I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 June 2022

10.00am

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams and either a recording or a written summary will be uploaded to the Auckland Council website.

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jon Turner

 

Members

Harry Doig

 

 

Ella Kumar, JP

 

 

Fiona Lai

 

 

Bobby Shen

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor

 

17 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           6

12        Notice of Motion from Chairperson J Fairey - Removal of high voltage power lines and pylons                                                                                                                      7

13        Adoption of the Puketāpapa Local Board Agreement 2022/2023                          11

14        Adoption of concept plan for Waikōwhai Park                                                        29

15        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)   63

16        Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change                                                                                          69

17        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 16 June 2022 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1 (LBS 3.11.1) or Standing Order 1.9.1 (LBS 3.10.17) (revoke or alter a previous resolution) a Notice of Motion has been received from Chairperson J Fairey, Seconded by Member H Doig for consideration under item 12.

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Notice of Motion from Chairperson J Fairey - Removal of high voltage power lines and pylons

File No.: CP2022/08784

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/executive-summary-reports.aspx

1.       Chairperson J Fairey has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Chairperson J Fairey and Member H Doig as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

3.       Supporting information is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      restates its advocacy of many years to support removing the three high voltage power lines, and associated pylons, which run through our community.

b)      supports the Transpower plan, in their Auckland Strategy, to remove two of the three high voltage power lines through our community.

c)      requests the removal of these two lines be brought forward to work in with the Kāinga Ora development of the Waikōwhai area, to enable good quality intensification and minimise community disruption.

d)      requests Transpower look at options for the undergrounding of the third high voltage power line, which runs in part through the Manukau Harbour.

e)      notes mana whenua concerns regarding the disturbing of land through undergrounding, and ask that Transpower take particular care to listen to mana whenua views and find ways to address them.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion from Chairperson J Fairey - Removal of high voltage power lines and pylons

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Adoption of the Puketāpapa Local Board Agreement 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07989

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Puketāpapa Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, council consulted on the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards have now considered local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

6.       On 29 June 2022, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Puketāpapa Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy (Attachment A).

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

c)      delegate authority to the Chair to make any final changes to the local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (the Puketāpapa Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, on 29 June 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards. Local board plans influence and inform the Annual Budgets which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a one-year period. For each financial year, Auckland Council must also have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

8.       Throughout the development of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

9.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, the council consulted with the public on the Annual Budget 2022/2023. One locally held event was held in the Puketāpapa Local Board area to engage with the community and seek feedback on both regional and local proposals.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was included as an attachment on the Puketāpapa May business meeting agenda.

11.     Local boards considered this feedback, and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of  consultation on Annual Budget 2022/2023 and local boards have received a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (Attachment A), including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

14.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement will be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2022/2023 that will be adopted at June business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

19.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

20.     Of those who submitted to the Annual Budget 2022/2023 from the Puketāpapa Local Board area 11 identified as Māori.These submissions were provided to the local board for consideration at local board workshops during the development of their local board agreement.

21.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2022/2023 financial year.

23.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the Annual Budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

24.     Funding for ABS is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

25.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 is adopted alongside of the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets. Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     Decisions on the local content of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023, are required by 23 June 2022 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, at its 29 June 2022 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2022 when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

28.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the Annual Budget 2022/2023 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Chair to make any final changes if necessary.

29.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be agreed between local boards and operational departments at business meetings in June 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Local content to support the Annual Budget 2022/2023

15

b

Attachment B – Local fees and charges schedules 2022/2023

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sara Khan - Local Board Advisor

David Rose - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Adoption of concept plan for Waikōwhai Park

File No.: CP2022/08578

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek adoption of the concept plan for Waikōwhai Park at 8 Waikōwhai Road, Hillsborough.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Puketāpapa Local Board allocated $50,000 Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) Opex funding in financial year 2017/2018, to complete delivery of several parks planning projects across the local board area. This included development of a concept plan for Waikōwhai Park.

3.       Significant consultation with mana whenua groups, local community, the Puketāpapa Local Board and other council departments was undertaken to shape the development of this concept plan. All those engaged in this process were supportive of the final draft as per attachment A to this report.

4.       The proposed concept plan was discussed with the local board at several workshops.  The local board provided positive feedback and supported the proposed concept plan in principle.

5.       The draft concept plan proposes an upgrade to existing assets and development of new assets on the site.  Key improvements to the park outlined in the final draft concept plan include:

·    amenity improvements

·    recreation improvements

·    environmental improvements

·    access improvements.

6.       As part of the Puketāpapa Local Board financial year 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme, the local board approved the renewal of the playground (ID 18343) and the provision of a drinking fountain (ID 26210) within the park.

7.       Staff recommend that the local board adopt the proposed concept plan for Waikōwhai Park.  It is proposed that some of the identified improvements including connections, accessibility, passive and active recreation, connection with nature and safety and security, could be incorporated within existing planned projects for the park.  Updates on progress of each project will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports.

8.       All funding requirements to deliver the remaining identified improvements in the proposed concept plan will be discussed with the local board as part of their future Customer and Community Services work programme approval process.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      adopt the concept plan for Waikōwhai Park at 8 Waikōwhai Road, Hillsborough as per Attachment A of the agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Waikōwhai Park, situated at 8 Waikōwhai Road, Hillsborough, within the Puketāpapa Local Board area is an important landscape and recreational feature for the local area. The 20ha site slopes steeply from the ridgeline at Hillsborough Road down to the Manukau Harbour.  See figure one below which shows the extent of Waikōwhai Park.

Figure 1: Waikōwhai Park, 8 Waikōwhai Road, Hillsborough

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10.     The park has significant history and was occupied by mana whenua for over 800 years, holding particular importance to Te Wai-o-hua, Te Kawerau a Maki and Ngāti Whātua o Ōrakei. In the early 1900’s it was activated as one of Auckland’s first ‘resort destination park’, and in the late 1900’s was used as a landfill site.

11.     The park provides opportunities for public use including a network of walking trails, a popular dog off-leash area, a playground, a BBQ facility, a toilet facility, and boat launching access to the Manukau Harbour. The regenerating native forest and impressive harbour views also enable people to connect with nature.

12.     The following projects are programmed for delivery at Waikōwhai Park, including the renewal of the playground (ID 18343) and the installation of a drinking fountain (ID 26210) as part of the Customer and Community Services work programme.  The reinstatement of the closed landfill sites is programmed for delivery as part of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme.

13.     In financial year 2017/2018, the Puketāpapa Local Board allocated $50,000 LDI Opex towards the delivery of a number of parks planning projects across the local board area. This included the development of a concept plan to enable holistic long-term planning for Waikōwhai Park.

Links to the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2020

14.     The development of the concept plan for the Waikōwhai Park aligns with the following Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Outcome One: Inclusive communities that are healthy, connected and thriving

Objective: Places that we live, learn, work and play support us to have healthier, more active lifestyles.

Outcome Three: Our environment is protected and enhanced for present and future generations

Objective: We all take care of waterways, parks and public spaces.

Outcome Four: Well-planned neighbours and vibrant public spaces

Objective: A well-used network of facilities and public spaces that are inviting, safe and promote wellbeing.

Outcome Five: Transport options that are reliable, accessible and less polluting

Objective: Making getting around safer.

Objective: More walking, cycling and use of public transport.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Parks Services and Community Facilities staff have identified possible improvements to park service provision at Waikōwhai Park through development of the attached concept plan.

16.     As part of the development of the concept plan, input was sought from various council departments, including working closely with the Closed Landfill team and Healthy Waters to ensure that the proposed concept plan responded to existing projects. Outcomes related to accessibility were extracted directly from the 2018 site investigation into accessibility, also funded by the local board.

17.     Mana whenua engagement and public consultation was undertaken as part of the concept plan development (detailed in paragraph 34-38).  Overall, the proposed concept plan was supported by all stakeholders, including mana whenua and the public.

18.     The draft concept plan (Attachment A) proposes an upgrade to existing assets and development of new assets on the site.  Some of these identified improvements can be incorporated within existing planned projects for the park.

19.     The following Waikōwhai Park improvements, as recommended in the proposed concept plan can be incorporated within current projects and will benefit the local community and the park:

·        amenity improvements – new or improved locations for picnicking, relaxing and appreciating views over the harbour.

·        recreation improvements – new or improved path connections and enhancement of the Waikōwhai Walkway. Improvements to play features on site, including nature play.

·        environmental improvements – additional native planting and repair of the streams/ storm water management through the site.

·        access improvements – improved access to the site for those with access needs in line with a Be Accessible site investigation report.

20.     The concept plan also details a number of specific improvements to assets within the park, which will require further investigation and design prior to delivery. These include:

·        path upgrades across the site

·        playground upgrades, including nature play and reinstatement of the flying fox (being funded in the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme ID 18343)

·        improved wayfinding and interpretative signage at upper car park

·        stormwater remediation

·        amenity nodes at Waikōwhai and Faulkner Bays, including seating, planting and improved beach access

·        accessibility improvements at upper carpark and to amenity area/toilet

·        car park improvements at Faulkner Bay.

21.     Staff recommend adoption of the proposed concept plan as it will enable delivery of some of the identified improvements above, through the two approved projects for the park.  All future budget allocations to deliver the full scope of the concept plan will be discussed with the local board as part of their future Customer and Community Services work programme development process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.     In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and a commitment to the community to look at ways on how we can consider climate implications in everything that we do.

23.     The Community Facilities department is committed to the regional sustainability targets of Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri-Auckland's Climate Plan.

24.     Any formal development of parks infrastructure will contribute to climate change through carbon emissions, particularly during construction and renewal phases, and through ongoing maintenance. This needs to be carefully considered when creating new parks assets.

25.     The changes proposed for Waikōwhai Park consider future impacts of climate change, including sea level rise and erosion. The concept plan works to improve the resilience of this piece of land for the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     The proposed concept plan was designed in collaboration with staff in various departments within council and will assist towards delivery of a holistic development of the park.  Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the development of the park is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

27.     The improvements outlined within the proposed concept plan will assist staff in various council departments and CCO’s undertaking development within the park currently and in the future, including Community Facilities, Parks, Sports and Recreation, Healthy Waters, Auckland Transport and Watercare, to deliver improved outcomes for the accessible needs’ for the community of Puketāpapa.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     Investment into Waikōwhai Park through the proposed concept plan will provide numerous benefits to the local community, and also to the sensitive and important coastal environment.

29.     The proposed concept plan aligns with a number of outcomes and objectives identified within the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2020 as detailed in paragraph 14.

30.     Workshops were held with the Puketāpapa Local Board to discuss this project in August 2017, May 2018 and June 2018.

31.     Feedback from the local board throughout this process emphasised the need to balance both environmental and recreational improvements, as well as other community use.

32.     Public feedback was sought at a public consultation evening in May 2018, as well as through online engagement via council’s Shape Auckland and Have Your Say websites over May and June 2018. Feedback for the final concept plan was positive, with support for all identified actions.

33.     The final draft concept plan was presented to the local board at a workshop on 28 June 2018. The local board indicated in principle support for the final concept plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

34.     Mana whenua were engaged throughout the development of the concept plan at several South-Central Park, Sports and Recreation Kaitiaki Forums. All representatives present at the forum on 30 May endorsed the final draft of the concept plan.

35.     Mana whenua were also invited to a site walkover in November 2017 in collaboration with the Closed Landfill team. Representatives from Te Akitai Waiohua and Te Kawerau a Maki offered feedback during the walkover around relevant cultural considerations, which helped to shape the finer details of the concept plan.

36.     The proposed concept plan for Waikōwhai Park references the importance of mana whenua as kaitiaki (guardians) of the whenua (land) and reflects Auckland Council’s desire to deliver the vision of a world class city, including a Māori identity that is Auckland’s point of difference in the world.

37.     Te Aranga Design Principles of Mana (Rangatiratanga/Authority), Whakapapa (names and naming), Tohu (the wider cultural landscape), Taiao (the natural environment), Mauri Tu (environmental health), Mahi Toi (creative expression) and Ahi Ka (the living presence) were taken into consideration during the overall development of the concept plan.

38.     Mana whenua will be engaged to provide further input when projects proposed within the concept plan are initiated.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     Funding is already in place for the renewal of the playground in financial year 2021/2022 as part of the Customer and Community Services work programme.  The playground renewal (ID 18343) is funded by the local board’s capital local renewal budget and the budget allocation was $427,000.  The installation of a drinking fountain is funded as part of the local board’s Locally Driven Initiative (LDI) Capex funding budget and $40,000 was allocated in the 2021/2022 financial year for the installation of several drinking fountains in the local board area including Waikōwhai Park.

40.     Additional funding will be sought in future Customer and Community Services work programmes to enable further delivery of outcomes identified within the proposed concept plan.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     The concept plan may require amendment in the short-term should changes occur to the design or planned actions of the closed landfill remediation project. Collaboration between departments will ensure that the identified improvements to park services will not be impacted by any such changes.

42.     Given the current financial constraints that Auckland Council faces, there may be insufficient budget to deliver on actions identified within the plan. To mitigate this, it is suggested that the local board consider funding implementation of the concept plan over a period of ten years, prioritizing deliverables over this time.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

43.     Subject to the local board’s adoption of the concept plan, staff will include delivery of appropriately identified outcomes within the current approved projects.  Progress updates on the projects will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports.

44.     If adopted, the attached concept plan will enable future work programme development with the local board.  All funding requirements to deliver the remaining identified improvements in the proposed concept plan will be discussed with the local board as part of their future Customer and Community Services work programme approval process.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

29 Waikowhai Concept Doc_E_LB ADOPTION_A3

35

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jody Morley – Manager Area Operations, Community Facilities

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)

File No.: CP2022/08352

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on Auckland Transport’s Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parking Strategy sets out the objectives, principles and policies relating to Auckland Transport’s management and supply of parking across Auckland and was last updated in 2015.

3.       Since 2015, numerous changes in both the central and local government context mean that a review of the Parking Strategy (2015) was required.

4.       The review has involved engagement with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community.

5.       In late May, Auckland Transport (AT) provided summaries of public engagement to all local boards. This report is to seek feedback from local boards, having had the opportunity to review feedback from their community, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback, taking into consideration their community’s feedback, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The current Parking Strategy (2015) was progressive at the time it was introduced, bringing about many changes in Auckland including wider acceptance of priced parking; however, it is no longer fit for purpose. Since it was developed there have been numerous changes to the policy and planning context including:

·        adoption of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Development signalled in the Unitary Plan will enable growth that may be difficult to service with public transport, meaning that some new suburbs will rely on car use for access

·        changes to travel behaviour, such as the emergence of micromobility (i.e., electric scooters) and the growth of the delivery economy

·        Auckland’s public transport network has matured over time, providing opportunities for further passenger uptake and efficiency related to park and ride management

·        market demand is pushing for more housing provision and density. Development is already showing evidence of less carparking provision and more issues with carparking compliance

·        the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) which guides direction on urban development through the Unitary Plan. The NPS-UD requires Auckland Council to remove parking minimum requirements from the Unitary Plan, which means that developments will not be required to provide onsite parking. This will contribute to society and transport becoming less car-centric over time; however, it will lead to increasing pressure on public parking resources, particularly on-street parking

·        both central government and Auckland Council have declared ‘climate emergencies’, prioritising policy initiatives and investment that will reduce carbon emissions. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and other plans and strategies proposed by central government will require changes to the land transport system, including parking.

7.       The Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) is an important element of aligning and addressing Auckland’s response to these issues, particularly by managing parking in a way that:

·        supports public transport and alternative modes, which will make public transport and active modes such as walking and cycling safer and more convenient

·        responds to Auckland’s population growth and land-use intensification

·        acknowledges that space for carparking is a limited public resource.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Draft Parking Strategy (2022) (Attachment A) sets out the strategic context and the need to manage the transport system, as well as the strategic objectives and agreed principles for parking management.

9.       The proposed approach to planning parking management is set out on pages 26-36 of Attachment A. The key elements of this are:

·        proactively applying parking management in areas that have land use intensity and good public transport access

·        repurposing road space away from parking where this is required to enable delivery of the Strategic Transport Network.

10.     The accompanying parking policies (p38-63 of Attachment A) provide more technical detail on how parking is proposed to be managed in order to align to the principles set out in the strategic direction. The policies are grouped by:

·        provision and approach

·        on-street and off-street

·        specific vehicle classes

·        specific situations.

11.     The strategy also includes a section on advocacy to central government for legislative and/or regulatory reform as there are some areas of parking management that are outside local government control. Including these areas also provides context on the limitations of regulation in areas we would like to effect change and achieve better outcomes. These areas include:

·        parking infringement fines

·        banning berm parking

·        residential parking permit cost-setting

·        influencing private parking through parking levies.

12.     In December 2021, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council released a Parking Discussion Document to start the conversation with the public on future parking management in Auckland. AT received 32 pieces of written feedback. Following this feedback, several areas of the draft Parking Strategy and its accompanying policies were updated, including:

·        developing the narrative to better link it to the broader transport story, strategic objectives and policy rationale, as well as regulatory areas in need of reform

·        focussing on the benefits of parking management to enable and support access, resulting in a more equitable transport system

·        articulating the benefits and implications of parking to the community

·        acknowledging the costs of parking provision

·        emphasising parking diversity to enable mode shift

·        emphasising that the roll-out of further parking management will happen over time, starting where there is most readiness for change, and that this is a ten-year plan

·        outlining indicators of success

·        ensuring that consultation materials acknowledge the existing context and public fatigue.

13.     Strategic direction provided by the Planning Committee has also guided development of the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) requires planning decisions to contribute to the development of urban environments that support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and are resilient to the likely current and future effects of climate change.

15.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan outlines the need for Auckland to reduce its transport-related emissions significantly, to meet the target of 64% reduction by 2030. This means that business as usual for transport and land-use project planning and delivery, and management of the transport system, cannot continue.

16.     Parking management is a lever in managing the transport network, both in terms of the opportunities that repurposing of road space offers to enabling other modes, and in disincentivising car use.

17.     Implementing the Parking Strategy will include repurposing parking lanes on key roads in Auckland, increasing the diversity of transport options and improving safety and efficiency for people using sustainable modes and for goods and service delivery. This is a key change required to reduce transport-related emissions, meaning the Parking Strategy is of significant importance as an early step to transport-related climate action.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Auckland Transport has engaged with key stakeholders across the council family, including raising awareness of the review with Auckland Council’s advisory panels.

19.     Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited provided feedback during engagement on the Parking Discussion Document. Their feedback was supportive of the proposed approach.

20.     Both the need for review and the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) prepared for public consultation have been endorsed by Auckland Council’s Planning Committee (Resolution number PLA/2022/24).

21.     Considerable liaison has taken place between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council departments ranging from Planning and Transport Strategy at a strategic level to Community Facilities about management of car parking in or near community parks.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Since Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board approved the review of the Parking Strategy in 2021, Auckland Transport has engaged with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community. The objective of the engagement process has been to ensure that Aucklanders are aware of the review, have had an opportunity to find out more about the proposed changes, and have had an opportunity to provide feedback.

23.     The engagement process included the following key activities:

a)      in 2021, information about the review was sent to all local boards and presented to the Local Board Chairs’ Forum

b)      all local boards were offered a workshop in August 2021, and in September 2021 all were invited to provide feedback that would contribute to the initial thinking around development of an updated draft document

c)      in December 2021, a Parking Discussion Document was published, targeted at key stakeholders and calling for initial feedback. 32 pieces of written feedback were received

d)      in March 2022, information about upcoming wider public consultation was provided to local boards along with a further workshop with Auckland Transport subject matter experts. The public consultation was again promoted through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum in April 2022

e)      public engagement and consultation on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy has recently closed. Auckland Transport received 943 submissions. Responses from the community have been collated and provided to local boards as area specific reports (Attachment B). Public engagement included:

i)   media (OurAuckland, radio) and social media (videos) marketing to let the public know about the engagement

ii)  online information

iii) webinars at which Auckland Transport staff were available to discuss the proposal with members of the public

iv) nine open days held in libraries around the region for members of the public to discuss the proposal with Auckland Transport staff

v)  discussions with key stakeholders including business associations, industry groups, emergency services, utilities, and other government agencies

vi) a public debate about parking issues.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to give their feedback, based on consideration of their community’s feedback, on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Parking management is a kaitiakitanga issue, in that it is about managing a limited public resource. Auckland Transport has engaged with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to establish how best to incorporate views from mana whenua into the review.

26.     Feedback from a series of AT hui with mana whenua representatives reinforced that parking is a topic of considerable concern to Māori. Other points raised include:

·        acknowledgement that, as well as the strategic concerns around air quality and resource management, parking enables access

·        that parking infringements can contribute to creating a cycle of debt

·        that communities are facing compounding pressures - parking management shouldn’t adversely impact people and places even further

·        the potential for parking management to further reduce access - particularly for less able-bodied kaumatua and kuia - to the whenua, the moana and to wahi tapu.

27.     Other potential impacts of increased parking management for Māori are likely to be similar to those for the wider population. Some members of the community are more reliant on cars for access, particularly if they do not have good access to public transport. Barriers to public transport, such as cost and network coverage, influence access to necessities such as education, healthcare, employment, shopping, and social services.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Parking management resourcing will be delivered through AT operational budgets. Initial work to understand the resourcing required to implement the strategy indicates that this will require significant resource increases for planning, design, compliance monitoring and enforcement. It is currently expected that the strategy would be at least revenue-neutral overall once compliance monitoring/enforcement revenue is considered.

29.     Revenue from parking management helps to offset AT operational costs and therefore reduce reliance on ratepayer funding.

30.     There are no financial implications for local boards associated with providing feedback on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are significant risks associated with adopting a new approach to parking management in Auckland – however these must be weighed against the opportunity costs of not having an appropriate framework in place to manage parking. These include:

a)      persistent and increasing issues with over-reliance on on-street parking, particularly since the removal of onsite parking requirements in the Unitary Plan

b)      reduced ability to support development of the public transport and cycling network (both of which reduce emissions) and less ability to enable place-based improvements within the road corridor

c)      not having the ability to take an integrated and strategic approach that supports business when managing parking in town centres using collaborative parking management plans

d)      less flexibility with managing the impacts of increased population growth and intensification.

32.     Strong, considered feedback from local boards will enable Auckland Transport to make good decisions about the Parking Strategy while they balance these risks against the opportunity costs described above.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Feedback from local boards will be reviewed and taken into account as staff consider any amendments to the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy before recommendations to the Auckland Council Planning Committee are made in August 2022.

34.     Following endorsement of the Auckland Parking Strategy by the Auckland Council Planning Committee, approval will be sought from the Auckland Transport Board.

35.     Once approved by the Auckland Transport Board, the new Parking Strategy will be introduced.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Parking Strategy - Attachment A (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Public Consultation - summary of local feedback - Attachment B (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Covacich, Principal Transport Planner, Auckland Transport

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Andrew McGill, Head of Integrated Network Planning, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on proposed supporting plan changes to accompany the Medium Density Residential Standards and National Policy Statement on Urban Development plan change

File No.: CP2022/08759

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of the report is to seek feedback from local boards on the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) that are to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument (IPI) on medium density residential standards (MDRS) and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020 (NPS-UD). These are:

·        Transport-related changes to promote safe and efficient access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites, and to address additional parking issues that were identified following the mandatory removal of car parking minimums from the AUP (Auckland-wide chapters E24 Lighting, E27 Transport, and E38 Subdivision – Urban access and parking provisions).

·        Additions to scheduled items to enable their protection when the IPI is notified (Schedule 10 Notable Tree Schedule and Maps, and Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps).

·        Mandatory variations to incomplete plan changes (council-initiated and private) required by the government to ensure MDRS are applied in all relevant residential zones.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

3.       Auckland Council is required to publicly notify its IPI in August 2022 to implement the NPS- UD and MDRS in relevant residential zones.  The council’s IPI must now re-write residential objectives, policies and rules to include MDRS, as well as making other changes to implement NPS-UD intensification directives, like increasing height to at least six stories within walkable catchments of certain zones and the rapid transit network stations.

4.       Additional plan changes and variations are necessary to address related matters and are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI.

5.       Feedback is sought from local boards on the policy approach and content of these draft plan changes and variations prior to the Planning Committee’s August 2021 meeting where notification will be considered.

6.       The specific text of each plan change and variation is likely to be amended as these changes progress towards notification as a result of feedback received from local boards, iwi authorities, key stakeholders, internal specialists and legal review.

1.          

2.          

Transport

7.       Auckland Council has already removed minimum car parking requirements from the AUP as required by NPS-UD and is completing a technical plan change to address gaps created by those removals.  In doing so, other more complex additional parking matters need to be addressed in the AUP.

8.       Greater intensification across Auckland brings forward the need to address gaps and inconsistencies in the residential access provisions in chapters E27 Transport and E38 Subdivision - Urban.

Notable trees and Historic Heritage Places

9.       Additional notable trees and historic heritage places are proposed to be added to the AUP schedules 10 and 14 following staff-evaluation and these will be qualifying matters in the IPI. Historic heritage places and notable trees are qualifying matters that will be set out in the IPI to limit intensification so those values can be accommodated.  Amendments to the notable tree and historic heritage places schedules are required to both update and add in newly assessed items for protection. It is important to protect qualifying matters by including items that are not presently scheduled to avoid the loss of those items through intensification.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

10.     The government requires that the council prepare a variation for each plan change commenced, but not completed, at the time the December 2021 amendments to the Resource Management Act (RMA) came into force, where a change relates to a relevant residential zone.  The governments’ MDRS will apply for up to six private plan change requests, and one council-initiated change. 

3.          

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      note the content outlined in the agenda report relating to the development of draft plan changes and variations to the Auckland Unitary Plan to be considered for notification at the August 2022 Planning Committee meeting together with the Intensification Planning Instrument on medium density residential standards and implementing Policies 3 and 4 of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development 2020

b)      provide feedback as the local board’s response to the matters discussed in this report:

i)       Transport

ii)       Notable trees - Schedule 10

iii)      Historic heritage - Schedule 14

iv)     Variations to incomplete plan changes.

 

Horopaki

Context

Decision-making authority

11.     Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of the council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.

12.     Local boards have a critical role in helping shape the council’s policy response to the NPS-UD. Plan changes and variations are required to address issues arising from implementing government policy and in terms of access matters in the Transport plan change, to address gaps and inconsistencies in the AUP provisions.  

13.     The plan changes and variations relate to:

Transport

·    Addressing access to residentially zoned parking spaces and rear sites to prioritise pedestrian access and safety and to improve access efficiency and convenience for all user groups.

·    Developing parking provisions to:

provide safe and convenient pedestrian access to dwellings that have no vehicle access 

require accessible parking so that people with disabilities can participate in everyday life

ensure the loading/unloading of goods can occur in a manner that does not compromise the safe and efficient functioning of the road network (including accessways)

cater for emerging changes in transport, including greater use of e-bikes, micro-mobility devices and electric vehicles.   

Notable Trees and Historic Heritage Places

·    Updating the Auckland Unitary Plan notable tree schedule 10 and adding new notable trees

·    Adding new historic heritage places to the AUP historic heritage schedule 14, and removing one place from schedule 14.

Variations to incomplete plan changes

14.     The government requires variations so that all relevant residential zones include MDRS.  Variations will be complementary to the approach taken in the IPI. These mandatory variations must be processed alongside council’s IPI and will use the same fast-track process.  Council staff will prepare variations for:

 

Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

Local board area in which land is located

PC 49 Drury East

Franklin

PC 50 Waihoehoe

Franklin

PC 51 Drury 2

Franklin

PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

Upper Harbour

PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

Upper Harbour

PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

Suburbs in which land is located

 

PC 60 Open space

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

 

15.     Addressing access and parking matters must be addressed alongside the IPI so that the development community responds to growth opportunities appropriately. The rule changes are required to implement standards for assessing resource consent applications.

16.     Protecting historic heritage places and notable trees is important to comprehensively address qualifying matters in the AUP and protect these for future generations. The IPI will acknowledge historic heritage places (and other values) and notable trees as qualifying matters, but a separate change is necessary for those historic heritage places and trees that are not already scheduled but whose known values are significant, and eligible for scheduling.

17.     Local board feedback is an important input to help develop the plan changes and variations that are proposed to be notified alongside the IPI in August 2022.

18.     Local boards will have a second opportunity to express views after submissions close on the changes.  Views expressed after submissions close in a resolution will be included in the analysis of the plan changes and submissions received.  If a local board chooses to provide its views, a local board member will be invited to present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who make the decision on the plan changes.

19.     This report provides an overview of the IPI-supporting plan changes related to transport matters, and additional and corrected historic heritage places and notable trees and mandatory variations to incorporate MDRS. This report does not include a recommendation. Planning staff cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views as part of reporting to the Planning Committee.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Transport

20.     The Plans and Places department maintains a ‘Residential Issues Register’ and is currently finalising the draft 2021 ‘Section 35 Monitoring: B2.3 Quality Built Environment’ report. The register and the draft section 35 report identify the need for changes to the AUP to achieve better-quality access outcomes. As noted above, the identified parking issues are a consequence of the mandatory removal of car parking minimums.

21.     Attachment A outlines a summary of the potential changes at this stage in the process and the principal reasons for the changes.

Notable Trees

22.     The AUP protects and retains notable trees with significant historical, botanical or amenity values. Trees or groups of trees in Schedule 10 were evaluated using a set of criteria based on historical association, scientific importance or rarity, contribution to ecosystem services, cultural association or accessibility and intrinsic value. These factors are considered in the context of human health, public safety, property, amenity values and biosecurity.

23.     Tree schedules are highly dynamic and are not as easily maintained as other AUP schedules which are static (e.g. Outstanding Natural Landscapes Overlay Schedule, Outstanding Natural Features Overlay Schedule) meaning that they fall out of date over time. This is because subdivision, development and consents for removal/alteration as well as emergency works affect the description of listings on the Schedule. The health of trees can also naturally deteriorate. Given the number of listings contained in the Schedule, errors will continue to be identified and further updates will therefore be required. To update Schedule 10 requires a plan change. These changes cannot be addressed through any other process.

24.     There is a database of nearly 600 nominations received as submissions through the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan process and further unsolicited nominations received through the current nomination process. These nominations have been received for trees right across the region and are not limited to any specific geographical area. There is an expectation from the community that the council will evaluate and progress a plan change to add trees to the Schedule. There is a large volume of nominations and due to resourcing constraints, it has not been possible to evaluate them all at once. There will however be a portion of these nominations which have been evaluated and some of these trees may be found to meet the criteria for scheduling.

25.     Notable tree nominations are being investigated in the Albert-Eden, Franklin, Howick, Ōrākei, Ōtara-Papatoetoe, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. There are also more general amendments required to ensure the Schedule is accurate and operating as originally intended (for example, removals of listings where the tree has been physically removed, updating legal descriptions as a result of subdivision).

26.     Options relating to notable trees were presented to the Planning Committee on 5 November 2020 which resolved to review or make changes to the notable tree schedule as resources permit (PLA/2020/96). This included addressing existing nominations. It is important to note the scope of this work would not include calling for additional nominations.

27.     In accordance with the resolution discussed in paragraph 22, the Notable Trees Plan Change will amend Schedule 10 Notable Trees Schedule of the AUP as follows:

·        add those nominated trees which merit inclusion to the schedule

·        amend the schedule to address known inaccuracies/inconsistencies.

28.     The IPI will recognise notable trees as qualifying matters, including the newly proposed notable trees. A separate change is needed to schedule these additional trees as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Historic Heritage

29.     Historic heritage is a matter of national importance that decision makers must consider under section 6 of the RMA. Significant historic heritage places are identified in Schedule 14 Historic Heritage Schedule, Statements and Maps of the Unitary Plan. Places identified in the schedule are subject to the provisions of the Unitary Plan Historic Heritage Overlay, which seeks to protect scheduled historic heritage places from inappropriate subdivision, use and development and enable the appropriate use of scheduled historic heritage places.

30.     For a place to qualify to be included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, each place must meet the criteria and thresholds for scheduling that are outlined in the Regional Policy Statement (RPS) section of the AUP. Historic heritage places must be at least of considerable significance to their locality or beyond.

31.     Historic heritage places have been identified in the Albert-Eden, Henderson-Massey, Howick, Ōrakei, Rodney, Waitematā and Whau Local Boards. A list of these places is included in Attachment B.

32.     Most of these places were identified as a result of the survey of the special character values that was part of the council’s response to the NPS-UD. Other places were identified via public nominations.  This work is supported by a Planning Committee resolution:

where significant historic heritage values are identified within the Special Character Areas Overlay, develop a plan change for places or areas to be added to the Auckland Unitary Plan historic heritage schedule.[1]

33.     Each identified historic heritage place’s evaluation demonstrates the criteria and thresholds for scheduling set out in the RPS are satisfied. It is important that places with significant historic heritage values are included in the AUP historic heritage schedule, so that these values can be appropriately managed. The historic heritage places listed in Attachment B are proposed to be included in Schedule 14 via a plan change. 

34.     Two historic heritage places are proposed to be deleted.  The former St Andrews Sunday School Hall at 40 Rankin Avenue, New Lynn (Schedule 14.1 ID 189) was demolished in 2019.  The Residence at 147 Sturges Road, Henderson (ID 75). This historic heritage place has been identified as not meeting the RPS thresholds for scheduling. It is not appropriate for a historic heritage place without sufficient value to remain in the AUP historic heritage Schedule 14.

35.     The IPI will recognise scheduled historic heritage places as qualifying matters, by limiting intensification to the extent necessary to continue to provide for the scheduled values. A separate change is needed to schedule the newly identified historic heritage places and to remove the place at 147 Sturges Road, as that is not the purpose of the IPI.

Variations

36.     Amendments made to the RMA in December 2021 came into force immediately and require tier 1 local authorities (including Auckland) to incorporate the government’s MDRS into all relevant residential zones.

37.     The government’s intention is that all plan changes relating to relevant residential zones also incorporate MDRS.  Transitional provisions inserted into the RMA require the council to prepare variations where changes commenced, but were not completed, when the RMA was amended.  Up to seven variations are required to be notified at the same time as the council’s IPI, and to be processed alongside it.  Work is commencing on variations to these changes:

Incomplete private plan changes relating to relevant residential zones:

Local board area in which land is located

PC 49 Drury East

Franklin

PC 50 Waihoehoe

Franklin

PC 51 Drury 2

Franklin

PC 59 Albany 10 precinct

Upper Harbour

PC 66 Schnapper Rock Road

Upper Harbour

PC 67 Hingaia precinct 1

Papakura

Incomplete council-initiated plan changes relating to relevant residential zones

 

Suburbs in which land is located

 

PC 60 Open space

 

Less than 20 sites across:

Forrest Hill

Ellerslie

Freemans Bay

Grey Lynn

Pukekohe

Beachlands

Waiuku

Howick

Birkenhead

Mangere East

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out Auckland’s climate goals:

a)      to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

b)      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation).

39.     The first of the council’s climate goals is relevant because it relates to climate adaptation. That goal aligns with the legal principle for RMA decision-makers to have regard to the effects of climate change (section 7(i) RMA).

40.     However, the RMA currently precludes the second goal: consideration of climate mitigation. The council may only consider climate adaptation and resilience.

41.     Several plan changes have some bearing on climate change. The transport plan change addresses the car parking design for new developments and access to residential car parking spaces and rear sites. How sites are designed and accessed provides for climate resilience, particularly by encouraging people to walk and cycle and facilitating sustainable modes of transport. Adding notable trees to the AUP schedule provides statutory protection for trees, adds to biodiversity and improves urban amenity for residents.

4.          

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

42.     The draft transport plan change has been consulted on with internal advice from Auckland Transport, Watercare and all relevant council departments including Auckland Plans Strategy and Research, Consents, Regulatory Engineering, Infrastructure & Environmental Services, and the Tāmaki Makurau Design Ope (formerly the Urban Design Unit).

43.     Key specialists are also involved in the review of the draft transport provisions and their feedback will be considered in the ongoing development of this plan change.

44.     In addition, the planning team is also working with the Infrastructure and Environmental Services technical standards team in their development of an Access Technical Guidance document for the construction and design of residential, business and rural accesses.  This is to ensure the plan change and the technical guidance document are consistent with each other.  It is anticipated the technical guidance will be completed later this year, after the notification of the transport plan change.

5.          

6.          

7.          

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     The extent of intensification anticipated by NPS-UD and RMA amendments will affect all local boards, except Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke.  Hauraki Gulf Islands are excluded from the application of MDRS and lie outside Auckland’s urban environment (where intensification is directed).

46.     Workshops were held with local boards on the draft transport plan change in November 2021 and in February 2022. Local boards’ feedback sought to address the access and parking matters by changing the operative AUP standards and/or creating new standards.  The draft section 32 report (which is being developed) also concurs that the issues are best addressed through statutory methods (e.g. a plan change). However, some matters could be supported by a non-statutory design guidance (e.g., cycle parking).  Other matter such as the access requirements for fire and emergency services are best addressed by additional staff training and amendments to the access Practice and Guidance Note.   Attachment C provides a summary of what we heard from local boards during workshops earlier in the year.

47.     This report and related briefings provide an opportunity for local board views to inform policy development.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau is Council’s framework for measuring our performance in delivering on the strategic priorities identified by Māori.

49.     Policy 9 of NPS-UD directs the council to particularly involve iwi and hapū in the NPS-UD during the preparation of planning documents. The proposed plan changes to implement the intensification provisions is one planning document.

50.     All mana whenua entities recognised by the council receive ongoing invitations to engage and provide feedback on the NPS-UD programme including the supporting draft transport plan change. All representatives (including those electing not to participate in collective meetings or workshops) receive information, updates and hui notes.

51.     Relevant common themes identified to date include:

a)      universal access provided in residential design for less able whānau members

b)      safe and connected whānau and communities.

52.     Staff provide regular updates on all plan changes to mana whenua and specific briefings are planned for late May and June on these changes and the IPI.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

53.     The local board is not exposed to any financial risk from providing its views on policy development.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a draft plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s). This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

55.     Any views provided by the local board will be included in the August 2022 report to the Planning Committee seeking decisions on the IPI plan changes and the IPI-supporting plan changes and variations.  Following the close of submissions, local boards will have the opportunity to express views on the notified changes.

56.     If resolutions are passed after submissions close, the relevant local boards will be informed of the hearing date and invited to speak at the hearing in support of their views. Planning staff will advise the local board of the decision on the plan change by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A: Summary of key potential changes to the draft transport plan change

79

b

Attachment B: Histroic heritage places proposed to be added to Schedule 14

87

c

Attachment C: Summary of what we heard from local board during workshops

89

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Michele Perwick - Senior Principal Planner

Tony Reidy - Team Leader Planning

Emma Rush - Senior Advisor Special Projects

Teuila Young - Policy Planner

Eryn Shields - Team Leader  Regional, North West and Islands

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Victoria Villaraza - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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[1] PLA/2021/80