I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Ōrākei Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 June 2022

5.00pm

Online via Microsoft Teams and at the Ōrākei Local Board office
25 St Johns Road,
Meadowbank

 

Ōrākei Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairman

Scott Milne, JP

 

Deputy Chairman

Troy Elliott

 

Members

Troy Churton

 

 

Colin Davis, JP

 

 

Sarah Powrie

 

 

Margaret Voyce

 

 

David Wong, JP

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jade Grayson

Democracy Advisor

 

20 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027 443 0342

Email: jade.grayson@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

9          Public Forum                                                                            5

10        Extraordinary Business                                       5

11        Adoption of the Ōrākei Local Board Agreement 2022/2023                                                               7

12        2022/2023 Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plans and 2021/2022 Quarter Three Update    27

13        Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Acheivements Report for January 2021 to June 2022                                                                      69

14        Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change                                                                 71

15        Local board feedback on the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021                                                                      95

16        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Chairman S Milne will welcome those present.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 16 June 2022, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairman of the Ōrākei Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Adoption of the Ōrākei Local Board Agreement 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07942

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Ōrākei Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, council consulted on the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards have now considered local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

6.       On 29 June 2022, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Ōrākei Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy (Attachment A).

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

c)       delegate authority to the Chair to make any final changes to the local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (the Ōrākei Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, on 29 June 2022.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards. Local board plans influence and inform the Annual Budgets which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a one-year period. For each financial year, Auckland Council must also have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

8.       Throughout the development of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

9.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, the council consulted with the public on the Annual Budget 2022/2023. Ōrākei locally held events were held in the Ōrākei Local Board area to engage with the community and seek feedback on both regional and local proposals.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was included as an attachment on the 12 May business meeting agenda.

11.     Local boards considered this feedback, and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of consultation on Annual Budget 2022/2023 and local boards have received a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (Attachment A), including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

14.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement will be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2022/2023 that will be adopted at June business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

19.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

20.     Of those who submitted to the Annual Budget 2022/2023 from the Ōrākei Local Board area 21 identified as Māori. Submissions were made by mana whenua and the wider Māori community who have interests in the rohe / local board area.These submissions were provided to the local board for consideration at local board workshops during the development of their local board agreement

21.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2022/2023 financial year.

23.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the Annual Budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

24.     Funding for ABS is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

25.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 is adopted alongside of the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets. Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Decisions on the local content of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023, are required by 23 June 2022 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, at its 29 June 2022 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2022 when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

28.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the Annual Budget 2022/2023 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Chair to make any final changes if necessary.

29.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be agreed between local boards and operational departments at business meetings in June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Local content to support the Annual Budget 2022/2023

11

b

Local fees and charges schedules 2022/2023

25

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Renee Burgers - Lead Advisor Plans and Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

2022/2023 Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plans and 2021/2022 Quarter Three Update

File No.: CP2022/07598

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

For the Ōrākei Local Board to adopt its Joint Council-Controlled Organisation (CCO) Local Board Engagement Plan 2022/2023. 2.  To provide the Ōrākei Local Board with an update on the 2021/2022 Council-Controlled Organisation work programme items in its area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plans have been discussed between local boards and CCO staff during workshops held in April and May, and through subsequent follow up conversations.

4.       The substantive document, once adopted, will be in place for two years. The attachments to the plan will be amended throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

5.       Updates will be provided to local boards each quarter to show both changes to the plan itself, and to provide updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      adopt the Joint Council Controlled Organisations Local Board Engagement Plan 2022/2023 as agreed between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited and Watercare

b)      note that the attachments to the Joint Council Controlled Organisations Local Board Engagement Plan 2022/2023 will be updated as needed, with changes reported to the local board each quarter

c)       authorise the chairman of the local board to sign this agreement on behalf of the local board, alongside representatives from the four Council Controlled Organisations.

Horopaki

Context

6.       In 2020, the CCO Review report recommended the introduction of a joint CCO local board engagement plan for each local board.

7.       In mid-2021, the first Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plans were agreed and adopted.

8.       Since then, staff have worked to develop and refine both the process to agree the documents, and the format of the documents themselves.

9.       During April and May 2022, workshops were held between each local board and representatives from the four substantive CCOs.

10.     During May, staff have worked to ensure that the final document is representative of the discussions held at workshops, and that any outstanding questions have been resolved. 

11.     The substantive part of the engagement plan is designed to be in place for two years. In subsequent years, this document is likely to remain in use for three years, following the completion of the Local Board Plan.

12.     The attachments to the plan include information that is likely to require updating such as staff contacts and project updates and will be amended throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

13.     Quarterly updates will be provided to each local board to show both changes to the plan itself, and updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Workshops between local boards and CCO staff have provided local boards with the opportunity to share their views on CCO delivery and engagement in their area. Each workshop included an outline of each CCO’s work programme within the local board area, and local boards have provided their views on the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme.

15.     The Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plan 2022/2023 addresses key elements of recommendations made by the CCO Review, including:

a)   documenting key contacts, including senior CCO representatives of the organisation well placed to quickly respond to and resolve local concerns

b)   giving local boards the opportunity to highlight projects likely to be most significant to them as governors, contributing to a “no surprises” environment

c)   ensuring the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

16.     While it is still early days in terms of local board members and staff adjusting to the new way of working together, initial feedback has been positive.

17.     Work programme items that will be confirmed with the formal adoption of 2022/2023 budgets will be included as they become available.

Updates to the engagement plan

18.     Staff have updated the attachments to the engagement plan where there have been:

a)   new board members

b)   changes to local board members delegations or portfolios

c)   staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

d)   FY2022/2023 additional projects/events

19.     These changes are reflected in Attachment A – Ōrākei Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022-2023.

Auckland Transport

Q3 Update

20.     Meadowbank Kohimarama Connectivity Project - The John Rymer Place connection is completed and opened on 25 May 2022. Detailed design is underway for the Gowing Drive connection.

21.     The Glen Innes to Tamaki Drive Shared Pathway - Section 2 is completed and opened 25 May 2022. Section 4c Ōrākei Basin Boardwalk to Purewa Bridge is now under construction, Section 4a is now under construction, and Section 4b is at resource consenting stage

22.     Consultations regarding the Remuera Paid Parking proposals are now complete, with discussion now undertaken with Remuera Business Association. Recommendations are to be brought to the board.

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

Q3 Update

23.     The Economic Development priority ‘Kia ora Te Umanga’ of the Māori Outcomes Framework is under review, with the view of aligning investments now and in the future to an investment logic map. It will result in a multi-year road map that may include resourcing a Māori Economic Development Plan from the long-term plan funds assigned to the Māori Outcomes Fund.

24.     Government support packages: this line has been removed from the work programme. These programmes will largely be completed by the end of July 2022. The board will be updated on the final outcomes via the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited monthly newsletters.

25.     There are some postponed projects. Since including the Auckland Stadium Network Strategy in the joint CCO 2020/2021 engagement plans, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited has prioritised its work to deliver on CCO Review recommendation #2. The potential establishment of a single-operating model has a direct bearing on the Auckland Stadia Strategy, so it was considered prudent to pause the strategy project until the recommendation outlined in the CCO Review was fully explored. The outcome of that work will be known soon (before the end of the 2021/2022 FY) and will inform Tātaki Auckland Unlimited future work.

FY2022/2023 additional projects/events

26.     FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 has been added to reflect Michaels Avenue Reserve, home of Ellerslie Association Football Club, which has been shortlisted as a training venue. The final selection will be advised by the end of 2022. The engagement approach with local board is consult.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

Q3 Update

27.     Resource consent has been lodged for the development of the Meadowbank Community Centre. While awaiting the outcome of the resource consent process, engagement will be undertaken with key stakeholders, the local board, and the wider community. 

28.     Eke Panuku, on behalf of Auckland Council, is close to finalising an agreement with a development partner for the site at 84-100 Morrin Road, St Johns. As part of the agreement the development partner will need to remediate the contaminated land before developing approximately 250 homes of various typology here. The adjacent land which forms Te Touma (Purchas Hill) will be retained by Auckland Council and become a public reserve. 

29.     The proposed revocation of the reserve at 78 Merton Road, St Johns is still under review. 

Watercare

Q3 Update

30.     At this time Auckland Council’s funding is focused on the Western Isthmus water quality programme with the Eastern Isthmus due to get underway from 2025 through to 2040. Investment required to achieve long term improvements in water quality will be in the order of $800 million. A communication and engagement plan will be developed by Watercare with input by the Ōrākei Local Board as the project is planned. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plan 2022/2023 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however many of the projects it refers to will.

32.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     Adopting the updated Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plan 2022/202023 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

51.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

53.     The engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/202023 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

55.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

56.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2023 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

57.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     Changes will be made within the attachments of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan to ensure that information is kept up to date. The substantive document will not change until after the development of the next Local Board Plan. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.     The local board will receive Quarter Four updates in September 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ōrākei Local Board Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2023

33

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Acheivements Report for January 2021 to June 2022

File No.: CP2022/08704

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Achievements Report for the period 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Achievements Report highlights the Board’s achievements and progress during the period 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2022.

3.       The Ōrākei Progress and Achievements Report is a key communication tool to the residents of the Ōrākei Local Board area, allowing the Board to inform and stay accountable to its community on the key successes the Board has achieved in the last 18 months.

4.       A draft report has been shared with departments to provide feedback by 17 June 2022.  To enable feedback from departments to be incorporated, the draft Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Achievements Report was not available in time to be included in the published agenda. 

5.       The Ōrākei Progress and Achievements Report will be pre-circulated to Board members and officially tabled at the 23 June 2022 business meeting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      receive the Ōrākei Local Board Progress and Achievements Report for the period 1 January 2021 to 30 June 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Caroline Teh - Local Board Advisor

Jade Grayson - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change

File No.: CP2022/08796

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of the report is to seek feedback from local boards on the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) that are to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument (IPI) on medium density residential standards (MDRS) and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 (NPS-UD). These are:

a)   Transport-related changes to promote safe and efficient access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites, and to address additional parking issues that were identified following the mandatory removal of car parking minimums from the AUP (Auckland-wide chapters E24 Lighting, E27 Transport, and E38 Subdivision – Urban access and parking provisions).

b)   Additions to scheduled items to enable their protection when the IPI is notified (Schedule 10 Notable Tree Schedule and Maps, and Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps).

c)   Mandatory variations to incomplete plan changes (council-initiated and private) required by the government to ensure MDRS are applied in all relevant residential zones.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

3.       Auckland Council is required to publicly notify its IPI in August 2022 to implement the NPS- UD and MDRS in relevant residential zones.  The council’s IPI must now re-write residential objectives, policies and rules to include MDRS, as well as making other changes to implement NPS-UD intensification directives, like increasing height to at least six stories within walkable catchments of certain zones and the rapid transit network stations.

4.       Additional plan changes and variations are necessary to address related matters and are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI.

5.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the policy approach and content of these draft plan changes and variations prior to the Planning Committee’s August 2022 meeting where notification will be considered.

6.       The specific text of each plan change and variation is likely to be amended as these changes progress towards notification as a result of feedback received from local boards, iwi authorities, key stakeholders, internal specialists and legal review.

Transport

7.       Auckland Council has already removed minimum car parking requirements from the AUP as required by NPS-UD and is completing a technical plan change to address gaps created by those removals.  In doing so, other more complex additional parking matters need to be addressed in the AUP.

8.       Greater intensification across Auckland brings forward the need to address gaps and inconsistencies in the residential access provisions in chapters E27 Transport and E38 Subdivision - Urban.

Notable trees and Historic Heritage Places

9.       Additional notable trees and historic heritage places are proposed to be added to the AUP schedules 10 and 14 following staff-evaluation and these will be qualifying matters in the IPI. Historic heritage places and notable trees are qualifying matters that will be set out in the IPI to limit intensification so those values can be accommodated.  Amendments to the notable tree and historic heritage places schedules are required to both update and add in newly assessed items for protection. It is important to protect qualifying matters by including items that are not presently scheduled to avoid the loss of those items through intensification.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

10.     The government requires that the council prepare a variation for each plan change commenced, but not completed, at the time the December 2021 amendments to the Resource Management Act (RMA) came into force, where a change relates to a relevant residential zone.  The governments’ MDRS will apply for up to six private plan change requests, and one council-initiated change. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the content outlined in the agenda report relating to the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument on medium density residential standards and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020

b)      provide feedback as the local board’s response to the matters discussed in this report:

i)        Transport

ii)       Notable trees - Schedule 10

iii)      Historic heritage - Schedule 14

iv)      Variations to incomplete plan changes.

Horopaki

Context

Decision-making authority

11.     Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

12.     Local boards have a critical role in helping shape the council’s policy response to the NPS-UD. Plan changes and variations are required to address issues arising from implementing government policy and in terms of access matters in the Transport plan change, to address gaps and inconsistencies in the AUP provisions.  

13.     The plan changes and variations relate to:

Transport

a)   Addressing access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites to prioritise pedestrian access and safety and to improve access efficiency and convenience for all user groups.

b)   Developing parking provisions to:

i)    provide safe and convenient pedestrian access to dwellings that have no vehicle access 

ii)   require accessible parking so that people with disabilities can participate in everyday life 

iii)  ensure the loading/unloading of goods can occur in a manner that does not compromise the safe and efficient functioning of the road network (including accessways)

iv)  cater for emerging changes in transport, including greater use of e-bikes, micro-mobility devices and electric vehicles.   

Notable Trees and Historic Heritage Places

·    Updating the Auckland Unitary Plan notable tree schedule 10 and adding new notable trees

·    Adding new historic heritage places to the AUP historic heritage schedule 14, and removing one place from schedule 14.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

14.     The government requires variations so that all relevant residential zones include MDRS.  Variations will be complementary to the approach taken in the IPI. These mandatory variations must be processed alongside council’s IPI and will use the same fast-track process.  Council staff will prepare variations for:

Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

Local board area in which land is located

PC 49 Drury East

Franklin

PC 50 Waihoehoe

Franklin

PC 51 Drury 2

Franklin

PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

Upper Harbour

PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

Upper Harbour

PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

Suburbs in which land is located

 

PC 60 Open space

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

 

15.     Addressing access and parking matters must be addressed alongside the IPI so that the development community responds to growth opportunities appropriately. The rule changes are required to implement standards for assessing resource consent applications.

16.     Protecting historic heritage places and notable trees is important to comprehensively address qualifying matters in the AUP and protect these for future generations. The IPI will acknowledge historic heritage places (and other values) and notable trees as qualifying matters, but a separate change is necessary for those historic heritage places and trees that are not already scheduled but whose known values are significant, and eligible for scheduling.

17.     Local board feedback is an important input to help develop the plan changes and variations that are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI in August 2022.

18.     Local boards will have a second opportunity to express views after submissions close on the changes.  Views expressed after submissions close in a resolution will be included in the analysis of the plan changes and submissions received.  If a local board chooses to provide its views, a local board member will be invited to present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who make the decision on the plan changes.

19.     This report provides an overview of the IPI-supporting plan changes related to transport matters, and additional and corrected historic heritage places and notable trees and mandatory variations to incorporate MDRS. This report does not include a recommendation. Planning staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views as part of reporting to the Planning Committee.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Transport

20.     The Plans and Places department maintains a ‘Residential Issues Register’ and is currently finalising the draft 2021 ‘Section 35 Monitoring: B2.3 Quality Built Environment’ report. The register and the draft section 35 report identify the need for changes to the AUP to achieve better-quality access outcomes. As noted above, the identified parking issues are a consequence of the mandatory removal of car parking minimums.

21.     Attachment A outlines a summary of the potential changes at this stage in the process and the principal reasons for the changes.

Notable Trees

22.     The AUP protects and retains notable trees with significant historical, botanical or amenity values. Trees or groups of trees in Schedule 10 were evaluated using a set of criteria based on historical association, scientific importance or rarity, contribution to ecosystem services, cultural association or accessibility and intrinsic value. These factors are considered in the context of human health, public safety, property, amenity values and biosecurity.

23.     Tree schedules are highly dynamic and are not as easily maintained as other AUP schedules which are static (e.g. Outstanding Natural Landscapes Overlay Schedule, Outstanding Natural Features Overlay Schedule) meaning that they fall out of date over time. This is because subdivision, development and consents for removal/alteration as well as emergency works affect the description of listings on the Schedule. The health of trees can also naturally deteriorate. Given the number of listings contained in the Schedule, errors will continue to be identified and further updates will therefore be required. To update Schedule 10 requires a plan change. These changes cannot be addressed through any other process.

24.     There is a database of nearly 600 nominations received as submissions through the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan process and further unsolicited nominations received through the current nomination process. These nominations have been received for trees right across the region and are not limited to any specific geographical area. There is an expectation from the community that the council will evaluate and progress a plan change to add trees to the Schedule. There is a large volume of nominations and due to resourcing constraints, it has not been possible to evaluate them all at once. There will however be a portion of these nominations which have been evaluated and some of these trees may be found to meet the criteria for scheduling.

25.     Notable tree nominations are being investigated in the Albert-Eden, Franklin, Howick, Ōrākei, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. There are also more general amendments required to ensure the Schedule is accurate and operating as originally intended (for example, removals of listings where the tree has been physically removed, updating legal descriptions as a result of subdivision).

26.     Options relating to notable trees were presented to the Planning Committee on 5 November 2020 which resolved to review or make changes to the notable tree schedule as resources permit (PLA/2020/96). This included addressing existing nominations. It is important to note the scope of this work would not include calling for additional nominations.

27.     In accordance with the resolution discussed in paragraph 22, the Notable Trees Plan Change will amend Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule of the AUP as follows:

a)      Add those nominated trees which merit inclusion to the schedule

b)      Amend the schedule to address known inaccuracies/inconsistencies.

28.     The IPI will recognise notable trees as qualifying matters, including the newly proposed notable trees. A separate change is needed to schedule these additional trees as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Historic Heritage

29.     Historic heritage is a matter of national importance that decision makers must consider under section 6 of the RMA. Significant historic heritage places are identified in Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps of the Unitary Plan. Places identified in the schedule are subject to the provisions of the Unitary Plan Historic Heritage Overlay, which seeks to protect scheduled historic heritage places from inappropriate subdivision, use and development and enable the appropriate use of scheduled historic heritage places.

30.     For a place to qualify to be included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, each place must meet the criteria and thresholds for scheduling that are outlined in the Regional Policy Statement (RPS) section of the AUP. Historic heritage places must be at least of considerable significance to their locality or beyond.

31.     Historic heritage places have been identified in the Albert-Eden, Henderson-Massey, Howick, Ōrakei, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. A list of these places is included in Attachment B.

32.     Most of these places were identified as a result of the survey of the special character values that was part of the council’s response to the NPS-UD. Other places were identified via public nominations.  This work is supported by a Planning Committee resolution:

where significant historic heritage values are identified within the Special Character Areas Overlay, develop a plan change for places or areas to be added to the Auckland Unitary Plan historic heritage schedule.[1]

33.     Each identified historic heritage place’s evaluation demonstrates the criteria and thresholds for scheduling set out in the RPS are satisfied. It is important that places with significant historic heritage values are included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, so that these values can be appropriately managed. The historic heritage places listed in Attachment B are proposed to be included in Schedule 14 via a plan change. 

34.     Two historic heritage places are proposed to be deleted.  The former St Andrews Sunday School Hall at 40 Rankin Avenue, New Lynn (Schedule 14.1 ID 189) was demolished in 2019.  The Residence at 147 Sturges Road, Henderson (ID 75). This historic heritage place has been identified as not meeting the RPS thresholds for scheduling. It is not appropriate for a historic heritage place without sufficient value to remain in the AUP historic heritage Schedule 14.

35.     The IPI will recognise scheduled historic heritage places as qualifying matters, by limiting intensification to the extent necessary to continue to provide for the scheduled values. A separate change is needed to schedule the newly identified historic heritage places and to remove the place at 147 Sturges Road, as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Variations

36.     Amendments made to the RMA in December 2021 came into force immediately and require tier 1 local authorities (including Auckland) to incorporate the government’s MDRS into all relevant residential zones.

37.     The government’s intention is that all plan changes relating to relevant residential zones also incorporate MDRS.  Transitional provisions inserted into the RMA require the council to prepare variations where changes commenced, but were not completed, when the RMA was amended.  Up to seven variations are required to be notified at the same time as the council’s IPI, and to be processed alongside it.  Work is commencing on variations to these changes:

Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

Local board area in which land is located

PC 49 Drury East

Franklin

PC 50 Waihoehoe

Franklin

PC 51 Drury 2

Franklin

PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

Upper Harbour

PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

Upper Harbour

PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

 

Suburbs in which land is located

 

PC 60 Open space

 

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out Auckland’s climate goals:

a)      to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

b)      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation).

39.     The first of the council’s climate goals is relevant because it relates to climate adaptation. That goal aligns with the legal principle for RMA decision-makers to have regard to the effects of climate change (section 7(i) RMA).

40.     However, the RMA currently precludes the second goal: consideration of climate mitigation. The council may only consider climate adaptation and resilience.

41.     Several plan changes have some bearing on climate change. The transport plan change addresses the car parking design for new developments and access to residential car parking spaces and rear sites. How sites are designed and accessed provides for climate resilience, particularly by encouraging people to walk and cycle and facilitating sustainable modes of transport. Adding notable trees to the AUP schedule provides statutory protection for trees, adds to biodiversity and improves urban amenity for residents.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     The draft transport plan change has been consulted on with internal advice from Auckland Transport, Watercare and all relevant council departments including Auckland Plans Strategy and Research, Resource Consents, Regulatory Services, Infrastructure & Environmental Services, and the Tāmaki Makurau Design Ope (formerly the Urban Design Unit).

43.     Key specialists are also involved in the review of the draft transport provisions and their feedback will be considered in the ongoing development of this plan change.

44.     In addition, the planning team is also working with the Infrastructure and Environmental Services technical standards team in their development of an Access Technical Guidance document for the construction and design of residential, business and rural accesses.  This is to ensure the plan change and the technical guidance document are consistent with each other.  It is anticipated the technical guidance will be completed later this year, after the notification of the transport plan change.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     The extent of intensification anticipated by NPS-UD and RMA amendments will affect all local boards, except Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke.  Hauraki Gulf Islands are excluded from the application of MDRS and lie outside Auckland’s urban environment (where intensification is directed).

46.     Workshops were held with local boards on the draft transport plan change in November 2021 and in February 2022. Local boards’ feedback sought to address the access and parking matters by changing the operative AUP standards and/or creating new standards.  The draft section 32 report (which is being developed) also concurs that the issues are best addressed through statutory methods (e.g. a plan change). However, some matters could be supported by a non-statutory design guidance (e.g., cycle parking).  Other matter such as the access requirements for fire and emergency services are best addressed by additional staff training and amendments to the access Practice and Guidance Note. Attachment C provides a summary of what we heard from local boards during workshops earlier in the year.

47.     This report and related briefings provide an opportunity for local board views to inform policy development.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau is Council’s framework for measuring our performance in delivering on the strategic priorities identified by Māori.

49.     Policy 9 of NPS-UD directs the council to particularly involve iwi and hapū in the NPS-UD during the preparation of planning documents. The proposed plan changes to implement the intensification provisions is one planning document.

50.     All mana whenua entities recognised by the council receive ongoing invitations to engage and provide feedback on the NPS-UD programme including the supporting draft transport plan change. All representatives (including those electing not to participate in collective meetings or workshops) receive information, updates and hui notes.

51.     Relevant common themes identified to date include:

a)      Universal access provided in residential design for less able whānau members

b)      Safe and connected whānau and communities.

52.     Staff provide regular updates on all plan changes to mana whenua and specific briefings are planned for late May and June on these changes and the IPI.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views on policy development.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a draft plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s). This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Any views provided by the local board will be included in the August 2022 report to the Planning Committee seeking decisions on the IPI plan changes and the IPI-supporting plan changes and variations.  Following the close of submissions, local boards will have the opportunity to express views on the notified changes.

56.     If resolutions are passed after submissions close, the relevant local boards will be informed of the hearing date and invited to speak at the hearing in support of their views. Planning staff will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change by memorandum.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Summary of key potential changes to the draft transport plan change

81

b

Histroic heritage places proposed to be added to Schedule 14

89

c

Summary of what we heard from local board during workshops

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michele Perwick - Senior Principal Planner

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Emma Rush - Senior Advisor Special Projects

Teuila Young - Policy Planner

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 

 


Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021

File No.: CP2022/07935

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek feedback from the local board on the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 (NPS-UD) and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021 (RMA amendments).

2.       This report includes an overview of the feedback on the council’s preliminary response received through the public consultation from 19 April to 9 May 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The council’s preliminary response to the NPS-UD and RMA amendments are set out in the NPS-UD and the Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS).  Some of these are not optional. Council must change the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) to put these new rules in place.

4.       However, the NPS-UD allows us to make some limited decisions to help shape the future of our city.  Council can determine:

a)      the distances of walkable catchments, where buildings of six storeys or more are required. These are the areas around the city centre, rapid transit stops, and the ten metropolitan centres (Albany, Takapuna, Westgate, Henderson, New Lynn, Newmarket, Sylvia Park, Manukau, Botany and Papakura)

b)      the building heights and density to enable residential development within and next to other suburban centres – neighbourhoods centres, local centres, and town centres

c)      the “qualifying matters” that will apply in Auckland, or the characteristics within some areas that may allow the council to modify (or limit) the required building heights and density.

5.       Central government has already identified a number of qualifying matters. The council is also able to include other ‘qualifying matters’ that are important for Auckland.

6.       The elements of the preliminary response that the council is able to determine were open to feedback. A three-week public engagement on the council’s preliminary response to the NPS-UD and RMA amendments was completed on 9 May 2022. This included an independently run survey of 2000 Aucklanders. The feedback has been analysed, and the themes that have emerged from that analysis were presented to local board on Monday, 30 May 2022

7.       The feedback summary report is attached to this report and has been published on the AKHaveYourSay website. The feedback responses received have also been published on the website.

8.       Local boards are now invited to give feedback on the council’s preliminary response, with particular regard to the matters available to council to make decisions on.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Ōrākei Local Board:

a)      note the council’s preliminary response to the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 and the Resource Management (Enabling Housing Supply and Other Matters) Amendment Act 2021

b)      note the feedback received from Aucklanders on the council’s preliminary response during the three-week public consultation in April and May 2022

c)       provide feedback on the council’s preliminary response, to be considered by the Planning Committee in preparation of the proposed intensification plan change for notification in August 2022

Horopaki

Context

9.       The NPS-UD and the RMA amendments require that a proposed intensification plan change (IPI) must be notified by 20 August 2022. The Planning Committee and local board chairs (or their delegates) have attended numerous workshops and made decisions in 2021 and 2022 on preliminary policy directions to guide how the council will implement the NPS-UD and RMA amendments.

10.     At it’s meeting on 31 March 2022 the Planning Committee approved a preliminary response to the NPS-UD (Attachment A), for the purpose of public engagement for three weeks in April and May 2022. The preliminary response was made available to the public on the Auckland “Have Your Say” website from 19 April to 9 May.

11.     The preliminary response contained an overall consultation document, more detailed information sheets, and access to the GIS map viewer that illustrates zoning proposals that reflected the committee’s resolutions.  The maps also illustrated locations where various qualifying matters (mostly existing AUP overlays, endorsed by the committee) would limit the height and/or density that would otherwise be enabled.

12.     The GIS viewer was supported by information sheets that described the approach to intensification and the process that the council is following. The AUP text for the new zone provisions was not available for feedback, as this was (and is) still being prepared and tested.

13.     Since October 2021, local boards and mana whenua have been involved in helping the council develop its preliminary response. This report summarises the themes emerging from the public engagement.  Feedback received from the public, together with the ongoing involvement of local boards and mana whenua, will greatly assist the council in finalising the IPI for notification by 20 August 2022. 

14.     Feedback was specifically sought on the following matters:

a)      the extent of walkable catchments around the city centre, metropolitan centres and rapid transit network stops (as required under Policy 3(c))

b)      the approach to, and extent of, intensification of areas adjacent to the city, metropolitan, town, local and neighbourhood centres (as required under Policy 3(d))

c)      the selection of, and approach to, “any other qualifying matters” that limit the height and density that would otherwise be required as enabled under Policy 4. 

15.     Feedback was not sought on matters in the NPS-UD and RMA amendments that are mandatory.  Mandatory matters include the introduction of walkable catchments into the AUP, the enablement of six storey buildings in all zones in walkable catchments, and the application of medium density residential standards in all residential zones outside walkable catchments. 

16.     The public engagement (under the heading ‘Government’s new housing rules: what it means for Auckland’) comprised the following:

a)      an overview of the response and how to give feedback

b)      a main consultation document (also translated into numerous languages) with the full preliminary response overview

c)      online feedback form with questions on consultation topics and an opportunity to provide reasons and further explanation

d)      more detailed information sheets on a range of topics

e)      frequently asked questions and an explanation video

f)       special character area assessment survey reports

g)      the GIS NPS-UD map viewer and user guide

h)      information and booking links for webinars and events

i)       access to a planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

17.     Hard copies of the main documents including the feedback form were placed in libraries and service centres.

18.     Online consultation activities and events were scheduled and undertaken through the engagement period, as follows:

a)   four online webinars - two covering the whole preliminary response (with a focus on intensification), one on special character areas, and one on other council-identified qualifying matters

b)   four ‘Have Your Say’ events – two for general opportunities for people or groups to present and discuss their feedback to members and staff, one for regional stakeholders, and one for residents’ groups and associations

c)   two information meetings focussed on the special character areas qualifying matter – one on the North Shore and one in the city centre.

19.     In addition to the online and hard-copy feedback opportunity, an independently run sample survey of 2000 Aucklanders was procured from Kantar Public Limited. This was intended to enable a broader public perspective of the aspects of preliminary response, to complement the feedback offered and received from individuals, groups and organisations.

20.     All feedback received has been recorded, reviewed and allocated to themes to enable evaluation and assessment by staff and local board members. Summary reports have been prepared for the feedback received via the AKHaveYourSay website and also via the sample survey. All feedback has been published at AKHaveYourSay.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     Most feedback (6,094 items) was provided via our online feedback form, provided in eight languages (English, Te Reo Māori, Samoan, Tongan, Simplified and Traditional Chinese, Korean and Hindi). There were also 1,766 ‘non-feedback form’ items of feedback received via email or through the post. Feedback received after the consultation closing date has not been included in the analysis within the “Summary of Feedback” report (Attachment B). However, feedback received later than the closing date is being considered and will be made available for viewing along with the rest of the feedback received.

22.     Local board feedback on the preliminary response is now sought through resolutions at this meeting. This feedback will be considered in (and attached to) a report for the 30 June Planning Committee meeting where further policy directions will be determined towards the preparation of a proposed plan change for reporting to committee on 4 August 2022 for a decision on notification.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Objective 8 and policy 1 of the NPS-UD set out a policy framework that signals the need for decisions under the RMA to reduce emissions and improve climate resilience.

24.     This framework is in line with the ‘built environment’ priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which has a goal of achieving “A low carbon, resilient built environment that promotes healthy, low impact lifestyles”. The plan states that:

“To move to a low carbon and resilient region, climate change and hazard risks need to be integral to the planning system that shapes Auckland. Integrating land-use and transport planning is vital to reduce the need for private vehicle travel and to ensure housing and employment growth areas are connected to efficient, low carbon transport systems.”

25.     Applying the NPS-UD will enable additional residential intensification to occur in areas where jobs, services and amenities can be easily accessed by active modes and public transport. This will contribute to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and the more efficient use of land will reduce growth pressures in areas more susceptible to the effects of climate change. In some places, applying the MDRS required under the RMA amendments will also achieve this outcome. However, a key aspect of the council’s submission on the RMA amendments was that enabling three-storey medium density housing across Auckland’s urban environment, is likely to result in a greater number of people living in areas where it is extremely difficult to provide a high level of public transport service. A more detailed analysis of climate impacts will be possible once the mapping work required to implement the NPS-UD and the RMA amendments is more advanced.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations have been involved in preparing the council’s preliminary response to the NPS-UD and the RMA amendments. They will have an ongoing role during the feedback period through to and beyond 20 August 2022. Feedback received on the council’s preliminary response will be reviewed by the relevant departments and CCOs to assist the council in finalising the IPI for public notification.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Local boards were briefed in October and November 2021 on the implications of the NPS-UD and local board chairs were invited to the series of Planning Committee workshops run in 2021 on the NPS-UD.  Local boards also received a detailed briefing on the council’s preliminary response in March and May 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

28.     Auckland Council has obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its Significance and Engagement Policy to take special consideration when engaging with Māori and to enable Māori participation in council decision-making to promote Māori well-being.

29.     The NPS-UD provides for the interests of Māori through intensification to increase housing supply, alongside its identification of qualifying matters. The widespread intensification sought by the NPS-UD has the potential to affect Māori both negatively and positively. This includes with respect to culturally significant sites and landscapes, Treaty Settlement redress land, the urban form as it reflects mātauranga Māori and accessibility, and Māori facilities where customs and traditions are observed (such as marae).

30.     The relevant qualifying matters set out in the NPS-UD and RMA amendments include matters of national importance that decision-makers are required to recognise and provide for under section 6 of the RMA 1991, and matters necessary to implement, or to ensure consistency with, iwi participation legislation.

31.     Policy 9 of the NPS-UD sets out requirements for local authorities as follows:

“Local authorities, in taking account of the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) in relation to urban environments, must:

a)   involve hapū and iwi in the preparation of RMA planning documents and any FDSs by undertaking effective consultation that is early, meaningful and, as far as practicable, in accordance with tikanga Māori; and

b)   when preparing RMA planning documents and FDSs, take into account the values and aspirations of hapū and iwi for urban development; and

c)   provide opportunities in appropriate circumstances for Māori involvement in decision-making on resource consents, designations, heritage orders, and water conservation orders, including in relation to sites of significance to Māori and issues of cultural significance; and

d)   operate in a way that is consistent with iwi participation legislation.”

32.     Policy 9 directs the council to involve iwi and hapū in the NPS-UD, during the preparation of planning documents, and to take into account the values and aspirations of hapū and iwi for urban development in the region. In the context of the NPS-UD, the council must involve mana whenua and mataawaka within the region.

33.     Individual and collective engagement has raised several key themes relating matters like the protection of scheduled and known cultural heritage and managing potential interface effects from new development with existing marae. This is supported by research undertaken by the council team in advance of these discussions with mana whenua. This has drawn on a wide range of council documents and publicly available information.

34.     Common themes that have been identified include:

a)      universal access to be provided in residential design for less able whānau members

b)      access to open space for health and wellbeing

c)      safe and connected whānau and communities

d)      avoiding development in areas poorly served by infrastructure

e)      access to affordable housing options

f)       maintaining access to customary activities e.g. waka launching, kaimoana gathering

g)      protection of Māori sites and places of cultural significance. Maintaining precincts that protect cultural values or are otherwise culturally sensitive (such as Ihumātao)

h)      avoiding negative effects of intensive residential development on established cultural activities/facilities (such as marae)

i)       provisions for Kohanga reo and Kura Kaupapa Māori in urban areas

j)       use of Māori design concepts in the development of commercial centres and in large residential developments

k)      use of mātauranga and tikanga Māori in the management of resources

l)       the support of measures to maintain and improve water quality, ecological areas, volcanic viewshafts, and the coastline

m)     avoiding exacerbating natural hazard risks

n)      maintaining the cultural significance of the Waitakere Ranges Heritage Area

o)      concern that Future Urban Zone land will be prematurely rezoned.

35.     The council’s engagement team continues to actively work with mana whenua representatives on these matters. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

36.      NPS-UD implementation has been progressing within existing budgets. However, the RMA amendments has resulted in a significant increase in the scale and complexity of the project, without any changes to the NPS-UD implementation timeframes. This will require a greater than anticipated level of change to the AUP.

37.     The financial impact of these changes will affect the current 2021-2022 and the 2022-2023 financial years, and potentially the following year. While it is expected that additional costs in the current financial year can be met through a re-prioritisation of work programmes within the Chief Planning Office, further costs (primarily relating to operation of an independent hearings panel and engagement of specialists) may require re-prioritisation of other work programmes from across the organisation.  Planning for the 2022-2023 financial year is currently underway, however any impacts will be of a scale that will not affect the council’s overall financial position.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

38.     The government has set a deadline of 20 August 2022 for the council to publicly notify the IPI. Given the scale and complexity of the work required to meet this deadline, there is a risk that the quality of engagement on the council’s preliminary response will not meet the expectation of Aucklanders and key stakeholders, and that the council may not receive quality feedback from a wide range of interests.  There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-UD and the RMA amendments, and where the council has some discretion. 

39.     These risks have been mitigated to date by strong, clear communications in the lead-up to and during the engagement period.  The responses during the consultation period show a good response from Pasifika, and the general 25-44 age group.  The responses were underrepresented in Māori, Asian and the general 15-24 age group. There was over-representation in the responses by New Zealand European / European and those over 45 years old. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

40.     Staff continue to analyse feedback received, and this analysis will be presented to the committee, mana whenua and local boards to inform the completion of the IPI that must be publicly notified by 20 August 2022.  Public notification is the beginning of formal submissions and hearings of those submissions.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Consultation document

103

b

NPS-UD Summary of the consultation feedback

109

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Trina Thompson - Local Area Manager

 


Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Ōrākei Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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[1] PLA/2021/80