I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 June 2022

2.30pm

Via Microsoft Teams

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Charlie Inggs

Democracy Advisor

 

17 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027 208 5284

Email: charlie.inggs@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2022/2023                7

12        Approval of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 2022/2023                                                                31

13        Approval of the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme                                                              37

14        Approval of the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                    57

15        Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan                                                                      101

16        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 16 June 2022, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Adoption of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07929

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chairperson, and local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, council consulted on the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 7 June 2022 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards have now considered local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

6.       On 29 June 2022, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Hibiscus Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chairperson, and local board advocacy (Attachment A to the agenda report)

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B to the agenda report)

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson to make any final changes to the local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, message from the chairperson, and local board advocacy)

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, on 29 June 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards. Local board plans influence and inform the Annual Budget, which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a one-year period. For each financial year, Auckland Council must also have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

8.       Throughout the development of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, local board chairpersons (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

9.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, the council consulted with the public on the Annual Budget 2022/2023. No local events were held in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area to engage with the community and to seek feedback on both regional and local proposals, due to COVID-19 disruptions and the online event had no attendees.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was included as an attachment on the 12 May business meeting agenda.

11.     Local boards considered this feedback, and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of consultation on the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and local boards have received a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (Attachment A), including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chairperson, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

13.     The local board consulted on the following priority however these are not included in the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 due to the need for further community engagement and reprioritisation of CAPEX funding in financial year 2022/2023.

·    investigate and design new dedicated dog parks within the local board area.

14.     The consultation feedback received on this priority was that this project was nice to have but not a funding priority at this time. The use of existing parks and beaches with dog access rules was sufficient at present.

15.     This project has been deferred until future years, rather than deleted from the local board work programme. This will allow it to be considered if funds are available.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

17.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

18.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement will be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2022/2023 that will be adopted at June business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

22.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

23.     Of those who submitted to the Annual Budget 2022/2023 from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area 22 identified as Māori. No iwi entities from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board rohe made submissions to the Annual Budget 2022/2023. These submissions were provided to the local board for consideration at local board workshops during the development of their local board agreement.

24.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset-based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2022/2023 financial year.

26.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the Annual Budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

27.     Funding for ABS is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

28.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 is adopted alongside of the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets. Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     Decisions on the local content of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023, are required by 23 June 2022 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, at its 29 June 2022 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2022 when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

31.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the Annual Budget 2022/2023 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Chairperson to make any final changes if necessary.

32.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be agreed between local boards and operational departments at business meetings in June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content to support the Annual Budget 2022/23

11

b

Local fees and charges schedules 2022/2023

23

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Renee Burgers - Lead Advisor Plans and Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07028

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme and its associated budget (attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the local board’s External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year.

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcome and objective that the local board identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome 2: A strong local economy

·    Objective 2.2: Our businesses and business centres feel supported and empowered.

4.       The local board provided feedback to staff on the project it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The local board indicated its support for the following project, with assigned budget as listed below:

·          Supporting business associations – Silverdale BID establishment - $20,000.

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $20,000, which can be funded from within the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 2022/2023.  (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome that are reflected in the work programme is:

·    Outcome 2: A strong local economy

·    Objective 2.2: Our businesses and business centres feel supported and empowered.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 2022/2023 Financial Year are detailed below (see Attachment A for further detail).

Activity name – Supporting business associations - BID establishment Silverdale - $20,000

10.     To assist in the planning and preparation towards the establishment of a new Business Improvement District (BID) programme in Silverdale business community. This activity aligns with the local board’s following outcome and objective:

·    Outcome 2: A strong local economy

·    Objective 2.2: Our businesses and business centres feel supported and empowered.

11.     To develop a project plan, timeline and budget for the next 18-months, the plan will include the following:

12.     2022/2023 Year two: The plan will utilize the $20,000 funding and focus on:

·    finalise the BID programme 2-year business plan, 2-year draft budget 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 (covers first two years of BID operation) and delivery timeline to BID members

·    finalise the BID income and expenditure budget (including the BID targeted rate grant amount) for the first two years of BID operation.

·    focus on communication and engagement to build interest and support for a BID programme

·    Silverdale Business Association (SABA) membership approval of BID programme, income and expenditure budget, proposed BID targeted rate grant amount and the targeted rate mechanism

·    coordinate and manage the BID ballot voting process noting the last day for voting being 31 March 2023 as per the BID Policy (2016).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The proposed External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

16.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Individual business associations may, through operating their BID programme, identify opportunities for niche support or development of any Māori business sector in their business area.

18.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori, then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The proposed Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme budget for 2022/2023 Financial Year is $20,000 of the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     Table 1 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme.

Table 1: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Supporting business associations – Silverdale Area Business Association

Silverdale Area Business Association unable to complete attract enough business support to the requirements of the BID Policy and meet the BID ballot deadline 31 March 2023.

Quarterly reporting on progress

Low

Supporting business associations – Silverdale Area Business Association

Ongoing financial impact on businesses post lockdowns and timing of the BID ballot.

Quarterly reporting on progress.

 

Low

 

21.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

23.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board External Partnerships-Business Associations work programme 2022/2023

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Siddens - Principal Advisor

Authorisers

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme

File No.: CP2022/07895

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and approve in principle the 2023/2024 work programme (attachment A to the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2022/2023 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent financial year, 2023/2024

3.       The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. 2022/2023 is year two of the three-year cycle. Many of the programmes included in this report were approved in principle in the 2021/2022 work programme.

4.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between October 2021 and May 2022, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

6.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2022/2023 financial year, with budgets as listed below:

·        work programme ID 572 - EcoNeighbourhoods - $30,000

·        work programme ID 3017 - Industrial pollution prevention programme - $32,000

·        work programme ID 692 - Īnanga spawning sites survey and restoration - $37,000

·        work programme ID 724 - Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure - $25,000

·        work programme ID 64 - Pest Free Hibiscus Coast – $54,400

·        work programme ID 65 - Pest plans on private land Okura - $17,500

·        work programme ID 480 - Restore Hibiscus and Bays Coordinator - $140,100

·        work programme ID 507 - Te Ao Māori and community led conservation - $5,000

·        work programme ID 729 - Trash Free Taiaotea - $30,300

·        work programme ID 721 - Zero Waste Early Childhood Education Programme - $35,600.

7.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $406,900, which can be funded from within the local board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year

8.       The proposed work programme also includes $360,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the following coastal renewals programmes:

·        work programme ID 1830 - Fishermans Rock Reserve - $15,000

·        work programme ID 1829 - Gulf Harbour Marina Hammerhead Reserve - $95,000

·        work programme ID 1832 - Hatfields Beach Reserve – $15,000

·        work programme ID 1840 - Matakatia Parade Beachfront Reserve - $95,000

·        work programme ID 1884 - Orewa Wharf, Western Reserve - $70,000

·        work programme ID 1893 - Wade River Road Reserve - $50,000

·        work programme ID 1838 - Waiwera Beach - $20,000.

9.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

10.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the local board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve its 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2022/2023 budget for approval

EcoNeighbourhoods

$30,000

Industrial pollution prevention programme

$32,000

Īnanga spawning sites survey and restoration

$37,000

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

$25,000

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

$54,400

Pest plans on private land Okura

$17,500

Restore Hibiscus and Bays Coordinator

$140,100

Te Ao Māori and community led conservation -

$5,000

Trash Free Taiaotea

$30,300

Zero Waste Early Childhood Education Programme

$35,600

Total

$406,900

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report).

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

d)      note the allocation of $360,000 asset-based services capital expenditure budget towards the coastal renewal programmes in the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.     Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

12.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·        continue to align and support community and volunteer groups, schools, and iwi to enhance and protect our natural environment

·        support the development and implementation of ecological and environmental restoration plans

·        support communities to live more sustainably, and prepare for the impacts of climate change

·        our waterways and beaches are clean and safe for people and wildlife

·        Hibiscus and Bays communities are supported, connected and vibrant.

13.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·        Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan

·        National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

·        Te Mahere Whakahaere me te Whakaiti Tukunga Para i Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan 2018

·        Mahere ā-Rohe Whakahaere Kaupapa Koiora Orotā mō Tāmaki Makaurau - Regional Pest Management Plan.

14.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

16.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

17.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year two of the three-year work programme (2022/2023), and approval in principle for 2023/2024.

18.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for year three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However, approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

19.     Budgets for year three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

20.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2023/2024 financial year:

EcoNeighbourhoods – $30,000

21.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to fund the EcoNeighbourhoods project in the 2022/2023 financial year.

22.     EcoNeighbourhoods is a programme that supports six or more neighbours from different households to come together to adopt sustainable, low carbon practices and increase resilience within their homes, lifestyles and neighbourhoods. These activities are decided by the groups and can range from local food production to rainwater collection.

23.     The programme funding supports the groups by providing 12 hours of facilitation support and up to $1,000 worth of incentives, discounts and training to support behaviour change.

24.     Funding in 2022/2023 will continue to support the six existing EcoNeighbourhoods groups (should they wish to continue with the programme) and up to two new groups.

25.     The local board allocated $30,000 towards this project in the 2019/2020, 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years, and staff recommend the board allocate a further $30,000 towards the programme in 2022/2023. Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Industrial pollution prevention programme – $32,000

26.     The local board has indicated its support for the Industrial pollution prevention programme in 2022/2023.

27.     This programme educates businesses around proper containment of hazardous materials to help prevent waterway pollution. This project will focus on visiting industry in the Silverdale area, which was originally covered in July 2014, with follow up visits taking place in November 2016.

28.     Due to extensive growth in Silverdale and many businesses seeing a change in ownership, a second programme is recommended to educate new businesses and follow up on existing practices. This budget will cover approximately 120 site visits.

29.     Staff have recommended that $32,000 be allocated to this programme in 2022/2023. Staff are not proposing to continue this programme in 2023/2024 as most of the businesses will have been visited by the contractor. It may be revisited in future years.

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration - $37,000

30.     The local board has indicated its continued support for the survey and restoration programme for īnanga spawning sites in the 2022/2023 financial year to help protect this at-risk species through targeted restoration. The local board allocated $30,000 towards this project in 2021/2022.

31.     The programme involves the collection of data in streams to establish a baseline understanding of the current state of īnanga populations within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

32.     This work will identify areas in need of urgent protection and restoration, and this will be communicated back to the community as an awareness-raising exercise. The community will then be supported to maintain, enhance and promote the restoration and care of these waterways.

33.     The local board had previously supported this work as one of the programmes funded by the North-West Wildlink streamside awareness project.

34.     Staff initially requested $27,000 for this programme in 2022/2023. At a workshop in May 2022 an additional $10,000 was made available for a total of $37,000 in 2022/2023. This extra funding will increase the programme’s engagement of the community across the financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $29,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure - $25,000

35.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to fund the ko te wai he taonga (water is a treasure) programme in the 2022/2023 financial year to further help children, teachers and their whānau understand the importance of water.

36.     The programme involves a series of interactive school sessions helping students to understand the impact of stormwater and pollution to receiving environments. Through the programme, students are encouraged to interact with their local streams. At the end of the educational sessions an action piece is decided upon and undertaken by all participating students.

37.     The board allocated $20,000 towards this project in the 2019/2020 financial year and $25,000 in the 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 financial years. Staff recommend the board allocate $25,000 towards the programme in 2022/2023. Approval in principle is also sought for $25,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast - $54,400

38.     The local board has indicated its continued support for the Pest Free Hibiscus Coast programme. This programme started in the 2021/2022 financial year to deliver the Pest Free Hibiscus Coast Project Plan 2019-2022 and beyond.

39.     The programme funds Forest and Bird Hibiscus Coast’s proposal for a predator control specialist and support roles. These roles assist the 80 existing volunteers, attract more volunteers, carry out pest animal monitoring and assist six schools in getting involved with trapping.

40.     The roles help to maintain and grow the progress that has been made to date establishing predator control networks, therefore enhancing the local native ecosystems.

41.     The board allocated $53,560 towards this project in the 2021/2022 financial year. Staff recommend the local board allocate $54,400 towards the programme in 2022/2023. Approval in principle is also sought for $55,200 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Pest plans on private land Okura - $17,500

42.     The local board has indicated its continued support for the pest plans on private land Okura programme. This programme started in the 2021/2022 financial year to support Friends of Okura Bush to restore the biodiversity of the Okura Bush, shoreline and surrounds.

43.     The programme funds a coordinator to assist private landowners surrounding the estuary to undertake pest plant and animal control in their properties, creating a pest free buffer zone along the Okura estuary.

44.     The pest control helps protect the biodiversity in the Okura region and is an essential part in the operation of the North-West Wildlink buffer zone.  

45.     The board allocated $15,000 towards this project in the 2021/2022 financial year. Staff recommend the local board allocate $17,500 towards the programme in 2022/2023. Approval in principle is also sought for $20,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Restore Hibiscus and Bays Coordinator - $140,100

46.     The local board has indicated its continued support to allocate funding towards a manager and field advisor for the Restore Hibiscus and Bays programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

47.     These roles are essential to the implementation of the revised 2021 Restore Hibiscus and Bays strategic plan. The roles bring together a wide range of expertise to support growth in community restoration activities.

48.     The manager focuses on strategic priorities, promoting the groups and applying for funding and gaining support. The field advisor provides technical advice, builds rapport with the community, and supports work on the ground.

49.     The manager role was funded in 2019/2020 as part of the North-West Wildlink restoration funding, but this has been separated out for ease of reporting. In the 2020/2021 financial year the local board allocated $90,000 to the programme and $133,120 was allocated in 2021/2022.

50.     Staff initially requested $135,100 for this programme. At a workshop in May 2022 an additional $5,000 was made available for a total of $140,100 in 2022/2023. This extra funding will support additional monitoring plan implementation. Approval in principle is also sought for $135,150 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Te Ao Māori and community-led conservation - $5,000

51.     The local board has indicated its continued support for the te ao Māori and community-led conservation programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

52.     The programme supports community-led conservation groups to learn about te ao Māori and to grow relationships with local iwi, through a series of te ao Māori workshops.

53.     Community groups are increasingly expressing their wish to connect with local iwi. The workshops will help groups gain an understanding of mātauranga Māori, sites of significance and historical land uses, and be able to establish meaningful relationships to inform their conservation activities.

54.     For the 2022/2023 year workshops will be developed and delivered to conservation groups to continue developing meaningful relationships between iwi and community groups. The programme will look to build on iwi’s capacity and capability if needed.

55.     The board allocated $5,000 towards this project in the 2021/2022 financial year. Staff recommend the local board allocate $5,000 towards the programme in 2022/2023. Approval in principle is also sought for $5,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay Waste Minimisation) - $30,300

56.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Trash Free Taiaotea (Browns Bay waste minimisation) programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. The local board allocated $19,500 to the programme in 2020/2021 financial year and $20,000 in 2021/2022.

57.     This programme continues to support Browns Bay residents, community groups and local businesses to care for the local environment and reduce waste.

58.    In 2022/2023, this will involve working alongside a further five businesses to support them to reduce their waste. This will be achieved through encouraging the use of Hibiscus Coast Zero Waste’s food scraps collection services, an awards event to recognise waste champions and businesses, and integration with catchment restoration activities including Restore Hibiscus and Bays.

59.     Staff initially requested $20,300 for this programme. At a workshop in May 2022 an additional $10,000 was made available for a total of $30,300 in 2022/2023. This increase will add staff hours and deliverables to the programme for the financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $20,600 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Zero waste early childhood education programme - $35,600

60.     The local board has indicated support to continue to allocate funding to the zero waste early childhood education programme in the 2022/2023 financial year to further support to waste minimisation outcomes. The local board allocated $14,200 in the 2020/2021 financial year and $25,200 in 2021/2022.

61.     This programme supports kindergartens, early childhood education centres and residents connected to these centres to reduce their waste and live more sustainably.

62.     After three years, staff aim to have engaged with 100 per cent of centres in the local board area.

63.     Staff initially requested $25,600 for this programme. At a workshop in May 2022 an additional $10,000 was made available for a total of $35,600 in 2022/2023. This increase will add staff hours and deliverables to the programme for the financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $26,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Fishermans Rock Reserve - renew seawall and boat ramp - $15,000

64.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. The programme is the renewal of the seawall and boat ramp at Fishermans Rock Reserve, Whangaparāoa. Works include regrouting and other minor repairs. Physical works started in 2021/2022 and are expected to be complete in 2022/2023.

Hatfields Beach Reserve - renew seawall - $15,000

65.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. The programme is a renewal of the seawall at Hatfields Beach Reserve. In 2022/2023 the works will be focused on resource consenting, investigation and design. Physical works are expected to start in 2023/2024.

Gulf Harbour Marina Hammerhead Reserve - renew seawall - $95,000

66.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. The programme is a renewal of the seawall at Gulf Harbour Marina Hammerhead Reserve. In 2022/2023 the works will be focused on resource consenting, investigation and design. Physical works are expected to start in 2023/2024.

Matakatia Parade Beachfront Reserve - renew seawall - $95,000

67.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. The programme is a renewal of the seawall at Matakatia Parade Beachfront Reserve. In 2022/2023 the works will be focused on resource consenting, investigation and design. Physical works are expected to start in 2023/2024.

Orewa Wharf, Western Reserve - renew timber wharf - $70,000

68.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. The programme is a renew the Orewa wharf in Western Reserve. Physical works started in 2021/2022 and are scheduled to be completed in 2022/2023.

Wade River Road Reserve - renew timber wharf - $50,000

69.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. The IES programme is a renewal of the timber wharf at Wade River Road Reserve. Minor physical works will be undertaken in 2022/2023.

Waiwera Beach - renew seawall - $20,000

70.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. The programme is a renewal of the seawall at Waiwera Place Reserve and Strand Reserve. In 2022/2023 the works will be focused on investigation and design. Physical works are expected to start in 2023/2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

71.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

72.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, neutral or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

73.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

EcoNeighbourhoods

This programme aims to reduce emissions and increase community resilience through the priorities identified by the EcoNeighbourhoods such as reducing energy demand, reducing waste, using sustainable transport options, increasing local food production and consumption, improving biodiversity and reducing pests

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration

When freshwater ecosystems are healthy and thriving, they provide many ecological services such as flood mitigation, habitat for native biodiversity, and carbon sequestration through riparian plants

Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

The actions identified by students can range from streamside plantings to rain barrel installation to providing education materials to the wider community. These actions will improve community resilience to future climate change. Plantings will also create carbon sinks and increase biodiversity, decrease erosion and help clean runoff before entering the water system

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

These programmes will contribute to fewer native plants being browsed, hence the survival and regeneration of increasing amounts of native vegetation. Plantings will also increase biodiversity and act as a carbon sink

Pest plans on private land Okura

Restore Hibiscus and Bays

Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay Waste Minimisation)

The contribution of waste to overall greenhouse gas emissions in the Auckland region is approximately 3.1 per cent as per the Auckland Greenhouse Gas Inventory to 2016. The largest source of emissions within the waste sector in Aotearoa New Zealand is solid waste disposal to landfill. These programmes will assist in taking practical steps to reducing a proportion of these waste-related emissions

Zero waste early childhood education programme

Fishermans Rock Reserve

Gulf Harbour Marina Hammerhead Reserve

Hatfields Beach Reserve

Matakatia Parade Beachfront Reserve

Orewa Wharf, Western Reserve

Wade River Road Reserve

Waiwera Beach

Physical works for the coastal programmes will have a negligible carbon footprint. Where possible, staff will adopt sustainable, low carbon options for project delivery. The renewal will improve the resilience of these coastal assets.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

74.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

75.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters and Waste Solutions.

76.     The Pest Free Hibiscus Coast and Restore Hibiscus and Bays programmes will be delivered with support from Parks, Sports and Recreation staff to ensure alignment in achieving biodiversity outcomes. Māori Outcomes and Connected Communities staff will help to inform the te ao Māori and community-led conservation programme.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

77.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2022/2023 work programme include Okura Bush, Silverdale and Browns Bay areas.

78.     The programmes noted above align with the local board plan outcomes including ‘a protected and enhanced environment’ and ‘a connected community’. The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

79.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

80.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

81.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

82.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

·   Te reo Māori

·   Kaitiakitanga

 

The interactive sessions will incorporate a te ao Māori perspective and te reo Māori into the delivery

Te ao Māori and community led conservation

·   Te reo Māori

·   Kaitiakitanga

 

The programme is led by local iwi. The purpose of the programme is to help conservation groups understand the mātauranga Māori approach and foster connections with iwi

Trash free Taiaotea (Browns Bay Waste Minimisation)

·   Te reo Māori

Te reo Māori will be used throughout promotional material and impact stories

Zero waste early childhood education programme

·   Kaitiakitanga

The programme will build connections with Te Herenga Waka o Orewa Marae to establish an ongoing relationship throughout the programme. The contractor will seek advice on incorporating te ao Māori into the programme’s delivery and approach.

83.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

84.     The proposed environment work programme for 2022/2023 totals to $406,900 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the local board’s total budget for 2022/2023.

85.     The proposed work programme also includes $360,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the coastal renewal programmes. Please note that the coastal renewal budgets are current estimates and are subject to change through the design and works stages. If there are any significant changes throughout the financial year these will be reported back to the local board.

86.     Budgets for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for a future year through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

87.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

88.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes. Some activities may not be able to be delivered fully if COVID-19 restrictions are increased.

89.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

90.     Table 3 shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

Table 3: Key risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

EcoNeighbourhoods

The collective knowledge of this programme sits with three people. Should the contractors be lost then there would be a significant workload to maintain the project

There are other organisations that can be approached to run this programme using existing knowledge and documentation if required

Low

Īnanga spawning sites survey and restoration

This programme relies on the willingness of volunteers and community to be engaged and take part in the activities

This programme builds on positive relationships and momentum that already exists in the local community and Hibiscus and Bays Ecological networks

Low

Industrial Pollution Prevention Programme

This programme is dependent on the businesses willing to cooperate. Success is measured by the amount of recommendations that have been implemented, so a risk of no implementations does exist

The contractor who will undertake this work has had significant experience in engaging with businesses across Auckland, so this risk is considered to be low

Low

Ko te wai he taonga: Water is a treasure

This programme relies on early childhood education centres and schools wanting to be involved. In addition, the programme is dependent on the contractor’s availability to continue the work

The programme has already had success in engaging early childhood centres and will continue with this momentum into the 2022/2023 financial year. The current supplier has been approached and confirmed their willingness to continue with the programme

Low

Pest Free Hibiscus Coast

These programmes largely depend on the motivation of landowners and volunteers

These programmes benefit from the dedication of volunteers in the Pest Free Hibiscus Coast and Friends of Okura Bush community

Low

Pest plans on private land Okura

Restore Hibiscus and Bays

This programme depends on the willingness of landowners and volunteers to be involved. In addition, the programme deliverables could be slowed if the people involved in the programme leave

There is considerable community support for restoration work. There are also other people who could run these projects if the contractors leave

Low

Trash Free Taiaotea: Browns Bay waste minimisation initiative

There is a risk of programme failing to reach targets for participation, influence and changing mindsets within the community

Staff have created relationships and positive networks with key community organisations (including the Browns Bay business district) and individuals involved in waste and environmental efforts

Low

Zero waste kindergarten project

There is a risk that kindergartens will not want to be involved or will not implement the suggested changes

This project builds on the success of the pilot project and the positive relationships already established between Hibiscus Coast Zero Waste and Auckland Council, and the wider community of organisations working towards waste minimisation

Low

91.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

92.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

93.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme 2022/2023

51

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Brandii Stephano - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator

PDF Creator



Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07516

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2022/2023 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme for approval from the following departments:

·    Connected Communities

·    Community and Social Innovation

·    Community Facilities

·    Parks, Sports, and Recreation

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships.

3.       In addition, the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities department work programme are presented for approval in principle.

4.       To support the delivery of the local board’s outcomes and aspirations highlighted in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020, Customer and Community Services presents a work programme for local board approval each financial year.

5.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

6.       The work programme has been developed with the local board providing feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation through a series of workshops, held between October 2021 and May 2022.

7.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to planning activities, involving collaboration between the local board and staff from across the council.

8.       Within the Customer and Community Services work programme, the Community Facilities department has identified several projects for the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 financial years as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme.

9.       Approval is sought for the planning and design of the Risk Adjusted Programme projects to commence during the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

10.     The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee, including Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects by way of resolutions to this report.

11.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19-related disruptions, some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

12.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

13.     Once approved in June 2022, the local board will receive quarterly progress updates on the delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

c)      approve in principle the 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities only work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

d)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

e)      note that there may be minor changes to year one of the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme, and other changes in years two and three which are approved in principle, due to Annual Budget decisions affecting capital budgets and that changes required will be discussed with and reported to the local board early in the new financial year

f)       provide feedback for consideration by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on projects funded from the Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

g)      note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets is subject to approval by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Auckland Plan 2050 (Auckland Plan) is council’s long-term spatial plan to ensure Auckland grows in a way that will meet the opportunities and challenges ahead.  It aims to contribute to Auckland’s social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing.

Diagram

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15.     Local board plans align with the Auckland Plan and set out local community priorities and aspirations. The 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme in turn aligns to not only the local board plans but the appropriate Auckland Council plans, policies and strategies.

16.     Work programme activities align to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Outcome 1 - A connected community

·        Outcome 2 - A strong local economy

·        Outcome 3 - A protected and enhanced environment

·        Outcome 4 - Open spaces to enjoy.

17.     Development of the work programme is based on consideration of community needs and priorities, availability of resources and funding, Treaty of Waitangi obligations, external partnerships and risk assessment.

18.     The Customer and Community Services directorate provides a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of Auckland’s people, places and natural environment. These are designed and implemented to meet the unique needs of the local community.

19.     Development of the work programme follows an integrated approach to planning activities by the following departments of the directorate:

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The work programme demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the 2022/2023 financial year.

21.     Delivery of the work programme commences from 1 July 2022, and in some cases comprises a continuation of implementation from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes.

22.     New activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items also form part of the work programme.

23.     Table one summarises the approval status required for the three financial years presented within the work programme.

Table one: Customer and Community Services local board work programme approvals

Department

2022/2023

2023/2024

2024/2025

Community Facilities

Approve

Approve in principle

Approve in principle

All other Customer and Community Services departments

Approve

Approve in principle

N/A

24.     Community Facilities presents a three-year rolling work programme so that delivery and financial commitments against the capital works programme can be planned.

25.     Approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2022/2023 work programme may lead to contractual commitments to the future budget needed to complete the project in 2023/2024 or 2024/2025.

26.     The remainder of Customer and Community Services presents the work programme in descending three-year increments and are therefore only presenting years two and three of the three-year work programme.

27.     The local board will be updated by staff on the delivery of the programme by way of quarterly performance reports.

Proposed amendments to the 2022/2023 work programme

28.     The local board approved the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme in June 2021 and approved in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

29.     The 2022/2023 work programme contains variations to the version that was approved in principle last year. These include the addition of new activities, changes to existing activities, such as required budget allocation and delivery timeframes, and identifies some activities that have been stopped.

30.     Table two highlights the new activities in the work programme:

Table two: work programme activities that are new

ID

Activity name

Lead department

Budget

3481

Hibiscus Coast indoor recreation facility options analysis

CCS: PSR – Active Recreation

$25,000

26014

1 Oro Lane, Silverdale - develop new neighbourhood park

C&CS: Community Facilities

$1,750,000

32099

Aicken Reserve - install walkway lighting

C&CS: Community Facilities

$140,000

31857

Cranston Reserve - renew tracks

C&CS: Community Facilities

$160,000

32106

Dacre Historic & Esplanade Reserve - improve coastal walkway

C&CS: Community Facilities

$90,000

32103

Deep Creek Reserve - install new footpath

C&CS: Community Facilities

$270,000

31826

Gilshennan Reserve - renew play space and footpaths

C&CS: Community Facilities

$400,000

32104

Hibiscus and Bays - develop permanent pump track

C&CS: Community Facilities

$500,000

32031

Hibiscus and Bays - install shade sails

C&CS: Community Facilities

$60,000

31869

Hibiscus and Bays - modular pump track relocation

C&CS: Community Facilities

$24,000

31860

Hibiscus and Bays - renew furniture and fixtures 2023/2024+

C&CS: Community Facilities

$250,536

32020

Hibiscus and Bays - renew park structures

C&CS: Community Facilities

$350,000

31829

Karaka Cove - improve carpark

C&CS: Community Facilities

$180,000

26026

Maka Terrace, Arran Point Millwater - develop new neighbourhood park

C&CS: Community Facilities

$1,600,000

31827

Pacific Parade Coastal Reserve - improve walkways

C&CS: Community Facilities

$400,000

31825

Rosario Reserve - renew play space

C&CS: Community Facilities

$280,000

24393

Stanmore Bay Pools & Leisure Centre - boiler phase out

C&CS: Community Facilities

$1,185,420

31863

Stredwick Reserve - renew play space

C&CS: Community Facilities

$280,000

31862

Stredwick Reserve - renew walkways

C&CS: Community Facilities

$220,000

31828

Torbay Heights - renew walkways and stairs

C&CS: Community Facilities

$270,000

31830

Victor Eaves Park - renew baseball diamond

C&CS: Community Facilities

$150,000

30767

Western Reserve - renew skatepark half-pipes

C&CS: Community Facilities

$350,000

 

31.     Table three highlights the activities that were approved in principle in June 2021 but have stopped, or proposed activities that did not start, and are therefore not included in the 2022/2023 work programme:

Table three: work programme activities that have been removed from the work programme

Previous ID

Activity name

Lead department

546

HB: Review 2017 Play Provision Assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

670

HB: Urban Ngahere Growing FY22

CCS: PSR – Park Services

1445

HB: Boat launching service assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2829

CARRY FORWARD HB: Te Kete Rukuruku (Māori naming of parks and places) Tranche One

CCS: RSPIP – Māori Outcomes

COVID-19 considerations for Customer and Community Services

32.     The work programme includes activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 by providing:

·     safe and welcoming spaces

·     inclusive events to bring the community back together

·     community support, including grants

·     stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi and Māori organisations, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies, which also serve Auckland’s communities.

33.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of these activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19 related disruption some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

34.     Current capex delivery challenges include increased material and labour costs, as well as shortages in both sectors, this in turn will lead to increased overall project costs.

35.     Current supply chain issues, obtaining building materials, may lead to delays in project delivery. Increased costs and delays will be managed as part of the ongoing management of work programmes via additional Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) projects, and the rephasing of projects to accommodate increased budget and address material shortages.

Māori Outcomes

36.     Local boards play a vital role in representing the interests of all Aucklanders and are committed to the Treaty-based obligations and to Māori participation and development.

37.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi - – The Treaty of Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

38.     A thriving Māori identity is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. It advances prosperity for Māori and benefits all Aucklanders.

39.     The local boards recognise the importance of building meaningful relationships with mana whenua, maatawaka and whānau, and understanding Māori aspirations.

40.     Table four shows the outcomes, objectives and key initiatives from the local board plan recognise these areas of common interest.

Table four: local board plan Māori outcomes, objectives and initiatives

Outcomes

Objectives

Initiatives

Outcome 1: A connected community

 

We have a strong relationship with Māori and embrace our Māori identity, heritage, and culture

 

·    strengthen relationships with local iwi to increase engagement and participation in local decision making

·    increase the exposure of te Reo Māori in our local board area through naming and signage opportunities

·    support mana whenua to tell stories of Māori cultural heritage and knowledge throughout our parks and open spaces network.

Outcome 3: A protected and enhanced environment

 

Continue to align and support community and volunteer groups, schools, and iwi to enhance and protect our natural environment

·    partner with Māori to understand areas of environmental significance and create opportunities for collaboration between iwi and environmental groups on projects of mutual interest.

 

41.     There is a wide range of activity occurring across Tāmaki Makaurau to advance Māori outcomes. Much of this is led by mana whenua and Māori organisations, as well government organisations, non-government organisations and businesses. 

42.     The Auckland Plan’s focus on Māori culture and identity is encapsulated in the outcome: Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

43.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, council’s Māori Outcomes performance measurement framework, captures the majority of council’s Māori outcome strategy and planning. The framework responds to the needs and aspirations that Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, both mana whenua and mataawaka, have expressed to council. 

44.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver outcomes for and with Māori. Attachment B to the agenda report sets out the activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas.

45.     Table five shows the strategic priority areas and alignment to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes.

Table five: local board work programme Māori outcome areas

Strategic priority area

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcome

Kaitiakitanga

Kia Ora te Taiao

Māori business, tourism and employment 

Kia Ora te Umanga

Māori identity and culture 

Kia Ora te Ahurea

Marae development

Kia Ora te Marae

Papakāinga and Māori housing 

Kia Ora te Kāinga

Realising rangatahi potential 

Kia Ora te Rangatahi

Te reo Māori 

Kia Ora te Reo

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Kia Ora te Whānau

 

46.     The Customer and Community Services directorate lead or contribute to programmes that align with all outcomes. Particular priorities are Kia Ora te Marae, Kia Ora te Whānau and Kia Ora te Reo. 

47.     In a COVID-19 recovery environment there is increasing focus on Kia Ora te Umunga /   Māori Business, Tourism and Employment and the role that the council can play, not only in supporting economic recovery, but in a thriving Māori economy. 

48.     Kia Ora te Ahurea / Māori Identity and Culture is often a focus for local boards as events and place-based design often plays an important part in many local programmes.

Work programme budget types and purpose

49.     Work programme activities are funded from various budget sources, depending on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme are funded from two or more sources, including from both local and regional budgets.

50.     Table six outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

Table six: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services, grants and staff time to deliver activities

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the partial renewal or full replacement of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council, often from external sources, held for specific local board areas, including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

Part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

51.     The capital projects to be delivered in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area, together with identified budgets and main funding sources, are shown in Attachment A.

52.     The budgets associated with the capital works programme are estimates only, costs are subject to change and may need to be refined as the project progresses through the design and delivery process. Once activity details are more clearly defined, staff will update the work programme for approval in subsequent years.

53.     The capital works projects have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within the local board area (Attachment C to the agenda report). Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

54.     The Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) was first implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

55.     Several capital projects in the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 work programme have been identified as part of the RAP and outlined in Attachment A.

56.     Local board approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

57.     Some activities from the Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development (growth) budgets are funded regionally and will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee for approval after 30 June 2022.

58.     The local board has decision-making responsibility for these activities within parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope, and budget. These activities are therefore included in the work programme. 

59.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. Staff will present this feedback to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

60.     Some projects in the work programme require further local board decisions as they progress through the delivery process.

61.     Where further decisions are anticipated they have been indicated in the work programme, and decisions will be sought as required through local board business meetings.

62.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects may also be required as projects progress, in response to more detailed design and costing information, community consultation, consenting requirements and similar factors.  

63.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects will be managed in accordance with the established local board delegations to staff.

64.     The work programme includes community leases. Lease renewals without variations will be processed by way of a memo, in accordance with agreed delegations.

65.     Should the local board signal their intent to change or pursue a new lease that is not contemplated in the leasing work programme, a deferral of an item already programmed for delivery will need to be accommodated.

66.     Staff will workshop expired and more complex community leases with the local board and then report on them at a business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

67.     As Customer and Community Services is a significant service provider and property owner, the directorate has a leading role in delivering Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

68.     In providing asset-based services, Customer and Community Services contributes most of council’s operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its facilities and infrastructure.

69.     Property managed by the directorate, in particular coastal assets, will be adversely affected by climate change. The work programme includes actions, consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to halve council’s operational GHG emissions by 2030, and to adapt to a changing climate.

70.     Actions include reducing operational GHG emissions through phasing-out gas heating in aquatic centres, improving the efficiency of facilities, investing in renewable energy, and adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy.

71.     At the same time, the directorate will mitigate GHG emissions and improve climate resilience through delivering tree planting programmes across the region. This includes delivering the Mayor’s tree planting initiatives, transitioning unproductive farmland on regional parks to permanent native forest, and delivering ecological restoration projects with community groups.

72.     Work is ongoing to build on the above actions and embed climate change considerations into investment decision-making, planning, and corporate policies, including asset management plans and Local Board Plans.

73.     As approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, council’s mandated approach to ‘deliver differently’ is also anticipated to help reduce the council carbon footprint by creating a sustainable service network. This may include a shift to digital service models or the consolidation of services into a smaller footprint.

74.     Each activity in the work programme has been assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and affect Auckland’s resilience to climate change.

75.     The activities in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board work programme identified as having a positive or negative impact on climate change are outlined in Attachment E.

76.     Types of activities in the work programme that will have positive impacts on emissions and improve community resilience to climate change, include community-led environmental and educational programmes, supporting volunteer planting, delivering council-led planting and sustainable design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

77.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed collaboratively by staff from the directorate’s departments and Local Board Services to ensure that the activities and delivery of the work programme are integrated, complementary, and reflect council wide priorities.

78.     An example of collaboration on delivery is the kauri dieback programme which is delivered by the Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

79.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme.

80.     A focus area of the work programme is to respond to the Recovery Budget, the communities of greatest need and build capacity within the community, including through community-led delivery and partnerships.

81.     Planning and delivery of some activities involves consultation with the community to ensure that their aspirations are understood and responded to.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

82.     The provision of services, facilities and open spaces support the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connection to the natural environment and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

83.     Attachment B shows local board projects or programmes that are ranked as delivering ‘high’ Māori Outcomes. They involve ongoing collaboration with Māori or are delivered by Māori. 

84.     Projects or programmes in Attachment A may also contribute to Māori Outcomes but are not highlighted as they are identified to have a moderate or low impact. 

85.     Engagement with Māori is critical and, if not already completed, will occur on a programme or project basis, prior to any work commencing, and be reported back separately to the local board. 

86.     Further information about the response to Māori aspirations as described in the work programme, is captured in the Analysis and Advice section.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

87.     Each activity line has a budget allocation in one or more of the financial years e.g., 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar operating expense (opex) budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

88.     The 2022/2023 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within 2022/2023 budgets and staff resources.

89.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 are indicative and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

90.     Table seven summarises the budget sources and allocation for each work programme financial year.


 

Table seven: Hibiscus and Bays Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2022/2023 (approve)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

2024/2025 (approve in principle – Community Facilities only)

Operational (Opex): Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

1,376,715

            1,489,441

            1,512,861

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

20,949,603

          17,057,768

          17,295,897

Capital (Capex): Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

7,883,167

6,208,601

7,821,018

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

4,086,353

6,208,601

7,821,018

Advanced Delivery RAP*

3,796,815

 

 

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

-1

-1

1

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

205,000

205,000

855,181

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

84,221

205,000

855,181

Advanced Delivery RAP*

120,779

 

 

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

0

0

0

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

240,971

775,000

8,773,956

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: One Local Initiative

1,525,000

7,100,000

5,460,905

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

839,136

334,500

0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

0

0

0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

20,000

233,454

0

             * See paragraph 54-56 for RAP explanation

91.     The budgets are based on the allocations in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Budgets are subject to change during council’s annual budget and future long-term plan processes. If decisions on the Annual Budget result in budget reductions, the work programme will need to be amended to align to these budgets via future decisions of the local board.

92.     Any 2021/2022 opex budget unspent on 30 June 2022, will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2022/2023 work programme. Carry-forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines and will be reflected in the revised budget.

93.     During delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme, where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the associated budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year. This process will include agreement from each department and will need to be resolved on by the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

94.     The most significant risk is that delivery of the Customer and Community Services work programme is dependent on the local board approving the work programme by 30 June 2022. Approval of the work programme after the start of the financial year could result in delays to delivery.

95.     The majority of operational (opex) activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

96.     Table eight outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme once it has been approved.

Table eight: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

Health, safety and wellbeing factors, including external influences relating to work programme delivery may impact the delivery of activities, resulting in activities requiring adjustment.

Health and safety assessments will be conducted prior to commencement of projects. Work programme activities and projects will be adjusted accordingly where these risks occur during the delivery phase.

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to negatively impact on the progress and deliverability of the work programme.

Development of the work programme has included consideration of potential impacts on delivery due to COVID-19 for all activities.

Timeframes for some activities are set to enable delivery within the agreed timeframe despite possible delays. 

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate the budget to other activities.

The COVID-19 pandemic and other geopolitical factors may result in further inflationary and supply chain pressures.

Potential inflationary pressures have been modelled into key forecasts; however, uncertainties remain.

The ongoing cost increase may become unsustainable, and may require a reprioritization of potential work programmes, capital spend and a potential discontinuation of some programmes.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

97.     Delivery of the Customer and Community Service work programme is scheduled to start on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023.

98.     Regionally funded projects are an exception and will commence after they have been approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2022.

99.     The local board will receive progress updates on a quarterly basis, with the first quarterly report available in November 2022.

100.   When further decisions for activities are needed at project milestones, these will be brought to the local board at the appropriate time.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board CCS work programme 2022/2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Maori Outcomes

75

c

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Capital Works and Leasing work programme map

77

d

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Regional Feedback

79

e

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Climate Impacts

81

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Tania Pouwhare - General Manager Community and Social Innovation

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


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23 June 2022

 

 

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23 June 2022

 

 

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23 June 2022

 

 

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23 June 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan

File No.: CP2022/05800

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that the local board supports the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

·     increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in August 2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      tautoko / support the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A to the agenda report)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan:

i)        increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)      tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

6.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[1]

7.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

8.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

9.       This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

10.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

11.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

12.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

13.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

·     a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment

·     a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

14.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

15.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

16.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

17.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

18.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

19.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

20.     It proposes three policy objectives:

·     increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

·     increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

·     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

21.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

22.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

23.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[2]

24.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of society.

25.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

26.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

27.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

28.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[3] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

29.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

30.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

31.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

 

 

 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[4]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

 

32.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

33.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

34.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

35.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

 

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

36.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

37.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

38.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

39.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

40.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

41.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

42.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

43.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

44.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

45.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

46.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

47.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

48.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

49.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access to publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

50.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

51.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

52.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.


 

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan


 

 

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

53.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

54.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

·     Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,074 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas

·     The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

55.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings ran until 27 May 2022.

56.     A memo outlining a summary of the feedback to the draft plan has been provided to the local board prior to its June business meetings.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

57.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

·     51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal

·     59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.


 

 

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

Description automatically generated

Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

Description automatically generated

People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 


Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 


Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 

28% Support

32% Partially support

37% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

21% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

20% Support

24% Partially support

45% Don’t support

 

44% Support

20% Partially support

27% Don’t support

 

58.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

59.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

60.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

61.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

62.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

63.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

64.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

65.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

66.     Staff will analyse all of the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

67.     Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

68.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

69.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

70.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

71.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

72.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

73.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

74.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

·     ecology

·     landscape and cultural heritage

·     energy consumption and waste reduction

·     water resource

·     climate change

·     pollution prevention.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

75.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

76.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

·     there is inequity for people living with disabilities

·     Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

·     women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

77.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

78.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

79.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

80.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

81.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

82.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks formal views on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

83.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

·     Whanaungatanga /… Access to public facilities 

·     Rangatiratanga /…Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

·     Manaakitanga /… Access to clean parks and reserves

·     Wairuatanga /… Indigenous flora and fauna

·     Kaitiakitanga /…Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

84.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

85.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

86.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

87.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

88.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

89.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in mid- 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Golf Investment Plan (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

 



[1] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[2] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[3] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[4] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy