I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 28 June 2022

1.00pm

Claris Conference Centre
19 Whangaparapara Road
Claris
Aotea / Great Barrier Island

 

Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Izzy Fordham

 

Deputy Chairperson

Luke Coles

 

Members

Susan Daly

 

 

Patrick O'Shea

 

 

Valmaine Toki

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Guia Nonoy

Democracy Advisor

 

20 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 301 0101

Email: guia.nonoy@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   1

2          Apologies                                                                                 1

3          Declaration of Interest                                          1

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         1

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    1

6          Acknowledgements                                              1

7          Petitions                                                                 1

8          Deputations                                                           1

9          Public Forum                                                                            1

10        Extraordinary Business                                       1

11        Local Ward Area Councillor's Update                1

12        Approval of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023                                          1

13        Approval of the 2022/2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                  1

14        Approval of the 2022/2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme                                  1

15        Medlands / Kaitoke Parks and Open Spaces Service Assessment 2022                                   1

16        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)                              1

17        Environmental agency and community group reports                                                                    1

18        Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 - 2022                  1

19        Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings                                        1

20        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Chairperson I Fordham will open the meeting and welcome everyone in attendance. Member V Toki will lead a karakia.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 21 June 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 


 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Local Ward Area Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2022/07525

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local ward area councillor to update the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board on Governing Body issues and other points of interest to the local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for local ward area councillors to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      receive the written report update from the Waitematā and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor Pippa Coom's June 2022 update

1

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/08182

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome: Ko te tino hia hia ki a manawaroa to tatou motu/ Our island is resilient. 

·    Objective: Our community is resilient to the impacts of climate change.

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·     Fire risk prevention and emergency preparation – $1,000.

·     Community emergency resilience programme - $1,000. 

·     Business emergency resilience programme - $1,500.

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $3,500, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      approve the Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023 and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below:

 

Activity name

2022/2023 budget for approval

Fire risk prevention and emergency preparation

$1,000

Community emergency resilience programme

$1,000

Business emergency resilience programme

$1,500

Total

$3,500

 

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Auckland Emergency Management work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)       note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome that are reflected in the work programme is:

·    Ko te tino hia hia ki a manawaroa to tatou motu/ Our island is resilient.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Fire risk prevention and emergency preparation – $1,000

10.     In partnership with Fire and Emergency New Zealand, Auckland Emergency Management will present the final approved Fire Plan to the Aotea / Great Barrier Island Emergency Management Committee and the Local Board for workshopping and guidance for next steps.

11.     The intent is to collaborate with the Department of Conservation, mana whenua and the wider community to increase the current and future knowledge of fire risk, mitigation and prevention strategies and increase community resilience to the impacts of fire.

Community emergency resilience programme - $1,000

12.     Delivery of the hazard awareness and emergency preparedness educational programme Kia Rite Kia Mau to children through the Learning Hub and the primary schools.

Business emergency resilience programme - $1,500

13.     Auckland Emergency Management will host resilience building workshops for Great Barrier businesses and organisations. Information packs will be available for those business and organizations unable to attend the workshops and follow-up activity undertaken, as required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Fire risk prevention and emergency preparation

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this work will increase our knowledge of current and future fire risk, mitigation and prevention strategies and increase community resilience.

Community emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change as this work will increase community resilience to emergencies and impacts of climate change.

Business emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change as this work will increase the business community’s resilience to emergencies and impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

17.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $3,500 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

22.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board AEM Work Programme 22-23

1

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rachael Mercer - Resilience Advisor LB & Community

Authorisers

Paul Amaral - General Manager Auckland Emergency Manager

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07834

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2022/2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme for approval from the following departments:

·    Connected Communities

·    Community and Social Innovation

·    Community Facilities

·    Parks, Sports, and Recreation

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

3.       In addition, the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities Department work programme are presented for approval in principle.

4.       To support the delivery of the local board’s outcomes and aspirations highlighted in the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020, Customer and Community Services presents a work programme for local board approval each financial year.

5.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

6.       The work programme has been developed with the local board providing feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation through a series of workshops, held between October 2021 and May 2022.

7.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to planning activities, involving collaboration between the local board and staff from across the council.

8.       Within the Customer and Community Services work programme, the Community Facilities Department has identified several projects for the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 financial years as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).

9.       Approval is sought for the planning and design of the RAP projects to commence during the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

10.     The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee, including Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects by way of resolutions to this report.

11.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19-related disruptions, some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

12.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

13.     Once approved in June 2022, the local board will receive quarterly progress updates on the delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      approve the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report) with the following changes:

i)       ID#192 Build capacity: funding for Destination Great Barrier Island Administrator budget increased to $20,000 for 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 (outlined on page 4 of Attachment A)

ii)       ID#134 Community grants Great Barrier budget increased to $108,377 for 2022/2023 (outlined on page 5 of Attachment A)

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

c)       approve in principle the 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities only work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

d)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

e)      note that there may be minor changes to year one of the 2022/2023 Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme, and other changes in years 2 and 3 which are approved in principle, due to Annual Budget decisions affecting capital budgets and that changes required will be discussed with and reported to the local board early in the new financial year.

f)       note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets is subject to approval by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Auckland Plan 2050 (Auckland Plan) is the council’s long-term spatial plan to ensure Auckland grows in a way that will meet the opportunities and challenges ahead.  It aims to contribute to Auckland’s social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing.

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15.     Local board plans align with the Auckland Plan and set out local community priorities and aspirations. The 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme in turn aligns to not only the local board plans but the appropriate Auckland Council plans, policies and strategies.

16.     Work programme activities align to the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020 outcome: Ko te tino hia hia ki a manawaroa to tatou motu / Our island is resilient.

17.     Development of the work programme is based on consideration of community needs and priorities, availability of resources and funding, Treaty of Waitangi obligations, external partnerships and risk assessment.

18.     The Customer and Community Services directorate provides a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of Auckland’s people, places and natural environment. These are designed and implemented to meet the unique needs of the local community.

19.     Development of the work programme follows an integrated approach to planning activities by the following departments of the directorate:

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The work programme demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the 2022/2023 financial year.

21.     Delivery of the work programme commences from 1 July 2022, and in some cases comprises a continuation of implementation from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes.

22.     New activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items also form part of the work programme.

23.     Table one summarises the approval status required for the three financial years presented within the work programme.

Table one: Customer and Community Services local board work programme approvals

Department

2022/2023

2023/2024

2024/2025

Community Facilities

Approve

Approve in principle

Approve in principle

All other Customer and Community Services departments

Approve

Approve in principle

N/A

24.     Community Facilities presents a three-year rolling work programme so that delivery and financial commitments against the capital works programme can be planned.

25.     Approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2022/2023 work programme may lead to contractual commitments to the future budget needed to complete the project in 2023/2024 or 2024/2025.

26.     The remainder of Customer and Community Services presents the work programme in descending three-year increments and are therefore only presenting years two and three of the three-year work programme.

27.     The local board will be updated by staff on the delivery of the programme by way of quarterly performance reports.

Proposed amendments to the in principle 2022/2023 work programme

28.     The local board approved the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme in June 2021 and approved in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

29.     The 2022/2023 work programme contains variations to the version that was approved in principle last year. These include the addition of new activities, changes to existing activities, such as required budget allocation and delivery timeframes, and identifies some activities that have been stopped.

30.     Table two highlights the new activities in the work programme:

Table two: work programme activities that are new

ID

Activity name

Lead Department

Budget

2993

Aotea/Great Barrier accessways and linkages plan

CCS: PSR – Park Services

 

$7,000

3513

Aotea / Great Barrier Parks Amenities Provision Service Assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

 

0

3514

Aotea / Great Barrier Play Provision Assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

 

0

3517

Ahu Moana communications

CCS: Connected Communities – Community Delivery

$1,500

32033

Aotea Great Barrier - design and install pou

C&CS: Community Facilities

$35,000

31973

Aotea Great Barrier - implement youth play and active recreation improvements

C&CS: Community Facilities

$244,428

31781

Aotea Great Barrier - LDI minor capex fund 2024/2025

C&CS: Community Facilities

$174,949

 

31.     Table three highlights the activities that were approved in principle in June 2021 but have been completed, stopped, or proposed activities that did not start, and are therefore not included in the 2022/2023 work programme:

Table three: work programme activities that have been removed from the work programme

Previous ID

Activity name

Lead Department

592

Medlands and Kaitoke parks service assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

1307

Great Barrier Island Community spaces and reserves activation plan

CCS: RSPIP – Service and Asset Planning

2777

CFWD CARRY FORWARD Accessway and linkages plan FY20

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2857

CARRY FORWARD: Great Barrier community spaces and reserves

CCS: RSPIP – Service and Asset Planning

 

COVID-19 considerations for Customer and Community Services

32.     The work programme includes activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 by providing:

·     safe and welcoming spaces

·     inclusive events to bring the community back together

·     community support, including grants

·     stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi and Māori organisations, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies, which also serve Auckland’s communities.

33.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of these activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19 related disruption some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

34.     Current capex delivery challenges include increased material and labour costs, as well as shortages in both sectors, this in turn will lead to increased overall project costs.

35.     Current supply chain issues, obtaining building materials, may lead to delays in project delivery. Increased costs and delays will be managed as part of the ongoing management of work programmes via additional RAP projects, and the rephasing of projects to accommodate increased budget and address material shortages.

Māori Outcomes

36.     Local boards play a vital role in representing the interests of all Aucklanders and are committed to the Treaty-based obligations and to Māori participation and development.

37.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

38.     A thriving Māori identity is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. It advances prosperity for Māori and benefits all Aucklanders.

39.     The local boards recognise the importance of building meaningful relationships with mana whenua, maatawaka and whānau, and understanding Māori aspirations. The following outcomes, objectives and key initiatives from the local board plan recognise these areas of common interest:

Outcome: Ko te tino hia hia ki a manawaroa to tatou motu / Our island is resilient.

o   Objective – Mana whenua will prosper

Key Initiatives:

·    Support mana whenua’s use and application of mātauranga and tikanga Māori within the moana and whenua  

·    Develop and improve council and mana whenua relationship networks across governance, organisation and community levels  

·    Support mana whenua, Ngāti Rehua Ngātiwai ki Aotea, aspirations with collaborative projects  

·    Support mana whenua to develop a rangatahi leadership programme and educational initiatives  

·    Support mana whenua and mana whenua enterprises to build capacity to engage in consents and compliance issues  

·    Support mana whenua to protect coastal infrastructure, accessways, sites of significance, urupa and waahi tapu  

·    Support mana whenua to investigate housing solutions including papakainga and kaumatua housing  

·    Acknowledge that the Waitangi Tribunal has stated that the Treaty of Waitangi provides for Māori proprietary interest in water bodies, as well as the exercise of tino rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga over water, and work alongside mana whenua to ensure safe and clean drinking water for everyone.

 

o   Objective – We have marine protection and conservation around our coastline 

Key Initiatives: 

·    Engagement with the community on an Ahu Moana approach for marine protection  

·    Investigate and implement marine protection, using tools such as, Ahu Moana, rāhui, and marine reserves with mana whenua, the community, and DOC, with Sea Change - Tai Timu Tai Pari as a guide.

40.     There is a wide range of activity occurring across Tāmaki Makaurau to advance Māori outcomes. Much of this is led by mana whenua and Māori organisations, as well government organisations, non-government organisations and businesses. 

41.     The Auckland Plan’s focus on Māori culture and identity is encapsulated in the outcome: Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

42.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, council’s Māori Outcomes performance measurement framework, captures the majority of council’s Māori outcome strategy and planning. The framework responds to the needs and aspirations that Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, both mana whenua and mataawaka, have expressed to council. 

43.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver outcomes for and with Māori. Attachment B sets out the activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas.

44.     Table four shows the strategic priority areas and alignment to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes.

Table four: local board work programme Māori outcome areas

Strategic priority area

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcome

Kaitiakitanga

Kia Ora te Taiao

Māori business, tourism and employment 

Kia Ora te Umanga

Māori identity and culture 

Kia Ora te Ahurea

Marae development

Kia Ora te Marae

Papakāinga and Māori housing 

Kia Ora te Kāinga

Realising rangatahi potential 

Kia Ora te Rangatahi

Te reo Māori 

Kia Ora te Reo

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Kia Ora te Whānau

45.     The Customer and Community Services directorate lead or contribute to programmes that align with all outcomes. Particular priorities are Kia Ora te Marae, Kia Ora te Whānau and Kia Ora te Reo. 

46.     In a COVID-19 recovery environment there is increasing focus on Kia Ora te Umunga / Māori Business, Tourism and Employment and the role that the council can play, not only in supporting economic recovery, but in a thriving Māori economy. 

47.     Kia Ora te Ahurea / Māori Identity and Culture is often a focus for local boards as events and place-based design often plays an important part in many local programmes.

Work programme budget types and purpose

48.     Work programme activities are funded from various budget sources, depending on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme are funded from two or more sources, including from both local and regional budgets.

49.     Table five outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

Table five: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services, grants and staff time to deliver activities

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the partial renewal or full replacement of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council, often from external sources, held for specific local board areas, including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

Part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

50.     The capital projects to be delivered in the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board area, together with identified budgets and main funding sources, are shown in Attachment A.

51.     The budgets associated with the capital works programme are estimates only, costs are subject to change and may need to be refined as the project progresses through the design and delivery process. Once activity details are more clearly defined, staff will update the work programme for approval in subsequent years.

Risk Adjusted Programme

52.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was first implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

53.     Several capital projects in the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme and outlined in Attachment A.

54.     Local board approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

55.     Some activities from the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development (growth) budgets are funded regionally and will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee for approval after 30 June 2022.

56.     The local board has decision-making responsibility for these activities within parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope, and budget. These activities are therefore included in the work programme. 

Process for changes to the approved work programme

57.     Some projects in the work programme require further local board decisions as they progress through the delivery process.

58.     Where further decisions are anticipated they have been indicated in the work programme, and decisions will be sought as required through local board business meetings.

59.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects may also be required as projects progress, in response to more detailed design and costing information, community consultation, consenting requirements and similar factors.  

60.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects will be managed in accordance with the established local board delegations to staff.

61.     The work programme includes community leases. Lease renewals without variations will be processed by way of a memo, in accordance with agreed delegations.

62.     Should the local board signal their intent to change or pursue a new lease that is not contemplated in the leasing work programme, a deferral of an item already programmed for delivery will need to be accommodated.

63.     Staff will workshop expired and more complex community leases with the local board and then report on them at a business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

64.     As Customer and Community Services is a significant service provider and property owner, the directorate has a leading role in delivering Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

65.     In providing asset-based services, Customer and Community Services contributes most of council’s operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its facilities and infrastructure.

66.     Property managed by the directorate, in particular coastal assets, will be adversely affected by climate change. The work programme includes actions, consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to halve council’s operational GHG emissions by 2030, and to adapt to a changing climate.

67.     Actions include reducing operational GHG emissions through phasing-out gas heating in aquatic centres, improving the efficiency of facilities, investing in renewable energy, and adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy.

68.     At the same time, the directorate will mitigate GHG emissions and improve climate resilience through delivering tree planting programmes across the region. This includes delivering the Mayor’s tree planting initiatives, transitioning unproductive farmland on regional parks to permanent native forest, and delivering ecological restoration projects with community groups.

69.     Work is ongoing to build on the above actions and embed climate change considerations into investment decision-making, planning, and corporate policies, including asset management plans and Local Board Plans.

70.     As approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, council’s mandated approach to ‘deliver differently’ is also anticipated to help reduce the council carbon footprint by creating a sustainable service network. This may include a shift to digital service models or the consolidation of services into a smaller footprint.

71.     Each activity in the work programme has been assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and affect Auckland’s resilience to climate change.

72.     The activities in the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board work programme identified as having a positive or negative impact on climate change are outlined in Attachment C.

73.     Types of activities in the work programme that will have positive impacts on emissions and improve community resilience to climate change, include community-led environmental and educational programmes, supporting volunteer planting, delivering council-led planting and sustainable design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

74.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed collaboratively by staff from the directorate’s departments and Local Board Services to ensure that the activities and delivery of the work programme are integrated, complementary, and reflect council wide priorities.

75.     An example of collaboration on delivery is the kauri dieback programme which is delivered by the Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

76.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme.

77.     A focus area of the work programme is to respond to the Recovery Budget, the communities of greatest need and build capacity within the community, including through community-led delivery and partnerships.

78.     Planning and delivery of some activities involves consultation with the community to ensure that their aspirations are understood and responded to.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

79.     The provision of services, facilities and open spaces support the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connection to the natural environment and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

80.     Attachment B shows local board projects or programmes that are ranked as delivering ‘high’ Māori Outcomes. They involve ongoing collaboration with Māori or are delivered by Māori. 

81.     Projects or programmes in Attachment A may also contribute to Māori Outcomes but are not highlighted as they are identified to have a moderate or low impact. 

82.     Engagement with Māori is critical and, if not already completed, will occur on a programme or project basis, prior to any work commencing, and be reported back separately to the local board. 

83.     Further information about the response to Māori aspirations as described in the work programme, is captured in the Analysis and Advice section.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

84.     Each activity line has a budget allocation in one or more of the financial years e.g. 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar operating expense (opex) budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

85.     The 2022/2023 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within 2022/2023 budgets and staff resources.

86.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 are indicative and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

87.     Table six summarises the budget sources and allocation for each work programme financial year.

Table six: Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2022/2023 (approve)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

2024/2025 (approve in principle – Community Facilities only)

Operational (Opex): Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

500,759

                507,340

                516,473

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

1,397,351

            1,051,630

            1,072,557

Capital (Capex): Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

257,156

184,853

298,227

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

218,594

184,853

298,227

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

38,562

0

0

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

35,000

35,000

174,949

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

35,000

35,000

174,949

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

0

0

0

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: One Local Initiative

0

0

0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

27,912

0

244,428

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

0

0

0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

0

0

0

* See paragraph 53-55 for RAP explanation

88.     The budgets are based on the allocations in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Budgets are subject to change during council’s Annual Budget and future Long-term Plan processes. If decisions on the Annual Budget result in budget reductions, the work programme will need to be amended to align to these budgets via future decisions of the local board.

89.     Any 2021/2022 opex budget unspent on 30 June 2022, will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2022/2023 work programme. Carry-forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines and will be reflected in the revised budget.

90.     During delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme, where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the associated budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year. This process will include agreement from each department and will need to be resolved on by the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

91.     The most significant risk is that delivery of the Customer and Community Services work programme is dependent on the local board approving the work programme by 30 June 2022. Approval of the work programme after the start of the financial year could result in delays to delivery.

92.     The majority of operational (opex) activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

93.     Table seven outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme once it has been approved.


 

 

Table seven: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

Health, safety and wellbeing factors, including external influences relating to work programme delivery may impact the delivery of activities, resulting in activities requiring adjustment.

Health and safety assessments will be conducted prior to commencement of projects. Work programme activities and projects will be adjusted accordingly where these risks occur during the delivery phase.

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to negatively impact on the progress and deliverability of the work programme.

Development of the work programme has included consideration of potential impacts on delivery due to COVID-19 for all activities.

Timeframes for some activities are set to enable delivery within the agreed timeframe despite possible delays. 

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate the budget to other activities.

The COVID-19 pandemic and other geopolitical factors may result in further inflationary and supply chain pressures.

Potential inflationary pressures have been modelled into key forecasts; however uncertainties remain.

The ongoing cost increase may become unsustainable, and may require a reprioritization of potential work programmes, capital spend and a potential discontinuation of some programmes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

94.     Delivery of the Customer and Community Service work programme is scheduled to start on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023.

95.     Regionally funded projects are an exception and will commence after they have been approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2022.

96.     The local board will receive progress updates on a quarterly basis, with the first quarterly report available in November 2022.

97.     When further decisions for activities are needed at project milestones, these will be brought to the local board at the appropriate time.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aotea Great Barrier CCS Work Programme 22-23

1

b

Māori Outcomes Aotea Great Barrier

1

c

Climate Impacts Aotea Great Barrier

1

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Tania Pouwhare - General Manager Community & Social Innovation

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Jacqui Fyers - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 



Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme

File No.: CP2022/07097

 

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme, and approve in principle the 2023/2024 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2022/2023 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent financial year, 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. 2022/2023 is year two of the three-year cycle. Many of the programmes included in this report were approved in principle in the 2021/2022 work programme.

4.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between November 2021 and May 2022, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

6.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2022/2023, with budgets as listed below:

·        Aotea awa restoration programme - $29,000

·        Aotea ecology vision - $30,000

·        Aotea Trap Library - $13,380

·        Argentine and Darwin’s ant surveillance - $19,000

·        Conservation Advisor - $45,000

·        Construction Waste Leadership Project - $16,960

·        Ōkiwi ecology programme - $24,000

·        Oruawharo Medlands Ecovision - $13,500

·        Wai resilience programme - $8,000

7.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $198,840, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year.

8.       The proposed work programme also includes $510,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the following coastal renewals programmes:

·        Mulberry Grove – seawall renewal - $450,000

·        Pa Point Reserve – renew coastal access steps - $60,000

9.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

10.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)          approve its 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

 

Activity name

2022/2023 budget for approval

Aotea awa restoration programme

$29,000

Aotea ecology vision

$30,000

Aotea Trap Library

$13,380

Argentine and Darwin’s ant surveillance

$19,000

Conservation Advisor

$45,000

Construction Waste Leadership Project

$16,960

Ōkiwi ecology programme

$24,000

Oruawharo Medlands Ecovision

$13,500

Wai resilience programme

$8,000

Total

$198,840

b)          approve in principle the 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report)

c)          note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes

d)          note the allocation of $510,000 asset based services capital expenditure budget towards the Mulberry Grove – seawall renewal and  Pa Point Reserve – renew coastal access steps programmes in the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

12.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objective reflected in the work programme is that our environment is protected and enhanced.

13.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·    National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020

·    Mahere ā-Rohe Whakahaere Kaupapa Koiora Orotā mō Tāmaki Makaurau - Regional Pest Management Plan

·    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

·    The Sea Change - Tai Timu Tai Pari Plan 2017

·    Tikapa Moana Hauraki Gulf Islands Waste Plan 2018

·    Aotea / Great Barrier Island Ecology Vision 2016

14.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

16.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

17.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year two of the three-year work programme (2022/2023), and approval in principle for 2023/2024.

18.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for year three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However, approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

19.     Budgets for year three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

20.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2023/2024 financial year:

Aotea awa restoration programme – $29,000

21.     The local board has indicated its support for the Aotea awa restoration programme in 2022/2023. This programme was previously named the Freshwater management programme, and was allocated $58,700 in the 2021/2022 financial year (which included a $20,000 carry forward from 2020/2021).

22.     This programme improves water quality outcomes through school and community education sessions, citizen science, stream and wetland restoration, and grants for riparian planting and fencing projects.

23.     Staff recommend that the board allocates $29,000 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $50,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Aotea ecology vision – $30,000

24.     The board has indicated it would like to continue funding its ecology vision programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. The board has supported the ecology vision programme since its development in 2016 and allocated $30,000 towards this project in the 2021/2022 financial year.

25.     This programme will enable the engagement of a facilitator to coordinate ecology vision workshops and events, maintain the ecology vision website and social media presence, and provide an ecosystem-based school education programme.

26.     In 2022/2023 and 2023/2024, staff will discuss with the local board the possibility of expanding the programme to focus on waste minimisation, low carbon, responsible pet ownership and planting activities.

27.     Staff recommend that the board allocates $30,000 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Aotea Trap Library – $13,380

28.     The local board has indicated its support for the Aotea Trap Library programme in 2022/2023.

29.     The programme provides education and pest control tools to private landowners and residents on Aotea to increase local knowledge on pest species, and options for their effective control.

30.     Staff recommend that the board allocates $13,380 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $13,380 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Argentine and Darwin’s ant surveillance – $19,000

31.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to support Argentine and Darwin’s ant surveillance in the 2022/2023 financial year. The board has supported this project since 2016 and allocated $19,000 towards this initiative through its environment work programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

32.     Argentine and Darwin’s ant surveillance work will inform decisions on the targeted control and management of these pest species at high-risk sites. Surveillance over the next two years will focus on residential areas, as well as any remote locations that have had recent builds or high-risk activities carried out onsite.

33.     Staff recommend that the board allocate $19,000 towards the continuation of this project in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $19,000 towards the continuation of this programme in 2023/2024.

Conservation Advisor – $45,000

34.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to contribute funding towards a conservation advisor role for Aotea / Great Barrier in the 2022/2023 financial year. The conservation advisor role will ensure the provision of specialist biodiversity advice, as well as support for biodiversity and marine projects, and community education on Aotea.

35.     The board established a part-time advisor position in 2017 and allocated $45,000 towards this role in the 2021/2022 financial year. Local board funding is complemented by regional funding, to enable a full-time position.

36.     In November 2020, the local board approved in principle the continuation of funding for the role over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023, and 2023/2024 financial years (up to $45,000 annually), noting that formal approval will be sought through the annual work programme processes (resolution GBI/2020/115). This commitment, alongside a staff commitment for regional funding towards the role over these years, will provide the coordinator with more job security over the three financial years.

37.     Staff recommend that the board allocate $45,000 towards the continuation of this project in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $45,000 towards the continuation of this programme in 2023/2024.

Construction Waste Leadership Project – $16,960

38.     The local board has indicated its support for the Construction Waste Leadership programme in 2022/2023.

39.     This programme will continue the fixed term role of a construction and demolition waste advisor, who will work with builders and developers to improve site practices and minimise waste in the building sector.

40.     Staff recommend that the board allocates $16,960 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $16,960 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Ōkiwi ecology programme – $24,000

41.     The board has indicated it would like to continue funding an Ōkiwi pest coordinator in the 2022/2023 financial year, to encourage community-led pest control in Ōkiwi. The board has supported this project for several years and allocated $24,000 towards this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

42.     Activities for the 2022/2023 financial year will include monitoring and servicing rat traps, facilitating bird counts, continuing the Asian paddle crab trapping initiative in the Whangapoua estuary and coordinating annual volunteer planting. The programme coordinator will also support wider community initiatives such as Tū Mai Taonga.

43.     Staff recommend that the board allocates $24,000 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $24,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Oruawharo Medlands Ecovision – $13,500

44.     The local board has indicated its support for the Oruawharo Medlands Ecovision programme in 2022/2023.

45.     This project will support community engagement and education initiatives that promote environmental resilience. Activities for the 2022/2023 financial year will include rat trapping maintenance, rat monitoring using ink cards, planting and weeding days, and providing support for wider community initiatives.

46.     Staff recommend that the board allocated $13,500 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $19,620 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Wai resilience programme – $8,000

47.     The local board has indicated its support for the Wai resilience programme in 2022/2023.

48.     This programme will fund a Sustainability coordinator to raise awareness of the benefits of rainwater harvesting for the health of the ecosystem and the community. The coordinator will be supported by a new raintank engagement app that Auckland Council is piloting.

49.     Staff recommend that the board allocated $8,000 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $8,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Mulberry Grove – seawall renewal

50.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme to renew the seawall at Mulberry Grove to prevent erosion. Consent, design, and physical works are scheduled to take place in the 2022/2023 financial year

Pa Point Reserve

51.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme to replace the existing coastal access steps at Pa Point Reserve with a solution more suitable to withstand the coastal environment. Investigation, design and physical works will take place in the 2022/2023 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

52.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

53.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, neutral or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

54.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Aotea awa restoration programme

Restoring freshwater ecosystems will help to both mitigate climate change and adapt to the effects of climate change. When healthy, these ecosystems mitigate flooding, provide habitat for native biodiversity, and provide carbon sequestration.

Aotea Ecology Vision

Specialists and guest speakers flying to the island for this project will be the only source of carbon emissions. Travellers to the island will be encouraged to reduce their carbon emissions by carpooling or using electric vehicles while on Aotea, bringing a reusable drink bottle and buying locally.

Aotea Trap Library

The wooden trap boxes necessary for pest management work will be manufactured locally. This will avoid the carbon emissions that would result from freighting them to the island.

Argentine and Darwin’s ant surveillance

Carbon emissions associated with this project are primarily form vehicle use. The project will employ local contractor staff eliminating carbon emissions from travel to the island.

Conservation Advisor

This on-island role circumvents the need to fly staff to the island for environmental work, reducing the council’s carbon footprint.

Construction Waste Leadership Project

Construction and demolition waste, particularly organic components such as timber and cardboard, produce methane when breaking down in landfill. Reducing this waste stream going to landfill will reduce the impacts on our climate.

Ōkiwi ecology programme

Trees will be planted as part of this project, which will reduce the island’s net carbon footprint.

Oruawharo Medlands Ecovision

There are no carbon emissions resulting from the work of this project. Trees will be planted, which will reduce the island’s net carbon footprint.

Wai resilience programme

Increased rainwater harvesting will improve the community’s resilience to drought. It will enable home gardening and food resilience, decreasing the need for food freight and packaging. Reducing the volume of water taken from streams for supply will increase the ability of the ecosystem to adapt to climate change.

Mulberry Grove

Pa Point Reserve

Physical works for the coastal programmes will have a negligible carbon footprint. Where possible, staff will adopt sustainable, low carbon options for project delivery. The renewal will improve the resilience of these coastal assets.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

56.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters and Waste Solutions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

57.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2022/2023 work programme include the Okiwi and Oruawharo Medlands areas.

58.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘our environment is protected and enhanced’. The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

59.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

60.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

61.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

62.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Aotea ecology vision

Kaitiakitanga

Māori identity and culture

 

This project aligns with the Ngāti Rehua Ngatiwai ki Aotea, Hapu management plan as it works to protect indigenous flora and fauna and encourage kaitiakitanga and mātauranga Māori. Māori outcomes will be discussed and mana whenua empowered to participate in the project. The Ecology Vision will utilise regionally funded cultural advisors from Motairehe and Kawa marae.

Aotea Trap library

 

Argentine and Darwin’s ant surveillance

 

Ōkiwi ecology project

 

Oruawharo Medlands Ecovision

Kaitiakitanga

These projects all communicate with Ngati Rehua Ngātiwai ki Aotea Trust on common goals and aspirations for the natural environment. They support the iwi trust in their leadership of the Tu Mai Taonga project.

Awa restoration programme

 

Conservation Advisor

Kaitiakitanga

These projects align with the guiding principle of kaitiakitanga, which has been identified as a priority action by mana whenua and mataawaka in Auckland Council’s framework for measuring Māori wellbeing outcomes – Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau.

Construction Waste Leadership programme

Kaitiakitanga

This project will align with the guiding principle of kaitiakitanga, which was identified as a priority action by mana whenua and mataawaka during engagement on the Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan. The project will reduce the harm of construction and demolition waste to the environment, actively protecting papatuanuku. It will also decrease the greenhouse gas emissions caused by transporting waste to the mainland.

Wai resilience programme

Kaitiakitanga

Māori identity and culture

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Staff will be engaging with marae and/or mana whenua on the design of the “Follow the Drop” app. The project’s goal to increase rainwater harvesting and decrease the practice of drinking and using water from streams will have positive impacts on the health of all residents on the island.

 

63.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

64.     The proposed environment work programme for 2022/2023 totals to $198,840 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

65.     The proposed work programme also includes $510,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the coastal renewals programmes. Please note that the coastal renewal budgets are current estimates and are subject to change through the design and works stages. If there is any significant changes throughout the financial year these will be reported back to the board.

66.     Budgets for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for a future year through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

67.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

68.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board.

69.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes. Some activities may not be able to be delivered fully if COVID-19 restrictions are increased.

70.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

71.     Table 3 shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

Table 3: Key risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Aotea awa restoration programme

Lack of up-take in the community for the Targeted Water Protection Fund

Staff have increased the hours of coordinator engagement to assist residents with their applications.

medium

Aotea Ecology Vision

Aotea Trap Library

Ōkiwi Ecology Programme

Oruawharo Medlands Ecovision

A lack of engagement from the community.

The Environmental community group programmes will utilise a range of engagement mediums including social media, emails, letters, hui and door-to-door contact.

low

Argentine and Darwin’s Ant Surveillance

 

Landowners refusing access to the contractor

If there is not a strong suspicion that the property in question has either species of ants, then the surrounding properties will have surveillance carried out on them. The property in question will be noted to be visited at a later date

medium

Construction Waste Leadership Project

Builders may be unaware/unwilling to engage with the project

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An increase in the volume of building work on the island would mean less time available per site for engagement

This risk will be mitigated by the consistent presence of the construction and demolition waste advisor, who will increase awareness about the effects of problematic waste practices

 

Any significant increase in consents or building activity would be flagged by building control, which would give the project managers the opportunity to rescope the project

low

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

low

 

Wai Resilience Programme

A lack of interest to engage with this project in the community, possibly as many landowners already have raintanks

The programme delivery partners have a relationship with the community on the island already

Engagement will aim to educate residents about the importance of water sustainability to ecosystem/community health, which will benefit even those who already have tanks

Those who do not have a tank installed will be prioritized for engagement

 

medium

72.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

73.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

74.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme 2022/2023 - Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

1

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nicola Perry - Relationship Coordinator

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Medlands / Kaitoke Parks and Open Spaces Service Assessment 2022

File No.: CP2022/08411

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Medlands / Kaitoke Parks and Open Spaces Service Assessment 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This assessment has reviewed the existing park and amenity provision in the Medlands / Kaitoke parks and open space areas and suggests potential projects for future work programmes

3.       It also outlines how the parks can be developed to provide opportunities for local communities to meet, play and enjoy nature. These include a mix of small-scale capital investments, work programming and long-term aspirations for the parks in scope.

4.       The Service Assessment has also been informed by the draft version of the Village Activation Plan.

5.       Several challenges have emerged during the drafting of the assessment, including Auckland Council’s declaration of a climate change emergency, the COVID-19 pandemic and constrained budgets responding to reduction in revenue due to the pandemic.

6.       On 31 May 2022, the Service Assessment was workshopped on site, with mana whenua, the Pou Whenua project, Department of Conservation (DOC) and Local Board members.

7.       The key recommendations are around providing good access to the beaches and enhancing the open spaces identified to complement the coastal environment and existing recreation experiences, centre around enhancing the following:

·       Linkages, connections – to foreshore and wetland;

·       Mana whenua presence;

·       Wayfinding and signage – park naming;

·       Amenities – seats, toilets, pathways;

·       Provision of all ages, services for play.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      adopt the Medlands / Kaitoke Parks and Open Spaces Service Assessment 2022 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The FY2021/2022 approved work programme included the Medlands / Kaitoke Parks Service Assessment (SharePoint reference #683).

9.       The study area for this project is approximately 4.0km long, from Kaitoke to the southern end of Medlands Beach and includes seven reserves.

10.     The study was delayed due to difficulties in completing the board-requested site visit; the findings were scheduled to be workshopped with the local board in November 2021.

11.     Staff undertook a site visit of the Medlands and Kaitoke service assessment area in February 2022.

12.     The Service Assessment has been informed by the draft version of the Village Activation Plan.

13.     Assessment recommendations have been provided to the local board at the 12 April workshop and were further discussed at a site meeting on 31 May 2022.

14.     The closure of the international border has seen an increase in domestic visitors to Aotea / Great Barrier Island.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     There are 7 identified Auckland Council reserves in the study area:

·     Oceanview Recreation Reserve (connection to Access & Linkages FY22/23).

·     Open Space (dunes).

·     Sandhills Reserve.

·     Medlands Cemetery Reserve.

·     Open Space (DOC).

·     Medlands Reserve (playground).

·     Open Space (estuary).

16.     The assessment has considered how each of them can be made more attractive to residents and visitors in the most cost-effective way. The assessment identifies how beach access through, and to, open space might be improved.

17.     In addition, the assessment considers how the recreation experiences offered within the identified open spaces complement the coastal environment. The open space amenities which are key, and which could be improved include rest / respite, gathering, shade and play.

18.     The thinking and consideration behind these improvements is provided in the attached assessment (Attachment A) and is summarised in the following recommendations.

19.     Medlands Reserve playground is very well known and has existing park services and assets, which are well utilised (see Page 9, Attachment A for details).

20.     Improvements recommended here are:

Recognise Mana Whenua:

-      Parks signage at entrance – which incorporates mana whenua presence and connection to foreshore.

-      Site large pou whenua on dune path off Sandhills Road.

Improve accessibility Park connection and amenity:

-      Build a concrete accessible path connecting road to toilet - to playground – around and through to the back court (use design and form, undulations, to connect coast to park (kina, shells, waves) and incorporate pump elements. 

-      Provide experiences for a broader age range.

-      Enable hard surface to be configurable for multiple uses:

(a)  Wheeled play – enhance learn to ride (incorporated into pathway connections also).

(b)  Basketball, futsal.

-      Bench seats – with backs

-      Investigate island appropriate traffic calming treatments for pedestrian connection between foreshore and reserve.

21.     Sandhills Reserve is a flat open space which has existing park services and assets, which are well utilised (see Page 10, Attachment A for details).

22.     Improvements recommended here are:

Recognise Mana Whenua:

-      Incorporate mana whenua presence and connection to foreshore.

-      Potential for marae or cultural centre (as discussed onsite).

-      Potential viewing platform for wetlands.

Improve Park accessibility and amenity:

-      Footpath access from Sandhills Road.

-      Bench seats and tables.

-      Barbecue.

-      Potential to level for kick-around field.

23.     Medlands Historic Reserve has existing park and services and functions as a pleasance area and cemetery (see Page 11, Attachment A for details).

24.     Improvements recommended here are:

Improve Park connection and amenity:

-      Signage and interpretation.

-      Bench seats.

25.     This unnamed reserve sits at the southern road end of Sandhills road, connecting to the estuary and bridge tracks south. This is next to the DOC camping ground and currently has few amenities (see Page 12, Attachment A for details).

26.     Improvements recommended here are:

Recognise Mana Whenua:

-      Provide a name for the reserve – which incorporates mana whenua presence and connection to the importance of place.

Improve Park connection and amenity:

-      Bench seats (table and benches to be installed).

-      Wayfinding/ directional signs to next open space or Pou.

27.     Oceanview Road is a strategic greenfield site adjoining DOC land beyond, offering alternative access to Kaitoke Beach from the Blackwell land crossing at the end of the street.

28.     Improvements recommended here are:

Recognise Mana Whenua

-      Incorporate mana whenua presence and connection to foreshore.

Improve Park connection and amenity:

-      Link to Kaitoke Beach for public access through neighbouring DOC land.

-      Must be informal & unformed, erosion managed.

-      Developed & maintained by council.

-      Bench seats.

-      Carparking for visitors accessing the beach.

-      Toilets.

 


 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     No major change is envisaged for any sites referenced and therefore the ability to influence climate change either in a positive or negative way is small. However, the board is focused on providing a range of recreation outcomes that complement the local parks network and that will enable and encourage park visits on foot or by bike. Changing travel behaviours across the park network can have a positive knock-on effect in terms of shaping the transport choices people make.

30.     Specific recreation experiences offered at parks are also important in this regard. Learn to ride facilities, as an example, are key to giving children the skills, confidence and behaviours that could make cycling the preferred transport option in adulthood.

31.     Where park development does occur, new assets will be durable, island specific and sustainably sourced plus constructed in order to help limit the carbon construction footprint and extend the working life of the asset.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     Parks, Sport and Recreation staff have worked closely with Community Facilities (CF) who are responsible for the implementation of changes to the parks network. CF understand site pressures, constraints and the need for public consultation in order to ensure development is appropriate and will meet community need.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

33.     The local board plan identifies the high-level outcome that ‘Our island is resilient’ / Ko te tino hia hia ki a manawaroa to tatou motu’. This together with the objectives below guides the local board’s choice of initiatives and budget allocation.

34.     The local board plan sees a future where Aotea mana whenua, Ngāti Rehua-Ngātiwai ki Aotea, aspirations are realised and relationships are respected and well communicated.

35.     In carrying out the plan the local board wants to make the best use of local assets such as community centres and parks.

36.     The plan identifies the following objectives which are relevant to parks:

Preservation of our island identity:

Protect our unique way of life by championing options that fit our place and our ethos.

Our local economy is strong, stable and sustainable:

Seek local jobs for local people by having council contracts procured locally.

Support local artists, craftspeople, writers, performers and musicians to create and teach.

Our environment is protected and enhanced:

Support the biodiversity of our flora and fauna by funding our community-led Ecology Vision - our sanctuaries, environmental trusts, and community environment projects.

We have safe shared roads and walkways:

Strive for improvements to our roads, including sealing where appropriate, to achieve safe and healthy roads for our people and environment.

Work with community, mana whenua and DOC to identify accessways and linkages across the island.

37.     The Service Assessment was workshopped with the local board 12 April 2022 and 31 May 2022 it was workshopped on site, with mana whenua, Department of Conservation (DOC) and local board members. All feedback has been reflected within the assessment where feasible. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Parks and reserves are taonga and hold significant importance to mana whenua. Developing a network of neighbourhood parks that provide for all ages and abilities will positively benefit the health and wellbeing of mana whenua also and the wider community through increased recreation provision and reflection of their presence and stories.

39.     Partnering with mana whenua will enable delivery of the following environmental outcome identified in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021– 2025 document: ‘Māori cultural values, history and heritage are reflected within the built environment through design, architecture and the inclusion of uniquely Māori design principles in public space’.

40.     Mana whenua consultation will continue to occur as part of the investigation and concept design process that will be undertaken by Community Facilities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Implementation of the service assessment will be considered by the local board as part of the annual work programme and budgeting process. This will include considering priorities which have been identified in the assessment and how they can be delivered as part of the renewals programme (of existing assets), allocating capital funding, or advocacy and partnership opportunities. The Customer and Community Services work programme is developed by the local board on an annual basis which will reflect priorities for implementation, and costs for each project.    

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     There are no significant risks associated with adopting this Service Assessment. The assessment identifies opportunity, rather than confirming development outcomes.

43.     Park layout changes however, always come with risk and this risk needs to be considered as part of any planning or implementation process particularly with any larger amenity elements.

44.     The impacts on landscape, neighbours, current recreation outcomes and budgets all need to be considered.

45.     Risk in this regard is mitigated by carrying out feasibility studies, undertaking public consultation and having a clear understanding of cost prior to works being approved and undertaken.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Implementation through the Customer and Community Services Local Board Work Programme.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Medlands / Kaitoke Parks and Open Spaces Service Assessment 2022

1

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Annette Richards - Parks & Places Specialist

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)

File No.: CP2022/08649

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on Auckland Transport’s Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parking Strategy sets out the objectives, principles and policies relating to Auckland Transport’s management and supply of parking across Auckland. It was last updated in 2015.

3.       Since 2015, numerous changes in both the central and local government context mean that a review of the Parking Strategy (2015) was required.

4.       The review has involved engagement with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community.

5.       In late May, Auckland Transport (AT) provided summaries of public engagement to all local boards. This report is to seek feedback from local boards, having had the opportunity to review feedback from their community, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)          provide feedback, taking into consideration the community’s feedback, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The current Parking Strategy (2015) was progressive at the time it was introduced, bringing about many changes in Auckland including wider acceptance of priced parking. However, it is no longer fit for purpose. Since it was developed there have been numerous changes to the policy and planning context including:

·     adoption of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Development signalled in the Unitary Plan will enable growth that may be difficult to service with public transport, meaning that some new suburbs will rely on car use for access

·     changes to travel behaviour, such as the emergence of micromobility (i.e., electric scooters) and the growth of the delivery economy

·     Auckland’s public transport network has matured over time, providing opportunities for further passenger uptake and efficiency related to park and ride management

·     market demand is pushing for more housing provision and density. Development is already showing evidence of less carparking provision and more issues with carparking compliance

·     the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) which guides direction on urban development through the Unitary Plan. The NPS-UD requires Auckland Council to remove parking minimum requirements from the Unitary Plan, which means that developments will not be required to provide onsite parking. This will contribute to society and transport becoming less car-centric over time. However, it will lead to increasing pressure on public parking resources, particularly on-street parking

·     both central government and Auckland Council have declared ‘climate emergencies’, prioritising policy initiatives and investment that will reduce carbon emissions. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and other plans and strategies proposed by central government will require changes to the land transport system, including parking.

7.       The Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) is an important element of aligning and addressing Auckland’s response to these issues, particularly by managing parking in a way that:

·     supports public transport and alternative modes, which will make public transport and active modes such as walking and cycling safer and more convenient

·     responds to Auckland’s population growth and land-use intensification

·     acknowledges that space for carparking is a limited public resource.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Draft Parking Strategy (2022), provided in Attachment A, sets out the strategic context and the need to manage the transport system, as well as the strategic objectives and agreed principles for parking management.

9.       The proposed approach to planning parking management is set out on pages 26-36 of Attachment A. The key elements of this are:

·     proactively applying parking management in areas that have land use intensity and good public transport access

·     repurposing road space away from parking where this is required to enable delivery of the Strategic Transport Network.

10.     The accompanying parking policies (p38-63 of Attachment A) provide more technical detail on how parking is proposed to be managed in order to align to the principles set out in the strategic direction. The policies are grouped by:

·     provision and approach

·     on-street and off-street

·     specific vehicle classes

·     specific situations.

11.     The strategy also includes a section on advocacy to central government for legislative and/or regulatory reform as there are some areas of parking management that are outside local government control. Including these areas also provides context on the limitations of regulation in areas we would like to effect change and achieve better outcomes. These areas include:

·     parking infringement fines

·     banning berm parking

·     residential parking permit cost-setting

·     influencing private parking through parking levies.

12.     In December 2021, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council released a Parking Discussion Document to start the conversation with the public on future parking management in Auckland. AT received 32 pieces of written feedback. Following this feedback, several areas of the draft Parking Strategy and its accompanying policies were updated, including:

·     developing the narrative to better link it to the broader transport story, strategic objectives and policy rationale, as well as regulatory areas in need of reform

·     focussing on the benefits of parking management to enable and support access, resulting in a more equitable transport system

·     articulating the benefits and implications of parking to the community

·     acknowledging the costs of parking provision

·     emphasising parking diversity to enable mode shift

·     emphasising that the roll-out of further parking management will happen over time, starting where there is most readiness for change, and that this is a ten-year plan

·     outlining indicators of success

·   ensuring that consultation materials acknowledge the existing context and public fatigue.

13.     Strategic direction provided by the Planning Committee has also guided development of the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) requires planning decisions to contribute to the development of urban environments that support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and are resilient to the likely current and future effects of climate change.

15.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan outlines the need for Auckland to reduce its transport-related emissions significantly, to meet the target of 64% reduction by 2030. This means that business as usual for transport and land-use project planning and delivery, and management of the transport system, cannot continue.

16.     Parking management is a lever in managing the transport network, both in terms of the opportunities that repurposing of road space offers to enabling other modes, and in disincentivising car use.

17.     Implementing the Parking Strategy will include repurposing parking lanes on key roads in Auckland, increasing the diversity of transport options and improving safety and efficiency for people using sustainable modes and for goods and service delivery. This is a key change required to reduce transport-related emissions, meaning the Parking Strategy is of significant importance as an early step to transport-related climate action.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Auckland Transport has engaged with key stakeholders across the council family, including raising awareness of the review with Auckland Council’s advisory panels.

19.     Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited provided feedback during engagement on the Parking Discussion Document. Their feedback was supportive of the proposed approach.

20.     Both the need for review and the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) prepared for public consultation have been endorsed by Auckland Council’s Planning Committee (Resolution number PLA/2022/24).

21.     Considerable liaison has taken place between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council departments ranging from Planning and Transport Strategy at a strategic level to Community Facilities about management of car parking in or near community parks.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Since Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board approved the review of the Parking Strategy in 2021, Auckland Transport has engaged with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community. The objective of the engagement process has been to ensure that Aucklanders are aware of the review, have had an opportunity to find out more about the proposed changes, and have had an opportunity to provide feedback.

23.     The engagement process included the following key activities:

a)    in 2021, information about the review was sent to all local boards and presented to the Local Board Chairs’ Forum

b)    all local boards were offered a workshop in August 2021, and in September 2021 all were invited to provide feedback that would contribute to the initial thinking around development of an updated draft document

c)    in December 2021, a Parking Discussion Document was published, targeted at key stakeholders and calling for initial feedback. 32 pieces of written feedback were received

d)    in March 2022, information about upcoming wider public consultation was provided to local boards along with a further workshop with Auckland Transport subject matter experts. The public consultation was again promoted through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum in April 2022

e)    public engagement and consultation on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy has recently closed. Auckland Transport received 943 submissions. Responses from the community have been collated and provided to local boards as area specific reports in Attachment B. Public engagement included:

i)        media (OurAuckland, radio) and social media (videos) marketing to let the public know about the engagement

ii)       online information

iii)      webinars at which Auckland Transport staff were available to discuss the proposal with members of the public

iv)      nine open days held in libraries around the region for members of the public to discuss the proposal with Auckland Transport staff

v)       discussions with key stakeholders including business associations, industry groups, emergency services, utilities, and other government agencies

vi)      a public debate about parking issues.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to give their feedback, based on consideration of their community’s feedback, on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Parking management is a kaitiakitanga issue, in that it is about managing a limited public resource. Auckland Transport has engaged with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to establish how best to incorporate views from mana whenua into the review.

26.     Feedback from a series of AT hui with mana whenua representatives reinforced that parking is a topic of considerable concern to Māori. Other points raised include:

·     acknowledgement that, as well as the strategic concerns around air quality and resource management, parking enables access

·     that parking infringements can contribute to creating a cycle of debt

·     that communities are facing compounding pressures - parking management shouldn’t adversely impact people and places even further

·     the potential for parking management to further reduce access - particularly for less able-bodied kaumatua and kuia - to the whenua, the moana and to wahi tapu.

27.     Other potential impacts of increased parking management for Māori are likely to be similar to those for the wider population. Some members of the community are more reliant on cars for access, particularly if they do not have good access to public transport. Barriers to public transport, such as cost and network coverage, influence access to necessities such as education, healthcare, employment, shopping, and social services.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Parking management resourcing will be delivered through AT operational budgets. Initial work to understand the resourcing required to implement the strategy indicates that this will require significant resource increases for planning, design, compliance monitoring and enforcement. It is currently expected that the strategy would be at least revenue-neutral overall once compliance monitoring/enforcement revenue is considered.

29.     Revenue from parking management helps to offset AT operational costs and therefore reduce reliance on ratepayer funding.

30.     There are no financial implications for local boards associated with providing feedback on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are significant risks associated with adopting a new approach to parking management in Auckland – however these must be weighed against the opportunity costs of not having an appropriate framework in place to manage parking. These include:

a)    persistent and increasing issues with over-reliance on on-street parking, particularly since the removal of onsite parking requirements in the Unitary Plan

b)    reduced ability to support development of the public transport and cycling network (both of which reduce emissions) and less ability to enable place-based improvements within the road corridor

c)    not having the ability to take an integrated and strategic approach that supports business when managing parking in town centres using collaborative parking management plans

d)    less flexibility with managing the impacts of increased population growth and intensification.

32.     Strong, considered feedback from local boards will enable Auckland Transport to make good decisions about the Parking Strategy while they balance these risks against the opportunity costs described above.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Feedback from local boards will be reviewed and taken into account as staff consider any amendments to the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy before recommendations to the Auckland Council Planning Committee are made in August 2022.

34.     Following endorsement of the Auckland Parking Strategy by the Auckland Council Planning Committee, approval will be sought from the Auckland Transport Board.

35.     Once approved by the Auckland Transport Board, the new Parking Strategy will be introduced.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Transport Parking Strategy (2022) (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Public consultation - summary of local feedback (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Covacich, Principal Transport Planner, Auckland Transport

Kat Ashmead, Senior Advisor Operations and Policy, Local Board Services

Authorisers

Andrew McGill, Head of Integrated Network Planning, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Environmental agency and community group reports

File No.: CP2022/07527

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for Aotea Great Barrier community groups and environmental agencies with interest or role in the environment or the work of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board to have items considered as part of the board’s business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To support open and more direct interaction between the board, local groups and others, the local board has extended an invitation to either speak at the board’s business meeting via Public Forum or put items forward and have reports included in the Agenda.

3.       Inclusion of items on the Agenda is at the discretion of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Chairperson in discussion with the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Local Area Manager. Any items submitted will be included under a cover report which will have the recommendation that “item xyz be noted or received”.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)    note the following reports:

i)     Aotea / Great Barrier Natural Environment-Islands monthly update – May 2022 report

ii)    Aotea Great Barrier Environmental Trust June 2022 report

iii)   Windy Hill Sanctuary Newsletter #42 June 2022

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aotea / Great Barrier Natural Environment-Islands monthly update – May 2022 report

1

b

Aotea Great Barrier Environmental Trust Update – June 2022

1

c

Windy Hill Sanctuary Newsletter #42 June 2022

1

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 - 2022

File No.: CP2022/07528

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board with its updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Governance Forward Work Calendar 2019 - 2022 is appended to the report as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff for reference and information only.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·     ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·     clarifying what advice is expected and when

·     clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)      note its Governance Forward Work Calendar for the political term 2019 - 2022 as at June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

June 2022 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board governance forward work calendar

1

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record of Proceedings

File No.: CP2022/07529

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Aotea / Great Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on Thursday 19th of May 2022, Tuesday 7th of June 2022 and Tuesday 14th June 2022 are appended to the report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board:

a)    note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on Thursday 19 May 2022, Tuesday 7 June 2022 and Tuesday 14 June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20220519 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record

1

b

20220607 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record

1

c

20220614 Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board Workshop Record

1

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Guia Nonoy - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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Aotea / Great Barrier Local Board

28 June 2022

 

 

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