderson, New Lynn, Newmarket, Sylvia Park, Manukau, Botany and Papakura)

ii)       the building heights and density to enable residential development within and next to other suburban centres – neighbourhoods centres, local centres, and town centres

iii)      the “qualifying matters” that will apply in Auckland, or the characteristics within some areas that may allow the council to modify (or limit) the required building heights and density.

5.       Central government has already identified a number of qualifying matters. The council is also able to include other ‘qualifying matters’ that are important for Auckland.

6.       The elements of the preliminary response that the council is able to determine were open to feedback. A three-week public engagement on the council’s preliminary response to the NPS-UD and RMA amendments was completed on 9 May 2022. This included an independently run survey of 2,000 Aucklanders. The feedback has been analysed, and the themes that have emerged from that analysis were presented to local board on Monday 30 May 2022.

7.       The feedback summary report is attached to this report and has been published on the AKHaveYourSay website. The feedback responses received have also been published on the website.

8.       Local boards are now invited to give feedback on the council’s preliminary response, with particular regard to the matters available to council to make decisions on. A template (refer Attachment C) has been provided to assist the preparation of that feedback.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021.

b)      note the feedback received from Aucklanders on the council’s preliminary response during the three-week public consultation in April and May 2022.

c)      endorse the following feedback as the local board’s response to the council’s preliminary response, to be considered by the Planning Committee in preparation of the proposed intensification plan change for notification in August 2022.

Horopaki

Context

9.       The NPS-UD and the RMA amendments require that a proposed intensification plan change (IPI) must be notified by 20 August 2022. The Planning Committee and local board chairs (or their delegate The NPS-UD and the RMA amendments require that a proposed intensification plan change (IPI) must be notified by 20 August 2022. The Planning Committee and local board chairs (or their delegates) have attended numerous workshops and made decisions in 2021 and 2022 on preliminary policy directions to guide how the council will implement the NPS-UD and RMA amendments.

10.     At its meeting on 31 March 2022 the Planning Committee approved a preliminary response to the NPS-UD (refer Attachment A), for the purpose of public engagement for three weeks in April and May 2022. The preliminary response was made available to the public on the Auckland “Have Your Say” website from 19 April to 9 May.

11.     The preliminary response contained an overall consultation document, more detailed information sheets, and access to the GIS map viewer that illustrates zoning proposals that reflected the committee’s resolutions.  The maps also illustrated locations where various qualifying matters (mostly existing AUP overlays, endorsed by the committee) would limit the height and/or density that would otherwise be enabled.

12.     The GIS viewer was supported by information sheets that described the approach to intensification and the process that the council is following. The AUP text for the new zone provisions was not available for feedback, as this was (and is) still being prepared and tested.

13.     Since October 2021, local boards and mana whenua have been involved in helping the council develop its preliminary response. This report summarises the themes emerging from the public engagement.  Feedback received from the public, together with the ongoing involvement of local boards and mana whenua, will greatly assist the council in finalising the IPI for notification by 20 August 2022. 

14.     Feedback was specifically sought on the following matters:

i)        the extent of walkable catchments around the city centre, metropolitan centres and rapid transit network stops (as required under Policy 3(c))

ii)       the approach to, and extent of, intensification of areas adjacent to the city, metropolitan, town, local and neighbourhood centres (as required under Policy 3(d))

iii)      the selection of, and approach to, “any other qualifying matters” that limit the height and density that would otherwise be required as enabled under Policy 4. 

15.     Feedback was not sought on matters in the NPS-UD and RMA amendments that are mandatory.  Mandatory matters include the introduction of walkable catchments into the AUP, the enablement of six storey buildings in all zones in walkable catchments, and the application of medium density residential standards in all residential zones outside walkable catchments. 

16.     The public engagement (under the heading ‘Government’s new housing rules: what it means for Auckland’) comprised the following:

·        an overview of the response and how to give feedback

·        a main consultation document (also translated into numerous languages) with the full preliminary response overview

·        online feedback form with questions on consultation topics and an opportunity to provide reasons and further explanation

·        more detailed information sheets on a range of topics

·        frequently asked questions and an explanation video

·        special character area assessment survey reports

·        the GIS NPS-UD map viewer and user guide

·        information and booking links for webinars and events

·        access to a planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

17.     Hard copies of the main documents including the feedback form were placed in libraries and service centres.

18.     Online consultation activities and events were scheduled and undertaken through the engagement period, as follows:

·        four online webinars - two covering the whole preliminary response (with a focus on intensification), one on special character areas, and one on other council-identified qualifying matters

·        four ‘Have Your Say’ events – two for general opportunities for people or groups to present and discuss their feedback to members and staff, one for regional stakeholders, and one for residents’ groups and associations

·        two information meetings focussed on the special character areas qualifying matter – one on the North Shore and one in the city centre.

19.     In addition to the online and hard-copy feedback opportunity, an independently run sample survey of 2,000 Aucklanders was procured from Kantar Public Limited. This was intended to enable a broader public perspective of the aspects of preliminary response, to complement the feedback offered and received from individuals, groups and organisations.

20.     All feedback received has been recorded, reviewed and allocated to themes to enable evaluation and assessment by staff and local board members. Summary reports have been prepared for the feedback received via the AKHaveYourSay website and also via the sample survey. All feedback has been published at AKHaveYourSay.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     Most feedback (6,094 items) was provided via the online feedback form, provided in eight languages (English, Te Reo Māori, Samoan, Tongan, Simplified and Traditional Chinese, Korean and Hindi). There were also 1,766 ‘non-feedback form’ items of feedback received via email or through the post. Feedback received after the consultation closing date has not been included in the analysis within the “Summary of Feedback” report (refer Attachment B). However, feedback received later than the closing date is being considered and will be made available for viewing along with the rest of the feedback received.

22.     Local board feedback on the preliminary response is now sought through resolutions at this meeting. This feedback will be considered in (and attached to) a report for the 30 June Planning Committee meeting where further policy directions will be determined towards the preparation of a proposed plan change for reporting to committee on 4 August 2022 for a decision on notification.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Objective 8 and Policy 1 of the NPS-UD set out a policy framework that signals the need for decisions under the RMA to reduce emissions and improve climate resilience.

24.     This framework is in line with the ‘built environment’ priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which has a goal of achieving “A low carbon, resilient built environment that promotes healthy, low impact lifestyles”. The plan states that:

“To move to a low carbon and resilient region, climate change and hazard risks need to be integral to the planning system that shapes Auckland. Integrating land-use and transport planning is vital to reduce the need for private vehicle travel and to ensure housing and employment growth areas are connected to efficient, low carbon transport systems.”

25.     Applying the NPS-UD will enable additional residential intensification to occur in areas where jobs, services and amenities can be easily accessed by active modes and public transport. This will contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the more efficient use of land will reduce growth pressures in areas more susceptible to the effects of climate change. In some places, applying the MDRS required under the RMA amendments will also achieve this outcome. However, a key aspect of the council’s submission on the RMA amendments was that enabling three-storey medium density housing across Auckland’s urban environment is likely to result in a greater number of people living in areas where it is extremely difficult to provide a high level of public transport service. A more detailed analysis of climate impacts will be possible once the mapping work required to implement the NPS-UD and the RMA amendments is more advanced.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations have been involved in preparing the council’s preliminary response to the NPS-UD and the RMA amendments. They will have an ongoing role during the feedback period through to and beyond 20 August 2022. Feedback received on the council’s preliminary response will be reviewed by the relevant departments and CCOs to assist the council in finalising the IPI for public notification.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Local boards were briefed in October and November 2021 on the implications of the NPS-UD, and local board chairs were invited to the series of Planning Committee workshops run in 2021 on the NPS-UD.  Local boards also received a detailed briefing on the council’s preliminary response in March and May 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Council has obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its Significance and Engagement Policy to take special consideration when engaging with Māori and to enable Māori participation in council decision-making to promote Māori well-being.

29.     The NPS-UD provides for the interests of Māori through intensification to increase housing supply, alongside its identification of qualifying matters. The widespread intensification sought by the NPS-UD has the potential to affect Māori both negatively and positively. This includes with respect to culturally significant sites and landscapes, Treaty settlement redress land, the urban form as it reflects mātauranga Māori and accessibility, and Māori facilities where customs and traditions are observed (such as marae).

30.     The relevant qualifying matters set out in the NPS-UD and RMA amendments include matters of national importance that decision-makers are required to recognise and provide for under section 6 of the RMA 1991, and matters necessary to implement, or to ensure consistency with, iwi participation legislation.

31.     Policy 9 of the NPS-UD sets out requirements for local authorities as follows:

“Local authorities, in taking account of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) in relation to urban environments, must:

a)      involve hapū and iwi in the preparation of RMA planning documents and any FDSs by undertaking effective consultation that is early, meaningful and, as far as practicable, in accordance with tikanga Māori; and

b)      when preparing RMA planning documents and FDSs, take into account the values and aspirations of hapū and iwi for urban development; and

c)      provide opportunities in appropriate circumstances for Māori involvement in decision-making on resource consents, designations, heritage orders, and water conservation orders, including in relation to sites of significance to Māori and issues of cultural significance; and

d)      operate in a way that is consistent with iwi participation legislation.”

32.     Policy 9 directs the council to involve iwi and hapū in the NPS-UD, during the preparation of planning documents, and to take into account the values and aspirations of hapū and iwi for urban development in the region. In the context of the NPS-UD, the council must involve mana whenua and mataawaka within the region.

33.     Individual and collective engagement has raised several key themes relating matters like the protection of scheduled and known cultural heritage and managing potential interface effects from new development with existing marae. This is supported by research undertaken by the council team in advance of these discussions with mana whenua. This has drawn on a wide range of council documents and publicly available information.

34.     Common themes that have been identified include:

a)      universal access to be provided in residential design for less able whānau members

b)      access to open space for health and wellbeing

c)      safe and connected whānau and communities

d)      avoiding development in areas poorly served by infrastructure

e)      access to affordable housing options

f)       maintaining access to customary activities e.g. waka launching, kaimoana gathering

g)      protection of Māori sites and places of cultural significance. Maintaining precincts that protect cultural values or are otherwise culturally sensitive (such as Ihumātao)

h)      avoiding negative effects of intensive residential development on established cultural activities/facilities (such as marae)

i)        provisions for Kohanga reo and Kura Kaupapa Māori in urban areas

j)        use of Māori design concepts in the development of commercial centres and in large residential developments

k)      use of mātauranga and tikanga Māori in the management of resources

l)        the support of measures to maintain and improve water quality, ecological areas, volcanic viewshafts, and the coastline

m)     avoiding exacerbating natural hazard risks

n)      maintaining the cultural significance of the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area

o)      concern that Future Urban Zone land will be prematurely rezoned.

35.     The council’s engagement team continues to actively work with mana whenua representatives on these matters. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.     NPS-UD implementation has been progressing within existing budgets. However, the RMA amendments has resulted in a significant increase in the scale and complexity of the project, without any changes to the NPS-UD implementation timeframes. This will require a greater than anticipated level of change to the AUP.

37.     The financial impact of these changes will affect the current 2021-2022 and the 2022-2023 financial years, and potentially the following year. While it is expected that additional costs in the current financial year can be met through a re-prioritisation of work programmes within the Chief Planning Office, further costs (primarily relating to operation of an independent hearings panel and engagement of specialists) may require re-prioritisation of other work programmes from across the organisation.  Planning for the 2022-2023 financial year is currently underway, however any impacts will be of a scale that will not affect the council’s overall financial position.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     Central government has set a deadline of 20 August 2022 for the council to publicly notify the IPI. Given the scale and complexity of the work required to meet this deadline, there is a risk that the quality of engagement on the council’s preliminary response will not meet the expectation of Aucklanders and key stakeholders, and that the council may not receive quality feedback from a wide range of interests.  There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-UD and the RMA amendments, and where the council has some discretion. 

39.     These risks have been mitigated to date by strong, clear communications in the lead-up to and during the engagement period.  The responses during the consultation period show a good response from Pasifika, and the general 25-44 age group.  The responses were underrepresented in Māori, Asian and the general 15-24 age group. There was over-representation in the responses by New Zealand European / European and those over 45 years old. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Staff continue to analyse feedback received, and this analysis will be presented to the committee, mana whenua and local boards to inform the completion of the IPI that must be publicly notified by 20 August 2022.  Public notification is the beginning of formal submissions and hearings of those submissions.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Consultation document

171

b

NPS-UD Summary of the consultation feedback (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Local board feedback template

177

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)

File No.: CP2022/08095

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on Auckland Transport’s Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parking Strategy sets out the objectives, principles and policies relating to Auckland Transport’s management and supply of parking across Auckland and was last updated in 2015.

3.       Since 2015, numerous changes in both the central and local government context mean that a review of the Parking Strategy (2015) was required.

4.       The review has involved engagement with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community.

5.       In late May, Auckland Transport (AT) provided summaries of public engagement to all local boards. This report is to seek feedback from local boards, having had the opportunity to review feedback from their community, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      provide feedback, taking into consideration their community’s feedback, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The current Parking Strategy (2015) was progressive at the time it was introduced, bringing about many changes in Auckland including wider acceptance of priced parking. However, it is no longer fit for purpose. Since it was developed there have been numerous changes to the policy and planning context including:

·        adoption of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Development signalled in the Unitary Plan will enable growth that may be difficult to service with public transport, meaning that some new suburbs will rely on car use for access

·        changes to travel behaviour, such as the emergence of micromobility (i.e. electric scooters) and the growth of the delivery economy

·        Auckland’s public transport network has matured over time, providing opportunities for further passenger uptake and efficiency related to park and ride management

·        market demand is pushing for more housing provision and density. Development is already showing evidence of less carparking provision and more issues with carparking compliance

·        the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD), which guides direction on urban development through the Unitary Plan. The NPS-UD requires Auckland Council to remove parking minimum requirements from the Unitary Plan, which means that developments will not be required to provide onsite parking. This will contribute to society and transport becoming less car-centric over time; however, it will lead to increasing pressure on public parking resources, particularly on-street parking

·        both central government and Auckland Council have declared ‘climate emergencies’, prioritising policy initiatives and investment that will reduce carbon emissions. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and other plans and strategies proposed by central government will require changes to the land transport system, including parking.

7.       The Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) is an important element of aligning and addressing Auckland’s response to these issues, particularly by managing parking in a way that:

·        supports public transport and alternative modes, which will make public transport and active modes such as walking and cycling safer and more convenient

·        responds to Auckland’s population growth and land-use intensification

·        acknowledges that space for carparking is a limited public resource.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Draft Parking Strategy (2022) (refer Attachment A) sets out the strategic context and the need to manage the transport system, as well as the strategic objectives and agreed principles for parking management.

9.       The proposed approach to planning parking management is set out on pages 26-36 of Attachment A. The key elements of this are:

·        proactively applying parking management in areas that have land use intensity and good public transport access

·        repurposing road space away from parking where this is required to enable delivery of the Strategic Transport Network.

10.     The accompanying parking policies (pages 38-63 of Attachment A) provide more technical detail on how parking is proposed to be managed in order to align to the principles set out in the strategic direction. The policies are grouped by:

·        provision and approach

·        on-street and off-street

·        specific vehicle classes

·        specific situations.

11.     The strategy also includes a section on advocacy to central government for legislative and/or regulatory reform, as there are some areas of parking management that are outside local government control. Including these areas also provides context on the limitations of regulation in areas Auckland Transport would like to effect change and achieve better outcomes. These areas include:

·        parking infringement fines

·        banning berm parking

·        residential parking permit cost-setting

·        influencing private parking through parking levies.

12.     In December 2021, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council released a Parking Discussion Document to start the conversation with the public on future parking management in Auckland. AT received 32 pieces of written feedback. Following this feedback, several areas of the draft Parking Strategy and its accompanying policies were updated, including:

·        developing the narrative to better link it to the broader transport story, strategic objectives and policy rationale, as well as regulatory areas in need of reform

·        focussing on the benefits of parking management to enable and support access, resulting in a more equitable transport system

·        articulating the benefits and implications of parking to the community

·        acknowledging the costs of parking provision

·        emphasising parking diversity to enable mode shift

·        emphasising that the roll-out of further parking management will happen over time, starting where there is most readiness for change, and that this is a ten-year plan

·        outlining indicators of success

·        ensuring that consultation materials acknowledge the existing context and public fatigue.

13.     Strategic direction provided by the Planning Committee has also guided development of the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) requires planning decisions to contribute to the development of urban environments that support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and are resilient to the likely current and future effects of climate change.

15.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan outlines the need for Auckland to reduce its transport-related emissions significantly, to meet the target of 64% reduction by 2030. This means that business as usual for transport and land-use project planning and delivery, and management of the transport system, cannot continue.

16.     Parking management is a lever in managing the transport network, both in terms of the opportunities that repurposing of road space offers to enabling other modes, and in disincentivising car use.

17.     Implementing the Parking Strategy will include repurposing parking lanes on key roads in Auckland, increasing the diversity of transport options and improving safety and efficiency for people using sustainable modes and for goods and service delivery. This is a key change required to reduce transport-related emissions, meaning the Parking Strategy is of significant importance as an early step to transport-related climate action.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Auckland Transport has engaged with key stakeholders across the council family, including raising awareness of the review with Auckland Council’s advisory panels.

19.     Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited provided feedback during engagement on the Parking Discussion Document. Their feedback was supportive of the proposed approach.

20.     Both the need for review and the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) prepared for public consultation have been endorsed by Auckland Council’s Planning Committee (Resolution number PLA/2022/24).

21.     Considerable liaison has taken place between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council departments ranging from Planning and Transport Strategy at a strategic level to Community Facilities about management of car parking in or near community parks.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Since Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board approved the review of the Parking Strategy in 2021, Auckland Transport has engaged with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community. The objective of the engagement process has been to ensure that Aucklanders are aware of the review, have had an opportunity to find out more about the proposed changes, and have had an opportunity to provide feedback.

23.     The engagement process included the following key activities:

a)      in 2021, information about the review was sent to all local boards and presented to the Local Board Chairs’ Forum

b)      all local boards were offered a workshop in August 2021, and in September 2021 all were invited to provide feedback that would contribute to the initial thinking around development of an updated draft document

c)      in December 2021, a Parking Discussion Document was published, targeted at key stakeholders and calling for initial feedback. 32 pieces of written feedback were received

d)      in March 2022, information about upcoming wider public consultation was provided to local boards along with a further workshop with Auckland Transport subject matter experts. The public consultation was again promoted through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum in April 2022

e)      public engagement and consultation on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy has recently closed. Auckland Transport received 943 submissions. Responses from the community have been collated and provided to local boards as area specific reports (Attachment B). Public engagement included:

i)       media (OurAuckland, radio) and social media (videos) marketing to let the public know about the engagement

ii)       online information

iii)      webinars at which Auckland Transport staff were available to discuss the proposal with members of the public

iv)     nine open days held in libraries around the region for members of the public to discuss the proposal with Auckland Transport staff

v)      discussions with key stakeholders including business associations, industry groups, emergency services, utilities, and other government agencies

vi)     a public debate about parking issues.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to give their feedback, based on consideration of their community’s feedback, on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Parking management is a kaitiakitanga issue, in that it is about managing a limited public resource. Auckland Transport has engaged with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to establish how best to incorporate views from mana whenua into the review.

26.     Feedback from a series of AT hui with mana whenua representatives reinforced that parking is a topic of considerable concern to Māori. Other points raised include:

·        acknowledgement that, as well as the strategic concerns around air quality and resource management, parking enables access

·        that parking infringements can contribute to creating a cycle of debt

·        that communities are facing compounding pressures - parking management should not adversely impact people and places even further

·        the potential for parking management to further reduce access - particularly for less able-bodied kaumatua and kuia - to the whenua, the moana and to wahi tapu.

27.     Other potential impacts of increased parking management for Māori are likely to be similar to those for the wider population. Some members of the community are more reliant on cars for access, particularly if they do not have good access to public transport. Barriers to public transport, such as cost and network coverage, influence access to necessities such as education, healthcare, employment, shopping, and social services.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Parking management resourcing will be delivered through AT operational budgets. Initial work to understand the resourcing required to implement the strategy indicates that this will require significant resource increases for planning, design, compliance monitoring and enforcement. It is currently expected that the strategy would be at least revenue-neutral overall once compliance monitoring/enforcement revenue is considered.

29.     Revenue from parking management helps to offset AT operational costs and therefore reduce reliance on ratepayer funding.

30.     There are no financial implications for local boards associated with providing feedback on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are significant risks associated with adopting a new approach to parking management in Auckland – however these must be weighed against the opportunity costs of not having an appropriate framework in place to manage parking. These include:

a)      persistent and increasing issues with over-reliance on on-street parking, particularly since the removal of onsite parking requirements in the Unitary Plan

b)      reduced ability to support development of the public transport and cycling network (both of which reduce emissions) and less ability to enable place-based improvements within the road corridor

c)      not having the ability to take an integrated and strategic approach that supports business when managing parking in town centres using collaborative parking management plans

d)      less flexibility with managing the impacts of increased population growth and intensification.

32.     Strong, considered feedback from local boards will enable Auckland Transport to make good decisions about the Parking Strategy while they balance these risks against the opportunity costs described above.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Feedback from local boards will be reviewed and taken into account as staff consider any amendments to the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy before recommendations to the Auckland Council Planning Committee are made in August 2022.

34.     Following endorsement of the Auckland Parking Strategy by the Auckland Council Planning Committee, approval will be sought from the Auckland Transport Board.

35.     Once approved by the Auckland Transport Board, the new Parking Strategy will be introduced.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Transport Parking Strategy (2002)

193

b

Public Consultation - summary of local feedback

269

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Covacich, Principal Transport Planner, Auckland Transport

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Andrew McGill, Head of Integrated Network Planning, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07854

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme for approval from the following departments:

·    Connected Communities

·    Community and Social Innovation

·    Community Facilities

·    Parks, Sports, and Recreation

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

3.       In addition, the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities Department work programme are presented for approval in principle.

4.       To support the delivery of the local board’s outcomes and aspirations highlighted in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020, Customer and Community Services presents a work programme for local board approval each financial year.

5.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

6.       The work programme has been developed with the local board providing feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation through a series of workshops, held between October 2021 and May 2022.

7.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to planning activities, involving collaboration between the local board and staff from across the council.

8.       Within the Customer and Community Services work programme, the Community Facilities Department has identified several projects for the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 financial years as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).

9.       Approval is sought for the planning and design of the RAP projects to commence during the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

10.     The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee, including Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects by way of resolutions to this report.

11.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19-related disruptions, some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

12.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

13.     Once approved in June 2022, the local board will receive quarterly progress updates on the delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

c)      approve in principle the 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities only work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

d)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

e)      note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets is subject to approval by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

f)       note that there may be minor changes to year one of the 2022/2023 Local Board C&CS Work Programme, and other changes in years 2 and 3 which are approved in principal, due to Annual Budget decisions affecting capital budgets and that changes required will be discussed with and reported to the local board early in the new financial year.

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Auckland Plan 2050 (Auckland Plan) is council’s long-term spatial plan to ensure Auckland grows in a way that will meet the opportunities and challenges ahead.  It aims to contribute to Auckland’s social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing.

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15.     Local board plans align with the Auckland Plan and set out local community priorities and aspirations. The 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme in turn aligns to not only the local board plans but the appropriate Auckland Council plans, policies and strategies.

16.     Work programme activities align to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Outcome 1 - Environment and heritage

·        Outcome 2 - Parks, facilities, and open spaces

·        Outcome 3 - Community participation and wellbeing

·        Outcome 4 - Transport and access

·        Outcome 5 - Opportunity, prosperity, and growth

·        Outcome 6 - Māori values Ngā tikanga a te Māori

17.     Development of the work programme is based on consideration of community needs and priorities, availability of resources and funding, Treaty of Waitangi obligations, external partnerships and risk assessment.

18.     The Customer and Community Services directorate provides a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of Auckland’s people, places and natural environment. These are designed and implemented to meet the unique needs of the local community.

19.     Development of the work programme follows an integrated approach to planning activities by the following departments of the directorate:
:

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The work programme demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the 2022/2023 financial year.

21.     Delivery of the work programme commences from 1 July 2022, and in some cases comprises a continuation of implementation from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes.

22.     New activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items also form part of the work programme.

23.     Table one summarises the approval status required for the three financial years presented within the work programme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table one: Customer and Community Services local board work programme approvals

Department

2022/2023

2023/2024

2024/2025

Community Facilities

Approve

Approve in principle

Approve in principle

All other Customer and Community Services departments

Approve

Approve in principle

N/A

 

24.     Community Facilities presents a three-year rolling work programme so that delivery and financial commitments against the capital works programme can be planned.

25.     Approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2022/2023 work programme may lead to contractual commitments to the future budget needed to complete the project in 2023/2024 or 2024/2025.

26.     The remainder of Customer and Community Services presents the work programme in descending three-year increments and are therefore only presenting years two and three of the three-year work programme.

27.     The local board will be updated by staff on the delivery of the programme by way of quarterly performance reports.

Proposed amendments to the 2022/2023 work programme

28.     The local board approved the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme in June 2021 and approved in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

29.     The 2022/2023 work programme contains variations to the version that was approved in principle last year. These include the addition of new activities, changes to existing activities, such as required budget allocation and delivery timeframes, and identifies some activities that have been stopped.

30.     Table two highlights the new activities in the work programme:

Table two: work programme activities that are new

ID

Activity name

Lead department

Budget

2988

Barrys Point Reserve Service Assessment Prioritisation

CCS: PSR – Park Services

$0

3001

DT: Urban Ngahere Strategy local implementation - Knowing phase

CCS: PSR – Park Services

$15,000

3054

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Occupancies FY2023-2024

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3055

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Community Occupancies FY2024/2025

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3462

Vauxhall Sportsfields/Devonport Domain: North Shore Rugby Football Club Incorporated

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

31688

Achilles Crescent Reserve - renew playground

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$231,000

32080

Bayswater Park - renew toilets and changing rooms

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$570,000

23853

Belle Verde Reserve - renew park play spaces

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$125,000

30085

Brian Byrnes Reserve - renew pedestrian path

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$81,000

36639

Devonport-Takapuna - increase the level of service in youth play

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$60,000

31704

Devonport-Takapuna - renew park furniture and fixtures 2024/2025

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$281,000

31700

Devonport-Takapuna - renew paths, tracks and structures 2023/2024

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$350,000

32055

Devonport-Takapuna - renew sports field lighting to LED

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$440,000

32051

Fort Takapuna Reserve - investigate options to eliminate vehicle access

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$175,000

32052

Knightsbridge Reserve - renew playground

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$192,000

31865

Linwood Reserve - investigate options to eliminate vehicle access

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$46,000

30084

Marine Parade Reserve - renew entrance and replace boom gate

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$5,000

31763

Ngataringa Park - investigate the skatepark use and relocation

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$846,000

24355

Ngataringa Park - renew Lake Road barrier

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$102,000

31699

Northboro Reserve - renew playground and hoggin path

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$240,000

24151

Selwyn Reserve - investigate relocating the playspace

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$10,000

31816

Stanley Bay Park - renew Scout Hall

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$310,000

31813

Stanley Bay Park - renew storage shed/pavilion and pedestrian paths

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$750,000

36627

Sunnynook - investigate community led BMX track development

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$30,000

24407

Sylvan Park - renew pathways

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$60,000

24408

Sylvan Park - renew toilet

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$170,000

31867

Takapuna Beach - investigate permanent accessibility options to the beach

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$91,992

31702

Takapuna Beach (Hauraki Road) - renew toilet, roof, downpipe and spouting

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$251,000

36638

Woodall Park - investigate toilet, basketball court & relocating the local skate facility

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$20,000

 

31.     Table three highlights the activities that were approved in principle in June 2021 but have stopped, or proposed activities that did not start, and are therefore not included in the 2022/2023 work programme:

Table three: work programme activities that have been removed from the work programme

Previous ID

Activity name

Lead department

521

DT: Review 2015 Greenways Plan phase two

CCS: PSR – Park Services

1440

Top up funding for Devonport Community House Incorporated

CCS: Connected Communities – Community Delivery

2782

Carry over for completion  DT: Toilet provision service assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2784

Carry over for completion- Auburn Street Reserve service assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

 

COVID-19 considerations for Customer and Community Services

32.     The work programme includes activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 by providing:

·     safe and welcoming spaces

·     inclusive events to bring the community back together

·     community support, including grants

·     stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi and Māori organisations, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies, which also serve Auckland’s communities.

33.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of these activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19 related disruption some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

34.     Current capex delivery challenges include increased material and labour costs, as well as shortages in both sectors, this in turn will lead to increased overall project costs.

35.     Current supply chain issues, obtaining building materials, may lead to delays in project delivery. Increased costs and delays will be managed as part of the ongoing management of work programmes via additional RAP projects, and the rephasing of projects to accommodate increased budget and address material shortages.

Māori Outcomes

36.     Local boards play a vital role in representing the interests of all Aucklanders and are committed to the Treaty-based obligations and to Māori participation and development.

37.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

38.     A thriving Māori identity is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. It advances prosperity for Māori and benefits all Aucklanders.

39.     The local boards recognise the importance of building meaningful relationships with mana whenua, maatawaka and whānau, and understanding Māori aspirations.

40.     Table four shows the outcomes, objectives and key initiatives from the local board plan recognise these areas of common interest.

Table four: local board plan Māori outcomes, objectives and initiatives

Outcomes

Objectives

Initiatives

Outcome 1: Environment and heritage

Conserve and celebrate our heritage areas, features, and buildings

 

·    Celebrate Māori cultural taonga by working with mana whenua to identify and care for taonga

Outcome 6: Māori values ngā tikanga a te Māori

Develop a relationship with Iwi

 

·    Work with iwi who have an interest in our area

Celebrate Māori culture and support te reo Māori to flourish

 

·    Work with the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority to increase understanding of the cultural significance of Takarunga / Mount Victoria and Maungauika / North Head.

·    Work with mana whenua to deliver Te Kete Rukuruku, the dual naming of parks and reserves to celebrate and share stories that showcase our unique Māori identity and heritage.

·    Māori language is promoted and visible in the programmes and services delivered from libraries, community facilities and leisure centres

Māori narratives and history are reflected in our built and natural environment

 

·    Reflect Māori design principles in our playgrounds, buildings, and street furniture

Māori communities are actively engaged to build a sense of belonging

 

·    Work alongside mana whenua and other organisations to tell Māori narratives on story boards at significant sites in our built and natural environment.

·    Continue support and funding of the Taha Māori initiative to build strong relationships that enable dialogue and a shared sense of belonging.

·    Work with mana whenua and mataawaka to identify and progress areas of importance to Māori and the local community.

 

41.     There is a wide range of activity occurring across Tāmaki Makaurau to advance Māori outcomes. Much of this is led by mana whenua and Māori organisations, as well government organisations, non-government organisations and businesses. 

42.     The Auckland Plan’s focus on Māori culture and identity is encapsulated in the outcome: Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

43.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, council’s Māori Outcomes performance measurement framework, captures the majority of council’s Māori outcome strategy and planning. The framework responds to the needs and aspirations that Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, both mana whenua and mataawaka, have expressed to council. 

44.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver outcomes for and with Māori. Attachment B sets out the activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas.

45.     Table five shows the strategic priority areas and alignment to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes.

Table five: local board work programme Māori outcome areas

Strategic priority area

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcome

Kaitiakitanga

Kia Ora te Taiao

Māori business, tourism and employment 

Kia Ora te Umanga

Māori identity and culture 

Kia Ora te Ahurea

Marae development

Kia Ora te Marae

Papakāinga and Māori housing 

Kia Ora te Kāinga

Realising rangatahi potential 

Kia Ora te Rangatahi

Te reo Māori 

Kia Ora te Reo

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Kia Ora te Whānau

 

46.     The Customer and Community Services directorate lead or contribute to programmes that align with all outcomes. Particular priorities are Kia Ora te Marae, Kia Ora te Whānau and Kia Ora te Reo. 

47.     In a COVID-19 recovery environment there is increasing focus on Kia Ora te Umunga /   Māori Business, Tourism and Employment and the role that the council can play, not only in supporting economic recovery, but in a thriving Māori economy. 

48.     Kia Ora te Ahurea / Māori Identity and Culture is often a focus for local boards as events and place-based design often plays an important part in many local programmes.

Work programme budget types and purpose

49.     Work programme activities are funded from various budget sources, depending on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme are funded from two or more sources, including from both local and regional budgets.

50.     Table six outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

 

 

 

Table six: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services, grants and staff time to deliver activities

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the partial renewal or full replacement of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council, often from external sources, held for specific local board areas, including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

Part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

51.     The capital projects to be delivered in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area, together with identified budgets and main funding sources, are shown in Attachment A.

52.     The budgets associated with the capital works programme are estimates only, costs are subject to change and may need to be refined as the project progresses through the design and delivery process. Once activity details are more clearly defined, staff will update the work programme for approval in subsequent years.

53.     The capital works projects have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within the local board area (Attachment C). Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

54.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was first implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

55.     Several capital projects in the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme and outlined in Attachment A.

56.     Local board approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

57.     Some activities from the Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development (growth) budgets are funded regionally and will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee for approval after 30 June 2022.

58.     The local board has decision-making responsibility for these activities within parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope, and budget. These activities are therefore included in the work programme. 

Process for changes to the approved work programme

59.     Some projects in the work programme require further local board decisions as they progress through the delivery process.

60.     Where further decisions are anticipated they have been indicated in the work programme, and decisions will be sought as required through local board business meetings.

61.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects may also be required as projects progress, in response to more detailed design and costing information, community consultation, consenting requirements and similar factors.  

62.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects will be managed in accordance with the established local board delegations to staff.

63.     The work programme includes community leases. Lease renewals without variations will be processed by way of a memo, in accordance with agreed delegations.

64.     Should the local board signal their intent to change or pursue a new lease that is not contemplated in the leasing work programme, a deferral of an item already programmed for delivery will need to be accommodated.

65.     Staff will workshop expired and more complex community leases with the local board and then report on them at a business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

66.     As Customer and Community Services is a significant service provider and property owner, the directorate has a leading role in delivering Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

67.     In providing asset-based services, Customer and Community Services contributes most of council’s operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its facilities and infrastructure.

68.     Property managed by the directorate, in particular coastal assets, will be adversely affected by climate change. The work programme includes actions, consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to halve council’s operational GHG emissions by 2030, and to adapt to a changing climate.

69.     Actions include reducing operational GHG emissions through phasing-out gas heating in aquatic centres, improving the efficiency of facilities, investing in renewable energy, and adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy.

70.     At the same time, the directorate will mitigate GHG emissions and improve climate resilience through delivering tree planting programmes across the region. This includes delivering the Mayor’s tree planting initaitives, transitioning unproductive farmland on regional parks to permanent native forest, and delivering ecological restoration projects with community groups.

71.     Work is ongoing to build on the above actions and embed climate change considerations into investment decision-making, planning, and corporate policies, including asset management plans and Local Board Plans.

72.     As approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, council’s mandated approach to ‘deliver differently’ is also anticipated to help reduce the council carbon footprint by creating a sustainable service network. This may include a shift to digital service models or the consolidation of services into a smaller footprint.

73.     Each activity in the work programme has been assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and affect Auckland’s resilience to climate change.

74.     The activities in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board work programme identified as having a positive or negative impact on climate change are outlined in Attachment D.

75.     Types of activities in the work programme that will have positive impacts on emissions and improve community resilience to climate change, include community-led environmental and educational programmes, supporting volunteer planting, delivering council-led planting and sustainable design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

76.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed collaboratively by staff from the directorate’s departments and Local Board Services to ensure that the activities and delivery of the work programme are integrated, complementary, and reflect council wide priorities.

77.     An example of collaboration on delivery is the kauri dieback programme which is delivered by the Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

78.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme.

79.     A focus area of the work programme is to respond to the Recovery Budget, the communities of greatest need and build capacity within the community, including through community-led delivery and partnerships.

80.     Planning and delivery of some activities involves consultation with the community to ensure that their aspirations are understood and responded to.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

81.     The provision of services, facilities and open spaces support the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connection to the natural environment and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

82.     Attachment B shows local board projects or programmes that are ranked as delivering ‘high’ Māori Outcomes. They involve ongoing collaboration with Māori or are delivered by Māori. 

83.     Projects or programmes in Attachment A may also contribute to Māori Outcomes but are not highlighted as they are identified to have a moderate or low impact. 

84.     Engagement with Māori is critical and, if not already completed, will occur on a programme or project basis, prior to any work commencing, and be reported back separately to the local board. 

85.     Further information about the response to Māori aspirations as described in the work programme, is captured in the Analysis and Advice section.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

86.     Each activity line has a budget allocation in one or more of the financial years e.g. 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar operating expense (opex) budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

87.     The 2022/2023 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within 2022/2023 budgets and staff resources.

88.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 are indicative and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

89.     Table seven summarises the budget sources and allocation for each work programme financial year.

Table seven: Devonport-Takapuna Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2022/2023 (approve)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

2024/2025 (approve in principle – Community Facilities only)

Operational (Opex): Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

1,105,365

            1,162,365

            1,162,365

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

13,676,817

          10,951,283

          11,145,184

Capital (Capex): Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

4,879,889

4,836,219

4,343,412

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

3,932,865

4,835,220

4,258,000

Advanced Delivery RAP*

943,538

 

 

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

3,486

999

85,412

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

118,000

118,000

492,434

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

94,992

97,000

430,650

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

23,008

21,000

61,784

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

149,730

0

0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: One Local Initiative

0

0

0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

0

0

0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

0

0

0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

120,000

0

0

* See paragraph 54-56 for RAP explanation

90.     The budgets are based on the allocations in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Budgets are subject to change during council’s Annual Budget and future Long-term Plan processes. If decisions on the Annual Budget result in budget reductions, the work programme will need to be amended to align to these budgets via future decisions of the local board.

91.     Any 2021/2022 opex budget unspent on 30 June 2022, will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2022/2023 work programme. Carry-forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines and will be reflected in the revised budget.

92.     During delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme, where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the associated budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year. This process will include agreement from each department and will need to be resolved on by the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

93.     The most significant risk is that delivery of the Customer and Community Services work programme is dependent on the local board approving the work programme by 30 June 2022. Approval of the work programme after the start of the financial year could result in delays to delivery.

94.     The majority of operational (opex) activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

95.     Table eight outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme once it has been approved.

Table eight: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

Health, safety and wellbeing factors, including external influences relating to work programme delivery may impact the delivery of activities, resulting in activities requiring adjustment.

Health and safety assessments will be conducted prior to commencement of projects. Work programme activities and projects will be adjusted accordingly where these risks occur during the delivery phase.

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to negatively impact on the progress and deliverability of the work programme.

Development of the work programme has included consideration of potential impacts on delivery due to COVID-19 for all activities.

Timeframes for some activities are set to enable delivery within the agreed timeframe despite possible delays. 

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate the budget to other activities.

The COVID-19 pandemic and other geopolitical factors may result in further inflationary and supply chain pressures.

Potential inflationary pressures have been modelled into key forecasts; however, uncertainties remain.

The ongoing cost increase may become unsustainable, and may require a reprioritization of potential work programmes, capital spend and a potential discontinuation of some programmes.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

96.     Delivery of the Customer and Community Service work programme is scheduled to start on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023.

97.     Regionally funded projects are an exception and will commence after they have been approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2022.

98.     The local board will receive progress updates on a quarterly basis, with the first quarterly report available in November 2022.

99.     When further decisions for activities are needed at project milestones, these will be brought to the local board at the appropriate time.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Devonport-Takapuna CCS Work Programme 22-23

367

b

Attachment B - Maori Outcomes Devonport-Takapuna

403

c

Attachment C - Capital Works and Leasing Work Programme Map

405

d

Attachment D - Climate Impacts Devonport-Takapuna

407

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Tania Pouwhare - General Manager Community & Social Innov

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Authoriser

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 



Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07884

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and approve in principle the 2023/2024 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2022/2023 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent financial year, 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. 2022/2023 is year two of the three-year cycle. Many of the programmes included in this report were approved in principle in the 2021/2022 work programme.

4.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between November 2021 and May 2022, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

6.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2022/2023, with budgets as listed below:

·          Wairau Estuary enhancement planting – $20,000

·          Pest-free environmental coordinator - Devonport – $60,000

·          Pest-free environmental coordinator - Takapuna – $50,000.

7.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $130,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year.

8.       The proposed work programme also includes $110,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the Milford Beach Front Reserve coastal renewals programmes.

9.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

10.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve its 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2022/2023 budget for approval

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Devonport

$60,000

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Takapuna

$50,000

Wairau Estuary enhancement planting

$20,000

Total

$130,000

 

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report)

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes

d)      note the allocation of $110,000 asset-based services capital expenditure budget towards the Milford Beach Front Reserve - renew the seawall stairs programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

Horopaki

Context

11.     Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

12.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·    improve water quality in our marine environment, the Wairau Catchment and Lake Pupuke

·    eliminate or control plant and animal pests to allow native trees and birds to thrive

·    community facilities are fit for purpose.

13.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·    Wairau Estuary Enhancement Plan

·    Restoring Takarunga Hauraki Pest Free Plan 2017

·    Pest Free Takapuna North Plan 2019

·    Mahere ā-Rohe Whakahaere Kaupapa Koiora Orotā mō Tāmaki Makaurau - Regional Pest Management Plan.

14.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

16.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

17.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year two of the three-year work programme (2022/2023), and approval in principle for 2023/2024.

18.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for year three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However, approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

19.     Budgets for year three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

20.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2023/2024 financial year:

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Devonport – $60,000

21.     The local board has indicated it would like to support the Devonport and Takapuna pest-free environmental coordinators in the 2022/2023 financial year.

22.     The board contributed $110,000 to the pest-free environmental coordinators - Devonport and Takapuna programme in the 2021/2022 financial year, and $50,000 in the 2018/2019, 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years.

23.     Staff recommend this programme be split into two separate programmes (Devonport and Takapuna) because the coordinators are now established within the two organisations, Restoring Takarunga Hauraki and Pupuke Birdsong, and the distinct communities they work in. Separating the programmes will also enable more detailed quarterly reporting.

24.     The pest-free environmental coordinator for Devonport will continue to provide technical advice and practical support to private landowners, community groups, schools, businesses, iwi and hapū to protect and enhance native biodiversity. The coordinator will engage more local volunteers in the North-West Wildlink project, and will contribute to restoring waterways that feed into Ngataringa Bay and Shoal Bay.

25.     Staff recommend the board allocate $60,000 towards the programme in 2022/2023. Approval in principle is also sought for $60,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Takapuna – $50,000

26.     The pest-free environmental coordinator for Takapuna will continue to provide technical advice and practical support to private landowners, community groups, schools, businesses, iwi and hapū to protect and enhance native biodiversity. The coordinator will contribute to the restoration of waterways that feed into the Wairau Estuary. They will also work to engage more local volunteers in the North-West Wildlink project.

27.     Staff recommend the board allocate $50,000 towards the programme in 2022/2023. Approval in principle is also sought for $50,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Wairau Estuary enhancement planting – $20,000

28.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Wairau Estuary enhancement planting in the 2022/2023 financial year. The board contributed $20,000 to this programme in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years to undertake initial native planting as part of the first portion of the Wairau Estuary Enhancement Plan.

29.     The Wairau Estuary Enhancement Plan was developed to address the community's aspirations to improve the health of this highly degraded body of water. The plan identified options to restore the estuary including native planting, weed management and erosion mitigation works.

30.     Staff recommend that the board allocate $20,000 towards stage two of the programme to continue native planting and weed management. Approval in principle is also sought for $20,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year

Milford Beach Front Reserve - renew the seawall stairs – $110,000

31.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme.  The project is for the renewal of the four staircases which form part of the Milford Beach seawall. The renewal will enhance public access to the beach and will improve safety and amenity. Design and consenting commenced in 2021/2022, and physical works will commence in the 2022/2023 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

33.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, neutral or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

34.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Wairau Estuary enhancement planting

 

Freshwater ecosystems provide many ecosystem services such as flood mitigation (increasing resilience to climate impacts), habitat for native biodiversity and carbon sequestration of emissions (through riparian planting). These services are enhanced when the ecosystems are enhanced.

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Devonport

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Takapuna

Community planting and pest management initiatives will increase the number of native plants available to sequester carbon in the local board area. This will also contribute to increasing canopy cover which will aid in the cooling of urban areas.

Milford Beach Front Reserve - renew the seawall stairs

Physical works for the stairs will have a negligible carbon footprint. Where possible, staff will adopt sustainable, low carbon options for project delivery. The renewal will improve the resilience of this coastal asset.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

36.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters and Resilient Land and Coasts.

37.     The pest free coordinators for Devonport and Takapuna work in conjunction with Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority for any biodiversity restoration co-management of Maungauika. In addition, the coordinators will work with Parks, Sports and Recreation staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2022/2023 work programme include the Wairau Estuary and waterways that feed into Ngataringa Bay and Shoal Bay.

39.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcomes ‘Environment and Heritage’ and ‘Parks, facilities, and open spaces’. The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

41.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

42.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

43.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Devonport

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Takapuna

Te reo Māori

Kaitiakitanga

Māori identity and culture

These programmes will continue to work alongside marae (Te Taua Moana Marae and He Manu Hopukia Marae), iwi (Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei) and the Tūpuna Maunga Authority to share knowledge of mātauranga Māori and to undertake planting and pest management activities. Te reo Māori is also used whenever possible in presentations and community outreach.

44.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

45.     The proposed environment work programme for 2022/2023 totals to $130,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

46.     The proposed work programme also includes $110,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the coastal renewals programme. Please note that the coastal renewal budgets are current estimates and are subject to change through the design and works stages. If there are any significant changes throughout the financial year these will be reported back to the board.

47.     Budgets for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for a future year through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

48.     An overall LDI opex carry-forward provision for projects to be carried forward from 2021/2022 to 2022/2023 was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee as part of the annual budget. Work programme activities to be carried forward from 2021/2022 will be finalised post 30 June 2022. Local boards will receive detail of carry-forwards in their first scheduled performance report for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

50.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes. Some activities may not be able to be delivered fully if COVID-19 restrictions are increased.

51.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

52.     Table 3 shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

Table 3: Key risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Wairau Estuary enhancement planting

 

This programme is dependent on securing the right contractor who has the expertise and ability to empower and motivate the community.

A contractor with a track record of delivering these works has already been identified (from the previous year’s work) and has indicated they wish to continue in this role.

Low

Pest-free environmental coordinator – Devonport

Pest-free environmental coordinator - Takapuna

These programme are dependent on landowner and community support for and willingness to undertake restoration action.

The coordinators have been undertaking work in these areas for multiple years. Both the Devonport and Takapuna pest-free coordinators have established significant community buy-in.

Low

53.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

55.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

427

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Brandii Stephano - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme

File No.: CP2022/07048

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Takapuna-Devonport Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme and its associated budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s External-Partnerships-Business Associations work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (refer Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome 5 - Opportunity, prosperity, and growth.

4.       The local board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The local board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·     Retail spend reports 2022/2023 for Takapuna Beach, Milford Village and Devonport associations - $15,000

·          Supporting BIDs – Takapuna Beach Business Association Inc - $38,000

·          Supporting BIDs – Milford Village Business Association Inc - $25,000

·          Supporting BIDs – Devonport Business Association Inc - $25,000

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $103,000 which can be funded from within the local board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI)  budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 2022/2023. presented as Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed development of the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome reflected in the work programme is:

·    Outcome 5 - Opportunity, prosperity, and growth.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the local board’s External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 2022/2023 are detailed below. Refer Attachment A for further detail.

Retail spend reports 2022/2023 – $15,000

10.     To provide funding $5,000 to each of the three BID-operating business associations to purchase retail spend information for the year ending 30 June 2023. The information provided in the reports will assist the business associations to measure and plan ongoing business activities as part of their BID programme delivery. The information contained in these reports should be shared with the local board.

Supporting BIDs – Takapuna Beach Business Association (TBBA) – $38,000

11.     To develop a plan containing post COVID-19 business recovery activities and programmes. The plan should identify the value and benefits of each activity and how they support the BID-member businesses.

Supporting BIDs – Milford Village Business Association (MVBA) – $25,000

12.     To develop a plan containing post COVID-19 business recovery activities and programmes. The plan should identify the value and benefits of each activity and how they support the BID-member businesses.

Supporting BIDs – Devonport Business Association (DBA) – $25,000

13.     To develop a plan containing post COVID-19 business recovery activities and programmes. The plan should identify the value and benefits of each activity and how they support the BID-member businesses.

The proposals presented to the local board

14.     TBBA, MVBA and DBA activities align with the local board’s following outcome and objectives:

·    Outcome 5 - Opportunity, prosperity, and growth

·    Objective 5.1 - Our town centres are vibrant, offering events and activities that attract visitors and support local businesses

15.     Before the end of the first quarter (September 2022), TBBA, MVBA and DBA will present to the local board their detailed proposals on how they propose to utilize the funds. After local board considerations and feedback has been received, funding agreements will be developed and forwarded to the business associations for signing.

16.     The External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme progress will be reported directly to the local board as part of the quarterly local board work programme report produced by Local Board Services.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The proposed External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

20.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their business area.

22.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The proposed External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $103,000 of the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the local board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     Table 1 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme:

Table 1: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Retail spend reports

Not implemented

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

Supporting BIDs – TBBA

Not implementing the recovery plan initiatives

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

Supporting BIDs – MVBA

Not implementing the recovery plan initiatives

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

Supporting BIDs – DBA

Not implementing the recovery plan initiatives

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

 

25.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

27.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 22-23

433

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme

File No.: CP2022/07678

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome - Environment and heritage.

·    Objective - Communities live more sustainably and are prepared for the impacts of climate change.

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·          Community emergency resilience programme - $5,000. 

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $5,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a.   approve the Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023 (Attachment A to the agenda report)

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome that are reflected in the work programme is:

    Environment and heritage. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Community emergency resilience programme - $5,000

10.     Support and deliver community resilience initiatives, resources and activities that engage and enable communities to increase their hazard risk understanding, reduce the impact of an emergency and increase their emergency preparedness and social connections. This will ensure they are better able to cope and support each other during an emergency and recover faster.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

11.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Community emergency resilience work programme

Positive impact on communities resilience to climate change, as this work increases understanding of impacts, how to prepare and build household and community wide resilience to emergencies that are exacerbated by a changing climate.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

14.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $5,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

17.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

19.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna  Local Board AEM Work Programme 2022-2023

439

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rachael Mercer - Resilience Advisor LB & Community

Authorisers

Paul Amaral - General Manager Auckland Emergency Manager

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme

File No.: CP2022/08090

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU) work programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the local board’s TAU work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (refer Attachment A). 

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board has identified in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020: 

·       Opportunity, prosperity, and growth

-       Continue to fund the Youth Enterprise scheme

 

4.       The local board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund via a series of workshops over the past year. The local board indicated its support for the following project, with the budget as listed below: 

·       Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days Sponsorship ($2000) 

 

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $2000, which can be funded from within the local board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.  

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      approve the TAU work programme 2022/2023 as presented in Attachment A to the agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the development of the draft work programme. 

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Devonport-Takapuna  Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcomes that are reflected in the work programme are: 

·         Opportunity, prosperity, and growth

-       Continue to fund the Youth Enterprise scheme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activity for delivery as part of the local board’s TAU work programme 2022/2023 is detailed below. Refer to  Attachment A for further detail.  

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days Sponsorship

10.     The Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. 

11.     Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students learn key work skills and business knowledge including business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and teamwork. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people.

12.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the overall YES program, including the Kick Start days in February 2023 where the Auckland Business Chamber will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick Start days are the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, and find out about their 2023 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to decide as to whether to participate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented draft work programmes to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The proposed TAU work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.  

16.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes, specifically:

·           Opportunity, prosperity, and growth

-       Continue to fund the Youth Enterprise scheme.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes:

Table 1: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Māori impact

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days will support YES Māori students at participating schools to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     The proposed TAU work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $2000 of the local boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the local board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

 

19.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery local board work programmes if the COVID-19 Alert Level changes. The deliverability of some activities will decrease if there is an increase to the COVID-19 Alert Level.

20.     Table 2 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme:

Table 2: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

There is a risk that the Kick Start days do not proceed due to changes in the Covid-19 alert levels. As a result, the sponsorship provided to the Auckland Business Chamber may not be required.

To maintain contact with the Auckland Business Chamber on the running of the event to ensure that if the events are cancelled the full impact on the need for the local board support is identified.

Medium

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.  

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023

445

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Luo Lei – Local Economic Development Advisor

Authorisers

John Norman – Head of Economic Places

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Adoption of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Agreement 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/08114

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, council consulted on the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards have now considered local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

6.       On 29 June 2022, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy (document to be tabled).

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

c)      delegate authority to the Chair to make any final changes to the local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, on 29 June 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards. Local board plans influence and inform the Annual Budgets which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a one-year period. For each financial year, Auckland Council must also have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

8.       Throughout the development of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

9.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, the council consulted with the public on the Annual Budget 2022/2023. One locally held event was held in the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area to engage with the community and seek feedback on both regional and local proposals.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was included as an attachment on the 10 May business meeting agenda.

11.     Local boards considered this feedback, and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of consultation on Annual Budget 2022/2023 and local boards have received a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (document to be tabled at the meeting), including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

14.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement will be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2022/2023 that will be adopted at June business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

19.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

20.     Of those who submitted to the Annual Budget 2022/2023 from the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board area 28 (5%) identified as Māori. One iwi entity from the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board rohe also made a submission to the Annual Budget 2022/2023. These submissions were provided to the local board for consideration at local board workshops during the development of their local board agreement.

21.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2022/2023 financial year.

23.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the Annual Budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

24.     Funding for ABS is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

25.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 is adopted alongside of the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets. Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Decisions on the local content of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023, are required by 23 June 2022 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, at its 29 June 2022 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2022 when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

28.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the Annual Budget 2022/2023 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Chair to make any final changes if necessary.

29.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be agreed between local boards and operational departments at business meetings in June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

A

Draft local fees and charges schedule 2022/2023

453

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Renee Burgers - Lead Advisor Plans and Programmes

Maureen Buchanan - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Chairpersons' Report

File No.: CP2022/07095

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Chairperson of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues relevant to the board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank Chairperson R. Jackson for her verbal report

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Elected Members' Reports

File No.: CP2022/07094

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the members of the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board to provide updates on the projects and issues they have been involved in since the May 2022 Meeting

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive and thank members for their verbal reports.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board - Record of Workshops May 2022

File No.: CP2022/07092

 

   Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a record of Devonport-Takapuna Local Board workshops held during May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Tuesday 03 May 2022, the board was briefed on:

·    Local Board Services

-     Annual Budget consultation feedback and input into regional topics

·    Local Board Services

-     Finalise 22/23 local board work programmes

3.       At the workshop held on Tuesday 10 May 2022, the board was briefed on:

·    Grants

-     Local Grants Round 2

·    Park, Sport, and Recreation

-     DT Toilet Provision Assessment

-     Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund (SRFIF)

4.       Records of these workshops are attached to this report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      receive the records of the workshops held in May 2022

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 3 May 2022

465

b

Devonport-Takapuna Local Board Workshop Record Tuesday 10 May 2022

469

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/07093

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on reports to be presented to the board for 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme. The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by the local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

3.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance to staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to local board business meetings, and distributed to council staff.

4.       The June 2022 governance forward work calendar for the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board is provided as Attachment A. The information contained within this attachment is as accurate as possible under covid-19 circumstances.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board:

a)      note the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board governance forward work calendar for June 2022 as set out in Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calendar June 2022

475

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rhiannon Foulstone-Guinness - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Devonport-Takapuna Local Board

21 June 2022

 

 

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[1] PLA/2021/80