I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Upper Harbour Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

 

Venue:

 

Thursday, 23 June 2022

9.30am

Upper Harbour Local Board Office and via Microsoft Teams
30 Kell Drive
Albany

 

Upper Harbour Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Lisa Whyte

 

Deputy Chairperson

Margaret Miles, QSM, JP

 

Members

Anna Atkinson

 

 

Uzra Casuri Balouch, JP

 

 

Nicholas Mayne

 

 

Brian Neeson, JP

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Max Wilde

Democracy Advisor (Upper Harbour Local Board)

 

15 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 4142684

Email: Max.Wilde@AucklandCouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

9.1     Duncan Gross - Upper Harbour Drive Cycleway Separation                          5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Adoption of the Upper Harbour Local Board Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 7

12        Approval of the Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023                                                                                       25

13        Approval of the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme                                                              31

14        Approval of the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                                          47

15        Approval of the Upper Harbour Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023                                                                                               129

16        To appoint a hearings panel regarding the proposal to grant a lease and licence to occupy for Sanders Reserve at 153 Sanders Road, Paremoremo                      135

17        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)         Confirm that the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 16 June 2022, including the confidential section, will be confirmed at its meeting on 21 July 2022..

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Upper Harbour Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.


 

 

 

9.1       Duncan Gross - Upper Harbour Drive Cycleway Separation

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Duncan Gross will be in attendance to address the board regarding the Upper Harbour Drive cycleway separation

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation from Duncan Gross and thank him for his attendance.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Adoption of the Upper Harbour Local Board Local Board Agreement 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07970

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and approved local board advocacy.

2.       To adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       Each financial year, Auckland Council must have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

4.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, council consulted on the proposed Annual Budget 2022/2023. Local boards considered this feedback and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback, and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

5.       Local boards have now considered local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 which includes a local board agreement, a message from the chair, and approved local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023.

6.       On 29 June 2022, the Governing Body will meet to adopt Auckland Council’s Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      adopt the local content for the Annual Budget, which includes the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and approved local board advocacy (Attachment A).

b)      adopt a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

c)      delegate authority to the Chair to make any final changes to the local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (the Upper Harbour Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, message from the chair, and local board advocacy).

d)      note that the resolutions of this meeting will be reported back to the Governing Body when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, on 29 June 2022.


 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Local board plans are strategic documents that are developed every three years to set a direction for local boards. Local board plans influence and inform the Annual Budgets which outlines priorities, budgets and intended levels of service over a one-year period. For each financial year, Auckland Council must also have a local board agreement, as agreed between the Governing Body and the local board, for each local board area.

8.       Throughout the development of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, local board chairs (or delegated local board representatives) have had the opportunity to attend Finance and Performance Committee workshops on key topics and provide local board views on regional issues being considered as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

9.       From 28 February to 28 March 2022, the council consulted with the public on the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

10.     A report analysing the feedback on local board priorities, as well as feedback from those living in the local board area related to the regional issues, was included as an attachment on the 12 May 2022 business meeting agenda.

11.     The Upper Harbour Local Board approved advocacy initiatives for inclusion in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 at the business meeting on 12 May 2022 (resolution number UH/2022/47)

12.     Local boards considered this feedback, and then held discussions with the Finance and Performance Committee at a workshop on 25 May 2022 on regional issues, community feedback and key local board initiatives and advocacy areas.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Both staff and the local board have reviewed the local feedback received as part of  consultation on Annual Budget 2022/2023 and local boards have received a report analysing the local feedback. It is now recommended that local boards adopt local content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 (Attachment A), including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023, the message from the chair, and approved local board advocacy, as well as a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 (Attachment B).

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The decisions recommended in this report are procedural in nature and will not have any climate impacts themselves.

15.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement may have climate impacts. The climate impacts of any projects council chooses to progress with will be assessed as part of the relevant reporting requirements.

16.     Some of the proposed projects in the Local Board Agreement will be specifically designed to mitigate climate impact, build resilience to climate impacts, and restore the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     Local boards worked with council departments to develop their local board work programmes for 2022/2023 that will be adopted at June business meetings. The local board work programmes help inform the local board agreements.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     This report seeks local board adoption of its content for the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and other associated material, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     Many local board decisions are of importance to and impact on Māori. Local board agreements and the Annual Budget are important tools that enable and can demonstrate council’s responsiveness to Māori. 

20.     Local board plans, which were developed in 2020 through engagement with the community including Māori, form the basis of local priorities. There is a need to continue to build relationships between local boards and iwi, and where relevant the wider Māori community.

21.     Of those who submitted to the Annual Budget 2022/2023 from the Upper Harbour Local Board area five percent identified as Māori. These submissions were provided to the local board for consideration at local board workshops during the development of their local board agreement.

22.     Ongoing conversations will assist local boards and Māori to understand each other’s priorities and issues. This in turn can influence and encourage Māori participation in council’s decision-making processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.     The local board agreement includes the allocation of locally driven initiatives (LDI) funding and asset based services (ABS) funding to projects and services for the 2022/2023 financial year.

24.     LDI funding is discretionary funding allocated to local boards based on the Local Board Funding Policy (included in the Annual Budget), which local boards can spend on priorities for their communities. Local boards can also utilise LDI funding to increase local levels of service if they wish to do so.

25.     Funding for ABS is allocated by the Governing Body to local boards based on current levels of service to run and maintain local assets and services including parks, pools and recreation facilities, community facilities, and libraries.

26.     A local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023 is adopted alongside of the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023. The fees and charges have been formulated based on region-wide baseline service levels and revenue targets. Where fees and charges are amended by a local board that results in lower revenue for the council, the shortfall will need to be made up by either allocating LDI funds or reducing expenditure on other services to balance overall budgets. 


 

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     Decisions on the local content of the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including the Local Board Agreement 2022/2023 and a local fees and charges schedule for 2022/2023, are required by 23 June 2022 to ensure the Governing Body can adopt the final Annual Budget 2022/2023, including each Local Board Agreement, at its 29 June 2022 meeting.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     The resolutions of this meeting will be reported to the Governing Body on 29 June 2022 when it meets to adopt the Annual Budget 2022/2023, including 21 local board agreements.

29.     It is possible that minor changes may need to be made to the attachments before the Annual Budget 2022/2023 is adopted, such as correction of any errors identified and minor wording changes. Staff therefore recommend that the local board delegates authority to the Chair to make any final changes if necessary.

30.     Local board agreements set the priorities and budget envelopes for each financial year. Work programmes then detail the activities that will be delivered within those budget envelopes. Work programmes will be agreed between local boards and operational departments at business meetings in June 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Local content to support the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

11

b

Attachment B - Local fees and charges schedule 2022/2023

21

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Renee Burgers - Lead Advisor Plans and Programmes

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07366

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To approve the Upper Harbour Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   This report presents the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (see Attachment A).  

 

3.   The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020: 

 

·    Outcome - Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities.    

·    Objective - Our communities are resilient to adversity and change, such as that caused by the impact of COVID-19. 

 

·    Outcome - A resilient local economy. 

·    Objective - Our local businesses and industry are resilient and sustainable. 

 

4.   The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below: 

·    Community emergency resilience programme – zero (budget sits with Connected Communities).   

·    Business emergency resilience programme - $5,000. 

 

5.   The proposed work programme has a total value of $5,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.  

 

6.   Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023 (Attachment A to the agenda report).

 

Horopaki

Context

7.   Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme. 

 

8.   The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcomes that are reflected in the work programme are: 

·    Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities.  

·    A resilient local economy. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.   In financial year 2022/2023, Auckland Emergency Management (AEM) will continue to investigate and commence community engagement in hazard risk locations within the local board area (especially eastern areas around Albany and Unsworth Heights) that could be supported to grow their community disaster resilience and social connectedness. This will build on the current work underway in Hobsonville Point and Scott Point. 

 

10. This will involve engaging with community organisations such as churches and other community groups and understanding exactly what community disaster resilience planning opportunities and initiatives the community needs. These findings will be presented the local board by the end of the financial year (June 2023). 

 

 

11. AEM understands this work will link to the budget within the Connected and Resilient Communities activities (Activity IDs: 462, 463, 464 and 468). All other costs are Auckland Emergency Management staff time.   

 

12. Work and delivery of initiatives to interested communities to increase their whānau and neighbourhood disaster resilience and strengthen social connections will begin in financial year 2022/2023.   

 

Business emergency resilience programme - $5,000 

13. In partnership with Business North Harbour, Auckland Emergency Management will deliver information packs designed to encourage small business owners to develop an emergency plan, undertake business continuity planning and explore opportunities to work together for maximum benefit. 

 

14. Auckland Emergency Management will also host an information stand and business engagement activity at Showcase North Harbour event. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15. Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities  

Activity name 

Climate impact 

Community emergency resilience programme 

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this works increases community resilience to emergencies and the impacts of climate change. 

Business emergency resilience programme 

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this work increases the business community’s resilience to emergencies and the impacts of climate change. 

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16. The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17. The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.  

 

18. The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19. Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

20. The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $5,000 of operational budget. This amount can be funded from the Upper Harbour Local Board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget for 2022/2023.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

21. Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.  

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

22. Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.  

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board AEM Work Programme 22-23

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Rachael Mercer - Resilience Advisor LB & Community

Authorisers

Paul Amaral, General Manager Auckland Emergency Management

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme

File No.: CP2022/07898

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and approve in principle the 2023/2024 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Upper Harbour Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2022/2023 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent financial year, 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. 2022/2023 is year two of the three-year cycle. Many of the programmes included in this report were approved in principle in the 2021/2022 work programme.

4.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between November 2021 and June 2022, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

6.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2022/2023, with budgets as listed below:

·          Circular Economy Programme - $28,000

·          Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership - $35,000

·          Ecology Initiatives Assistance Programme - $80,000

·          Īnanga Spawning Sites Survey And Restoration - $17,000

·          New Kiwis Zero Waste Education Initiative - $21,000

·          Our Local Streams - $30,000

·          Pest Free Upper Harbour Strategy - $30,000

·          Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream - $10,000.

7.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $251,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also being sought for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year.

8.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

9.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.


 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve its 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2022/2023 budget for approval

Circular Economy Programme                  

$28,000

Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership

$35,000

Ecology Initiatives Assistance Programme

$80,000

Īnanga Spawning Sites Survey And Restoration

$17,000

New Kiwis Zero Waste Education Initiative

$21,000

Our Local Streams

$30,000

Pest free Upper Harbour strategy              

$30,000

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream

$10,000

Total

$251,000

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report)

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

11.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·    our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced

·    our communities care for their surrounding environment

·    the lifeforce (mauri) of our harbour and waterways is respected and restored

·    our communities practice te ao Māori guardianship (kaitiakitanga) principles

·    our residents participate and feel a sense of belonging to their community.

 

12.     The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·    National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

·    Mahere ā-Rohe Whakahaere Kaupapa Koiora Orotā mō Tāmaki Makaurau - Regional Pest Management Plan

·    Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy.

13.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above in the context section.

15.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

16.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year two of the three-year work programme (2022/2023), and approval in principle for 2023/2024.

17.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for year three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However, approval in principle will help staff, contractors and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

18.     Budgets for year three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

19.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2023/2024 financial year:

Circular Economy Programme - $28,000

20.     The board has indicated it would like to fund a new Circular Economy programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

21.     This programme will involve a stocktake of current Upper Harbour Local Board area zero waste and circular economy activities. It will provide a written report that identifies gaps and future opportunities to encourage community and business participation in waste minimisation.

22.     A programme coordinator will facilitate the stocktake, write the report and deliver a presentation to community stakeholders and local board members. The programme will involve at least one stakeholder hui to encourage community building, networking and information sharing.

23.     Staff recommend the local board allocates $28,000 to this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $28,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership - $35,000

24.     The local board has indicated support to continue funding the Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership Programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

25.     The construction and demolition sector are the biggest contributor of waste in Auckland. This budget will support a construction and demolition waste advisor to work alongside the council’s waste team to reduce the amount of construction and demolition waste produced from building sites.

26.     This programme will continue to fund a fixed term role for a construction and demolition waste advisor to work with builders and developers to improve site practices and provide increased reporting to the council’s compliance team.

27.     The advisor will focus on weekly surveillance and reporting of breaches of the Litter Act, the Solid Waste Bylaw and the Building Act. They will also undertake verbal engagement with builders and developers to promote installation of silt and security fences and work to improve site waste practices around littering and problematic materials such as polystyrene.

28.     The board allocated $25,000 to this programme in the 2021/2022 financial. Staff recommend the allocation of $35,000 to the programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

29.     Approval in principle is also sought for $45,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Ecology Initiatives Assistance Programme - $80,000

30.     The board has indicated it would like to continue supporting the Ecology Initiatives Assistance Programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. This was formerly called the North-West Wildlink assistance programme.

31.     Funding will support community groups to lead and undertake restoration action, protecting local native biodiversity and restoring ecosystems across Upper Harbour.

32.     The continued support for conservation projects proposed by the community, as part of the implementation of the Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy. Activities may include pest animal and weed control, training to build community capability, biodiversity monitoring and restoration planting on high value ecological sites on public and private land.

33.     The allocation of funding will be determined within the Upper Harbour Ecology Network. Staff will provide updates at workshops at the end of quarter one and quarter three 2022/2023.

34.     The board allocated $80,000 to this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. Staff recommend the allocation of a further $80,000 in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $80,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

Īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration - $17,000

35.     The board has indicated support for continuing to fund the īnanga spawning sites – survey and restoration programme in the 2022/2023 financial year to help protect at-risk species through targeted restoration

36.     The programme involves the collection of data in streams to establish a baseline understanding of the current state of īnanga populations within the Upper Harbour Local Board area.

37.     This work will identify areas in need of urgent protection and restoration, and this will be communicated back to the community as an awareness raising exercise. The community will then be supported to maintain, enhance and promote the restoration and care of these waterways. By supporting this work, increased terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity outcomes will be achieved through the creation of ecological corridors.

38.     The board allocated $15,000 to this programme in 2021/2022. Staff recommend the local board allocates $17,000 to this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $19,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

New Kiwis Zero Waste Education Initiative – $21,000

39.     The board has indicated it would like to continue supporting the New Kiwis Zero Waste Education Initiative programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

40.     The programme is delivered through the English Language Partners North Shore group. Through their English classes, this group incorporates waste minimisation materials and activities. These initiatives will empower immigrants and former refugees to be champions for Auckland's zero waste target.

41.     The programme will involve classes, writing competitions and site tours of recycling facilities to support migrants and their families to understand waste and its environmental impact. Surveys will be conducted to see what waste minimisation behaviours have been undertaken over the financial year.

42.     The board allocated $10,174 to this programme in 2021/2022 (this amount was a carry-over from 2020/2021). Staff recommend the local board allocates $21,000 to this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $21,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

Our Local Streams - $30,000

43.     The board has indicated support for continuing funding the Our Local Streams programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

44.     Funding will support the continued provision of expertise and assistance for schools in the Upper Harbour Local Board area to connect with their local streams. This will be achieved through testing and monitoring water quality and connecting with community restoration groups working in the same catchment.

45.     The programme will continue to provide expertise and assistance for eight schools to connect with their local streams. This will be achieved through water quality testing and monitoring (using Wai Care kits), connecting with community restoration groups in the same catchment, and building on work undertaken over the past four years.

46.     This programme will continue to provide education for students and professional development for teachers to increase understanding of issues affecting local streams. It also allows continued monitoring of the water quality and biodiversity through student-led action projects such as weed and pest control, planting, and awareness raising.

47.     Funding supports connections between schools, the local environment, and community restoration groups, and provides schools with a source of water for use on gardens or other non-potable uses.

48.     The board allocated $40,300 to this programme in 2021/2022. Staff recommend the allocation of $30,000 to this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 for the 2023/2024 financial year.

Pest free Upper Harbour strategy - $30,000

49.     The board has indicated it would like to fund a new Pest free Harbour strategy programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

50.     This programme will develop a Pest Free Upper Harbour Strategy. This strategy will enable, inform and guide the Upper Harbour community, community-based conservation groups and the Upper Waitematā Ecology Network on how they can collaborate as a collective to develop an action plan for pest plant and animal control to protect native species and ecosystems across the Upper Harbour area, informed by the Upper Harbour Ecological Connectivity Strategy.

51.     This strategic plan is to empower and build capability and capacity of the Upper Waitematā Ecology Network members to deliver on their environmental and community engagement outcomes. This stage of delivery will be more strategic and targeted to areas in Upper Harbour identified as biodiversity hotspots, build/expand ecological steppingstones and linkages for biodiversity specific and native species focused projects according to the Ecological Connectivity Strategy story map.

52.     Staff recommend the allocation of $30,000 to this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $20,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream - $10,000

53.     The board has indicated support to continue allocating funding to the restoration of the Waiarohia Stream in the 2022/2023 financial year. This programme is expected to last five years and will involve working with community and iwi to restore the stream.

54.     Funding will support the continuation of the restoration of local waterways, increasing both terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity by creating ecological corridors and riparian margins. It also empowers local communities to connect and advocate for their natural environment and for positive freshwater outcomes.

55.     Funding for 2022/2023 will be used to implement year three of the five-year schedule of works, which will connect the community and local schools to improve stream health.

56.     Staff recommend the allocation of $10,000 to this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in principle is also sought for $10,000 in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

57.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

58.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, neutral or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

59.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

New Kiwis Zero Waste Education Initiative

The contribution of waste to overall greenhouse gas emissions in the Auckland region is approximately 3.1 per cent as per the Auckland Greenhouse Gas Inventory to 2016. These programmes will reduce waste going to landfill and reduce greenhouse gas production.

Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership

Ecology Initiatives Assistance Programme

Upper Harbour Ecology Network’s efforts result in the protection and restoration of native biodiversity which acts as an important carbon sink.

Circular Economy Programme

This programme aims to inspire and support waste minimisation and circular economy initiatives which in turn reduces damaging greenhouse gasses produced when waste is sent to landfill.

Īnanga Spawning Sites – Survey and Restoration

The implementation of stream restoration and protection efforts will minimise the impact of flooding, improve native biodiversity and enhance carbon sequestration. This will help protect the stream banks from erosion caused by the increased rainfall events resulting from climate change.

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream

Our Local Streams

Actions to improve local streams that include native planting will enhance carbon sequestration by plants, as well as reducing erosion and increasing the resilience of streams to storm events.

Pest free Upper Harbour Strategy

This project will support community led conservation in Upper Harbour, which is contributing to the protection of native biodiversity which acts as an important carbon sink, such as community native planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

60.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

61.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters and Waste Solutions.

62.     Environmental Services and Healthy Waters staff working on restoration programmes will work closely with colleagues from Parks, Sports and Recreation as some of the restoration work happens on public land and public parks. The sediment-related water quality testing and the construction waste enforcement and leadership programme will also liaise with the council’s Proactive Compliance Team.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

63.     The projects proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Upper Harbour Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2022/2023 work programme include Scott Point, Whenuapai and the Waiarohia Stream.

64.     The programmes noted above align with the Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

· our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced

· empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities.

65.     The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to June 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

66.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

67.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

68.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

69.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Our local streams

Te reo Māori

Kaitiakitanga 

Realising rangatahi potential

 

Students will:

·    be taught relevant terms in te reo Māori as they learn about the importance of stream health and biodiversity

·    learn about the concept of kaitiakitanga as they become kaitiaki of their local stream site

through learning to be citizen scientists, students will be empowered with confidence and skills, and awareness of environmental science as a potential career pathway

70.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

71.     The proposed environment work programme for 2022/2023 totals to $251,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

72.     Budgets for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for a future year through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

73.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

74.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board.

75.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes. Some activities may not be able to be delivered fully if COVID-19 restrictions are increased.

76.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

77.     Table 3 shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

Table 3: Key risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

New Kiwis Zero Waste Education Initiative

The programme is dependent on students putting the actions into practice.

 

All students will receive appropriate education through the Waste Solutions team and English Language Partners. Waste Solutions staff will help participants identify and overcome any barriers to good waste practice.

Medium

Ecology Initiatives Assistance Programme

This programme is dependent on the volunteer time of the participants in the Upper Harbour Ecology Network.

The network has been running for a number of years and the amount of volunteer time and engagement is very high.

Low

Īnanga Spawning Sites – Survey and Restoration

These programmes rely on community members’ willingness to be involved.

 

These programmes build on the positive relationships and momentum that already exist in active conservation groups in Upper Harbour.

Low

 

Restoration of the Waiarohia Stream

Our Local Streams

This programme relies on the schools wanting to be involved. In addition, the programme is dependent on the contractor’s availability to continue the work.

Schools currently engaged will be asked to confirm their continued involvement, and new schools will be approached if any existing schools do not continue. The current contractor has been approached and is interested in running this programme again.

Low

Pest Free Upper Harbour Strategy

The programme is dependent on the volunteer time of the participants in the Upper Waitematā Ecology Network

The network has been running for a number of years and the amount of volunteer time and engagement is very high.

Low

Circular Economy Programme

This programme is dependent on the volunteer time of the participants/ organisation leading the programme.

This programme will be built on emerging positive relationships and networks held by the organisation leading the programme.

Low

Construction Waste Enforcement and Leadership

The programme is reliant on the willingness of small site developments to take on the recommendations.

 

The contractor has already had success in working with builders and developers in the 2020/2021 financial year. This same successful approach will be followed in this financial year.

Medium

78.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

79.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

80.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022/2023 Upper Harbour Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brandii Stephano - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07430

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme for approval from the following departments:

·    Connected Communities

·    Community and Social Innovation

·    Community Facilities

·    Parks, Sports, and Recreation

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

3.       In addition, the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities Department work programme are presented for approval in principle.

4.       To support the delivery of the local board’s outcomes and aspirations highlighted in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020, Customer and Community Services presents a work programme for local board approval each financial year.

5.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

6.       The work programme has been developed with the local board providing feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation through a series of workshops, held between October 2021 and May 2022.

7.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to planning activities, involving collaboration between the local board and staff from across the council.

8.       Within the Customer and Community Services work programme, the Community Facilities Department has identified several projects for the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 financial years as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).

9.       Approval is sought for the planning and design of the Risk Adjusted Programme projects to commence during the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

10.     The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee, including Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects by way of resolutions to this report.


 

 

11.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19-related disruptions, some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

12.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

13.     Once approved in June 2022, the local board will receive quarterly progress updates on the delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

c)      approve in principle the 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities only work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

d)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

e)      provide feedback for consideration by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on projects funded from the Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

f)       note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets is subject to approval by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Auckland Plan 2050 (Auckland Plan) is council’s long-term spatial plan to ensure Auckland grows in a way that will meet the opportunities and challenges ahead.  It aims to contribute to Auckland’s social, economic, environmental, and cultural wellbeing.

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15.     Local board plans align with the Auckland Plan and set out local community priorities and aspirations. The 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme in turn aligns to not only the local board plans but the appropriate Auckland Council plans, policies and strategies.

16.     Work programme activities align to one or more of the following 2020 Upper Harbour Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Outcome 1 - Empowered, connected and resilient Upper Harbour communities

·        Outcome 2 - An efficient and accessible travel network

·        Outcome 3 - Healthy and active communities 

·        Outcome 4 - Our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced  

·        Outcome 5 - A resilient local economy. 

17.     Development of the work programme is based on consideration of community needs and priorities, availability of resources and funding, Te Tiriti o Waitangi obligations, external partnerships and risk assessment.

18.     The Customer and Community Services directorate provides a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of Auckland’s people, places and natural environment. These are designed and implemented to meet the unique needs of the local community.

19.     Development of the work programme follows an integrated approach to planning activities by the following departments of the directorate:
:

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The work programme demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the 2022/2023 financial year.

21.     Delivery of the work programme commences from 1 July 2022, and in some cases comprises a continuation of implementation from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes.

22.     New activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items also form part of the work programme.

23.     Table one summarises the approval status required for the three financial years presented within the work programme

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table one: Customer and Community Services local board work programme approvals

Department

2022/2023

2023/2024

2024/2025

Community Facilities

Approve

Approve in principle

Approve in principle

All other Customer and Community Services departments

Approve

Approve in principle

N/A

 

24.     Community Facilities presents a three-year rolling work programme so that delivery and financial commitments against the capital works programme can be planned.

25.     Approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2022/2023 work programme may lead to contractual commitments to the future budget needed to complete the project in 2023/2024 or 2024/2025.

26.     The remainder of Customer and Community Services presents the work programme in descending three-year increments and are therefore only presenting years two and three of the three-year work programme.

27.     The local board will be updated by staff on the delivery of the programme by way of quarterly performance reports.

Proposed amendments to the 2022/2023 work programme

28.     The local board approved the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme in June 2021 and approved in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

29.     The 2022/2023 work programme contains variations to the version that was approved in principle last year. These include the addition of new activities, changes to existing activities, such as required budget allocation and delivery timeframes, and identifies some activities that have been stopped.

30.     Table two highlights the new activities in the work programme:

Table two: work programme activities that are new

ID

Activity name

Lead department

Budget

1467

Upper Harbour Indoor Court Detailed Business Court Project - design and consent phase

CCS: PSR – Active Recreation

$100,000

2989

Whenuapai Park Service Guidance

CCS: PSR – Park Services

$0

2998

UH: Dog walking provision assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

$0

3495

Oteha Valley and Hooten Reserves: North Harbour BMX Association Incorporated

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3496

Catalina Bay Esplanade Reserve: Hobsonville Point Marine Sports Recreation Centre Charitable Trust

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3498

Funding review for Upper Harbour community-led facilities

CCS: Connected Communities – Community Delivery

$7,500

3510

UH Online walking guide

CCS: PSR – Park Services

$10,000

31996

Albany Coronation Hall and Memorial Library - renew building exteriors and hall storage room

C&CS: Community Facilities

$280,000

31864

Albany Domain - renew baseball diamond and backstop fence

C&CS: Community Facilities

$80,000

36482

Albany Pools - install solar panels

C&CS: Community Facilities

$376,570

31939

Barbados Reserve Unsworth Heights - install retaining wall

C&CS: Community Facilities

$100,000

31943

Fernhill Reserve - landslide prevention

C&CS: Community Facilities

$370,000

32019

Hooton Reserve - renew play space

C&CS: Community Facilities

$320,000

30718

Hooton Reserve - renew western carpark

C&CS: Community Facilities

$400,000

32024

Meadowood Reserve - renew and upgrade play space

C&CS: Community Facilities

$320,000

31861

Rosedale Park - renew softball diamond skins on fields #3,4 & 6

C&CS: Community Facilities

$160,000

36492

Sanders House - refurbish building

C&CS: Community Facilities

$140,000

30455

Scott Point - develop sustainable sports park (Stage 1b)

C&CS: Community Facilities

$11,900,000

27896

Upper Harbour - install wayfinding signage

C&CS: Community Facilities

$120,000

30234

Upper Harbour - modular pump track

C&CS: Community Facilities

$120,000

30662

Upper Harbour - renew tracks and footpaths 2024/2025+

C&CS: Community Facilities

$320,681

 

31.     Table three highlights the activities that were approved in principle in June 2021 but have stopped, or proposed activities that did not start, and are therefore not included in the 2022/2023 work programme:

Table three: work programme activities that have been removed from the work programme

Previous ID

Activity name

Lead department

597

UH:Wheeled Sports Service Assessment (Phase 2)

CCS: PSR – Park Services

684

UH: Urban Ngahere Growing FY22

CCS: PSR – Park Services

1448

Spedding /Trig Roads park service assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2785

Carry over for completion - UH: Greenways Plan Prioritisation

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2815

CFWD UH Local Parks: Ecological volunteers and environmental programme FY21

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2818

CFWD UH: Tennis Charitable Trust Facility Partnership

CCS: PSR – Active Recreation

 

COVID-19 considerations for Customer and Community Services

32.     The work programme includes activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 by providing:

·      safe and welcoming spaces

·      inclusive events to bring the community back together

·      community support, including grants

·      stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi and Māori organisations, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies, which also serve Auckland’s communities.

33.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of these activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19 related disruption some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

34.     Current capex delivery challenges include increased material and labour costs, as well as shortages in both sectors, this in turn will lead to increased overall project costs.

35.     Current supply chain issues, obtaining building materials, may lead to delays in project delivery. Increased costs and delays will be managed as part of the ongoing management of work programmes via additional Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) projects, and the rephasing of projects to accommodate increased budget and address material shortages.

Māori Outcomes

36.     Local boards play a vital role in representing the interests of all Aucklanders and are committed to the Treaty-based obligations and to Māori participation and development.

37.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

38.     A thriving Māori identity is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. It advances prosperity for Māori and benefits all Aucklanders.

39.     The local boards recognise the importance of building meaningful relationships with mana whenua, maatawaka and whānau, and understanding Māori aspirations.

40.     Table four shows the outcomes, objectives and key initiatives from the local board plan that recognise these areas of common interest.

Table four: local board plan Māori outcomes, objectives and initiatives

Outcomes

Objectives

Initiatives

Outcome 1: We have numbered it like this in main title so should remain consistent

Māori culture and identity are celebrated in Upper Harbour 

Partner with mana whenua to deliver initiatives that celebrate Māori identity and culture, for instance through local storytelling 

Outcome 4: Our unique natural environment is protected and enhanced 

Our communities practice te ao Māori guardianship (kaitiakitanga) principles 

Partner with mana whenua and community groups to deliver initiatives that increase understanding of matauranga Māori (knowledge) 

 

41.     There is a wide range of activity occurring across Tāmaki Makaurau to advance Māori outcomes. Much of this is led by mana whenua and Māori organisations, as well government organisations, non-government organisations and businesses. 

42.     The Auckland Plan’s focus on Māori culture and identity is encapsulated in the outcome: Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

43.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, council’s Māori Outcomes performance measurement framework, captures the majority of council’s Māori outcome strategy and planning. The framework responds to the needs and aspirations that Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, both mana whenua and mataawaka, have expressed to council. 

44.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver outcomes for and with Māori. Attachment B sets out the activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas.

45.     Table five shows the strategic priority areas and alignment to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes.

Table five: local board work programme Māori outcome areas

Strategic priority area

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcome

Kaitiakitanga

Kia Ora te Taiao

Māori business, tourism and employment 

Kia Ora te Umanga

Māori identity and culture 

Kia Ora te Ahurea

Marae development

Kia Ora te Marae

Papakāinga and Māori housing 

Kia Ora te Kāinga

Realising rangatahi potential 

Kia Ora te Rangatahi

Te reo Māori 

Kia Ora te Reo

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Kia Ora te Whānau

 

46.     The Customer and Community Services directorate lead or contribute to programmes that align with all outcomes. Particular priorities are Kia Ora te Marae, Kia Ora te Whānau and Kia Ora te Reo. 

47.     In a COVID-19 recovery environment there is increasing focus on Kia Ora te Umunga /   Māori Business, Tourism and Employment and the role that the council can play, not only in supporting economic recovery, but in a thriving Māori economy. 

48.     Kia Ora te Ahurea / Māori Identity and Culture is often a focus for local boards as events and place-based design often plays an important part in many local programmes.

Work programme budget types and purpose

49.     Work programme activities are funded from various budget sources, depending on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme are funded from two or more sources, including from both local and regional budgets.

50.     Table six outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

 

Table six: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services, grants and staff time to deliver activities

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the partial renewal or full replacement of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council, often from external sources, held for specific local board areas, including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

Part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

51.     The capital projects to be delivered in the Upper Harbour Local Board area, together with identified budgets and main funding sources, are shown in Attachment A.

52.     The budgets associated with the capital works programme are estimates only, costs are subject to change and may need to be refined as the project progresses through the design and delivery process. Once activity details are more clearly defined, staff will update the work programme for approval in subsequent years.

53.     The capital works projects have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within the local board area (Attachment C). Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

54.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was first implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

55.     Several capital projects in the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme and outlined in Attachment A.

56.     Local board approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

57.     Some activities from the Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development (growth) budgets are funded regionally and will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee for approval after 30 June 2022.

58.     The local board has decision-making responsibility for these activities within parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope, and budget. These activities are therefore included in the work programme. 

59.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. Staff will present this feedback to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

60.     Some projects in the work programme require further local board decisions as they progress through the delivery process.

61.     Where further decisions are anticipated they have been indicated in the work programme, and decisions will be sought as required through local board business meetings.

62.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects may also be required as projects progress, in response to more detailed design and costing information, community consultation, consenting requirements and similar factors.  

63.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects will be managed in accordance with the established local board delegations to staff.

64.     The work programme includes community leases. Lease renewals without variations will be processed by way of a memo, in accordance with agreed delegations.

65.     Should the local board signal their intent to change or pursue a new lease that is not contemplated in the leasing work programme, a deferral of an item already programmed for delivery will need to be accommodated.

66.     Staff will workshop expired and more complex community leases with the local board and then report on them at a business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

67.     As Customer and Community Services is a significant service provider and property owner, the directorate has a leading role in delivering Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

68.     In providing asset-based services, Customer and Community Services contributes most of council’s operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its facilities and infrastructure.

69.     Property managed by the directorate, in particular coastal assets, will be adversely affected by climate change. The work programme includes actions, consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to halve council’s operational GHG emissions by 2030, and to adapt to a changing climate.

70.     Actions include reducing operational GHG emissions through phasing-out gas heating in aquatic centres, improving the efficiency of facilities, investing in renewable energy, and adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy.

71.     At the same time, the directorate will mitigate GHG emissions and improve climate resilience through delivering tree planting programmes across the region. This includes delivering the Mayor’s tree planting initaitives, transitioning unproductive farmland on regional parks to permanent native forest, and delivering ecological restoration projects with community groups.

72.     Work is ongoing to build on the above actions and embed climate change considerations into investment decision-making, planning, and corporate policies, including asset management plans and Local Board Plans.

73.     As approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, council’s mandated approach to ‘deliver differently’ is also anticipated to help reduce the council carbon footprint by creating a sustainable service network. This may include a shift to digital service models or the consolidation of services into a smaller footprint.

74.     Each activity in the work programme has been assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and affect Auckland’s resilience to climate change.

75.     The activities in the Upper Harbour Local Board work programme identified as having a positive or negative impact on climate change are outlined in Attachment E.

76.     Types of activities in the work programme that will have positive impacts on emissions and improve community resilience to climate change, include community-led environmental and educational programmes, supporting volunteer planting, delivering council-led planting and sustainable design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

77.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed collaboratively by staff from the directorate’s departments and Local Board Services to ensure that the activities and delivery of the work programme are integrated, complementary, and reflect council wide priorities.

78.     An example of collaboration on delivery is the kauri dieback programme which is delivered by the Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

79.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme.

80.     A focus area of the work programme is to respond to the Recovery Budget, the communities of greatest need and build capacity within the community, including through community-led delivery and partnerships.

81.     Planning and delivery of some activities involves consultation with the community to ensure that their aspirations are understood and responded to.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

82.     The provision of services, facilities and open spaces support the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connection to the natural environment and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

83.     Attachment B shows local board projects or programmes that are ranked as delivering ‘high’ Māori Outcomes. They involve ongoing collaboration with Māori or are delivered by Māori. 

84.     Projects or programmes in Attachment A may also contribute to Māori Outcomes but are not highlighted as they are identified to have a moderate or low impact. 

85.     Engagement with Māori is critical and, if not already completed, will occur on a programme or project basis, prior to any work commencing, and be reported back separately to the local board. 

86.     Further information about the response to Māori aspirations as described in the work programme, is captured in the Analysis and Advice section.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

87.     Each activity line has a budget allocation in one or more of the financial years e.g. 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar operating expense (opex) budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

88.     The 2022/2023 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within 2022/2023 budgets and staff resources.

89.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 are indicative and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

90.     Table seven summarises the budget sources and allocation for each work programme financial year.

Table seven: Upper Harbour Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2022/2023 (approve)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

2024/2025 (approve in principle – Community Facilities only)

Operational (Opex): Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

907,134

            1,040,689

            1,081,640

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

13,950,488

          13,271,599

          13,312,365

Capital (Capex): Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

3,581,589

2,214,103

2,962,140

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

2,624,479

2,214,103

2,962,140

Advanced Delivery RAP*

957,110

 

 

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

1

0

0

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

228,875

150,000

536,259

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

228,875

150,000

536,259

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

0

0

0

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

1,681,108

6,048,715

8,800,000

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

0

10,000

460,000

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

2,036,695

624,000

830,000

Capex: One Local Initiative

0

0

0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

0

0

0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

1,013,000

0

0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

6,399,260

54,287

0

* See paragraph 53-55 for RAP explanation

91.     The budgets are based on the allocations in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Budgets are subject to change during council’s Annual Budget and future Long-term Plan processes. If decisions on the Annual Budget result in budget reductions, the work programme will need to be amended to align to these budgets via future decisions of the local board.

92.     Any 2021/2022 opex budget unspent on 30 June 2022, will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2022/2023 work programme. Carry-forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines and will be reflected in the revised budget.

93.     During delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme, where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the associated budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year. This process will include agreement from each department and will need to be resolved on by the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

94.     The most significant risk is that delivery of the Customer and Community Services work programme is dependent on the local board approving the work programme by 30 June 2022. Approval of the work programme after the start of the financial year could result in delays to delivery.

95.     The majority of operational (opex) activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

96.     Table eight outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme once it has been approved.

Table eight: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

Health, safety and wellbeing factors, including external influences relating to work programme delivery may impact the delivery of activities, resulting in activities requiring adjustment.

Health and safety assessments will be conducted prior to commencement of projects. Work programme activities and projects will be adjusted accordingly where these risks occur during the delivery phase.

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to negatively impact on the progress and deliverability of the work programme.

Development of the work programme has included consideration of potential impacts on delivery due to COVID-19 for all activities.

Timeframes for some activities are set to enable delivery within the agreed timeframe despite possible delays. 

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate the budget to other activities.

The COVID-19 pandemic and other geopolitical factors may result in further inflationary and supply chain pressures.

Potential inflationary pressures have been modelled into key forecasts; however uncertainties remain.

The ongoing cost increase may become unsustainable, and may require a reprioritization of potential work programmes, capital spend and a potential discontinuation of some programmes.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

97.     Delivery of the Customer and Community Service work programme is scheduled to start on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023.

98.     Regionally funded projects are an exception and will commence after they have been approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2022.

99.     The local board will receive progress updates on a quarterly basis, with the first quarterly report available in November 2022.

100.   When further decisions for activities are needed at project milestones, these will be brought to the local board at the appropriate time.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Upper Harbour Local Board CCS Work Programme 22-23

63

b

Attachment B - Maori Outcomes Upper Harbour

91

c

Attachment C - Capital Works and Leasing Work Programme Map

93

d

Attachment D - Upper Harbour - Regional Feedback v2

95

e

Attachment E - Climate Impacts Upper Harbour

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Mace Ward - General Manager Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Tania Pouwhare - General Manager Community & Social Innov

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss - Director Customer and Community Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the Upper Harbour Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07560

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Upper Harbour Local Board Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme and its associated budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020:

·          A resilient local economy

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·          Local Small Business Mentors Programme - $3,000

·          Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days Sponsorship (continuation) – $2,000

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $5,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      approve the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023 (Attachment A to the agenda report)

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

8.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcome(s) that are reflected in the work programme are:

·          A resilient local economy

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

9.       The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (TAU) work programme 2022/2023 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Local Small Business Mentors Programme – $3,000

10.     This is a continuation of funding for Local Business Mentors Programme that provides free access to business mentoring to local small businesses indicating some demand for this support will remain. 

11.     This programme was highly subscribed in the local board area in 2021/2022. TAU will promote to businesses e.g. via Electronic Direct Mail to local businesses that TAU hold on our database of businesses.  It is envisaged a further 10 businesses would access support in 2022/2023.

12.     Local boards can utilise their own channels to their community.  The recruitment programme will be strengthened by Business North Harbour support in order to reach their membership.

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days Sponsorship (continuation) – $2,000

13.     The Auckland Business Chamber, on behalf of the Young Enterprise Trust, delivers the Young Enterprise Scheme (YES) in Auckland. YES is a practical, year-long programme for year 12 and 13 students. 

14.     Fostering youth entrepreneurship is a key requirement for developing an innovative economy and creating employment pathways for our young people. Through the programme, students develop creative ideas into actual businesses, complete with real products and services and real profit and loss. Students learn key work skills and business knowledge including: business fundamentals, planning, interpersonal relations, financial, decision making, reporting, risk management and team work. YES helps create a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship amongst Auckland’s young people.

15.     The funding from the local board will support the delivery of the overall YES program, including the Kick Start days in February 2023 where the Auckland Business Chamber will specifically acknowledge local board support. The Kick start days are the first day students get to meet the Young Enterprise team, and find out about their 2023 year, what YES is about, and what is in store for them. All schools in the local board area that have shown an interest in YES are invited. In addition, the invite is extended to those schools who have not shown an interest to enable them to make a decision as to whether to participate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     The proposed work programme does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     The proposed TAU work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

19.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Upper Harbour Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.

Table 1: Māori impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Māori impact

Local Business Mentors Programme

The Local Business Mentors project will ensure Māori businesses identified on our database and that are a part of the Whariki Māori Business Network are made aware of the programme available.  Data on Māori business participation will be collected as part of TAU’s KPI reporting and will be shared with the local board. The current Business Mentors New Zealand Strategic plan identifies aligning the mentoring service with te ao Māori and expanding the pool of Māori mentors through partnerships such as with Te Puni Kōkiri and Poutama Trust as one of its current strategic objectives.

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days will support YES Māori students at participating schools to benefit from the experience and learnings from the YES.

 

21.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

 

22.     The proposed TAU work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $5,000 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

23.     Table 2 shows the identified significant risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme.

Table 2: Significant risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Local Business Mentors Programme

The programme will not recruit the number of businesses envisaged.

The number of places available has been scaled based on uptake in 2021/2022.  AUL will promote the programme via social media, AUL will also work with Business North Harbour to promote the programme.

Medium

Young Enterprise Scheme Kick Start Days

There is a risk that the Kick Start days do not proceed due to changes in the Covid-19 alert levels. As a result, the sponsorship provided to the Auckland Business Chamber may not be required.

To maintain contact with the Auckland Business Chamber on the running of the event to ensure that if the events are cancelled the full impact on the need for the local board support is identified.

Medium

 

24.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

26.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Upper Harbour Local Board Tataki Auckland Unlimited work programme 2022/2023

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jonathan Sudworth – Local Economic Development Advisor

Authorisers

John Norman – Head of Economic Places

Lesley Jenkins – Local Area Manager

 

 


Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

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Upper Harbour Local Board

23 June 2022

 

 

To appoint a hearings panel regarding the proposal to grant a lease and licence to occupy for Sanders Reserve at 153 Sanders Road, Paremoremo

File No.: CP2022/08559

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To establish a hearings panel to consider the objection and submissions to the proposal to grant a community lease and licence to occupy to Sustainable Paremoremo Group for a community orchard and garden, known as the Kai Rākau Project, at Sanders Reserve, 153 Sanders Road, Paremoremo.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Section 54 of the Reserves Act 1997, before the granting of a lease over a recreation reserve: where there is not a management plan, or the activity is not in accordance with that management plan; iwi engagement and public notification of the intention to lease must take place.

3.       The administering body (in this case, the local board) must give full consideration to the objections and submissions it received to the proposal.

4.       Under Section 120 of the same Reserves Act 1997 all submissions and objections must be in writing and those submitting given ‘a reasonable opportunity’ to appear in support of their objection or submission.

5.       In order to hear submissions on the proposed lease and licence, staff are requesting the local board nominate a hearings panel to hear from those who have responded to the notification of the proposal and have requested to speak.  The panel will hear from the respondents and make recommendations to the local board for consideration when deciding on the application.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Upper Harbour Local Board:

a)      appoint a hearings panel, of at least two members of the local board, to hear from the submitters and objector to the proposal to grant a lease and licence to occupy at Sanders Reserve, 153 Sanders Road, Paremoremo and make recommendations to the local board on the proposal.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The land at Sanders Reserve, described as Part Lot 5 Deposited Plan 193647, is held in fee simple by council as a classified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977.

7.       The former North Shore City Council developed the Sanders Reserve Paremoremo Reserve Management Plan in November 2006.  Use of the park for community gardens was not contemplated in the plan and therefore the proposal for the community lease and licence for this activity must be publicly notified and iwi engagement held.

8.       A memo was presented at the Upper Harbour Local Board’s workshop on 7 April 2022, which discussed the group’s community lease application.  The local board confirmed that they wished to proceed to public notification and iwi engagement for proposed community lease and licence to occupy.

9.       A public notice was placed in the North Harbour News on 21 April 2022  Submissions closed on 20 May 2022.  A presentation about the proposal was emailed to identified interested iwi on 21 April 2022, asking for feedback on the proposal.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Brief overview of submissions received

10.     Forty-nine written submissions were received by the closing date.  Forty-seven are in favour of the proposal with one opposed.  One submitter did not indicate support or opposition.

11.     Four submitters indicated they would like to speak to their submissions, including the applicant, and the one opposing submitter.  Another two submitters indicated they would speak, if necessary, in favour of the proposal.

Hearings and decision making on proposal

12.     Under section 120 of the Reserves Act 1977  any person or organisation may make a (written) submission on the proposal.  Those submitters are given the opportunity to be heard before the administering body (the local board).  The local board determines its own procedure for these hearings.

13.     The local board can choose whether the full local board, or a hearings panel will hear submissions and objection.

14.     If the local board decides to appoint a hearings panel it will hear the submitters and objector and make a recommendation to the local board for their consideration when considering the lease/licence application.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

15.     As a procedural report, there are no climate impacts as a result of actions arising from the recommendations within this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     As a procedural report, there are no local impacts arising from the recommendations within this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     As a procedural report, there are no local impacts arising from the recommendations within this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     As a procedural report, there are no impacts on Māori arising from the recommendations within this report.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     All costs associated with the formation and operation of the hearing panel will be funded from existing budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     If the local board does not decide on the make-up of the proposed hearing panel, then consideration of the submissions and objection will not take place.  This would put the local board in contravention of the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Subject to the local board’s decision, staff will action the resolutions.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Ophilia MacRae - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Heather Skinner - Senior Local Board Advisor

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager