I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 June 2022

3.00pm

Online via Microsoft Teams and at the Ōrākei Local Board office
25 St Johns Road,
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairman

Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairman

Troy Elliott

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Sarah Powrie

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jade Grayson

Democracy Advisor

 

13 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027 443 0342

Email: jade.grayson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                            5

9.1     Public Forum - Fraser Brothers- Tamaki Drive and Solent Street to Ngapipi Road Roadworks                                         5

9.2     Public Forum - Kit Parkinson - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan                                                               6

9.3     Public Forum - Pete Williams - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan                                                               6

9.4     Public Forum - Judith Wesley  - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan                                                               7

9.5     Public Forum - Stephen Prinselaar - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan                                                               7

9.6     Public Forum - Paul and Jenny Vahry - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan                                                7

9.7     Public Forum - Toni Wood - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan            8

9.8     Public Forum - Golf New Zealand and Golf Remuera                                               8

10        Extraordinary Business                                       9

11        Consultation on The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan                                                11

12        Draft Auckland golf investment plan                23

13        Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations          35

14        Proposed new community lease to Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama     41

15        Approval of the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                          49

16        Approval of the Ōrākei Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023                                                             65

17        Approval of the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme                                                 69

18        Local Board Transport Capital Fund Decision                                                                              81

19        Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 - Local Board views                         89

20        Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change                                                                 93

21        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)                          103

22        Chairman and Board Members' Report         109

23        Governance Forward Work Calendar             111

24        Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings 113

25        Resolutions Pending Action report                115

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Chairman Milne will welcome those present.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 19 May 2022, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairman of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 


 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

 

9.1       Public Forum - Fraser Brothers- Tamaki Drive and Solent Street to Ngapipi Road Roadworks

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Fraser Brothers (Hamish and Ollie) will be in attendance to speak on the Tamaki Drive and Solent Street to Ngapipi Road roadworks, and how this is affecting the parking at Lilliput mini golf course.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Fraser Brothers for their attendance.

 

 

 

 

9.2       Public Forum - Kit Parkinson - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kit Parkinson will be in attendance to speak to The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan, in support of some elements of the revised plan. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Kit Parkinson for his attendance.

 

 

 

9.3       Public Forum - Pete Williams - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Pete Williams will be in attendance to speak to The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan, regarding accessibility inclusion at the Landing. 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Pete Williams for his attendance.

 

 

 

 

9.4       Public Forum - Judith Wesley  - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Judith Wesley, president of Auckland Canoe Club, will be in attendance to speak to The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Judith Wesley for her attendance.

 

 


 

 

9.5       Public Forum - Stephen Prinselaar - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Stephen Prinselaar will be in attendance to speak to The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan, regarding the experiences and social value of the Hardstand.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Stephen Prinselaar for his attendance.

 

 

 

 

9.6       Public Forum - Paul and Jenny Vahry - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Paul and Jenny Vahry will be in attendance to speak to The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan, in favor of the existing Hardstand area being retained.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Paul and Jenny Vahry for their attendance.

 

 


 

 

 

9.7       Public Forum - Toni Wood - The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Toni Wood will be in attendance to speak to The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan, regarding maintenance to vessels, and the environmental, economic and tourism impact.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Toni Wood for their attendance.

 

 

 

 

9.8       Public Forum - Golf New Zealand and Golf Remuera

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To deliver a presentation to the local board during the public forum segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Chris Davies (General Manager Remuera Golf Club) and Hana-Rae Seifert (General Manager Golf New Zealand) will be in attendance to speak on the Draft Auckland golf investment plan.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation and thank Chris Davies and Hana- Rae Seifert for their attendance.

 

 


 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Consultation on The Landing Pathways to the Sea concept plan

File No.: CP2022/06520

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present feedback received on The Landing concept plan refresh project and to identify key service outcomes the local board would like to see incorporated within a ‘refreshed’ plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Pathways to the Sea (2013) is the current guiding document for development at The Landing.

3.       A refresh of Pathways to the Sea is included as an activity in the Ōrākei Local Board’s 2020/2021 work programme (ID#1585 / resolution number OR/2020/76).

4.       The need for this refresh is driven by growth demands from all incumbent stakeholders and a desire on the part of Auckland Council to make the site more accessible and inviting for all users.

5.       Stakeholder engagement was undertaken in May 2021 followed by public consultation, which ran from 1 to 28 February 2022.

6.       A very high level of community interest in the process has been evident, with 856 people inputting into the public consultation process (see Attachment A for consultation feedback).

7.       The three draft concepts consulted on (see Attachment B) present degrees of change when compared to the 2013 Pathways to the Sea concept plan. The draft concepts address issues raised by stakeholders and deliver outcomes formalised by the local board at business meetings in April and August 2021.

8.       There are multiple variations on the plan versions presented and design elements for the different concepts can be combined for the purpose of developing the optimal ‘refresh’ plan. While space is a constraining factor, none of the five proposed key service outcomes identified should be regarded as mutually exclusive.

9.       The Landing is of high cultural and spiritual importance to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei (NWO) and NWO has provided a submission on the concept proposals (Attachment C).

10.     There is currently no budget allocated for delivery of any of the concept plan design elements presented for consultation. Some of these elements come at significant cost requiring both internal and external funding.  

11.     Expectation has been raised by the consultation process and there is reputational risk involved should outcomes identified through the plan refresh fail to be funded and delivered. Risk is also linked to any significant service level change at The Landing, such as removal of the hardstand services.

12.     A reduction in the footprint of the hardstand (as shown in concept two) to enable additional service outcomes to be realised at The Landing will likely result in the need to review and change the operating model for the hardstand, potentially as part of an expressions of interest process.

13.     This report seeks local board direction to identify the service outcomes they would like to see carried through to a ‘refreshed’ draft plan as part of the first planning stage of decision making on this project and agreement to progress an Expressions of Interest process to inform future decision making on haul out and hardstand services.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      consider the following key service outcomes for the refreshed Landing concept plan:

i)       Multi-sport paddling centre

ii)       Safe harbour

iii)      Hardstand / boat yard

iv)      Shared multipurpose open space

v)      Storage building / storage area.

b)      request staff progress an Expressions of Interest process to inform decision making on haul-out and hardstand services at The Landing based on the following new operational outcomes:

i)       hardstand footprint reduced by approximately. 30-40 per cent

ii)       a commercial agreement that is run at no cost to council

iii)      length of term to be 5 years with 2 further rights of renewal of 5 years each

iv)      area licensed to the service provider 

v)      differential fees being applied that encourage short occupation for hull cleaning / basic boat maintenance and disincentivise longer occupation.

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Landing is a 3.2 hectare local park held in fee simple by Auckland Council for recreation purposes and is subject to the Local Government Act 2002.

15.     The following local board objectives were established in 2021 to address current issues and anticipated future community needs at the site. These are a revision of the objectives set out in the 2013 concept plan:

a)      Support opportunities to increase participation in water-based sport and recreation activities by maximising accessibility and public boat launching facilities.

b)      Develop quality multipurpose park like open space that can accommodate events and passive recreation outcomes in order to increase the public’s enjoyment of The Landing.

c)      Accommodate the various clubs and users of the site in an efficient way that supports their future development and growth.

d)      Enhance The Landing as a destination for marine-related activities such as sailing, paddling and waka culture.

e)      Improve visual and physical connections into and through the site and create a clear connection eastward through to Ōkahu Bay beach.

f)       Acknowledge the significance of Ōkahu Bay to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

Consultation process

16.     Consultation for the project has been broken down into stakeholder engagement (phase one) and public consultation (phase two).

17.     Stakeholder engagement, carried out in May 2021, included meetings and a co-design workshop with the groups currently operating out of The Landing.

18.     The engagement identified the following key themes:

a)      strong support for multi-sport paddling centre

b)      recognise the cultural, spiritual and environmental importance of The Landing at Pokanoa to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

c)      increase storage capacity for all users

d)      create an events / gathering space and lift activation potential of site

e)      improve access and safety throughout the site for all users. 

19.     Phase two was intended to be carried out in August 2021 and was deferred to February 2022 because of COVID-19 restrictions.

20.     The level of interest in the plan refresh has been extremely high, with 856 pieces of feedback received (Attachment A). Several written submissions were also provided by individuals and organisations (Attachment C).

21.     In the lead up to this consultation, Auckland Council was approached by a private operator interested in running an electric ferry service from the southwest corner of The Landing to, and from, Kennedy Point on Waiheke Island. The service would have the capacity to carry a maximum of 35 vehicles and up to 150 passengers or cyclists.

22.     The implications of running such a service out of The Landing are not fully understood and primarily for this reason, neither the survey questions, nor the draft concepts, referenced or detailed a ferry service. The proposal was simply referred to in general consultation information and people were directed to the project proposer for further information regarding the service.

23.     A Landowner Approval application has since been received on the proposal and further community input may be sought on this project.

24.     Additionally, the proposal will need to go through a Resource Consent process.

Concepts presented for consultation

25.     Three draft concept options were consulted on and reflected degrees of change from the 2013 concept plan, ranging from small to large.

26.     Concept one was based largely on the 2013 Pathways to the Sea plan with minor additional change relating to the dinghy ramp (number 5 in the concept plan key), realignment of the secure dinghy storage lockers (number 21) and increasing the size of a public deck space (number 12) in front of the multi-sport paddling centre. The multi-sport paddling centre represents the main undelivered design element taken from the 2013 plan. 

27.     Concept two provides similar outcomes to concept one but with a reduced footprint for the commercial boat yard (hardstand) that allows for a public space (#24) at the top of the boat ramp for pedestrian promenade, marine based events, boat set up, club gatherings, have-a-go days, training and water safety sessions. It also delivers a widened and more inviting shared pathway access across the top of the ramp and improved sightlines from Ōkahu Bay on one side through to Hobson Bay on the other. An additional boat storage area is also provided (#20).

28.     Concept three represents transformational change through removal of the hardstand (commercial boat yard) and the creation of, along with the multi-sport paddling centre which features in all three concepts, the following design elements: 

a)      central park-like space (#16) for recreational activities including major events

b)      multi-use, two-storey building (#9) to accommodate the various clubs (including Auckland Canoe Club and Fergs Kayaks), plus potential new users

c)      raised treetop canopy boardwalk (#1) extending over the new two-storey building

d)      a ‘safe harbour’ (#3) that provides a protected, all abilities launching environment.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

High-level consultation findings

29.     Table one shows how the 856 survey respondents supported the three concepts.

Table one: Concept plan survey results / * 12 respondents did not state a preferred option

Survey results for concepts 1, 2 and 3

Supported

Concept 1 – 2013 concept plan with minor changes

238

Concept 2 – Rationalisation

102

Concept 3 – Transformation

469

None of the above

35

 

30.     Table two shows the number of respondents that identified concept three as their preferred design and prioritised the key design elements presented in that concept.

Table two: Concept three design theme priorities 

Concept 3 priority preferences

 

Central Park Like Space

292 

Safe Harbour

261

Multi-Purpose Building – Storage Facility

168

Multi-Sport Paddling Centre

  99

Survey analysis broken down by key design elements

Multi-sport paddling centre provided for in all three concepts

31.     The multi-sport paddling centre is a planning priority for a large number of respondents. This is reflected by the 340 people that supported either concepts one or two and the 99 respondents who supported the centre as a key planning priority within concept three.

32.     The multi-sport paddling centre is a major, but still undelivered, element of the 2013 Pathways to the Sea plan.

33.     It is universally supported by stakeholders. It provides a facility for the paddling activity that dominates the eastern end of the site currently, creates storage for waka and canoes/kayaks and would provide a culturally important facility and reference point for Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

34.     A centre with a slightly larger footprint and a two-storey building was detailed in concept three to provide for a waka centre. This will require the relocation of Fergs Kayaks, the Auckland Canoe Club and the ‘operation centre’ to the new multi-use two storey building in concept three (#9). There was a stated preference from effected groups (Auckland Canoe Club in particular) to stay closer to the water.

35.     If the multi-sport paddling centre is carried through into the plan refresh, it is recommended that the building is based on Pathways to the Sea concept plan footprint, but one that could accommodate a two-storey facility. Design detail can be progressed when funds become available to progress the centre. 

36.     The deck (#12) outside of the paddling centre shown in all three concepts was a design element in Pathways to Sea. It has been expanded in size. Feedback from a number of submitters is that the deck expansion restricts the launching and landing of waka, as well as impacting on ease of access to the ramp for the launching other small paddle craft. It is advised that for the refreshed plan, the 2013 concept for this deck component is applied.

The hardstand / boat yard provided for in concepts one and two  

37.     A significant number of respondents were supportive of a plan option that continues to accommodate the hardstand / boat yard in some form (340). The majority (238), many of whom are current or former yacht and launch owners, favoured the hardstand being retained on its current footprint (concept one).

38.     A smaller number of respondents (102) preferred concept two which incorporates a shared space along the top of the boat ramp enabled by a reduction in the footprint of the hardstand.

39.     The local board has undertaken an assessment that indicates other Auckland based hardstand service providers have the capacity to pick up demand displaced as a result of changes at The Landing.

40.     The impacts of reducing hardstand services, or removing them altogether, include:

a)      increased user costs (30 per cent – 60 per cent) for similar services based at other sites

b)      boats berthed at Outboard Boating Club (OBC), Ōrākei Marina and local swing moorings having to travel greater distances to haul-out

c)      multi-hulls that are too wide for Pier 21 and not long enough for the new lift at Orams, having to de-rig for preferred local hydraulic trailer haul-out services or be winched out in cradles

d)      additional pressure on peak period haul-out, with maintenance having to be scheduled at less favoured times during the year

e)      displacement of the mobile marine trade businesses servicing The Landing

f)       potential for reduced levels of hull cleaning and further spread of marine pests and increased legal non-compliance of boat operators in the area.

Safe harbour provided for in concept three

41.     A safe harbour was identified as a key development priority by 261 of those survey respondents who favoured concept three.

42.     While it is aspirational in the sense that it will be costly to deliver, it does not impact on the delivery of other plan design elements.

43.     Organisations that provide sailing opportunities for people with disabilities were particularly supportive of this design element, noting the safe harbour will be of value to all dinghy sailors and small paddler craft users who wish to launch from within a safe and protected breakwater environment.

Multi-use two storey building / raised tree top canopy boardwalk provided for in concept three

44.     The multi-use two storey building was identified as a key development priority by 168 of those survey respondents who favoured concept three.

45.     The need for additional storage space is evident from the number of waka and dinghies left unsecured across the site on berms, dedicated car park spaces and beside buildings. Shipping containers are also being used by clubs to store equipment on site.

46.     The size of the multi-purpose building shown in concept three was partly based on the requirements of an external organisation, such as Yachting NZ, setting up their administrative and activity base at The Landing and would require independent financing.  

47.     While Yachting NZ did not make a submission through the consultation process, they still have an interest in the site and would consider jointly funding a facility if opportunity arose. 

48.     The 2200 m2 building footprint could be shrunk to lessen the visual impacts and provide more space for other outcomes.

49.     The raised tree top boardwalk (#2) over the proposed two-storey building provides opportunity, through design and vantage points, to celebrate the culture, heritage, recreation and environmental significance of the site and surrounding area. Some respondents expressed that it was unnecessary and would add expense to the project.

Central Park like space provided for in concept three

50.     A central park like space was identified as the key development priority by the largest number (292) of those respondents who supported concept three.

51.     It would provide for recreational activities including boat set up, gathering spaces and areas for relaxation and passive recreation.

52.     Given the significant open space footprint presented in concept three, it could also accommodate relatively large visitor or spectator numbers plus infrastructure associated with larger scale events.

53.     If the footprint is shrunk significantly, this space could still provide boat set up, gathering and social spaces, but the ability to accommodate bigger events, with for example large numbers of spectators, would be diminished.

54.     The need for a relatively large park like space on a permanent basis should be considered in the context of:

a)      the high level of public support for this design outcome

b)      the anticipated number of large-scale events held at The Landing

c)      proximity of other open space options for passive recreation along Tamaki Drive

d)      the 2013 plan vision with its primary focus on community access to the sea

e)      the number of respondents who support retention of the hardstand.

Optimal service outcomes analysis

55.     Decisions on The Landing plan refresh should be driven by the current and future provision needs of all relevant community activities in the context of the scarcity of parks that support both blue and green recreation outcomes on the Waitematā Harbour. 

56.     At this first stage of decision making, the local board is being asked to identify which of the following five service outcomes it would like to see carried through into a refreshed plan:

a)    Multi-sport paddling centre.

b)    Safe-harbour.

c)    Hardstand / boat yard.

d)    Shared multi-purpose open space.

e)    Storage building / storage area.

57.     On the basis that the 2013 plan vision for The Landing continues to be primarily focused on providing community access to the sea, staff consider that the optimal plan refresh integrates all five service outcomes. This is likely to result in a spatial arrangement of services that closely aligns with concept two, but which includes the addition of the safe harbour.

58.     The multi-sport paddling centre and safe harbour, can be realised without impact on other service outcomes.

59.     Shared multi-purpose open space, a hardstand and additional building / storage areas are all being considered for the centre of the site and realising one, two or all three of these service outcomes therefore comes with opportunity cost.  Table three presents the pros and cons associated with development options for the central area of the site, as presented across the three concepts.

Table three: Pros and cons associated with three concepts for development

 

Pros

Cons

Concept 1

 

 

 

·   Maintains level of service for hard stand customers

·   Enabling of hull cleaning, boat maintenance and major refits

 

·   No provision for multi-use shared open space for marine activity, passive recreation or staging larger spectator events

·   No provision for a building or storage areas that can meet growth needs in terms of boat storage for existing users and admin/storage requirements for new users

·   Continued poor visual and physical connectivity through site

·   Longer-stay boat bookings on the hardstand, typical during winter months, provides sub-optimal rec outcomes for wider community

Concept 2

 

 

 

·   Maintains a basic level of service for hard stand customers

·   Enabling of hull cleaning and boat maintenance

·   Improved visual and physical connectivity (#24) across site

·   Shared open space created (#24) for marine based events, boat set up, club gatherings, have-a-go days and passive recreation

·   Provides additional boat storage area (#20)

·   Reduction in level of hardstand services with possible charge increases

·   No space for holding larger spectator events

·   No provision for a multi-use building that can meet growth needs in terms of boat storage for existing users and admin/storage requirements for new users

Concept 3

 

 

 

·   Central park-like space (#16) for recreational activities including marine events alongside passive recreation

·   Substantial area in which to hold major spectator events, night markets etc

·   Space for build of multi-use, two-storey building (#9) with capacity for new users and additional storage for existing stakeholders

·   Opens up the heart of the site for optimal visual and physical connectivity

 

·   Hardstand services removed with significant cost and convenience implications for historic users

·   Potential for less hull cleaning and maintenance of boats that sail in the Waitematā, with environmental implications for pest spread and the health of the harbour 

·   Park like space may experience low levels of use during weekdays 

 

60.     The drafting of the 2013 concept plan considered the footprint of the hardstand. The decision to retain the pre-2013 footprint was made on the basis that this was the minimum space required to maintain a ‘self-funding’ service.

61.     The effect of shrinking the hardstand footprint reduces its operational capacity with both impacts on levels of service to customers and income generated.

62.     A reduction in the footprint of the hardstand (as shown in concept two) will likely result in the need to review and change the operating model for the services provided there, potentially as part of an expressions of interest process.

63.     This change could be based on the principle of short stays for the purposes of regular hull cleaning and basic boat maintenance but without provision for longer boat stays linked to major refits.

64.     A new operating model for the hardstand could be based on the following outcomes:

a)    footprint reduced by approx. 30-40 per cent

b)    a commercial agreement that is run at no cost to council

c)    length of term to be 5 years with 2 further rights of renewal of 5 years each

d)    area licenced to the service provider 

e)    differential fees / rates being applied that encourage short occupation for hull cleaning / basic boat maintenance and disincentivise longer occupation.

65.     The hardstand in concept two has been shrunk by approximately 36 per cent.

66.     Retention of a financially viable hardstand needs to be market tested through an EOI process but is likely to preclude opportunity for a new multipurpose storage building as shown in concept three.

67.     The provision of new storage facilities in concept two is limited to that delivered through the multi-sport paddling facility and an additional dinghy storage area (#20). 

68.     What is considered to be the minimum footprint requirement for providing meaningful shared open space is set out in concept two (#24).

69.     This covers approximately 2500 square metres; it includes shared car/trailer access to the boat ramp and haul-out access to the hardstand, but approximately 1000 square metres could be used principally for the creation of a landscaped gathering space that supports club activities and small-scale events.

70.     It also allows for improved connectivity through the site by opening a corridor across the top of the boat ramp for shared pedestrian use but would not present the extent of open space required for large scale spectator events as presented in concept three (#16). 

71.     Because of the complexities of assessing the importance of each of the five key service outcomes, a multi-criteria analysis workshop could be arranged before the local board decide on the spatial arrangement for the endorsed design elements.

72.     The workshop process provides the board opportunity to collectively attribute levels of importance to the key service outcomes and further inform decision making.

73.     Examples of criteria against which service outcomes could be measured have been provided in Attachment D.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

74.     Changes to the Pathways to the Sea Concept Plan for The Landing (2013) need to factor in sea level rise and impacts on greenhouse gas emissions.

75.     More vehicle visitation to the site is likely to arise from further development but this is not thought to be to any significant extent. Parking provision at the site remains at current levels in plan concepts one and two, and is slightly reduced in concept three.

76.     With active transport improvements currently being delivered on Tamaki Drive, and across other areas of the city, increased visitation is unlikely to result in a commensurate rise in greenhouse gas emissions.

77.     Spread and impact of marine pests is expected to be exacerbated by climate change. Options and concepts that retain the presence of sufficient hard stand facilities to enable hull cleaning will contribute to climate adaptation by reducing pest spread.

78.     Conversely any option that sees hull cleaning facilities removed entirely will reduce the ability of local marine ecosystems to adapt to climate change

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

79.     Community Facilities and Parks, Sport and Recreation staff are working together to ensure that service agreements, leases, licences and maintenance contracts at The Landing align with any approved plan changes.

80.     Staff have also engaged with Auckland Transport, Healthy Waters and the Coast Management Team within Infrastructure and Environmental Services on the plan refresh.

81.     Environmental Services staff have expressed a preference for the retention of short-stay hull cleaning facilities, to ensure boat owners are able to comply with Biosecurity Act requirements under the Regional Pest Management Plan and forthcoming National Clean Hull Plan.

82.     The service agreement with STF Limited (STF) ends on 31 August 2022. STF is the Blue Flag accredited incumbent operator of the hard stand.

83.     Community Facilities recommended a continuation of the current service until alternative agreement options have been presented to the local board and the plan refresh for The Landing has been formally approved.

84.     At its May 2022 business meeting the local board resolved to hold over the agreement on a monthly basis to the end of February 2023 [OR/2022/62]. This allows for hardstand bookings that have been made beyond August 2022 to largely be met. 

85.     Undertaking an EOI process, reporting on findings, signing off a ‘refreshed’ concept plan and signing a new hardstand service agreement based on a new operating model will take an estimated 14 months.   

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

86.     The need for this refresh is driven by significant growth demands from all incumbent stakeholders and a desire on the part of the Ōrākei Local Board to realise some, or all, of the following outcomes:

a)      improved public access for both active and passive users of the site

b)      stronger visual and physical connectivity through the site

c)      developing a shared multipurpose space for gathering, events, boat set up etc.    

87.     All potential plan change decisions need to be considered in the context of consultation feedback, service level impacts to the customer, funding and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei’s Masterplan objectives for the area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

88.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei (NWO) were the only iwi to request that council partner with them on this project. The full submission from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei in response to consultation on the three plan options is included in Attachment C.

89.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei support and endorse concept one because it:

a)      was the only concept where NWO was involved in the design and process from early stages

b)      acknowledges those commitments made in 2013 which have still yet to be delivered

c)      still has ability to grow into concepts outlined in 2 & 3 with consultation and collaboration with NWO and wider community.

d)      is the best fit with the NWO masterplan for Ōkahu Bay.

90.     Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei have also expressed the view that the plan for The Landing needs to be outward looking and align with NWO’s Ōrākei masterplan for the area.

91.     The masterplan plan is currently in draft form, and NWO have suggested that The Landing plan refresh is not finalised until their masterplan is completed later in 2022. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

92.     No budget has been allocated to progress a ‘refreshed’ plan and funding of should be a key consideration for development of the plan.

93.     The multi-sport paddling centre, the safe harbour and the multi-use building with tree top boardwalk all require significant investment and partnership funding running into millions of dollars.

94.     The case for securing partnership funding through organisations like Sport NZ is thought to be particularly strong for the multi-sport paddling centre, while Yachting NZ have finance to deliver elements of a two-storey building.

95.     Reducing the level of service currently provided by the hardstand could have an impact on board finances. If the board wish to continue the haul-out and hardstand service at The Landing it is recommended that an EOI process is undertaken based on a new operating model that aligns with a commercial agreement and license to occupy

96.     Revenue targets for The Landing have been budgeted for in the remaining years of the LTP and are planned for from FY22-FY31. Any changes implemented by the local board that result in a change to these targets will need to be met by the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

97.     Expectation has been raised by the consultation process and there is reputational risk involved should some, or all, outcomes identified through the plan refresh fail to be funded and delivered.

98.     Risk is also linked to any significant service level change at The Landing, such as removal of the hardstand operation.

99.     The reported sale of Pier 21 has raised concerns amongst some in the boating community that hard stand facilities across Tāmaki Makaurau are failing to keep up with growing demand and that the high environmental standards applied by STF will not be met at other sites that boaties could be displaced to. 

100.   The removal of boat cleaning facilities from The Landing also has the potential to contribute to further spread of marine pests and increased legal non-compliance of boaties in the area.

101.   Marine pests are very difficult to control once established, therefore preventing further spread is the most important management approach.

102.   Biofouling on craft hulls accounts for about 70-80 per cent of the total risk of marine pests moving to new locations. To address this risk, the Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030, created under the Biosecurity Act 1993, requires craft hulls to be kept clean of biofouling at all times.

103.   Auckland Council in collaboration with other northern regional councils, the Ministry for Primary Industries and Department of Conservation, is currently preparing a ‘Clean Hull Plan’ for public consultation. This plan will also be created under the Biosecurity Act 1993 and will create consistent rules for hull cleaning across the upper North Island.

104.   This issue could be mitigated at The Landing by retaining short-stay cleaning facilities but does not require the retention of longer-stay boat maintenance facilities.

105.   In addition to impacts on customers and environmental impacts, closure of the hardstand at The Landing could also affect a number of independent boat industry operators (i.e. trades people who service, maintain and fit out boats).

106.   While economic spinoffs are an important consideration, the main objective for The Landing plan refresh should remain focused on delivering optimal harbour-based recreation outcomes for the community    

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

107.   Following a decision by the local board staff will progress an Expression of Interest process for the haul-out and hardstand services at The Landing.

108.   If requested, staff will arrange a detailed analysis workshop.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Consultation results

 

b

Concept plans

 

c

Submissions

 

d

Multi-Criteria Assessment Table

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Barker - Parks & Places Team Leader

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

File No.: CP2022/07939

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek tautoko / support for the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To increase Aucklander’s access to, and the benefits from, publicly owned golf land, staff have developed a draft investment plan.

3.       Staff recommend that you support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land.  

4.       There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework. Implementation of the plan is expected to achieve:

a)   increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

b)    increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

c)    best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

5.       If adopted, any future investment would need to align with the plan. The main trade-off is between taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making and one-off decisions as current leases end.

6.       The next step is for the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in August 2022. Local board feedback will help inform their decision-making.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      support the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to this report (Attachment A)

b)      support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)       increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)       increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)      best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)       support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

Horopaki

Context

Exclusive use of publicly owned land for golf is not sustainable

Problem definition

7.       There are 13 golf courses operating on 535 hectares of council-owned or managed land. This publicly owned land has an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2018.[1]

8.       Public access to this land, other than to play golf, is limited, which means that some Aucklanders are missing out.

9.       There are competing demands to provide open space and community facilities. Housing and business land is also in short supply in urban areas.

10.     This makes exclusive use of publicly owned land by a single sports code unsustainable.

 

The draft investment plan builds on community engagement, research and analysis

11.     Development of the draft plan involved community engagement, research and analysis.

12.     Work commenced in 2016 with the release of a discussion document for public engagement [PAR/2016/11 refers].

13.     The investment approach was supported by a majority of Aucklanders who responded to the consultation in 2016. There was strong feedback for council to maximise the benefits from its investment in golf. This is reflected in the draft plan.

14.     Following analysis of submissions on the discussion document, the Parks, Sport and Recreation Committee approved development of a draft plan with the following components [PAR/2016/52 refers]:

a)   a policy statement setting out the vision, investment principles and the scope of council’s investment.

b)    a decision-making framework that sets how the investment approach will be applied as well as ongoing reporting and monitoring.

15.     A range of research was undertaken to support the development of a draft plan, including an analysis of the value of golf to Auckland’s economy and benchmarking to assess the environmental performance of golf courses on publicly owned land.

16.     Cost-benefit analyses were undertaken of the 13 golf courses. A tool was developed to assess the costs and benefits of different forms of sport and recreation investment.

17.     An intervention logic and decision-making framework were developed and refined following workshops with the Environment and Community Committee and 10 local boards in September and November 2018.

18.     Key aspects of the draft plan were workshopped with the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in December 2021.

19.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee considered the draft plan in February 2022 and invited staff to use this document to engage with the community.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Changes are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land

20.     Staff have developed a draft Auckland golf investment plan in order to make publicly owned golf land accessible to Aucklanders and to increase public benefits from this land.

21.     It proposes three policy objectives:

a)   increase equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

b)    increase equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

c)    best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

22.     The proposed outcome-focused investment approach, with a clear decision-making framework, would also increase accountability and transparency.

Increasing public value is an accepted public sector approach

23.     The draft plan takes a public value approach as it aims to deliver more public value to Aucklanders from council investment.

24.     Public value is an accepted approach. It has informed public policy in New Zealand and other countries such as Australia and the United Kingdom since the mid-1990s.[2]

25.     It focuses decision-making on how best to manage public assets to benefit all members of  society.

26.     Alternate approaches, where council does not consider the costs and benefits of allocating publicly owned land to golf or public versus private benefits, have been discounted.

27.     These factors cannot be overlooked when there are competing demands for open space or community facilities and land supply constraints.

The investment approach is consistent with council policy

28.     In 2019, the Environment and Community Committee adopted the Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 [ENV/2019/93 refers].

29.     The draft plan is consistent with council policy on sport investment.[3] It has the same investment objective of increasing equity and participation and the same investment principles as the overarching sport investment plan.

30.     A separate plan from Increasing Aucklanders’ Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2019-2039 was needed because there is more complexity to golf both in terms of costs and benefits. For example, golf courses may operate on marginal land, and they can have other functions such as stormwater management.

31.     Increasing environmental benefits were an additional consideration given the large land areas currently allocated to golf.

The draft plan proposes four key shifts to benefit all Aucklanders

32.     Four key shifts to the status quo are proposed so that all Aucklanders benefit from increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.


 

Figure 1: Four key shifts to deliver increased benefits to Aucklanders

1

 

FROM ad hoc historic decisions of legacy councils

Now there is intensive demand for land to accommodate Auckland’s growth

 

TO a robust investment framework that is focused on increasing benefits to all Aucklanders

Public-owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes

 

DELIVERS increased accountability and transparency

 

2

 

FROM publicly owned land used exclusively by golfers

There is competition over access to open space and some Aucklanders are missing out

TO sport and recreation for all Aucklanders

Opening publicly owned golf land to other users with new play spaces, walking, running and cycling paths and other sport and recreation activities

 

DELIVERS increased equity and sport and recreation participation rates

 

3

 

FROM asset-based investment in traditional mid-level (development) golf courses

Auckland golf courses meet the needs of a relatively narrow segment of population[4]

TO a broad golf service offering across the network that appeals to a wider group of people

Providing a broad range of golf experiences and pathways that attract and retain participants with services targeted at low participation groups

 

DELIVERS increased equity and golf participation rates

 

4

 

FROM variable environmental management of publicly owned golf land

Some golf courses are high users of water, fertilisers, pesticides and energy

 

TO best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation that meets clearly defined targets

A kaitiakitanga framework ensures publicly owned golf land is environmentally sustainable, energy neutral and carbon positive

 

DELIVERS increased natural and environmental benefits

 

34.     If the draft plan is adopted, these changes can be implemented as leases end, or by agreement with current leaseholders.

Decision-makers will consider a range of evidence and options before any future investment

35.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

36.     Decisions will be informed by an indicative business case with a full range of policy options assessed against the plan’s investment objectives and principles. This will help inform decisions that local boards make about golf leases.

37.     Development of the indicative business cases will commence three to five years prior to the end of a current lease for golf courses on publicly owned land. Eight of these leases end before 2028.

 

Figure 2: Proposed decision-making framework (see page 21 of Attachment A for a larger version)

Timeline

Description automatically generated

Future investment decisions will involve the governing body and local boards

38.     If the golf investment plan is adopted, the governing body and local boards will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

39.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

40.     During the development of indicative business cases for individual publicly owned golf land, joint working groups can be set up to consider policy options and implementation requirements. This would ensure close collaboration between decision-makers.

There are some trade-offs associated with adopting the plan and the key shifts

41.     Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework) means taking a consistent regional approach to future decision-making rather than making one-off decisions as current leases end. It also means that a full range of policy options will be considered as part of an indicative business case, rather than simply going through a new lease process.

42.     Implementation will require a joint approach involving the governing body and local boards, reflecting and adapting to changing decision-making allocated to local boards.

43.     Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders) means making space for other sport and recreation activities on publicly owned golf land.

44.     In most cases, it is anticipated that these activities can co-exist alongside golf on publicly owned land.

45.     Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering) could mean making changes to the types of services or facilities available. For example, a driving range and an introductory golf could be provided in place of an existing 18-hole golf course.

46.     Any such change would have varied support between new and experienced golfers.

47.     Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices) means that all golf courses on publicly owned land will need to meet a minimum environmental benchmark.

48.     Six golf courses on publicly owned land would not currently meet this benchmark.

49.     Some of them are participating in a pilot run by Auckland Council’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services department to improve environmental practices, but decisions may need to be made as to whether additional council support is provided.

There are strengths and weaknesses to the plan

50.     There are strengths and weaknesses to the draft plan as well as some limitations and constraints (see Table 1).

51.     A strength of the draft plan is how it has built on public engagement in 2016. The majority of public respondents to a council discussion document sought increased access publicly owned golf land. They supported walking, running and cycling trails. They also supported use of an environmental auditing tool.

52.     Other key strengths are the proposed public value approach and strategic alignment with the Auckland and Māori Plans. It also builds on golf sector strategies and plans.

53.     The main weakness is that the draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020). Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

54.     Another weakness is that the draft plan does not specify any level of future council investment. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make timely decisions based on community needs as participation trends will change over time. This may however create uncertainty for leaseholders and the wider golf sector.

55.    

Table 1: High-level analysis of the merits of the draft plan

Strengths

 

The draft Auckland golf investment plan takes a public value approach. It focuses decision-making on how to manage publicly owned golf land to benefit all Aucklanders. This means carefully considering how council can achieve equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

He tangata    
Impacts for aucklanders

The draft plan demonstrates how it meaningfully contributes to broader strategy, including the Auckland Plan and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

It aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as outlined in the Māori Plan.

It also supports the vision of the Auckland regional golf strategy and draws upon Golf New Zealand strategies and programmes, including Golf for Life and OnCourse New Zealand.

Weaknesses

 

The draft plan relied on publicly available golf participation data (up to and including data from 2020).

Golf New Zealand has subsequently provided more up-to-date data, which shows increases in participation over the last two years.

The plan does not specify any level of future council investment in golf.

Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis as leases end. This will allow council to make decisions based on community needs at the time as participation trends will change over time.

This may create uncertainty for current leaseholders and the wider golf sector. However, the plan does clearly indicate what council will invest in and how it will invest.

Constraints

 

Implementation is constrained by long-term leases granted by legacy councils. As leases end council can consider options to increase the benefits from publicly owned golf land. Service level agreements with agreed participation and environmental targets can be included in any future lease terms and conditions if this option is taken.

Staff can provide support to golf courses if they agree to implement the plan before the end of their leases.

Implementation would require complementary decisions of the governing body and local boards in accordance with their allocated decision-making responsibilities.

Joint working parties can ensure that indicative business cases take both governing body and local boards views into consideration.

A picture containing clipart

Description automatically generated

A picture containing text, clipart

Description automatically generated

Limitations

 

There is a lack of up-to-date and statistically significant sport and recreation participation data across demographic groups, including ethnicity, gender and age.

Publicly available golf participation data is limited.

Staff will look at ways to fill this data gap in order to support ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the plan.

Data sharing by leaseholders and the golf sector will be critical to understand participation trends and to inform needs assessments as part of the indicative business cases.

A picture containing chart

Description automatically generated

We are engaging again with Aucklanders to get their views

56.     Staff are engaging with Aucklanders, the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders to get their views on the draft plan.

57.     A range of mechanisms were used to engage the public, including the People’s Panel survey and public submissions to the Have Your Say consultation, with a cross section of Aucklanders providing feedback.

a)      Have Your Say engagement ran from 23 March to 20 April 2022. A total of 1,076 people provided feedback on the draft plan. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented. However, a large proportion was older, male Pākeha/New Zealand European respondents, or from the Albert-Eden, Devonport-Takapuna and Ōrākei local board areas.

b)      The People’s Panel ran from 7 to 12 April 2022. A total of 1,070 people completed the survey. A broad range of ages, ethnicities and locations were represented in the feedback.

58.     Consultation with the sport and recreation sector as well as golf clubs and leaseholders through a series of virtual meetings ran until 27 May 2022.

59.     A memo outlining a summary of the feedback to the draft plan will be provided to the local boards prior to their June business meeting.

The views of Aucklanders in 2022 varied on the draft plan

60.     Feedback from the Peoples Panel and Have Your Say varied (see Figure 3):

a)   51 per cent of the Peoples Panel ‘support’ the overall goal to ensure that all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land. A further 28 per cent ‘partially support’ this goal.

b)    59 per cent of Have Your Say respondents ‘don’t support’ the plan.


 

Figure 3: Summary of public feedback

People’s Panel: Goal to ensure all Aucklanders benefit

Chart type: Clustered Bar. 'Field1': 1 Support has noticeably higher 'Field2'.

Description automatically generated

Have Your Say: Overall opinion on the draft plan

Chart type: Pie. 'Field2' by 'Field1'

Description automatically generated

People’s Panel

62% Support

19% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

44% Support

30% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

72% Support

16% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

54% Support

24% Partially support

14% Don’t support

 

62% Support

20% Partially support

15% Don’t support

 

40% Support

32% Partially support

20% Don’t support

 

70% Support

18% Partially support

9% Don’t support

 

 

Policy Objective 1 (increasing public access)

 

Policy Objective 2 (a broad range of golf experiences)

 

Policy Objective 3 (ecosystem management and biodiversity)

 

Key Shift 1 (a robust investment framework)

 

Key Shift 2 (sport and recreation for all Aucklanders)

 

Key Shift 3 (a broad golf service offering)

 

Key Shift 4 (sustainable environmental practices)

 

Have Your Say

21% Support

19% Partially support

59% Don’t support

 


28% Support

32% Partially support

36% Don’t support

 

53% Support

21% Partially support

22% Don’t support

 

26% Support

24% Partially support

44% Don’t support

 

20% Support

16% Partially support

63% Don’t support

 

21% Support

25% Partially support

47% Don’t support

 

45% Support

21% Partially support

29% Don’t support

61.     There is support across both groups of respondents for the environmental aspects of the plan, in particular Policy Objective 3 (best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation).

62.     On most other aspects of the plan there were opposing views between respondents to the Peoples Panel’s survey and the Have Your Say consultation.

The sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation

63.     Initial feedback from the sport and recreation sector supports the focus on increasing equity and participation in sport and recreation for all Aucklanders as well as golf.

64.     They also welcome opportunities for new play spaces, walking, jogging and cycling paths.

The golf sector opposes the draft plan in its current form

65.     The golf sector has indicated that they oppose the draft plan in its current form. They are concerned that the draft plan does not reflect the current situation.

66.     Golf New Zealand provided evidence that participation rates have increased in recent years and suggested that further investment is required to meet the needs for golf in the future.


 

To date golf leaseholders have told us that the draft plan gives them more certainty and they are doing many of the things it seeks to achieve

67.     Golf leaseholders that staff have spoken with to date think that the draft plan gives them more certainty as to what council would invest in and transparency over future decision-making processes.

68.     They also noted that they were already doing many of the things outlined in the plan, including growing participation among young people and women, broadening their golf service offering and increasing environmental benefits.

Staff will analyse all the submissions and will look at what changes need to be made

69.     Staff will analyse all the submissions made on the draft plan and will look at what changes need to be made to the document. This includes updating golf participation data.

Staff recommend that local boards support the draft plan

70.     Staff recommend that you support the adoption of this plan.

71.     There will be increased accountability and transparency from an outcome-focused investment approach and a clear decision-making framework.

72.     If adopted, the plan will help increase Aucklander’s access to publicly owned land.

73.     It will also help increase equity and participation in sport and recreation, including golf.

74.     Increased natural and environmental benefits will come from a kaitiakitanga framework with ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

The draft plan aligns with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan

75.     Getting better environmental outcomes from the 535 hectares of open space currently allocated to golf is critical to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan.

76.     A kaitiakitanga framework will ensure golf courses employ best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation.

77.     If the draft plan is adopted, leaseholders will need to meet a minimum benchmark covering:

a)    ecology

b)    landscape and cultural heritage

c)    energy consumption and waste reduction

d)    water resource

e)    climate change

f)     pollution prevention

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

78.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland will need to ensure that decision-making on any leases is made in accordance with the plan if it is adopted.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

There is inequity across age, gender and ethnic groups and people living with disabilities

79.     Not all Aucklanders have the same opportunities to participate in sport and recreation or to play golf:

a)   there is inequity for people living with disabilities

b)    Asian and Pacific Aucklanders have lower sport and recreation participation rates

c)    women and young people have lower golf participation rates.

Local boards have been briefed on the draft plan and their views are now sought

80.     The draft plan sets out a clear decision-making framework to guide and inform any future investment and leasing decisions. Its sets out clear objectives and expectations about the public benefits sought from publicly owned golf land.

81.     If the draft plan is adopted, the governing body and local board allocated decision-making responsibilities will work together to implement the plan. This process will adapt to any changes made to current allocated decision-making responsibilities.

82.     Currently the governing body makes strategic decisions concerning asset ownership and future investment to increase sport and recreation opportunities for all Aucklanders. Local boards make decisions on the use of publicly owned land, including leases, and the development of open space to meet community needs.

83.     Joint working groups to consider policy options and implementation requirements as part of the development of indicative business cases can ensure close collaboration between investment and lease decisions.

84.     Staff held a local board member briefing on 4 April 2022, providing an overview of the draft plan and responded to questions.

85.     This report provides an overview of the draft plan as well as a high-level summary of public feedback. It seeks a formal view on the draft plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

86.     The draft plan aligns with the five key directions that reflect the overarching goals or aspirations of mana whenua and mataawaka as set-out in the Māori Plan:

a)      Whanaungatanga / Access to public facilities 

b)    Rangatiratanga / Māori are actively involved in decision-making and management of natural resources

c)    Manaakitanga / Access to clean parks and reserves

d)    Wairuatanga / Indigenous flora and fauna

e)    Kaitiakitanga / Māori are kaitiaki of the environment.

87.     Mana whenua have been provided with a summary of the draft plan and public feedback to assist with their decision-making process about providing feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

88.     There are no financial implications to the local board for any decision to support the draft plan, its policy objectives and the decision-making framework it outlines.

89.     If the draft plan is adopted, the costs of undertaking indicative business cases would be funded within existing department budget.

90.     The financial implications of any decisions recommended through individual indicative business cases would be outlined at the relevant time.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

91.     Adoption of a plan for future council investment in golf manages risk as well as increasing transparency and accountability.

92.     If the governing body and local boards follow the indicative business case process and decision-making framework, then there would be a low risk of legal challenge.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

93.     The Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee to consider adoption of the plan in August 2022. The agenda report will include local board feedback

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Not Council Policy - draft Auckland golf investment plan

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Aubrey Bloomfield - Senior Policy Advisor

Authorisers

Carole Canler - Senior Policy Manager

Kataraina Maki - General Manager - Community and Social Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection Round Two 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/07005

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with information on applications in the Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection round two 2021/2022; to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 15 April 2021. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants (Attachment A).

3.       This report presents applications received in the Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection round two 2021/2022 (Attachment B).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $279,000.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year.  A total of $49,785.00 remains for allocation in the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       Thirteen applications have been received for Quick Response and Tree Protection round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $30,385.44, and three applications were received for the Tree Protection grant requesting a total of $3,407.00. A combined total of $31,698.94.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in the Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection round two 2021/2022 listed in the following table:

 

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QRTP2212-208

AFL New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards footballs, training tops and engraved medals

$2,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-211

Art Yoga Partnership

Community

Towards the costs to run a seven week meditative course at the Orakei Community Centre

$996.51

Eligible

QRTP2212-217

David Henley

Arts and culture

Towards costs for the "100 Suns - Winter Sunset Series"

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-218

Fireplace Arts & Media Limited

Arts and culture

Towards performer fees for the one hoe pop-up show at Orakei station

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-216

Meadowbank Community Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards rent costs for the Meadowbank Toy Library at 38 St Johns Road Meadowbank

$725.00

Ineligible

QRTP2212-214

NZ Young@Heart Chorus Incorporated

Community

Towards hall hire and vocal training costs

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-202

Pete Williams

Community

Towards the cost of traffic management

$4,025.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-212

Remuera Chinese Association Incorporated

Community

Towards hall hire, administration and costs associated with the Mid-Autumn Festival

$3,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-207

St Heliers U3A

Community

Towards the cost of a website

$1,000.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-215

Presbyterian Parish Of St Luke’s Church

Community

Towards the costs of a replacement AED

$1,995.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-210

The Eastern Bays Toy Library Incorporated

Community

Towards their rental costs at the Glendowie Community Centre

$2,800.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-209

Young Mariners of New Zealand Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards replacement life jackets

$2,843.93

Eligible

QRTP2212-206

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the total budget of counsellor helpline training, management, and support between July 2022 to March 2023

$2,000.00

Ineligible

QRTP2212-203

Pete Williams

Tree Protection

Towards removal of Pohutakawa tree

$1,313.50

Eligible

QRTP2212-213

Robert Freeman

Tree Protection

Towards the cost of pruning two tress

$1,391.00

Eligible

QRTP2212-201

Sung-jae Lee

Tree Protection

Towards pruning of Pohutukawa tree

$702.50

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$31,698.94

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The Ōrākei Local Board adopted the Ōrākei Local Board Community Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 15 April 2021. The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

9.       The local board grants programme sets out:

a.   local board priorities

b.   lower priorities for funding

c.   higher priorities for funding

d.   exclusions

e.   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

f.    any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

12.     Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, staff have also assessed each application according to which alert level the proposed activity is able to proceed. In addition, staff have also provided comments regarding how the application responds to the needs of the community during the COVID-19 pandemic.

13.     Two applications have been marked as ineligible, Meadowbank Community Toy Library Incorporated, and Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust for the reason outlined in the Ōrākei Community Grants Programme 2021/2022, “Applicants can only apply for the same project or activity once in a financial year to Ōrākei Local Board”.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action.

15.     Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

17.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Ōrākei Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

19.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

20.     A summary of each application received through Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection round two 2021/2022 is provided (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

22.     Two applicants applying to Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection round two have indicated their projects target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

24.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $279,000.00 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

25.     A total of $111,900.00 was allocated to the Local Grant round one and Multi-board Grant round one. This leaves a total of $167,100.00.

26.     A total of $12,815.00 was allocated to the Quick Response and Tree Protection round one leaving a total of $154,285.00.

27.     A total of $104,500.00 was allocated to the Local Grant and Multi-board Grant round two, leaving a total remaining of $49,785.00.

28.     Thirteen applications have been received for Quick Response and Tree Protection round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $30,385.44, and three applications were received for the Tree Protection grant requesting a total of $3,407.00. A combined total of $31,698.94.

29.      Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

31.     Due to COVID-19, this risk is low as assessors would consider the implications of COVID restrictions as part of assessment. Where projects are impacted by changes in alert level the grants and incentives team, work with recipients on amended project plans so that the number of projects not delivered is minimised.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     Following the Ōrākei Local Board allocation of funding for the Quick Response and Tree Protection round two Grants and Incentives staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Community Grants Programme 2021/2022

 

b

Ōrākei Quick Response and Tree Protection round two - application summary

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Arna Casey - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama

File No.: CP2022/07993

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated for Madills Farm Recreation Reserve located at 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated (ESAFC, the club, or the lessee) seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from a council-owned building at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama.

3.       ESAFC currently holds the lease on the building which reached final expiry on 30 November 2017. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2018/2019 (resolution OR/2018/130) at their local board meeting on 19 July 2019, and as part of their Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2020/2021 (resolution OR/2020/75) at their local board meeting on 20 August 2020.

5.       ESAFC aims to continue to provide the sport of football and related activities and services from the premises. These activities align with the Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome Three – “All parks and open space areas are attractive and well-used places for both active and passive recreation.”

6.       ESAFC has provided all required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds, and it is being managed appropriately. ESAFC has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

7.       As this is a council-owned building, review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. The proposed new community lease to the ESAFC for the land and building at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve is in the process of being publicly notified. The notification appeared in the East and Bays Courier on Wednesday 8 June 2022 and the Auckland Council website with a submission deadline for 8 July 2022.

8.       The club is provided for in the Eastern Parks Management Plan 2012, expressions of interest for council-owned buildings is recommended to local boards when a new lease is being considered, however as the club is provided for in the Management Plan, an expression of interest is not required in this instance.

9.       A number of site visits have been completed since 2018, the last in May 2022. The clubroom and leased premises are in good order.  Auckland Council recently completed improvements to the changing and latrine facilities.

10.     A community outcomes plan is being negotiated with the group that identifies the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease document.

11.     Iwi engagement about council’s intention to grant a new community lease for Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama is being undertaken with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

12.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions.

13.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to ESAFC for a term of five years commencing from the date of resolution with one five year right of renewal.

14.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      subject to the satisfactory resolution of any public submissions, and completion of iwi engagement, grant, a new community lease to the Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated for an area comprising approximately 1644.5m2 located at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve on the land legally described as Lot 1 DP 204517 (as per Attachment A – Site Plan of Leased Premises), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)       term – five years, commencing on the date of the board resolution, with one five year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      an early termination clause to terminate the lease pending future development plans for the site

iv)      maintenance fee/operational charge - $1000 plus GST per annum

v)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement

vi)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

b)      note that public notification for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community lease to Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated located at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama, is in progress.

c)       appoint a hearings panel to consider any submissions received, with respect to the intent to grant a lease to the Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama, following the public notification and delegate the panel to make any required decisions on behalf of the local board.

 

Horopaki

Context

15.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

16.     The Ōrākei Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2020/2021 at their local board meeting on date month year (resolution OR/2020/75).

17.     The progression of this lease to ESAFC at Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama, was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Madills Farm Recreation Reserve is located at 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama (refer to Attachment A Site Plan – Site Plan of Leased Premises). The land is legally described as Lot 1 DP 204517 comprised in Record of Title NA133C/247, held by Auckland Council in fee simple as classified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977, and is approximately 1644.5m².

19.     ESAFC holds a community lease for the council owned land and building situated at Madills Farm. Which expired on 30 November 2017. The building is primarily used by the group as clubrooms.

20.     For council-owned buildings, maintenance costs for an exclusive use building is charged to the lessee.  A number of site visits have been undertaken since 2018, the last in May 2022. The clubroom and leased premises are in good order.  Council recently completed improvements to the changing and latrine facilities.

21.     The club have been operating within the Ōrakei community since 1934.  Their lease with council commenced on 1 December 1991 and expired on the 30 November 2017. The club applied for a new lease in 2018, then again in 2020, as they wish to continue the same activities on the premises and there is a continued need for their services in the community. 

22.     The lease application was placed on hold in 2019 and 2020 while Auckland Council looked into options for the council-owned building and future utilisation of the reserve. 

23.     ESAFC lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Eastern Suburbs Association Football Club Incorporated (ESAFC)

24.     ESAFC was established in 1934 through the amalgamation of Tamaki United AFC (formed 1924) and Glen Innes (formed 1930) and has proved a great nursery for Auckland Football talent.  It is affiliated to Football New Zealand, and sees players travel from across Auckland to be a part of their top-level teams.

25.     ESAFC prides itself on providing a recreational and sporting environment for thousands of youngsters and their families in and around New Zealand.  The club view one of their greatest successes as providing player pathways from club to national and international level; and coaching pathways which has seen one of their current coaches Zach Haydon take on the Junior Manager and Kitman position for the All-Whites team on tour in Bahrain in late 2021.

26.     Grace Jale, one of their Lilywhites (premier women’s team) was named to the A-League women’s side, Wellington Phoenix, in September 2021.  Ex-Lilywhites Daisy Cleverly, Ava Collins, Emma Rolston and Jacqui Hand were also named to the New Zealand first team for the Canadian tour last October. These are just a few of the many club players who have made national representative teams, the first dating back to 1933 with R. Stone.

27.     Alongside player representatives, the club has achieved much success with the following titles: Chatham Cup, Kate Sheppard Cup, Rothmans National League (now ISPS Handa), Northern League Champions, Norther League Division 1, 2 and 3 Champions; Auckland FA Champions and Women’s Premier Champions.

28.     ESAFC has the largest club membership in Auckland of 2400 and growing. Nearly half of its members are children in the 5–13-year age group. Membership is roughly 7:3 to males, although female membership has consistently grown in the past five years.

29.     The clubrooms are open and used by the club every day of the week, mornings through to evenings. They have sought council’s assistance over the years with options for more space to cater to their high membership numbers. The facilities is at full capacity, with not enough changing rooms, administrative space, or space dedicated to club-related or social activities. They also share the facilities with fitness and pilates groups.

30.     They have a good relationship with Kohimarama Yachting Club whose building is next door, on the southern end of the clubrooms, as well as other frequent users of the fields such as cricket and touch who book through Auckland Council.

31.     ESAFC has a long history (88 years) within the Ōrakei community and provide a thriving service that is beneficial to many, particularly youth.

32.     ESAFC believe they are good neighbours and tenants who welcome all, whether it is to the clubrooms or Madills Farm, and will continue to be good neighbours.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice https://acintranet.aklc.govt.nz/EN/workingatcouncil/techandtools/infocouncil/Pages/AnalysisAndAdvice.aspx

33.     At the expiry of a lease for a council owned building, a review of alternatives for the use of the premises should be carried out as good practice. For this, an expression of interest process can be undertaken to gauge interest and best use. The club is provided for in the Eastern Parks Management Plan 2012, which will not be replaced by the Ōrakei Local Parks Management Plan.  Expressions of interest for council-owned buildings is recommended to local boards when a new lease is being considered, however as the club is provided for in the Management Plan, an expression of interest is not required in this instance.

Public notification and engagement 

34.     As there is no adopted reserve management plan, public notification is required under section 54(2) of the Reserves Act 1977, and iwi engagement is required under the terms of section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 prior to any lease being granted.

35.     Public notification is underway, it appeared in the East and Bays Courier on 8 June 2022 and the Auckland Council website with a submission deadline for 8 July 2022.

36.     Iwi engagement is also underway, the ESAFC have confirmed that due to covid19 lockdown they have been significantly constrained but intend to make further contact with Ngati Whātua Ōrākei and strengthen that relationship.

37.     The cost of the public notification was met by the Community Facilities department of the council.   

Assessment of the application

38.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver football and related services.

39.     The area proposed to be leased to the ESAFC consists of approximately 1,644.5m2 and is outlined in Attachment A – Site Plan of Leased Premises.

40.     The original leased area is 600m² and was for the clubrooms and parking space at the northern end of the facility.

41.     The proposed leased area of 1,644.5m² is nearly three times the original size, it includes the footprint of the clubroom and now includes the changing room facilities to the south, as well as the area behind the building.

42.     The proposed leased area for this new lease, is the result of many meetings held with the club and internally with council departments, to find a solution to assist the club’s large membership and growth, and to address neighbour’s issues regarding maintenance of the leased site and storage of club equipment. Council believes the increased leased space addresses the immediate needs of the club as well as the local neighbours.

43.     ESAFC has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities. They have all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

44.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained. All management and operational costs are funded by council as it is a council-owned asset.

45.     Council have also undertaken improvements to the clubrooms by upgrading the changing rooms and latrines. New shower and latrine cubicles were installed, shower tiling replaced, wall surfaces upgraded, and dividing doors to changing rooms put in. These changes allowed for increased use of the changing rooms by more players, and for both genders.

46.     ESAFC provides a valuable service to the local community by offering the sport of football and related services, making the sport accessible to the local community, and providing pathways for its players and coaching members to go professional.  They also provide a holiday programme during the school break to further support members.

47.     ESAFC services a large demographic. Its catchment area includes Mission Bay, to Wai O Taiki Bay, St Johns, Meadowbank, and everything in between. By its membership numbers, it is evident the club’s services are needed in this area, and they are provided for in the Eastern Parks Management Plan 2012.

48.     A Community Outcomes Plan will be negotiated with the ESAFC if the local board agree to granting a new lease. This will identify the benefits it will provide to the community and will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement.

49.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to ESAFC for a term of five years commencing from the date of resolution with one five year right of renewal. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

50.     There is no impact on greenhouse gas emissions as the proposal does not introduce any new source of emissions. A shared community space will however decrease overall energy use. The space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within local community.

51.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

a)   use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

b)      use eco labelled products and services

c)      seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

52.     Asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the council will strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material. This will be in alignment with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact on greenhouse gas emission.

53.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

a)      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

b)      to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

54.     A stream runs directly behind the building. Climate change may impact on the lease as the site is in a low-lying area and sits in a flood prone zone.  The likelihood of flooding happening is low as there has been no flooding or reports of flooding in this area.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

55.     Council staff from the Customer and Community Services Directorate, Community Facilities Operational Management and Maintenance; parks, sports and recreation; parks and places; land advisory; and service investment and programming have been consulted.

56.     Council staff have shared concerns about neighbours’ complaints regarding excessive noise, maintenance of areas around the clubrooms outside of the leased area, and storage of ESAFC equipment.

57.     These issues have been discussed at length between council and ESAFC with the understanding that the proposed new lease area will help alleviate issues relating to equipment storage, and the club have undertaken to continue to work with council and concerned neighbours on any other matters.

58.     Overall council staff are supportive of the proposed new lease as it will include positive outcomes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote the sport of football, exercise and healthy living, which will continue to benefit the Ōrākei board Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

60.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Ōrākei Local Board in May 2019, 5 November 2020, and 14 April 2022.

61.     The local board are aware of the issues referred to in paragraphs 53 and 54, and at its recent workshop indicated in principle its support of the lease proposal, based on the need to balance the immediate needs of the local community with those of the ESAFC –a football club that is one of the largest in New Zealand and growing, with the purpose of community leases, the benefit of the services provided to the local community, local board requirements and future utilisation of the reserve.

62.     The delivered activities align with the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020 outcome three and objective:

Local Board Plan outcomes and objectives:

Outcome

Objective

Outcome Three: All parks and open space areas are attractive and well-used places for both active and passive recreation.

More than ever, since COVID-19, our residents have enjoyed and appreciated our parks, reserves and open spaces. Providing recreational space for more people, more of the time, will continue to be our focus.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

63.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for Madills Farm Recreation Reserve, 30 Melanesia Road, Kohimarama is underway with the iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Ōrākei Local Board area. The engagement involves:

a)    presentation at the South/Central Mana Whenua Hui held on 22 June 2022 at Manukau

b)    an email to all iwi identified as having an interest in the area as captured in Attachment A, containing detailed information on the land, the lessee, the lease proposal as per Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987.

64.     ESAFC has agreed, via the community outcomes plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through health and wellbeing services offered by the ESAFC. ESAFC have previously engaged with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei pre-covid and intend to strengthen its relationship with the iwi.

65.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

66.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

67.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

68.     All costs relating to the advertisement of the council’s intention to grant the proposed lease will be borne by the Community Facilities Department of Auckland Council.

69.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. No concerns were raised regarding the financial implications for the new lease to ESAFC.

70.     Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be shared by council and ESAFC, as set out in the maintenance schedule to be attached to the lease. Rent of $1 and a maintenance fee of $1000 plus GST per annum will be charged to the lessee under the new lease agreement.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

71.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to ESAFC, their ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome.

72.     The new lease affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility.

73.     Should the building remain unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the assets regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals.

74.     The renewal of the building will also not appear in the annual work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

75.     If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with ESAFC to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.


 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Site Plan of Leased Premises

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Valerie Vui - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07463

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme for approval from the following departments:

a)      Connected Communities

b)      Community and Social Innovation

c)      Community Facilities

d)      Parks, Sports, and Recreation

e)   Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

3.       In addition, the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities Department work programme are presented for approval in principle.

4.       To support the delivery of the local board’s outcomes and aspirations highlighted in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020, Customer and Community Services presents a work programme for local board approval each financial year.

5.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

6.       The work programme has been developed with the local board providing feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation through a series of workshops, held between October 2021 and May 2022.

7.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to planning activities, involving collaboration between the local board and staff from across the council.

8.       Within the Customer and Community Services work programme, the Community Facilities Department has identified several projects for the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 financial years as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).

9.       Approval is sought for the planning and design of the RAP projects to commence during the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

10.     The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee, including Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects by way of resolutions to this report.

11.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19-related disruptions, some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

12.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

13.     Once approved in June 2022, the local board will receive quarterly progress updates on the delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

c)       approve in principle the 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities only work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

d)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

e)      provide feedback for consideration by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on projects funded from the Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

f)       note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets is subject to approval by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Auckland Plan 2050 (Auckland Plan) is council’s long-term spatial plan to ensure Auckland grows in a way that will meet the opportunities and challenges ahead.  It aims to contribute to Auckland’s social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing.

Diagram

Description automatically generated

15.     Local board plans align with the Auckland Plan and set out local community priorities and aspirations. The 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme in turn aligns to not only the local board plans but the appropriate Auckland Council plans, policies and strategies.

16.     Work programme activities align to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

a)      Our communities are connected, engaged and resilient  

b)      Our land, forests, waterways and marine environment are protected, restored and enhanced  

c)      All parks and open space areas are attractive and well-used places for both active and passive recreation  

d)      Our transport infrastructure is efficient and connected, enabling people to move around safely and effectively using a range of options  

e)      Our town centres and local businesses are increasingly vibrant and prosperous 

17.     Development of the work programme is based on consideration of community needs and priorities, availability of resources and funding, Treaty of Waitangi obligations, external partnerships and risk assessment.

18.     The Customer and Community Services directorate provides a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of Auckland’s people, places and natural environment. These are designed and implemented to meet the unique needs of the local community.

19.     Development of the work programme follows an integrated approach to planning activities by the following departments of the directorate:
:

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The work programme demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the 2022/2023 financial year.

21.     Delivery of the work programme commences from 1 July 2022, and in some cases comprises a continuation of implementation from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes.

22.     New activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items also form part of the work programme.

23.     Table one summarises the approval status required for the three financial years presented within the work programme.

Table one: Customer and Community Services local board work programme approvals

Department

2022/2023

2023/2024

2024/2025

Community Facilities

Approve

Approve in principle

Approve in principle

All other Customer and Community Services departments

Approve

Approve in principle

N/A

24.     Community Facilities presents a three-year rolling work programme so that delivery and financial commitments against the capital works programme can be planned.

25.     Approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2022/2023 work programme may lead to contractual commitments to the future budget needed to complete the project in 2023/2024 or 2024/2025.

26.     The remainder of Customer and Community Services presents the work programme in descending three-year increments and are therefore only presenting years two and three of the three-year work programme.

27.     The local board will be updated by staff on the delivery of the programme by way of quarterly performance reports.

Proposed amendments to the 2022/2023 work programme

28.     The local board approved the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme in June 2021 and approved in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

29.     The 2022/2023 work programme contains variations to the version that was approved in principle last year. These include the addition of new activities, changes to existing activities, such as required budget allocation and delivery timeframes, and identifies some activities that have been stopped.

30.     Table two highlights the new activities in the work programme:

Table two: work programme activities that are new

ID

Activity name

Lead department

Budget

#3525

Local Civic Events Ōrākei- volunteer Awards

CCS: RSPIP – Events

$9,000

#2987

Ōrakei Community Arts Broker

CCS: Connected Communities – Arts, Culture & Heritage

$50,000

#2997

OR: Wheeled play assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

$20,000

#36723

Tāmaki Drive beach replenishment concept - pre feasibility study

C&CS: Community Facilities

$35,000

#3501

Waiatarua Reserve: Mens Shed Auckland East Incorporated

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

#31622

Crossfield Reserve changing rooms - roof renewal

C&CS: Community Facilities

$100,000

#32138

Madills Farm - renew changing rooms floor

C&CS: Community Facilities

$30,001

#36757

Michaels Avenue Reserve - renew sports fields and lighting

C&CS: Community Facilities

$670,392

#36936

Mission Bay - installation of accessible beach mats

C&CS: Community Facilities

$11,000

#32146

Open space buildings - renew - 2024/2025 - Ōrākei

C&CS: Community Facilities

$830,000

#32139

Open space furniture, fixtures, fencing and structures - renew - 2024/2025 - Ōrākei

C&CS: Community Facilities

$500,000

#30501

Open space play space equipment - renew - 2023/2024 - Ōrākei

C&CS: Community Facilities

$320,000

#30502

Open space signage - renew - 2023/2024 - Ōrākei

C&CS: Community Facilities

$141,560

#36671

Purchas Hill/Te Tauoma reserve - development of green open space

C&CS: Community Facilities

$1,364,480

#32127

Sports and cricket fields, lighting and equipment - renew 2024/2025 - Ōrākei

C&CS: Community Facilities

$980,000

31.     Table three highlights the activities that were approved in principle in June 2021 but have stopped, or proposed activities that did not start, and are therefore not included in the 2022/2023 work programme:

Table three: work programme activities that have been removed from the work programme

Previous ID

Activity name

Lead department

#178

OR: Urban Ngahere Growing FY22

CCS: PSR – Park Services

 

COVID-19 considerations for Customer and Community Services

32.     The work programme includes activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 by providing:

a)      safe and welcoming spaces

b)      inclusive events to bring the community back together

c)      community support, including grants

d)      stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi and Māori organisations, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies, which also serve Auckland’s communities.

33.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of these activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19 related disruption some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

34.     Current capex delivery challenges include increased material and labour costs, as well as shortages in both sectors, this in turn will lead to increased overall project costs.

35.     Current supply chain issues, obtaining building materials, may lead to delays in project delivery. Increased costs and delays will be managed as part of the ongoing management of work programmes via additional RAP projects, and the rephasing of projects to accommodate increased budget and address material shortages.

Māori Outcomes

36.     Local boards play a vital role in representing the interests of all Aucklanders and are committed to the Treaty-based obligations and to Māori participation and development.

37.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

38.     A thriving Māori identity is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. It advances prosperity for Māori and benefits all Aucklanders.

39.     The local boards recognise the importance of building meaningful relationships with mana whenua, maatawaka and whānau, and understanding Māori aspirations. Table four shows outcomes, objectives and key initiatives from the local board plan recognise these areas of common interest


 

Table four: local board plan Māori outcomes, objectives and initiatives

Outcome

Objective

Initiative

Our communities are connected, engaged and resilient

Arts, local heritage and culture are reflected in our public facilities and places

Partner with mana whenua, arts and cultural groups, and Ōrākei schools to blend arts and culture into people’s everyday lives and create a culturally rich and creative local area 

Our land, forests, waterways and marine environment are protected, restored and enhanced

 

Our forest and bush habitats continue to be enhanced for future generations

Practice kaitiakitanga (guardianship), working with mana whenua, Watercare, Healthy Waters, schools and local communities to improve the quality of marine, coastal and freshwater environments and provide education opportunities

 

40.     There is a wide range of activity occurring across Tāmaki Makaurau to advance Māori outcomes. Much of this is led by mana whenua and Māori organisations, as well government organisations, non-government organisations and businesses. 

41.     The Auckland Plan’s focus on Māori culture and identity is encapsulated in the outcome: Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

42.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, council’s Māori Outcomes performance measurement framework, captures the majority of council’s Māori outcome strategy and planning. The framework responds to the needs and aspirations that Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, both mana whenua and mataawaka, have expressed to council. 

43.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver outcomes for and with Māori. Attachment B sets out the activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas.

44.     Table five shows the strategic priority areas and alignment to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes.

Table five: local board work programme Māori outcome areas

Strategic priority area

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcome

Kaitiakitanga

Kia Ora te Taiao

Māori business, tourism and employment 

Kia Ora te Umanga

Māori identity and culture 

Kia Ora te Ahurea

Marae development

Kia Ora te Marae

Papakāinga and Māori housing 

Kia Ora te Kāinga

Realising rangatahi potential 

Kia Ora te Rangatahi

Te reo Māori 

Kia Ora te Reo

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Kia Ora te Whānau

 

45.     The Customer and Community Services directorate lead or contribute to programmes that align with all outcomes. Particular priorities are Kia Ora te Marae, Kia Ora te Whānau and Kia Ora te Reo. 

46.     In a COVID-19 recovery environment there is increasing focus on Kia Ora te Umunga /   Māori Business, Tourism and Employment and the role that the council can play, not only in supporting economic recovery, but in a thriving Māori economy. 

47.     Kia Ora te Ahurea / Māori Identity and Culture is often a focus for local boards as events and place-based design often plays an important part in many local programmes.

Work programme budget types and purpose

48.     Work programme activities are funded from various budget sources, depending on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme are funded from two or more sources, including from both local and regional budgets.

49.     Table six outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

Table six: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services, grants and staff time to deliver activities

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the partial renewal or full replacement of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council, often from external sources, held for specific local board areas, including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

Part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

50.     The capital projects to be delivered in the Ōrākei Local Board area, together with identified budgets and main funding sources, are shown in Attachment A.

51.     The budgets associated with the capital works programme are estimates only, costs are subject to change and may need to be refined as the project progresses through the design and delivery process. Once activity details are more clearly defined, staff will update the work programme for approval in subsequent years.

52.     The capital works projects have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within the local board area (Attachment C). Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

53.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was first implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

54.     Several capital projects in the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme and outlined in Attachment A.

55.     Local board approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

56.     Some activities from the Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development (growth) budgets are funded regionally and will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee for approval after 30 June 2022.

57.     The local board has decision-making responsibility for these activities within parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope, and budget. These activities are therefore included in the work programme. 

58.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. Staff will present this feedback to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

59.     Some projects in the work programme require further local board decisions as they progress through the delivery process.

60.     Where further decisions are anticipated they have been indicated in the work programme, and decisions will be sought as required through local board business meetings.

61.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects may also be required as projects progress, in response to more detailed design and costing information, community consultation, consenting requirements and similar factors.  

62.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects will be managed in accordance with the established local board delegations to staff.

63.     The work programme includes community leases. Lease renewals without variations will be processed by way of a memo, in accordance with agreed delegations.

64.     Should the local board signal their intent to change or pursue a new lease that is not contemplated in the leasing work programme, a deferral of an item already programmed for delivery will need to be accommodated.

65.     Staff will workshop expired and more complex community leases with the local board and then report on them at a business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

66.     As Customer and Community Services is a significant service provider and property owner, the directorate has a leading role in delivering Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

67.     In providing asset-based services, Customer and Community Services contributes most of council’s operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its facilities and infrastructure.

68.     Property managed by the directorate, in particular coastal assets, will be adversely affected by climate change. The work programme includes actions, consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to halve council’s operational GHG emissions by 2030, and to adapt to a changing climate.

69.     Actions include reducing operational GHG emissions through phasing-out gas heating in aquatic centres, improving the efficiency of facilities, investing in renewable energy, and adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy.

70.     At the same time, the directorate will mitigate GHG emissions and improve climate resilience through delivering tree planting programmes across the region. This includes delivering the Mayor’s tree planting initaitives, transitioning unproductive farmland on regional parks to permanent native forest, and delivering ecological restoration projects with community groups.

71.     Work is ongoing to build on the above actions and embed climate change considerations into investment decision-making, planning, and corporate policies, including asset management plans and Local Board Plans.

72.     As approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, council’s mandated approach to ‘deliver differently’ is also anticipated to help reduce the council carbon footprint by creating a sustainable service network. This may include a shift to digital service models or the consolidation of services into a smaller footprint.

73.     Each activity in the work programme has been assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and affect Auckland’s resilience to climate change.

74.     The activities in the Ōrākei Local Board work programme identified as having a positive or negative impact on climate change are outlined in Attachment D.

75.     Types of activities in the work programme that will have positive impacts on emissions and improve community resilience to climate change, include community-led environmental and educational programmes, supporting volunteer planting, delivering council-led planting and sustainable design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

76.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed collaboratively by staff from the directorate’s departments and Local Board Services to ensure that the activities and delivery of the work programme are integrated, complementary, and reflect council wide priorities.

77.     An example of collaboration on delivery is the kauri dieback programme which is delivered by the Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

78.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme.

79.     A focus area of the work programme is to respond to the Recovery Budget, the communities of greatest need and build capacity within the community, including through community-led delivery and partnerships.

80.     Planning and delivery of some activities involves consultation with the community to ensure that their aspirations are understood and responded to.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

81.     The provision of services, facilities and open spaces support the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connection to the natural environment and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

82.     Attachment B shows local board projects or programmes that are ranked as delivering ‘high’ Māori Outcomes. They involve ongoing collaboration with Māori or are delivered by Māori. 

83.     Projects or programmes in Attachment A may also contribute to Māori Outcomes but are not highlighted as they are identified to have a moderate or low impact. 

84.     Engagement with Māori is critical and, if not already completed, will occur on a programme or project basis, prior to any work commencing, and be reported back separately to the local board. 

85.     Further information about the response to Māori aspirations as described in the work programme, is captured in the Analysis and Advice section.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

86.     Each activity line has a budget allocation in one or more of the financial years e.g. 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar operating expense (opex) budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

87.     The 2022/2023 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within 2022/2023 budgets and staff resources.

88.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 are indicative and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

89.     Table seven summarises the budget sources and allocation for each work programme financial year.


 

Table seven: Ōrākei Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2022/2023 (approve)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

2024/2025 (approve in principle – Community Facilities only)

Operational (Opex): Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

1,124,052

            1,112,256

            1,137,172

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

14,097,304

          11,471,979

          11,506,796

Capital (Capex): Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

3,638,794

3,689,510

4,325,056

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

3,638,794

3,689,510

4,325,056

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

0

0

0

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

120,000

170,000

704,894

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

61,000

30,000

30,000

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

59,000

140,000

674,894

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

907,040

850,000

1,200,000

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

42,682

224,081

0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

2,000,000

0

0

Capex: One Local Initiative

0

0

0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

0

0

5,114,361

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

0

0

0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

676,105

54,287

0

* See paragraph 53-55 for RAP explanation

91.     The budgets are based on the allocations in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Budgets are subject to change during council’s Annual Budget and future Long-term Plan processes. If decisions on the Annual Budget result in budget reductions, the work programme will need to be amended to align to these budgets via future decisions of the local board.

92.     Any 2021/2022 opex budget unspent on 30 June 2022, will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2022/2023 work programme. Carry-forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines and will be reflected in the revised budget.

93.     During delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme, where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the associated budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year. This process will include agreement from each department and will need to be resolved on by the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

94.     The most significant risk is that delivery of the Customer and Community Services work programme is dependent on the local board approving the work programme by 30 June 2022. Approval of the work programme after the start of the financial year could result in delays to delivery.

95.     The majority of operational (opex) activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

96.     Table eight outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme once it has been approved.

Table eight: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

Health, safety and wellbeing factors, including external influences relating to work programme delivery may impact the delivery of activities, resulting in activities requiring adjustment.

Health and safety assessments will be conducted prior to commencement of projects. Work programme activities and projects will be adjusted accordingly where these risks occur during the delivery phase.

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to negatively impact on the progress and deliverability of the work programme.

Development of the work programme has included consideration of potential impacts on delivery due to COVID-19 for all activities.

Timeframes for some activities are set to enable delivery within the agreed timeframe despite possible delays. 

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate the budget to other activities.

The COVID-19 pandemic and other geopolitical factors may result in further inflationary and supply chain pressures.

Potential inflationary pressures have been modelled into key forecasts; however uncertainties remain.

The ongoing cost increase may become unsustainable, and may require a reprioritization of potential work programmes, capital spend and a potential discontinuation of some programmes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

97.     Delivery of the Customer and Community Service work programme is scheduled to start on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023.

98.     Regionally funded projects are an exception and will commence after they have been approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2022.

99.     The local board will receive progress updates on a quarterly basis, with the first quarterly report available in November 2022.

100.   When further decisions for activities are needed at project milestones, these will be brought to the local board at the appropriate time.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Orakei Local Board CCS Work Programme 22-23

 

b

Attachment B - Māori Outcomes Ōrākei

 

c

Attachment C - Capital Works and Leasing Work Programme Map

 

d

Attachment D - Orakei - Regional Feedback v2

 

e

Attachment E - Climate Impacts ORAKEI

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Tania Pouwhare - General Manager Community & Social Innov

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the Ōrākei Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07619

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme and its associated budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020:

a)  Our town centers and local businesses are increasingly vibrant and prosperous

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

a)    Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days Sponsorship (continuation) – $2,000

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $2,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023 (Attachment A in the agenda report)

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome(s) that are reflected in the work programme are:

a)      Our town centers and local businesses are increasingly vibrant and prosperous

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU) work programme 2022/2023 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days Sponsorship (continuation) – $2,000

10.     The Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. 

11.     Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for our young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students learn key work skills and business knowledge including: business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and team work. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people.

12.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the overall YES program, including the Kick Start days in February 2023 where the Auckland Business Chamber will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick start days are the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, and find out about their 2023 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to make a decision as to whether to participate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15.     The proposed TAU work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

16.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 1: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Māori impact

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days will support YES Māori students at participating schools to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES.

 

18.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The proposed TAU work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $2,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     Table 2 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme.

Table 2: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

There is a risk that the Kick Start days do not proceed due to changes in the Covid-19 alert levels. As a result, the sponsorship provided to the Auckland Business Chamber may not be required.

To maintain contact with the Auckland Business Chamber on the running of the event to ensure that if the events are cancelled the full impact on the need for the local board support is identified.

Medium

21.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

23.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board -  Auckland Unlimited Work Programme 2022-2023

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jonathan Sudworth - Local Economic Development Advisor

Authorisers

John Norman - Head of Economic Places

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07719

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Ōrākei Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and approve in principle the 2023/2024 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Ōrākei Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2022/2023 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent financial year, 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. 2022/2023 is year two of the three-year cycle. Many of the programmes included in this report were approved in principle in the 2021/2022 work programme.

4.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between November 2021 and May 2022, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

6.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2022/2023, with budgets as listed below:

a)    Eastern Bays Songbird Project - $90,000

b)    Newmarket / Middleton stream restoration - $10,000

c)    Ōrākei schools marine programme - $25,000

d)    Pourewa Valley catchment assessment - $10,000

e)    Sustainable schools moth plant competition - $16,000

f)     Tāhuna Tōrea shorebird habitat restoration - $10,000

g)    Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum - $8,000

h)    Waiata Reserve restoration - Hobson catchment - $48,000

i)     Wildlink Eastern Bays Network - $75,000.

7.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $292,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year.

8.       The proposed work programme also includes $140,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the Cliff Road, St Heliers - coastal protection coastal renewal programme.

9.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

10.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve its 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2021/2022 budget for approval

Eastern Bays Songbird Project

$90,000

Newmarket / Middleton stream restoration - Ōrākei

$10,000

Ōrākei schools marine programme

$25,000

Pourewa Valley catchment assessment

$10,000

Sustainable schools moth plant competition - Ōrākei

$16,000

Tāhuna Tōrea shorebird habitat restoration

$10,000

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum - Ōrākei

$8,000

Waiata Reserve restoration - Hobson catchment

$48,000

Wildlink Eastern Bays Network

$75,000

Total

$292,000

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report)

c)       note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes

d)      note the allocation of $140,000 asset-based services capital expenditure budget towards the Cliff Road, St Heliers – coastal protection programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

Horopaki

Context

11.     Each year, the local board considers which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

12.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

a)      Pourewa Valley is the focus for environmental projects and becomes the new jewel in Tāmaki Makaurau’s crown

b)      council-community partnerships are strengthened for the betterment of the environment

c)      our forest and bush habitats continue to be enhanced for future generations.

13.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

a)      Auckland’s Urban Ngahere Strategy

b)      Regional Pest Management Plan

c)      Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy

d)      Pourewa Valley Integrated Plan

14.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

16.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

17.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year two of the three-year work programme (2022/2023), and approval in principle for 2023/2024.

18.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for year three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However, approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

19.     Budgets for year three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

20.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2023/2024 financial year:

Eastern Bays Songbird Project - $90,000

21.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue funding the Eastern Bays Songbird Project programme.

22.     This programme will maintain a leadership role in the Eastern Bays community to support the vision of a biodiverse local environment, where current and future generations will continue to be surrounded by extraordinary and irreplaceable natural ecosystems.

23.     Funding will be allocated to the Eastern Bays Songbird Project group to deliver the following activities:

a)      coordinator time

b)      landscape scale pest control

c)      distributing pest control, monitoring and habitat enhancing equipment

d)      advocacy and community engagement activities

e)      collaboration and leadership.

24.     In 2021/2022 the local board provided $90,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend the board allocate $90,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023.

25.     Approval in principle is also sought for $100,000 for 2023/2024 towards this programme to support its ongoing growth.

Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration - $10,000

26.     The local board has indicated it would like to continue to support the Newmarket/Middleton Stream restoration programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

27.     30.          The work has been jointly funded with Waitematā Local Board as the stream passes through both local board areas. Waitematā Local Board has a lower proposed investment of $6,250 for the 2022/2023 financial year as more of the stream is in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

28.     This programme supports a community-led initiative to implement the restoration plan for Newmarket Stream, which involves weed control, animal pest control and native planting. This restoration work will continue to improve biodiversity and enhance the waterway by mitigating issues such as contamination, erosion and sedimentation and implementing the stream restoration plan developed by Te Ngahere. If water conditions permit, Wai Care water quality testing will also resume through this programme.

29.     In 2021/2022 the Ōrākei Local Board provided $10,000 to co-fund this programme, while Waitematā Local Board contributed $6,250. Staff recommend that the Ōrākei Local Board allocate $10,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023.

30.     Approval in principle is also sought for $10,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024 from Ōrākei Local Board.

Ōrākei schools marine programme - $25,000

31.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue funding the schools marine programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

32.     This programme supports three schools in the Ōrākei Local Board area to learn about and actively participate in protecting their local marine environment. The programme provides experiential educational sessions that focus on identifying local marine issues in areas such as Ōkahu Bay, Ōrākei Basin, Kohimarama Beach, Tāhuna Tōrea and Pourewa Valley and explores potential solutions. Local experiences will connect students to the marine environment and surrounding catchment. At the conclusion of the project a student-led celebration will be held to share their learning with the wider Ōrākei community.

33.     In 2021/2022, the local board provided $23,480 to fund this programme. Staff recommend the board allocate $25,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023.

34.     Approval in principle is sought from the local board for $26,000 in 2023/2024 towards this programme.

Pourewa Valley catchment assessment - $10,000

35.     The local board has indicated that it would like to fund a new initiative in the 2022/2023 financial year to undertake a catchment assessment of the Pourewa Valley.

36.     The Pourewa Valley catchment assessment is a one-year project that will survey and collate all of the existing environmental information and data into a succinct document. This document will include baseline information of physical, ecological and cultural data which will inform and guide any future ecological and development work in the area.

37.     This activity will identify gaps in existing information about the catchment and will also identify any environments that need attention for future preservation of the valley. The assessment will also gather information that is readily available and able to be easily interpreted by advisors, scientists and co-ordinators undertaking ecological restoration work. This exercise will identify culturally and environmentally significant areas.

38.     Staff recommend the board allocate $10,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023.

 Sustainable schools moth plant competition - $16,000

39.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue funding the sustainable schools moth plant competition programme in the 2022/2023 financial year to engage with primary, intermediate and secondary schools in the Ōrākei Local Board area.

40.     This programme will facilitate community action through education – informing students how to manage pest plants, increase public awareness of pest plants, engage with whānau and community to protect native species and to encourage active participation in enhancing biodiversity.

41.     The moth plant competition will close with a weed swap where students bring in their moth plant pod photos and other weeds they have collected to be replaced with a native plant sourced from the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei nursery.

42.     Funding for this programme will support promotional material, weed bins and prize money for the top collectors. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei will be contracted to supply native plants for the weed swap and there will be a celebration prizegiving event.

43.     In 2021/2022 the local board provided $15,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend the board allocate $16,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023.

44.     Approval in principle is also sought from the board for $17,000 in 2023/2034 towards this programme.

Tāhuna Tōrea shorebird habitat restoration - $10,000

45.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue funding the Tāhuna Tōrea shorebird habitat restoration programme in the 2022/2023 financial year to improve roosting sites for declining shorebird populations within the nature reserve.

46.     Tāhuna Tōrea has been identified as a biodiversity focus area and therefore is recognised as a high priority site for active management. The programme will provide weed control to preserve roosting sites, providing secure, undisturbed places for shorebirds to rest when their feeding grounds are submerged at high tide. This work programme will be supported by regional budget for consented mangrove removal.

47.     Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff delivering this project will work closely with Parks, Sports and Recreation and Community Facilities staff, as well as consult with the Tāhuna Tōrea Rangers community group.

48.     In 2021/2022 the local board provided $10,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $10,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023.

49.     Approval in principle is also sought from the local board for $10,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum - $8,000

50.     The board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum in the 2022/2023 financial year.

51.     The Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum includes the Howick, Māngere-Ōtāhuhu, Maungakiekie-Tāmaki, Ōrākei, and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards. Members include local community groups, businesses and individual residents who have an interest in protecting and restoring the mauri of the Tāmaki Estuary.

52.     In 2021/2022, the five member local boards each provided $8,000 to co-fund the Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum. Staff recommend that each member local board contributes a further $8,000 each towards the forum in the 2022/2023 financial year, allowing a total budget of $40,000.

53.     This funding will enable continued coordinator support for 18 hours per week to progress the forum’s vision for the Tāmaki Estuary. The funding will also support Tāmaki Estuary Clean Stream Watch, a community stream monitoring and response project, which will enable real time stream water quality data to be captured with community support and guardianship of each sensor.

54.     Approval in principle is also sought for $8,000 towards this programme from each member local board in 2023/2024.

Waiata Reserve restoration – Hobson catchment - $48,000

55.     The local board has indicated that it will continue funding the Waiata Reserve restoration programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. This programme will continue to support the implementation of the Waiata Reserve Operational Restoration Plan which was completed for the local board in 2019.

56.     The restoration work includes weed control, site preparation and plant supply and a community planting day to connect existing islands of vegetation, buffer the stream and wetland areas and to encompass areas of wet ground that are difficult to mow in winter.

57.     The project will also include control of several large crack willow specimens throughout the park, some of which will need to be controlled by a qualified contractor to prepare the planting sites for community planting.

58.     In 2021/2022 the local board provided $48,000 to fund this programme. Staff recommend that the board allocate $48,000 towards this programme in 2022/2023.

59.     Approval in principle is also sought from the board for $35,000 in 2023/2024 towards this programme.

Wildlink Eastern Bays Network - $75,000

60.     The local board has indicated that it would like to continue funding the Wildlink Eastern Bays Network. This programme will maintain its focus on regenerating landscape throughout Ōrākei, while fostering significant growth in collaboration between a range of community groups and Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, enabling participation across the wider community.

61.     Funding for this programme will support:

a)           native planting

b)           pest plant removal

c)            water quality testing

d)           community workshops.

62.     Projects within the Wildlink Eastern Bays Network programme are collectively designed to contribute to the Ōrākei ecosystem, each adding value to the landscape-scale programme.

63.     In 2021/2022, the local board provided $75,000 to fund this programme. To maintain momentum in the high level of interest and uptake from the community, staff recommend the board allocate $75,000 toward the programme in 2022/2023.

64.     Approval in principle is also sought from the local board for $75,000 in 2023/2024.

Cliff Road, St Heliers - coastal protection

65.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. This programme investigates options for appropriate coastal protection between the existing seawall and the stormwater outfall at Cliff Road, St Heliers. The programme includes obtaining appropriate updated consents for the existing seawall. In 2022/2023 works will be focused on investigation, design, and consenting. Physical works will be scheduled in future, dependent upon the investigations outcomes and findings.

66.     Staff will update the board on the progress of this programme through the quarterly local board work programme reporting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

67.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

68.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, neutral or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

69.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Eastern Bays Songbird Project

The improved health of native biodiversity will improve the resilience of Auckland’s indigenous ecosystems against the impacts of climate change. Additionally, the increase of trees through planting and pest control will help reduce carbon in the atmosphere.

Wildlink Eastern Bays Network

Tāhuna Tōrea shorebird habitat restoration

Ōrākei sustainable schools moth plant competition

Ōrākei schools marine programme

These programmes will contribute to environmental resilience by ensuring waterways and the marine environment are protected and enhanced. Freshwater and marine ecosystems provide many ecosystem services such as flood mitigation, habitat for native biodiversity and carbon sequestration. These services are enhanced when the ecosystems are restored.

Newmarket / Middleton stream restoration

Waiata Reserve restoration - Hobson catchment

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum

Pourewa Valley Catchment Assessment

This project will indirectly impact greenhouse gas emissions through providing a baseline of data on the ecosystem of the Pourewa Valley. This will then inform ecological priorities of the area including weed management and native planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

70.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

71.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services and Healthy Waters.

72.     Infrastructure and Environmental Services staff will work closely with Parks, Sports and Recreation and Community Facilities staff on programmes where restoration work is undertaken on public land.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

73.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Ōrākei Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2022/2023 work programme include Hobson Bay, Kohimarama Beach, Newmarket/Middleton Stream, Ōkahu Bay, Pourewa Valley, Tāhuna Tōrea Nature Reserve and Waiata Reserve.

74.     The projects noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘our land, forests, waterways and marine environment are protected, restored and enhanced’. The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

75.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

76.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

77.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

78.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

79.     Ōrākei Local Board’s environmental work programme is strongly supported by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and will contribute to achieving kaitiakitanga outcomes. Programmes including Eastern Bays Songbird Project, Eastern Bays Wildlink Network, the Ōrākei sustainable schools moth plant competition and the schools marine programme will involve staff working closely with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and its Pourewa Valley Nursery, which will strengthen the partnership and identify further opportunities.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

80.     The proposed environment work programme for 2022/2023 totals to $292,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

81.     The proposed work programme also includes $140,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the coastal renewals programmes. Please note that the coastal renewal budgets are current estimates and are subject to change through the design and works stages. If there are any significant changes throughout the financial year these will be reported back to the board.

82.     Budgets for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for a future year through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

83.      An overall LDI opex carry-forward provision for projects to be carried forward from 2021/2022 to 2022/2023 was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee as part of the annual budget adoption. Work programme activities to be carried forward from 2021/2022 will be finalised post 30 June 2022. Local boards will receive detail of carry-forwards in their first scheduled performance report for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

84.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

85.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board.

86.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes. Some activities may not be able to be delivered fully if COVID-19 restrictions are increased.

87.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

88.     Table 2 shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

Table 2: Key risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Eastern Bays Songbird Project

The success of this programme depends on the Ōrākei community’s engagement and commitment to pest trapping activities.

The Eastern Bays Songbird Project group of core staff and volunteers are very well connected with the Ōrākei community and will continue to advertise the benefits of pest control to Ōrākei residents through trap-handouts, social media and speaking to different community groups and schools.

Low

Newmarket / Middleton stream restoration - Ōrākei

There is a risk that there will be low participation at the community planting day.

 

Previous planting days have been well attended and supported by the community. Staff will continue to engage with community members and raise awareness of the stream. Contingency plans for bad weather have been included in the project. This project has been successfully delivered by this contractor

Low

Waiata Reserve restoration - Hobson catchment

Ōrākei schools marine programme

There is a risk of low school engagement. The programme is dependent on the availability of external organisations.

 

There is an engaged cluster of Enviroschools in the local board area. Schools that participated in 2021/2022 have provided expressed an interest to continue with the programme. The programme has been successful in previous years so there is a track record of organisations that will continue to engage.

Low

 

Sustainable schools moth plant competition - Ōrākei

Pourewa Valley catchment assessment

Dependencies on staff availability to provide information. If this is the case, it may require multiple years to complete rather than one year.

Staff are currently available to identify information and have indicated that this is a priority.

Low

Tāhuna Tōrea shorebird habitat restoration

There is a risk that the Tāhuna Tōrea Rangers community group may not have capacity to engage.

 

Infrastructure and Environmental staff are working closely with Parks, Sports and Recreation, who have a good relationship with the volunteers.

Low

Tāmaki Estuary Environmental Forum - Ōrākei

This programme is dependent on the sourcing of a suitable contractor to coordinate the forum.

The programme relies on community engagement in the water quality monitoring project.

It is expected that the current coordinator will be able to continue in the role and staff are confident that other contractors would be available if necessary.

Individual leaders within the forum will be designated to oversee an area to actively engage the community to participate in monitoring activities to share ownership and responsibility of water quality results for their local area.

Low

Wildlink Eastern Bays Network

The success of this programme is reliant on the critical mass of volunteers and community groups, and their level of commitment and uptake of restoration activity ideas and implementation.

There is a strong network of established environmental and social groups in the Ōrākei area. Staff have existing relationships with many of these groups. In 2021/2022 the ideas and level of engagement were highly valuable and collaborative.

Low

89.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

90.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

91.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022/2023 Ōrākei Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Prasanthi Cottingham - Relationship Coordinator

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Decision

File No.: CP2022/07997

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Ōrākei Local Board on the local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) and to recommend partial allocation of the remaining LBTCF budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       There is $985,238 remaining in the LBTCF for this political term 2019-2022.

3.       This report provides an update to the local board on the already funded LBTCF projects and the current status of those projects.

4.       It outlines projects considered by the local board which may be allocated funding from the LBTCF and recommends proceeding with two of these projects.

5.       The Merton Road raised crossing is recommended as it provides a safe crossing point on this busy road where none currently exists. In addition, it will be an enhancement to the Auckland Transport (AT )Links to Glen Innes project that is to be delivered on Merton Road in the new financial year.

6.       The traffic calming scheme to install speed humps on Tahora Avenue is recommended as it will provide both a speed calming effect and encourage traffic to keep to the main arterials. Residents of Tahora Avenue have requested the project and are likely to support it during consultation processes.

7.       Due to ongoing effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, there are risks further budget cuts may be necessary in the future, therefore it is expedient that prioritised projects are contracted out as soon as practicable.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      approve the partial allocation of the remaining local board transport capital fund as follows:

i) $260,000 to a raised pedestrian crossing on Merton Road, St Johns.

ii) $70,000 to speed bumps on Tahora Avenue, Remuera to promote traffic calming.

Horopaki

Context

8.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in AT’s Local Board Engagement Plan, we report on a regular basis to local boards. The regular reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

9.       AT has been reporting in 2022 on projects and operations in the local board areas by way of a monthly central bulletin. Information on local board consultations and updates on the status of the Community Safety Fund (CSF) and the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) have been conveyed by memo or email.

10.     The CSF is a capital budget established by AT for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund to allow elected members to address longstanding local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the AT work programme.

11.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver minor transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also be:

a)   safe

b)   not impede network efficiency

c)   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

Funded Ōrākei Local Board Transport Projects

12.     The projects noted below were approved for funding by the local board in late 2021:

Project

Description

Update

Estimates

Roberta Reserve Playground Crossing

A crossing to be established near the T intersection of Riddell Road and Roberta Avenue.

Designs are being updated which will determine if further consultation is required. 

$260,000

Ōrākei School

A new crossing to be established on Coates Avenue as well as a drop-off zone.

The design is being updated and discussions held with the school as to the placement of the drop-off zone. May need to be reconsulted.

$300,000

Victoria Avenue

Raise the crossing at 274 Victoria Avenue (approximately) to improve safety for school children.

Public consultation is anticipated in the next quarter.

$260,000

Stonefields Bus Shelter

To be located at stop 1317.

 

Delivery is expected in September 2022.

$40,000

St Johns Road Bus Shelter

To be located at approximately 131 St Johns Road, St Johns.

Construction to start on the raised crossing and bus shelter in June 2022.

$40,000

St Kentigern Crossing

Contribution toward the crossing.

Completed

$20,000

Achilles Point and St Heliers CCTV programme

 

CCTV programme to monitor safety

Project manager has been appointed who will liaise with Safer Cities.

$70,000

 


 

New Projects

13.     At its workshop 24 March 2022, the local board considered additional projects it  maysupport with the remaining LBTCF. Five projects were suggested by the local board for preliminary investigation and indicative cost. These are noted below:

Project

Description

Approximate Cost

126 Allum Street – St Thomas School

Converting the kea crossing to a raised zebra.

$126,000

Merton Road, St Johns pedestrian facility

A zebra crossing at approximately 40 Merton Road.

 

$126,000

Grand Drive, Remuera -pedestrian facility

A pedestrian refuge facility near #38/#43/#45 Grand Drive, Remuera.

 

$150,000

St Johns Road pedestrian facility

A pedestrian refuge near the intersection with Dorchester Street.

$150,000

Mainston Road/Tahora Avenue, Remuera - speed calming or speed feedback sign

 

Interventions to slow traffic down and reduce the cut-through behaviour of motorists.

$70,000 (speed bumps)

 

$40,000 (speed feedback sign)

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Auckland Transport reported back to the local board on 26 May 2022 with preliminary advice and indicative cost. The projects were priortised based on criteria outlined in Attachment A.

15.     The projects were also allocated a score after consideration of the transport outcomes in the Ōrākei Local Board Plan 2020.

16.     The  plan states : Our transport infrastructure is efficient and connected, enabling people to move around safely and effectively using a range of options.

·    Alternative modes of transport are enabled and encouraged to ease congestion across our area and to reduce our carbon footprint

·    Continued improvements to roads and shared paths contribute to a safer and free-flowing transport network of roads, connections and pathways, and reduce congestion

·    Safety initiatives, upgrades and improvements around our schools and town centres continue to be a priority.

Allum Street – St Thomas School

17.     St Thomas School has an existing kea crossing which is mobilised during school entry and exit times. The school is an active Travelwise school, and it is promoting cycling and scootering to school as the school is currently building a bike track.

18.     AT understands that the school has had some concerns about the safety of the kea crossing as several near misses here have been noted. The school initially registered support to have the kea crossing upgraded to a raised crossing.

19.     On analysis, AT found that Allum Street is classed as a Collector Road with a 50 km/h speed limit which is identified Our Future Connect strategy as a connector cycle route and a primary walking route. Allum Street gives access to John Rymer Place and the northern link to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive shared pathway. It is is not an overdimension, overweight or approved HPMV route and is not an emergency lifeline route.

20.     ATinvestigation also showed that a raised table zebra is unlikely to fit where the existing kea crossing is currently, due to driveway locations. Adding a raised zebra may mean relocating the crossing as well as the possible removal of parking and trees. Further consultation with the school is necessary to ensure that the school would still support the raised crossing if it needed to be relocated.

21.     The local board queried whether a raised zebra was necessary due to the street being narrowed by parked cars which acts to limit speeds.  Due to the uncertainty of whether the school would support a change of crossing location should it be necessary, it was decided that this project needed to be further investigated before funds were allocated.

22.     AT will continue discussions with the school and this project may come back for consideration at a later date.

23.     The approximate cost for the raised crossing is $260,000.

Merton Road, St Johns - Raised Zebra Crossing

A picture containing circuit

Description automatically generated

Merton Road - approximate location of raised crossing

 

24.     Currently, there is only one pedestrian refuge on Merton Road between Morrin Road and College Road close to the Felton Matthew/Morrin Road roundabout. A further pedestrian facility would provide safer access for local residents and visitors to the facilities and the recreational and sporting opportunities offered at Colin Maiden Park.

25.     Merton Road is considered an arterial road with 50 km/h speed limit. There is an existing shared path on the southern side of the road. This road is an existing overweight and approved HPMV route. But not an emergency lifeline route or bus route.

26.     AT’s Future Connect strategy shows Merton Road as a connector cycle route and a primary walking route to the Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Pathway, the local shopping area, the rail station and bus connections.

27.     A crossing point would complement the Links to Glen Innes cycle project which will provide dedicated cycle facilities along Merton Road.  The new cycle facility will improve mulit-modal access to both the Glen Innes town centre and rail station.

28.     The approximate cost of the raised crossing would be $260,000.

29.     The local board indicated a preference for this project but noted that pedestrian surveys should be carried out to ensure that the raised crossing is optimally located where most pedestrians are crossing the road.

38 Grand Drive, Remuera – Pedestrian refuge closer to the bus stops

30.     At the March workshop the local board asked AT to investigate the feasibility of  a pedestrian refuge on Grand Drive to be located near paired bus stops.

31.     AT found that Grand Drive is classed as a Collector Road with 50 km/h speed limit.  A minor bus improvement project was completed at approximately 153 Grand Drive recently that provided a raised crossing point for pedestrians.

32.     Our Future Connect strategy identifies Grand Drive as supporting the local transit network and a secondary walking route. This road is not an Over Dimension, Over Weight or approved HPMV route. However, this road is part of an emergency lifeline route and it is a bus route.

33.     AT considered further investigations may be required here as there seems to be localised crossing demand only around this part of Grand Drive. A pedestrian survey would help to identify the best place for a refuge as its likely that pedestrians may cross to access the Waiatarua Reserve pathways.

34.     The local board clarified that the major concerns with Grand Drive related to speeding rather than pedestrian facilities, although they noted that pedestrian refuges do help with speed calming.

35.     The direction of the workshop was for AT to investigate speed calming measures on Grand Drive rather than the pedestrian refuge and bring this back to the local board at a later time for consideration.

 St Johns Road – Pedestrian Refuge (between Purewa Cemetry and Dorchester Street)

36.     A request for further pedestrian facilities on St Johns Road has come to the local board from members of the public and this was investigated as a possible project.

37.     St Johns Road is classed as an arterial road with a 50 km/h speed limit

38.     AT’s Future Connect strategy identifies St Johns Rd as a regional future cycle route, Frequent Transit Network, mainly a secondary walking route but as a primary walking route closer to Dorchester St intersection. This road is part of emergency lifeline route and an Over Dimensional route.

39.     AT advised that a pedestrian survey should be undertaken to determine the pedestrian desire lines and to determine the optimal placement of a pedestrian refuge. The survey should start from the Purewa Cemetry to bus stops outside #113, including pedestrians crossing Dorchester Street.

40.     The local board considered that this project is relatively close to the work happening at the St John Rd/Ipswich/Truman Street intersection which will provide a raised zebra crossing and a bus shelter.

41.     Local board direction given at the workshop was that this project be reconsidered at a later date.

Mainston Rd and Tahora Avenue, Remuera

A screenshot of a video game

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

Mainston Road and Tahora Avenue showing potential speed bumps

42.     Residents of Tahora Avenue have been complaining about speeding and rat running issues in their street as drivers seek to miss the signals at the Ladies Mile/Remuera Road intersection.

43.     AT has installed two “slow” signs painted on the road surface in each direction on Tahora Avenue. There are also two new STOP signs and yellow “stop” road markings at the Tahora/Mainston junction and at the junction of Mainston Road and Ladies Mile.

44.     Residents have noted that these measures have not had as much impact on speeding in their street as desired.

45.     The local board has asked AT to investigate the cost of additional measures in Tahora Avenue such as speed humps or a speed feedback sign to slow traffic down.

46.     AT provided the sketch above of the potential placement of speed humps and it was suggested that an alternative could be a speed feedback sign to warn drivers of excess speed.

47.   The estimate for these speed humps is approximately $70,000 and a speed feedback sign which would cost approximately $40,000 to install.

48.     AT’s advice was that speed humps would be a more effective measure than the speed feedback sign and the local board indicated its preference towards using the LBTCF to add speed bumps to Tahora Avenue.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

49.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

50.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian, active modes or support public transport therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT. Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     AT attended workshops with the Ōrākei Local Board on 24 March 2022 and 26 May 2022 to discuss these projects.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

53.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

54.     Allocating the local board transport capital fund budget as recommended to the raised crossing on Merton Road and the traffic calming on Tahora Avenue will expend $330,000 of the local board’s transport capital fund. This will leave $515,238 unspent.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.     The impact of last year’s COVID lockdown has not been factored into these recommendations. There is a risk that budgets might be impacted by budget cuts resulting from the August to October 2021 lockdown.

56.     After the last lockdown in 2020, projects that were already contracted out once the Emergency Budget was resolved continued to be delivered, therefore the local board is advised to allocate funding to its preferred projects as soon as possible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.     Once the local board’s resolutions are finalised, AT begin the detailed investigation into the resolved projects.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Project Scoresheet

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lorna Stewart - Elected Member Relationship Partner (AT)

Authorisers

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 - Local Board views

File No.: CP2022/07740

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board views on applications to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund is a regionally contestable fund allocated through The Long-term Plan 2021 – 2031.

3.       The fund supports the development of community sport and recreation facilities across Auckland, looks to address gaps in provision and allows the council to proactively respond to changing trends in sport and recreation.

4.       There is $15.3million available in the current funding round.

5.       Allocation of the fund will be decided by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee at its meeting in September 2022.

6.       Local board views will inform recommendations to the PACE Committee.

7.       Applications received from within the Ōrākei Local Board area are included at Attachment A.

8.       Local board views will be included with materials for an independent assessment panel scheduled to sit in July 2022. The recommendations from the assessment panel will be presented to the PACE Committee at the September meeting. If approved, the grant allocations and funding agreements with successful applicants will be developed in late 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      endorse the following applications to be considered for investment through the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022:

Project

Location

Amount

Ellerslie Sports Club Inc.

 

Michaels Ave Sports Complex (Part B)

46 Michaels Ave, Ellerslie Auckland

 

$250,000

 

Auckland Netball Centre Incorporated

 

Indoor Courts Expansion – Auckland Netball Centre Site

7 Allison Ferguson Drive, St Johns

 

$1,500,000

 

Eastern Suburbs Gymnastics Club

 

Liston Park Development

Liston Park, Marua Road Ellerslie

 

$3,000,000

 

Auckland Hockey Association

 

Auckland Hockey – Colin Maiden Park: 2 x New Hockey Turf and Multi-use Artificial Turf Development

Colin Maiden Park, St Johns

 

$5,000,000

 

b)      Provide any additional views regarding the applications

Horopaki

Context

Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022

9.       The Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund was established through the Long-term Plan 2018-2028 to support development of sport and recreation facilities in the Auckland region.

10.     The regionally contestable fund will invest circa $140 million over the next ten years to proactively address sport and recreation infrastructure shortfalls, respond to changing participation preferences and get more Aucklanders more active, more often.

11.     There is $15.3 million available in the current funding round. This funding envelope is a combined allocation from two financial years (2021/2022 and 2022/2023).

12.     The fund will be allocated by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events (PACE) Committee in September 2022.

13.     Further information relating to the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund and the current funding round can be found in the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 Guidelines.

Communication to local board

14.     Memos dated 29 October 2021 and 13 April 2022 were circulated to local boards to provide information on the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022, outline the approach to local board engagement and provide information on applications to the fund from within the board’s area.

15.     In workshops during May/June 2022 local boards were provided with further information on application(s) to the fund from within their areas where they had the opportunity to ask questions for clarification and provide local insights.

16.     Applications received from within the Ōrākei Local Board area are included at Attachment A.

17.     Local board views will inform consideration of applications by an independent assessment panel whose recommendations will go to the PACE Committee in September 2022.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     Local boards may endorse an application to be considered for investment through the Sport and Recreation Facilities Investment Fund 2022 or decline to endorse and instead raise concerns about the application.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Local board endorsement of the application(s) is not in itself considered to carry a climate impact.

20.     Mitigation of potential environmental impacts arising from individual projects will be examined as one of the assessment criteria for the fund.

21.     Should an application to the fund be successful, potential emissions and environmental impacts (e.g.: through construction) will be further considered in land-owner approval and resource consent processes.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Decision-making on the fund sits with the PACE Committee.

23.     Local board views will inform recommendations to the committee.

24.     No other council group impacts are identified as arising from the local board expressing views on applications to the fund.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Workshops were held with local boards during May and early June 2022 where applications(s) have been received from their area.

26.     During those workshops, local boards had the opportunity to:

a)   learn more about the application(s) and ask questions

b)   provide their views supporting or opposing the applications.

27.     Local board directions taken from the workshops inform the recommendations in this report

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Māori outcomes are a priority criteria for the fund in the social and community theme. The social and community criteria are weighted to align with the equity focus in the Increasing Aucklanders Participation in Sport: Investment Plan 2018-2038. Scoring will reflect applications displaying strong Māori outcomes.

29.     An initial presentation on the fund was provided to the Mana Whenua Forum in October 2021. In response to Mana Whenua feedback, staff have ensured that the independent assessment panel assessing applications in July 2022 will include a specialist with a Māori outcomes perspective.

30.     Applications to the fund will be presented to Mana Whenua Forum in June 2022. Mana Whenua views will be sought to inform the assessment panel and recommendations to the PACE Committee. Where it is desired by Mana Whenua, fund recipients will be required to engage with iwi about their projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The Sport and Recreation Facility Investment Fund is a regional budget established through The Long-term Plan 2018-2028. The PACE Committee allocates budget following a regionally contestable process.

32.     Local board views on applications will inform discussions with the assessment panel and ultimately recommendations to the PACE Committee.

33.     Local board endorsement of the application(s) will have no financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The following risks and mitigations have been identified:

Risk

Mitigation

Applicants may consider the endorsement by the local board to be an indication that a grant will be forthcoming.

The applicant will be advised by staff that any endorsement at this stage is an endorsement to progress their application for further consideration.

Applicants may consider the endorsement by the local board to be an indication that the local board will provide necessary approvals (e.g. land owner approval, agreement to lease)

The applicant will be advised by staff that any local board endorsement at this stage does not affect future local board decisions.

The applicant may not have the capability to lead delivery of a successful project.

The applicant’s ability to deliver a successful project is a key weighting within the criteria to be used by the assessment panel.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Local board views will be included with materials for an independent assessment panel scheduled to sit in July 2022.

36.     Recommendations from the assessment panel will be presented to the PACE Committee at the September meeting.

37.     Should the PACE Committee approve grant allocations, funding agreements with successful applicants will be developed in late 2022.

38.     Local boards will be advised of the PACE Committee decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Applications received from within the local board area

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Nick Harris - Sport & Recreation Team Lead

Authorisers

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change

File No.: CP2022/08048

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of the report is to seek feedback from local boards on the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) that are to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument (IPI) on medium density residential standards (MDRS) and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 (NPS-UD). These are:

a)   Transport-related changes to promote safe and efficient access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites, and to address additional parking issues that were identified following the mandatory removal of car parking minimums from the AUP (Auckland-wide chapters E24 Lighting, E27 Transport, and E38 Subdivision – Urban access and parking provisions).

b)   Additions to scheduled items to enable their protection when the IPI is notified (Schedule 10 Notable Tree Schedule and Maps, and Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps).

c)   Mandatory variations to incomplete plan changes (council-initiated and private) required by the government to ensure MDRS are applied in all relevant residential zones.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

3.       Auckland Council is required to publicly notify its IPI in August 2022 to implement the NPS- UD and MDRS in relevant residential zones.  The council’s IPI must now re-write residential objectives, policies and rules to include MDRS, as well as making other changes to implement NPS-UD intensification directives, like increasing height to at least six stories within walkable catchments of certain zones and the rapid transit network stations.

4.       Additional plan changes and variations are necessary to address related matters and are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI.

5.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the policy approach and content of these draft plan changes and variations prior to the Planning Committee’s August 2022 meeting where notification will be considered.

6.       The specific text of each plan change and variation is likely to be amended as these changes progress towards notification as a result of feedback received from local boards, iwi authorities, key stakeholders, internal specialists and legal review.

Transport

7.       Auckland Council has already removed minimum car parking requirements from the AUP as required by NPS-UD and is completing a technical plan change to address gaps created by those removals.  In doing so, other more complex additional parking matters need to be addressed in the AUP.

8.       Greater intensification across Auckland brings forward the need to address gaps and inconsistencies in the residential access provisions in chapters E27 Transport and E38 Subdivision - Urban.

Notable trees and Historic Heritage Places

9.       Additional notable trees and historic heritage places are proposed to be added to the AUP schedules 10 and 14 following staff-evaluation and these will be qualifying matters in the IPI. Historic heritage places and notable trees are qualifying matters that will be set out in the IPI to limit intensification so those values can be accommodated.  Amendments to the notable tree and historic heritage places schedules are required to both update and add in newly assessed items for protection. It is important to protect qualifying matters by including items that are not presently scheduled to avoid the loss of those items through intensification.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

10.     The government requires that the council prepare a variation for each plan change commenced, but not completed, at the time the December 2021 amendments to the Resource Management Act (RMA) came into force, where a change relates to a relevant residential zone.  The governments’ MDRS will apply for up to six private plan change requests, and one council-initiated change. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the content outlined in the agenda report relating to the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument on medium density residential standards and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020

b)      provide feedback as the local board’s response to the matters discussed in this report:

i)        Transport

ii)       Notable trees - Schedule 10

iii)      Historic heritage - Schedule 14

iv)      Variations to incomplete plan changes.

Horopaki

Context

Decision-making authority

11.     Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

12.     Local boards have a critical role in helping shape the council’s policy response to the NPS-UD. Plan changes and variations are required to address issues arising from implementing government policy and in terms of access matters in the Transport plan change, to address gaps and inconsistencies in the AUP provisions.  

13.     The plan changes and variations relate to:

Transport

a)   Addressing access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites to prioritise pedestrian access and safety and to improve access efficiency and convenience for all user groups.

b)   Developing parking provisions to:

i)    provide safe and convenient pedestrian access to dwellings that have no vehicle access 

ii)   require accessible parking so that people with disabilities can participate in everyday life 

iii)  ensure the loading/unloading of goods can occur in a manner that does not compromise the safe and efficient functioning of the road network (including accessways)

iv)  cater for emerging changes in transport, including greater use of e-bikes, micro-mobility devices and electric vehicles.   

Notable Trees and Historic Heritage Places

·    Updating the Auckland Unitary Plan notable tree schedule 10 and adding new notable trees

·    Adding new historic heritage places to the AUP historic heritage schedule 14, and removing one place from schedule 14.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

14.     The government requires variations so that all relevant residential zones include MDRS.  Variations will be complementary to the approach taken in the IPI. These mandatory variations must be processed alongside council’s IPI and will use the same fast-track process.  Council staff will prepare variations for:

Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

Local board area in which land is located

PC 49 Drury East

Franklin

PC 50 Waihoehoe

Franklin

PC 51 Drury 2

Franklin

PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

Upper Harbour

PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

Upper Harbour

PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

Suburbs in which land is located

 

PC 60 Open space

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

15.     Addressing access and parking matters must be addressed alongside the IPI so that the development community responds to growth opportunities appropriately. The rule changes are required to implement standards for assessing resource consent applications.

16.     Protecting historic heritage places and notable trees is important to comprehensively address qualifying matters in the AUP and protect these for future generations. The IPI will acknowledge historic heritage places (and other values) and notable trees as qualifying matters, but a separate change is necessary for those historic heritage places and trees that are not already scheduled but whose known values are significant, and eligible for scheduling.

17.     Local board feedback is an important input to help develop the plan changes and variations that are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI in August 2022.

18.     Local boards will have a second opportunity to express views after submissions close on the changes.  Views expressed after submissions close in a resolution will be included in the analysis of the plan changes and submissions received.  If a local board chooses to provide its views, a local board member will be invited to present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who make the decision on the plan changes.

19.     This report provides an overview of the IPI-supporting plan changes related to transport matters, and additional and corrected historic heritage places and notable trees and mandatory variations to incorporate MDRS. This report does not include a recommendation. Planning staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views as part of reporting to the Planning Committee.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Transport

20.     The Plans and Places department maintains a ‘Residential Issues Register’ and is currently finalising the draft 2021 ‘Section 35 Monitoring: B2.3 Quality Built Environment’ report. The register and the draft section 35 report identify the need for changes to the AUP to achieve better-quality access outcomes. As noted above, the identified parking issues are a consequence of the mandatory removal of car parking minimums.

21.     Attachment A outlines a summary of the potential changes at this stage in the process and the principal reasons for the changes.

Notable Trees

22.     The AUP protects and retains notable trees with significant historical, botanical or amenity values. Trees or groups of trees in Schedule 10 were evaluated using a set of criteria based on historical association, scientific importance or rarity, contribution to ecosystem services, cultural association or accessibility and intrinsic value. These factors are considered in the context of human health, public safety, property, amenity values and biosecurity.

23.     Tree schedules are highly dynamic and are not as easily maintained as other AUP schedules which are static (e.g. Outstanding Natural Landscapes Overlay Schedule, Outstanding Natural Features Overlay Schedule) meaning that they fall out of date over time. This is because subdivision, development and consents for removal/alteration as well as emergency works affect the description of listings on the Schedule. The health of trees can also naturally deteriorate. Given the number of listings contained in the Schedule, errors will continue to be identified and further updates will therefore be required. To update Schedule 10 requires a plan change. These changes cannot be addressed through any other process.

24.     There is a database of nearly 600 nominations received as submissions through the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan process and further unsolicited nominations received through the current nomination process. These nominations have been received for trees right across the region and are not limited to any specific geographical area. There is an expectation from the community that the council will evaluate and progress a plan change to add trees to the Schedule. There is a large volume of nominations and due to resourcing constraints, it has not been possible to evaluate them all at once. There will however be a portion of these nominations which have been evaluated and some of these trees may be found to meet the criteria for scheduling.

25.     Notable tree nominations are being investigated in the Albert-Eden, Franklin, Howick, Ōrākei, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. There are also more general amendments required to ensure the Schedule is accurate and operating as originally intended (for example, removals of listings where the tree has been physically removed, updating legal descriptions as a result of subdivision).

26.     Options relating to notable trees were presented to the Planning Committee on 5 November 2020 which resolved to review or make changes to the notable tree schedule as resources permit (PLA/2020/96). This included addressing existing nominations. It is important to note the scope of this work would not include calling for additional nominations.

27.     In accordance with the resolution discussed in paragraph 22, the Notable Trees Plan Change will amend Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule of the AUP as follows:

a)      Add those nominated trees which merit inclusion to the schedule

b)      Amend the schedule to address known inaccuracies/inconsistencies.

28.     The IPI will recognise notable trees as qualifying matters, including the newly proposed notable trees. A separate change is needed to schedule these additional trees as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Historic Heritage

29.     Historic heritage is a matter of national importance that decision makers must consider under section 6 of the RMA. Significant historic heritage places are identified in Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps of the Unitary Plan. Places identified in the schedule are subject to the provisions of the Unitary Plan Historic Heritage Overlay, which seeks to protect scheduled historic heritage places from inappropriate subdivision, use and development and enable the appropriate use of scheduled historic heritage places.

30.     For a place to qualify to be included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, each place must meet the criteria and thresholds for scheduling that are outlined in the Regional Policy Statement (RPS) section of the AUP. Historic heritage places must be at least of considerable significance to their locality or beyond.

31.     Historic heritage places have been identified in the Albert-Eden, Henderson-Massey, Howick, Ōrakei, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. A list of these places is included in Attachment B.

32.     Most of these places were identified as a result of the survey of the special character values that was part of the council’s response to the NPS-UD. Other places were identified via public nominations.  This work is supported by a Planning Committee resolution:

where significant historic heritage values are identified within the Special Character Areas Overlay, develop a plan change for places or areas to be added to the Auckland Unitary Plan historic heritage schedule.[5]

33.     Each identified historic heritage place’s evaluation demonstrates the criteria and thresholds for scheduling set out in the RPS are satisfied. It is important that places with significant historic heritage values are included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, so that these values can be appropriately managed. The historic heritage places listed in Attachment B are proposed to be included in Schedule 14 via a plan change. 

34.     Two historic heritage places are proposed to be deleted.  The former St Andrews Sunday School Hall at 40 Rankin Avenue, New Lynn (Schedule 14.1 ID 189) was demolished in 2019.  The Residence at 147 Sturges Road, Henderson (ID 75). This historic heritage place has been identified as not meeting the RPS thresholds for scheduling. It is not appropriate for a historic heritage place without sufficient value to remain in the AUP historic heritage Schedule 14.

35.     The IPI will recognise scheduled historic heritage places as qualifying matters, by limiting intensification to the extent necessary to continue to provide for the scheduled values. A separate change is needed to schedule the newly identified historic heritage places and to remove the place at 147 Sturges Road, as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Variations

36.     Amendments made to the RMA in December 2021 came into force immediately and require tier 1 local authorities (including Auckland) to incorporate the government’s MDRS into all relevant residential zones.

37.     The government’s intention is that all plan changes relating to relevant residential zones also incorporate MDRS.  Transitional provisions inserted into the RMA require the council to prepare variations where changes commenced, but were not completed, when the RMA was amended.  Up to seven variations are required to be notified at the same time as the council’s IPI, and to be processed alongside it.  Work is commencing on variations to these changes:

Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

Local board area in which land is located

PC 49 Drury East

Franklin

PC 50 Waihoehoe

Franklin

PC 51 Drury 2

Franklin

PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

Upper Harbour

PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

Upper Harbour

PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

 

Suburbs in which land is located

 

PC 60 Open space

 

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out Auckland’s climate goals:

a)      to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

b)      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation).

39.     The first of the council’s climate goals is relevant because it relates to climate adaptation. That goal aligns with the legal principle for RMA decision-makers to have regard to the effects of climate change (section 7(i) RMA).

40.     However, the RMA currently precludes the second goal: consideration of climate mitigation. The council may only consider climate adaptation and resilience.

41.     Several plan changes have some bearing on climate change. The transport plan change addresses the car parking design for new developments and access to residential car parking spaces and rear sites. How sites are designed and accessed provides for climate resilience, particularly by encouraging people to walk and cycle and facilitating sustainable modes of transport. Adding notable trees to the AUP schedule provides statutory protection for trees, adds to biodiversity and improves urban amenity for residents.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     The draft transport plan change has been consulted on with internal advice from Auckland Transport, Watercare and all relevant council departments including Auckland Plans Strategy and Research, Resource Consents, Regulatory Services, Infrastructure & Environmental Services, and the Tāmaki Makurau Design Ope (formerly the Urban Design Unit).

43.     Key specialists are also involved in the review of the draft transport provisions and their feedback will be considered in the ongoing development of this plan change.

44.     In addition, the planning team is also working with the Infrastructure and Environmental Services technical standards team in their development of an Access Technical Guidance document for the construction and design of residential, business and rural accesses.  This is to ensure the plan change and the technical guidance document are consistent with each other.  It is anticipated the technical guidance will be completed later this year, after the notification of the transport plan change.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     The extent of intensification anticipated by NPS-UD and RMA amendments will affect all local boards, except Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke.  Hauraki Gulf Islands are excluded from the application of MDRS and lie outside Auckland’s urban environment (where intensification is directed).

46.     Workshops were held with local boards on the draft transport plan change in November 2021 and in February 2022. Local boards’ feedback sought to address the access and parking matters by changing the operative AUP standards and/or creating new standards.  The draft section 32 report (which is being developed) also concurs that the issues are best addressed through statutory methods (e.g. a plan change). However, some matters could be supported by a non-statutory design guidance (e.g., cycle parking).  Other matter such as the access requirements for fire and emergency services are best addressed by additional staff training and amendments to the access Practice and Guidance Note.   Attachment C provides a summary of what we heard from local boards during workshops earlier in the year.

47.     This report and related briefings provide an opportunity for local board views to inform policy development.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau is Council’s framework for measuring our performance in delivering on the strategic priorities identified by Māori.

49.     Policy 9 of NPS-UD directs the council to particularly involve iwi and hapū in the NPS-UD during the preparation of planning documents. The proposed plan changes to implement the intensification provisions is one planning document.

50.     All mana whenua entities recognised by the council receive ongoing invitations to engage and provide feedback on the NPS-UD programme including the supporting draft transport plan change. All representatives (including those electing not to participate in collective meetings or workshops) receive information, updates and hui notes.

51.     Relevant common themes identified to date include:

a)      Universal access provided in residential design for less able whānau members

b)      Safe and connected whānau and communities.

52.     Staff provide regular updates on all plan changes to mana whenua and specific briefings are planned for late May and June on these changes and the IPI.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views on policy development.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a draft plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s). This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Any views provided by the local board will be included in the August 2022 report to the Planning Committee seeking decisions on the IPI plan changes and the IPI-supporting plan changes and variations.  Following the close of submissions, local boards will have the opportunity to express views on the notified changes.

56.     If resolutions are passed after submissions close, the relevant local boards will be informed of the hearing date and invited to speak at the hearing in support of their views. Planning staff will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change by memorandum.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Summary of key potential changes to the draft transport plan change

 

b

Attachment B: Histroic heritage places proposed to be added to Schedule 14

 

c

Attachment C: Summary of what we heard from local board during workshops

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michele Perwick - Senior Principal Planner

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Emma Rush - Senior Advisor Special Projects

Teuila Young - Policy Planner

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)

File No.: CP2022/07617

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on Auckland Transport’s Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parking Strategy sets out the objectives, principles and policies relating to Auckland Transport’s management and supply of parking across Auckland and was last updated in 2015.

3.       Since 2015, numerous changes in both the central and local government context mean that a review of the Parking Strategy (2015) was required.

4.       The review has involved engagement with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community.

5.       In late May, Auckland Transport (AT) provided summaries of public engagement to all local boards. This report is to seek feedback from local boards, having had the opportunity to review feedback from their community, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      provide feedback, taking into consideration their community’s feedback, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

Horopaki

Context

6.       The current Parking Strategy (2015) was progressive at the time it was introduced, bringing about many changes in Auckland including wider acceptance of priced parking; however, it is no longer fit for purpose. Since it was developed there have been numerous changes to the policy and planning context including:

a)   adoption of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Development signalled in the Unitary Plan will enable growth that may be difficult to service with public transport, meaning that some new suburbs will rely on car use for access

b)   changes to travel behaviour, such as the emergence of micromobility (i.e., electric scooters) and the growth of the delivery economy

c)   Auckland’s public transport network has matured over time, providing opportunities for further passenger uptake and efficiency related to park and ride management

d)   market demand is pushing for more housing provision and density. Development is already showing evidence of less carparking provision and more issues with carparking compliance

e)   the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) which guides direction on urban development through the Unitary Plan. The NPS-UD requires Auckland Council to remove parking minimum requirements from the Unitary Plan, which means that developments will not be required to provide onsite parking. This will contribute to society and transport becoming less car-centric over time; however, it will lead to increasing pressure on public parking resources, particularly on-street parking

f)    both central government and Auckland Council have declared ‘climate emergencies’, prioritising policy initiatives and investment that will reduce carbon emissions. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and other plans and strategies proposed by central government will require changes to the land transport system, including parking.

7.       The Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) is an important element of aligning and addressing Auckland’s response to these issues, particularly by managing parking in a way that:

a)      supports public transport and alternative modes, which will make public transport and active modes such as walking and cycling safer and more convenient

b)      responds to Auckland’s population growth and land-use intensification

c)      acknowledges that space for carparking is a limited public resource.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Draft Parking Strategy (2022) (Attachment A) sets out the strategic context and the need to manage the transport system, as well as the strategic objectives and agreed principles for parking management.

9.       The proposed approach to planning parking management is set out on pages 26-36 of Attachment A. The key elements of this are:

a)      proactively applying parking management in areas that have land use intensity and good public transport access

b)      repurposing road space away from parking where this is required to enable delivery of the Strategic Transport Network.

10.     The accompanying parking policies (p38-63 of Attachment A) provide more technical detail on how parking is proposed to be managed in order to align to the principles set out in the strategic direction. The policies are grouped by:

a)      provision and approach

b)      on-street and off-street

c)      specific vehicle classes

d)      specific situations.

11.     The strategy also includes a section on advocacy to central government for legislative and/or regulatory reform as there are some areas of parking management that are outside local government control. Including these areas also provides context on the limitations of regulation in areas we would like to effect change and achieve better outcomes. These areas include:

a)      parking infringement fines

b)      banning berm parking

c)      residential parking permit cost-setting

d)      influencing private parking through parking levies.

12.     In December 2021, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council released a Parking Discussion Document to start the conversation with the public on future parking management in Auckland. AT received 32 pieces of written feedback. Following this feedback, several areas of the draft Parking Strategy and its accompanying policies were updated, including:

a)   developing the narrative to better link it to the broader transport story, strategic objectives and policy rationale, as well as regulatory areas in need of reform

b)   focussing on the benefits of parking management to enable and support access, resulting in a more equitable transport system

c)   articulating the benefits and implications of parking to the community

d)   acknowledging the costs of parking provision

e)   emphasising parking diversity to enable mode shift

f)    emphasising that the roll-out of further parking management will happen over time, starting where there is most readiness for change, and that this is a ten-year plan

g)   outlining indicators of success

h)   ensuring that consultation materials acknowledge the existing context and public fatigue.

13.     Strategic direction provided by the Planning Committee has also guided development of the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) requires planning decisions to contribute to the development of urban environments that support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and are resilient to the likely current and future effects of climate change.

15.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan outlines the need for Auckland to reduce its transport-related emissions significantly, to meet the target of 64% reduction by 2030. This means that business as usual for transport and land-use project planning and delivery, and management of the transport system, cannot continue.

16.     Parking management is a lever in managing the transport network, both in terms of the opportunities that repurposing of road space offers to enabling other modes, and in disincentivising car use.

17.     Implementing the Parking Strategy will include repurposing parking lanes on key roads in Auckland, increasing the diversity of transport options and improving safety and efficiency for people using sustainable modes and for goods and service delivery. This is a key change required to reduce transport-related emissions, meaning the Parking Strategy is of significant importance as an early step to transport-related climate action.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Auckland Transport has engaged with key stakeholders across the council family, including raising awareness of the review with Auckland Council’s advisory panels.

19.     Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited provided feedback during engagement on the Parking Discussion Document. Their feedback was supportive of the proposed approach.

20.     Both the need for review and the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) prepared for public consultation have been endorsed by Auckland Council’s Planning Committee (Resolution number PLA/2022/24).

21.     Considerable liaison has taken place between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council departments ranging from Planning and Transport Strategy at a strategic level to Community Facilities about management of car parking in or near community parks.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Since Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board approved the review of the Parking Strategy in 2021, Auckland Transport has engaged with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community. The objective of the engagement process has been to ensure that Aucklanders are aware of the review, have had an opportunity to find out more about the proposed changes, and have had an opportunity to provide feedback.

23.     The engagement process included the following key activities:

a)      in 2021, information about the review was sent to all local boards and presented to the Local Board Chairs’ Forum

b)      all local boards were offered a workshop in August 2021, and in September 2021 all were invited to provide feedback that would contribute to the initial thinking around development of an updated draft document

c)      in December 2021, a Parking Discussion Document was published, targeted at key stakeholders and calling for initial feedback. 32 pieces of written feedback were received

d)      in March 2022, information about upcoming wider public consultation was provided to local boards along with a further workshop with Auckland Transport subject matter experts. The public consultation was again promoted through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum in April 2022

e)      public engagement and consultation on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy has recently closed. Auckland Transport received 943 submissions. Responses from the community have been collated and provided to local boards as area specific reports (Attachment B). Public engagement included:

i)     media (OurAuckland, radio) and social media (videos) marketing to let the public know about the engagement

ii)    online information

iii)   webinars at which Auckland Transport staff were available to discuss the proposal with members of the public

iv)   nine open days held in libraries around the region for members of the public to discuss the proposal with Auckland Transport staff

v)    discussions with key stakeholders including business associations, industry groups, emergency services, utilities, and other government agencies

vi)   a public debate about parking issues.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to give their feedback, based on consideration of their community’s feedback, on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Parking management is a kaitiakitanga issue, in that it is about managing a limited public resource. Auckland Transport has engaged with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to establish how best to incorporate views from mana whenua into the review.

26.     Feedback from a series of AT hui with mana whenua representatives reinforced that parking is a topic of considerable concern to Māori. Other points raised include:

a)      acknowledgement that, as well as the strategic concerns around air quality and resource management, parking enables access

b)      that parking infringements can contribute to creating a cycle of debt

c)      that communities are facing compounding pressures - parking management shouldn’t adversely impact people and places even further

d)      the potential for parking management to further reduce access - particularly for less able-bodied kaumatua and kuia - to the whenua, the moana and to wahi tapu.

27.     Other potential impacts of increased parking management for Māori are likely to be similar to those for the wider population. Some members of the community are more reliant on cars for access, particularly if they do not have good access to public transport. Barriers to public transport, such as cost and network coverage, influence access to necessities such as education, healthcare, employment, shopping, and social services.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Parking management resourcing will be delivered through AT operational budgets. Initial work to understand the resourcing required to implement the strategy indicates that this will require significant resource increases for planning, design, compliance monitoring and enforcement. It is currently expected that the strategy would be at least revenue-neutral overall once compliance monitoring/enforcement revenue is considered.

29.     Revenue from parking management helps to offset AT operational costs and therefore reduce reliance on ratepayer funding.

30.     There are no financial implications for local boards associated with providing feedback on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are significant risks associated with adopting a new approach to parking management in Auckland – however these must be weighed against the opportunity costs of not having an appropriate framework in place to manage parking. These include:

a)      persistent and increasing issues with over-reliance on on-street parking, particularly since the removal of onsite parking requirements in the Unitary Plan

b)      reduced ability to support development of the public transport and cycling network (both of which reduce emissions) and less ability to enable place-based improvements within the road corridor

c)      not having the ability to take an integrated and strategic approach that supports business when managing parking in town centres using collaborative parking management plans

d)      less flexibility with managing the impacts of increased population growth and intensification.

32.     Strong, considered feedback from local boards will enable Auckland Transport to make good decisions about the Parking Strategy while they balance these risks against the opportunity costs described above.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Feedback from local boards will be reviewed and taken into account as staff consider any amendments to the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy before recommendations to the Auckland Council Planning Committee are made in August 2022.

34.     Following endorsement of the Auckland Parking Strategy by the Auckland Council Planning Committee, approval will be sought from the Auckland Transport Board.

35.     Once approved by the Auckland Transport Board, the new Parking Strategy will be introduced.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Transport Parking Strategy (2022) (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Public consultation - summary of local feedback

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Covacich, Principal Transport Planner, Auckland Transport

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Andrew McGill, Head of Integrated Network Planning, Auckland Transpor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Chairman and Board Members' Report

File No.: CP2022/05376

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Members with the opportunity to provide an update on projects, activities, and issues in the local board area.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      that the Ōrākei Local Board Chairman and Board Members’ Report for May 2022 be received.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairman and Board Members' Report - May 2022

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/05396

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Ōrākei Local Board with a governance forward work calendar as at 16 June 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Ōrākei Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

a)  ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

b)  clarifying what advice is required and when

c)  clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the draft governance forward work calendar as at 16 June 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Calender - June 2022

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Workshop Proceedings

File No.: CP2022/05397

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held following the previous business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Local Board workshops are an informal forum held primarily for information or discussion purposes, as the case may be and at which no resolutions or decisions are made.

3.       Attached are copies of the records for the Ōrākei Local Board workshops held on 05, 12 and 26 May 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)   notes the records for the workshops held on 05, 12 and 26 May 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Workshop Proceedings - 05 May 2022

 

b

Workshop Proceedings - 12 May 2022

 

c

Workshop Proceedings - 26 May 2022

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

16 June 2022

 

 

Resolutions Pending Action report

File No.: CP2022/05401

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an opportunity to track reports that have been requested from staff.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the Ōrākei Local Board Resolutions Pending Action report as at 16 June 2022.

b)      agree that resolution number OR/2019/40 has now been completed, which requested, “That the Ōrākei Local Board request the Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation to issue a notice to Outboard Boating Club of Auckland Inc requiring the Club to dismantle the current fence along Tāmaki Drive bordering the grass reserve area of the Hakumau Reserve and the public boat ramps to enable easier ingress and egress for the public into the public boat ramps and grass area on the Reserve from Tāmaki Drive”.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Resolutions Pending Action Report - June 2022

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 



[1] MartinJenkins (2018). Cost-Benefit Analysis: Publicly-owned Auckland Golf Courses

[2] M. Moore (1995). Creating Public Value: Strategic Management in Government

[3] This is an important consideration in the context of section 80 of the Local Government Act 2002: Identification of inconsistent decisions

[4] O’Connor Sinclair (2013). Auckland Golf Facility Strategy

[5] PLA/2021/80