I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Value For Money Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 16 June 2022

10.00am

This meeting will be held remotely and a recording of the meeting will be available on the Auckland Council website:

https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/meetings-council-bodies/Pages/webcasts-council-meetings.aspx

 

Kōmiti Tiaki Pūtea / Value for Money Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Members

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

 

 

Cr Angela Dalton

 

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

 

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

IMSB Member Glenn Wilcox

 

 

Cr Paul Young

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Duncan Glasgow

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere /

Governance Advisor

 

13 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 2656

Email: duncan.glasgow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 



Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

The Value for Money Committee ensures the pro-active assessment of money saving opportunities and considers the cost-effectiveness of the governance, funding and delivery across the Auckland Council Group, including those opportunities beyond the scope of s17A.  Responsibilities include:

 

1.    approving the s17A Local Government Act 2002 review forward work programme.

2.    monitoring and reporting on the implementation of s17A reviews, and the recommendations arising from those reviews.

3.    approving the terms of reference for individual s17A reviews

4.    receiving and making recommendations on the outcome of individual reviews

5.    requesting reports on Auckland Council parent and CCO value for money and cost effectiveness-focused initiatives that are beyond the scope of s17A reviews.

 

Powers

 

All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

Except:

(a)        powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)        where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(c)        the power to establish sub-committees.

 

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 


Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·         Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·         Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·         Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·         In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·         The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·         However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·         All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·         Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·         Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·         All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·         Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·         Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·         Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

A picture containing logo

Description automatically generated

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          Auckland Council savings progress for the period ended 31 May 2022                9

9          Value for Money End of Council Term Report                                                         15

10        'Optimise our Service Outcomes' Value for Money Committee Update               21

11        Summary of Value for Money Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 16 June 2022                                       41

12        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

13        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                                 45

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Group Shared Services update                                                    45


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Value for Money Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 17 February 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

 

Auckland Council savings progress for the period ended 31 May 2022

File No.: CP2022/07287

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the progress towards meeting the $90 million operating budget savings target for Auckland Council for 2021/2022 financial year.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A $90 million ongoing operating savings target has been included in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Recovery Budget) after considering the level of the expenditure required to provide council services and the level of rates we collect.

3.       The progress towards the savings target was last reported to the Finance and Performance Committee in the quarterly performance report to 31 March 2022. At that time $83.5 million had been achieved.

4.       The most recent result at 31 May 2022 is that Auckland Council has achieved $90.7 million (100.8 per cent), thereby fully achieving the $90 million savings target for the 2021/2022 financial year.

5.       The savings have been achieved mainly because expenditure is less than what was planned due to cautious financial management, different ways of working during COVID-19 restrictions, delays in capital projects meaning consequential operating costs will commence later, as well as staff vacancies not able to be filled due to labour market conditions. Ongoing cost reductions were achieved through billing system enhancements in Regulatory Services, a review of corporate property maintenance services required compared to what is contracted, and the sale of Amenity and Infrastructure Management Services (AIMS). There were some additional procurement savings achieved through contract negotiation.

6.       The organisation continues to look for further efficiencies and other cost reduction opportunities. There is a pipeline of further savings which includes financial benefits from some initiatives in the operating model portfolio, further procurement savings opportunities and areas where expenditure is expected to be below budget, such as staff costs.

7.       Progress against the savings target is reported monthly to the Executive Leadership Team and closely monitored for risks and opportunities.

8.       Of the $90 million savings achieved in 2021/2022 and previous years, over half are enduring savings which have contributed to the $90 million savings target in the next financial year 2022/2023. At 31 May 2022 approximately $52 million of savings have been achieved towards the 2022/2023 target. It remains challenging to find ongoing cost reductions that contribute to future years’ savings targets, given the current inflationary environment for goods, services and labour.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Value for Money Committee:

a)      note that Auckland Council has achieved the $90 million operating budget savings target for the 2021/2022 financial year, with $90.7 million (100.8 per cent) achieved at 31 May.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       Auckland Council continues to experience significant financial impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. Because of this, Auckland Council set an operating expenditure savings target of $120 million for the 2020/2021 financial year (Emergency Budget) and achieved this ambitious target in April 2021.

10.     To maintain essential services and high levels of spending on infrastructure, a $90 million ongoing operating savings target has been included in the Recovery Budget after considering the level of the expenditure required to provide council services and the level of rates we collect. This considers changes to operating budgets impacted by items such as growth, interest and inflation, the levels of external revenue, political decisions and the overall affordability of rates increases.

11.     The savings target is set at a level to provide enough focus on efficiencies without detriment to agreed service levels or staff health and safety.

12.     The target for the 2021/2022 financial year follows on from the $120 million operating savings target included in the Emergency Budget 2020/2021. Of the $120 million savings achieved in 2022/2021, over one-third ($48.1 million) were enduring savings which have contributed to the $90 million savings target in 2021/2022.

13.     A centralised process for identifying, measuring and reporting on savings was developed for monitoring and reporting against the Emergency Budget target and continues to be used as the basis for this reporting.

Chart, bar chart

Description automatically generatedTātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     At 31 May 2022, Auckland Council has achieved $90.7 million (100.8 per cent) towards the $90 million savings target. Approximately $52 million of savings have been achieved towards the 2022/2023 target. Savings of note include:

Prudent financial management

·        $2.3 million one-off saving of consequential opex (repairs and maintenance and other expenditure) not required due to project delays at Kotuku House and cemetery land acquisition delays

·        $1.0 million one-off saving in outsourced works and services as a result of fewer objections to the council rating valuations received through a better planning and communications process

·        $2.0 million one-off saving from the Strategic Mobilisation Fund for operational improvement projects not allocated in this financial year

·        $1.9 million one-off saving in budgeted operating expenditure as a result of different ways of working during COVID-19 restrictions, for example, online council meetings and some citizenship ceremonies being held online resulted in lower costs in catering, office consumables and related support activities 

·        $0.5 million one-off saving of expenditure not required due to the decision to extend the life of one of the community recycling centres

·    $2.0 million one-off saving from repairs and maintenance not required due to deferral of non-urgent stormwater works as a result of COVID-19 restrictions

·    $0.5 million of travel budget not spent due to continuing COVID-19 travel restrictions

·    $0.2 million permanent saving from a reduction in printing service lease cost compared to the budget

·    $5.8 million of staff cost budget not spent in the financial year to date due to vacancies not able to be filled in a constrained labour market

·    $1.0 million of training budget not spent due to the year to date lower number of staff than budgeted.

15.     Auckland Council has completed the one-year delayed property revaluation process. Ratepayers are able to make objections to their property valuation. Council received objections to 1.3 per cent of the property valuations, down from 1.7 per cent in the previous 2017 revaluation round. The reduced objections rate has been achieved partly through a strong and simple communications strategy around a complex process, with coordination between the operational and communications teams. For example, clear, regular updates were provided to media, citizens and elected members to ensure awareness of what the valuations represent and the part these valuations play in the rates determination. 

16.     These savings are primarily due to a continued focus on cost control and budget reviews. Also included are savings resulting from actual expenditure less than budget at the end of the third quarter, which will not be needed in the current financial year.

Process optimisation and efficiency savings

·      $1.0 million permanent saving in better contract management in corporate property maintenance

·      $0.2 million permanent saving from the sale of Amenities and Infrastructure Maintenance Services (AIMS), with $1.3 million annualised saving recorded in future years

·      $0.2 million one-off additional saving from lower ACC costs compared to budget allowed

17.     Improved efficiency of corporate property maintenance and renewals through re-prioritisation of the WorkSmart programme and the planned divestment of selected properties, now recorded as permanently achieved due to completion of contract variations.

18.     The sale of AIM Services resulted in a $1.3 million permanent saving through the reduction in back-office costs including finance, ICT and corporate support. Other benefits include future cash investment avoided, a better focus on council’s core business and a simpler council operating model.

19.     A review of the ACC levy assumption rate is in the delivery pipeline to be assessed for any permanent savings following the change in service provider.

Procurement

·    $0.1 million multi-year saving from favourable contract negotiation of general courier contracts

20.     The five-year courier contract covers existing general courier work for council, plus new services for housing and operating the new automated book sorter machine that Libraries are introducing.

21.     The procurement savings are primarily achieved by reducing operating contract spend with third parties through negotiating better terms for the council.


 

22.     The council procurement team is currently exploring further savings opportunities from panel agreements and syndicated contracts for services delivered across the group. These agreements allow the council to benefit from work already completed, saving time and money for the wider organisation. They are also actively working on supplier diversity and engaging Māori businesses.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Several completed savings initiatives and initiatives in the pipeline consider climate change impacts and deliver non-financial benefits such as reducing carbon emissions and improving the environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The $90 million savings target in the Recovery Budget 2021-2031 only applies to Auckland Council.

25.     However, new tools and process improvements successfully implemented in Auckland Council can potentially be introduced to the council-controlled organisations for greater efficiencies and other benefits.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

26.     The centralised savings approach has been set at a regional level. None of the initiatives delivered or in delivery have specific impacts on local board service levels.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     The savings initiatives delivered or in delivery have no specific impact on Māori outcomes. The Māori outcomes budget is ring-fenced for delivery on the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau framework and is not considered an area for cost reductions.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     This report provides visibility on how Auckland Council is performing against its operating savings target which supports meeting the annual budget for 2021/2022 and future years. Savings reporting is included in the Auckland Council quarterly performance reporting to the Finance and Performance Committee for context as part of the council’s overall financial performance.

29.     The savings target of $90 million has been met. To the extent that the savings target is exceeded, there is benefit in respect of a having a favourable starting position for the next financial year. This means that we would have lower net debt at 30 June 2022 and therefore this would help to mitigate some of the interest cost pressures for next year and beyond.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     As the 2021/2022 savings target has been met, there are no remaining risks.

31.     The significant risks to achievement of future savings and cost reduction targets include inflationary pressure on staff and operating costs which may reduce savings opportunities; and the pace at which process and efficiency improvements are implemented in order to realise benefits.

32.     Any savings as a result of the COVID-19 Alert Level 4 lockdown related impacts in August and September 2021, have not been counted towards the $90 million savings target as they were used to offset revenue losses.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     The next update will be provided after the council’s quarter one results are finalised for the financial year 2022/2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Nicole Heng - Senior Finance Advisor - Programmes

Nicola Mills - General Manager Financial and Business Performance

Authorisers

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Ross Chirnside - General Manager Value For Money

 

 


Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

 

Value for Money End of Council Term Report

File No.: CP2022/07603

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an end of council term update on value for money activity.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Since the formation of Auckland Council in 2010, there has been a commitment to deliver on value for money across the group. This commitment has continued during this term of council including the establishment of the Value for Money Committee, the development of the Optimise Our Service Outcomes programme, S17A[1] reviews, savings initiatives, and asset recycling.

3.       In the 10 years following amalgamation, Auckland Council has made over $2.4 billion in operating savings. In the current financial year up until the end of May 2022, a further $90 million has been achieved in savings. If these cumulative savings had not been achieved, then rates would be 14 per cent higher (as at 2021).

4.       The key Value for Money highlights since 2019 include:

·    savings since amalgamation - Cumulative savings of $2.4 billion have been realised since amalgamation. If these savings had not been made, the total rates requirement would have been 14 per cent higher over these years (as of FY21).

·    savings in response to Emergency Budget - Exceeding the $120 million savings target in 2020/2021 and establishing $90 million savings target for 2021/2022 and annually for the duration of the 10-year Budget 2021-2031. Council-controlled organisations (CCOs) had their own savings targets.

·    group procurement savings - COVID-19 brought significant change and disruption to group procurement in 2020/2021. From a results perspective, the council group has delivered $63 million of procurement benefits in 2020/2021. A further $33 million in savings had been achieved by February 2022.

·    asset recycling - Programme established to realise capital from non-service assets. There was a $454 million asset recycling overall target established for FY21 to FY24. A strong pipeline of opportunities has been developed with $92 million realised since FY21.

·    CCO Review implementation - The CCO Review panel included ‘value for money’ as one of their evaluation criteria. Many of the recommendations will improve effectiveness and some such as the creation of Auckland Unlimited will also improve efficiency. Work is underway to assess the feasibility of developing a coherent strategy to back-office shared services for the group.

·    optimise our service outcomes - Focused on Auckland Council this is consideration of the services council delivers and the best delivery model. This work contributes to the savings targets mentioned above.  This activity also supports compliance with S17A of the Local Government Act.

5.       Through the Annual Budget 2022/2023 planning process, further operating budget gaps have been identified and the value for money activity will continue to be an important priority for the next council term.  Staff will prepare a briefing note for the incoming council outlining the ongoing and continued importance of value for money.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Value for Money Committee:

a)      receive the update on value for money work undertaken during the 2019-2022 Auckland Council term.

Horopaki

Context

6.       During the last council term, council chose to broaden the Local Government Act S17A process into a much more robust vehicle than that required by the legislation. From 2017 to 2020, a systematic approach to reviewing services and activities has been undertaken, incorporating the legislative requirements of S17A.

7.       With the formation of the council post-election in 2019, there was a continued commitment to deliver on value for money outcomes. This commitment included the establishment of the Value for Money Committee, the development of the Optimise Our Service Outcomes programme, asset recycling and alignment with the Chief Executive’s performance objectives.

8.       In the 10 years following amalgamation, Auckland Council has made over $2.4 billion in operating savings. In the current financial year up until the end of May 2022, a further $90 million has been achieved in savings. If these cumulative savings had not been achieved, then rates would be 14 per cent higher (as at 2021).

9.       Since 2020, COVID-19 and the subsequent economic conditions have required council to take a much stronger focus on short-term cost savings rather than longer-term value opportunities. As a result, value for money has been focused on activities which make a meaningful contribution to current budgetary requirements. It is becoming increasingly difficult to find on-going savings following the value for money reductions already made since amalgamation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     There have been significant efforts made by council and group to reach the savings targets identified in the Recovery Budget. Below is a breakdown of the value for money activities for FY19/20 to FY21/22.

2019/2020

11.     From March 2020, COVID-19 has required council to move from a systemic review of services to rapid cost reduction and cash realisation from council assets.

12.     The CCO Review commenced in January 2020 and value for money was one of the criteria used by the independent panel during their review.  The panel reported in July 2020 and the recommendations are in the process of being implemented.

13.     The formation of Auckland Unlimited through the merger of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development and Regional Facilities Auckland resulted in $5 million of on-going operating savings. The CCO Review recommendations have also resulted in a shift towards greater collaboration and stronger relationships between council and the CCOs which over time will deliver further efficiencies and improved effectiveness.  Work is also underway to assess the feasibility of developing a coherent strategy to back-office shared services for the group.

14.     Implementation continued on S17A service reviews (previous Value for Money Programme) completed during the prior term of council.  These reviews included three waters, domestic waste, communications and engagement, investment attractions and global partnerships, procurement, information and communication technology, customer services, and financial services.

2020/2021

15.     A number of dependent programmes were established to identify the areas that council needed to focus on and improve post-COVID-19. Optimise our Service Outcomes is a key programme of work to support the drivers of change and to realise value for money opportunities including contributing to future savings targets. The programme is part of the Chief Executive’s performance objectives FY22 - FY24.

16.     Optimise our service outcomes is a programme of service reviews which has included AIM Services, Pools and Leisure, Auckland Film Studios along with other commercial opportunities. Further information about this programme is outlined in the Optimise our Service Outcomes report which is also presented to the Value for Money Committee on today’s agenda.

17.     $126 million in cost savings were realised for council. This included savings and cost reductions made through staff salary, staff numbers, procurement, and efficiencies gained. CCOs had similar targets.

18.     A programme to review council’s non-strategic assets was also established.  This has included Downtown Carpark, Bledisloe House and other surplus land and buildings.  There was $62 million in property sales in FY21 and a further $27.2 million has gone to unconditional sale in FY22. Asset sales have recently slowed due to a cooling property market.

2021/2022

19.     The Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031) includes $90 million savings targets and $70 million proceeds from asset recycling for the 2022-2024 financial years

20.     The Optimise our Service Outcomes work has resulted in the sale of Amenities and Infrastructure Maintenance Services (AIMS) in April 2022, the review of the council holiday accommodation, review of Auckland Film Studios and other alternative commercial opportunities which are contributing to the financial saving targets.

21.     To assist with the future strategic review of council services, council proposed a service prioritisation framework (Figure 1) to focus on the high priority services and how the service should be delivered (e.g., do more, less, or do differently). This framework was developed to help meet cost reduction targets. This was included as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation and the feedback was in majority support for the implementation of the framework.

Figure 1 – Service Prioritisation Framework included in Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation

Table

Description automatically generated

2022/2023

22.     On 7 June 2022, the Governing Budget agreed the Annual Budget 2022/2023 which includes ongoing savings and cost reductions to address the emerging budget gap caused by rising inflation, stagnant revenue recovery, supply chain disruption and increasing climate action necessity. One of the levers that will be used to address the budget gap will be the prioritisation of council services using the service prioritisation framework.

23.     In addition to the existing $90 million savings target and $70 million proceeds from asset recycling it is anticipated that $30 million of cost reductions from service prioritisation will need to be made by 2023/2024 and then a further target of $50 million for 2024/2025.

Key Value for Money highlights from 2019 to 2022

24.     In FY21, $126 million of savings were achieved by council as part of the Emergency Budget. and a further $90 million savings has been achieved in FY22.

25.     Council recognised in 2020 that while AIMS was operating strongly, council was not the right ‘parent’ for a growing business and council began exploring options for divestment. The decision to sell was made in July 2021 and Programmed was announced as the successful buyer in December 2021. By 4 April 2022, 300 staff had been successfully transitioned to Programmed on the same terms and conditions.  The sale price was $19.2 million and council avoided an estimated capital investment of $15 million for new operating equipment.

26.     Cost savings resulted from a change in data centre infrastructure by moving data process and storage from onsite services to outsourced data centres (the “cloud”). This has resulted in cost savings of $7.7 million in FY19 and $4.7 million in FY21.[2] There has also been the non-financial benefit of providing adaptive, efficient and effective technology which meets the current and future needs of Auckland Council, which was particularly necessary during the rapid transition to working from home requirements of the COVID-19 lockdowns. The cloud platform provides a secure and resilient system which will meet the future needs of staff.

27.     In July 2020, the CCO Review included recommendation 64 which called for ‘compliance with the group procurement policy to be mandatory on all CCOs to reduce costs and minimise duplication.’ The new group procurement policy, which includes the principle of “deliver the best value for every dollar” has delivered a number of positive outcomes for council group entities. This includes the ongoing group sourced procurement programme of activity overseen by the steering committee made up of representatives from council, Auckland Transport and Watercare. The group procurement benefits totalled $44.7 million for the 2020/2021 financial year and the year-to-date savings for FY2021/22 is $33 million (as of February 2022).

Future Value for Money activity

28.     Value for money is core to how the council and group operates.  During this term of council the financial realities have required a focus on immediate cost savings.  During the next term of council there is the opportunity to adopt a more holistic view of value of money assessing the effectiveness and value to the community from the services council provides.

29.     The service prioritisation framework will guide the strategic assessment of services and provide the basis for determining council’s role in service delivery and how services are delivered in the most effective way.

30.     Staff will prepare a briefing note for the incoming council outlining the ongoing and continued importance of value for money.

 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     Our climate commitments are set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. The Optimise our Service Outcomes Programme will consider our commitment to ensure the decisions we make positively contribute to achieving the targets.

32.     Climate adaptation has also been included as part of the priority objective criteria in the draft prioritisation framework for determining the next group of services for review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.     Value for Money initiatives apply across the council group and saving targets are shared amongst all entities. The CCO Review recommendations were made in collaboration with the CCOs and there has been work underway to complete the recommendations. This has resulted in increased collaboration and stronger relationships between council and the CCOs.

34.     Value for money activity adopts a group perspective and considers activities undertaken both by Auckland Council and its substantive CCOs. The wider council group have not been engaged in the development of this report but will be included when the programme considers activities impacting their operations and will provide updates to future Value for Money Committee meetings.

35.     The Optimise our Service Outcomes programme is council-wide and supported by the Chief Executive as part of their performance objectives.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Local boards have been involved with various service reviews where there is an impact to their local areas or on local services. This is aligned with the decision-making responsibilities set out in the long-term plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The Optimise our Service Outcomes Programme contributes to the long-term priority of “An Empowered Organisation” in the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework.

38.     As part of the assessment of services, consideration is given to how council services (and any decisions to change) advance Māori health and wellbeing, promote Māori success, and recognise and provide for Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Māori outcomes.

39.     Service decisions will also consider the Independent Māori Statutory Board Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 – 2025, and where appropriate, the process will include engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

40.     Under the ‘Thriving Business Networks’ issue of significance, the optimisation of service outcomes may facilitate business opportunities for Māori businesses through future procurement processes. This has been undertaken throughout the AIMS procurement process.

41.     In addition, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outlines the following measures in relation to Māori employment in council-led service provision which will be considered in service reviews:

·        realising rangatahi potential – the number of Māori youth employed in permanent and fixed term roles across the council group

·        an empowered organisation - the percentage of council employees in fixed term and permanent roles who identify as Māori, and the percentage of council staff in senior leadership positions who identify as Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     Value for money activity is focused on ensuring maximum value for the community from council expenditure.

43.     Achieving savings targets and realising funds from surplus assets will continue to be priorities as council balances its financial position.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The 2022 elections may result in a strategic direction change and value for money activity must be ready to adapt accordingly. This could include changes to the service prioritisation framework to meet the new strategic priorities, especially as it is becoming increasingly difficult to find on-going savings following the value for money reductions already made since amalgamation.

45.     Global economic conditions may continue to impact the local economy which would further increase inflation beyond predictions and potentially cause further disruption to the supply chain. Value for money work may need to be accelerated if this occurs.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Staff will prepare a briefing note for the incoming council outlining the ongoing and continued importance of value for money.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chantelle Subritzky - Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Ross Chirnside - General Manager Value For Money

 

 


Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

 

'Optimise our Service Outcomes' Value for Money Committee Update

File No.: CP2022/00112

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the ‘Optimise our Service Outcomes’ activity update and the development of the service prioritisation framework.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       To meet Aucklanders changing needs effectively and efficiently, Auckland Council services and service delivery must continue to evolve, particularly with recent drivers of service change including the post-pandemic economic climate, the council-controlled organisation (CCO) review, and government policy reforms.

3.       Optimise our Service Outcomes is a key programme of work to support the drivers of change and to realise value for money opportunities including contributing to future savings targets. The programme is part of the Chief Executive’s performance objectives FY22 - FY24.  An overview of the programme and progress update was provided at the 29 July Governing Body meeting.[3]

4.       Since 2020, COVID-19 has required council to take a much stronger focus on short-term cost savings rather than longer-term value opportunities. As a result, focus has been on delivering activities which make a meaningful contribution to current budgetary requirements.

5.       The sale of Amenities and Infrastructure Maintenance (AIM) Services was successfully completed on 4 April 2022 for $19.2 million. The sale of AIM Services resulted in a $1.3 million permanent saving through the reduction in back-office costs including finance, information technology and corporate support.

6.       The S17A review of Pools and Leisure services identified several opportunities for improvements to service delivery. Work has been completed on the current state service review and recommendations have been made to improve the service, including information improvement, future-focused operating model, improved delivery model, and a review of council’s role in the delivery of the service. The implementation of these recommendations is underway.

7.       Value for money activity has continued on the review of holiday parks, Auckland Film Studio and alternative commercial opportunities. The relevant local boards have been engaged on the future model for holiday park management and the request for proposal process is underway. Auckland Film Studios have been approved by the Finance and Performance Committee for sale and this process has started.

8.       A prioritisation framework was developed and consulted on as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023. The framework will determine the future pipeline of opportunities for service improvement to be considered by the appropriate committee in the new term of council.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Value for Money Committee:

a)      receive the update on the Optimise our Service Outcomes programme and refer the agenda report via memo to the Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board for information.

Horopaki

Context

9.       Over the last 10 years, Auckland Council has made progress to address significant challenges facing the region, including record levels of growth, meeting changing community expectations, and creating efficiencies with our size and scale.

10.     To meet Aucklanders needs effectively and efficiently, Auckland Council services and service delivery must continue to evolve, particularly with drivers of service change including the post-pandemic economy, the CCO review, and government policy reforms.

11.     Optimise our Service Outcomes is a key programme of work to support the drivers of change and to realise value for money opportunities including contributing to future savings targets. The programme is part of the Chief Executive’s performance objectives FY22 - FY24. An overview of the programme and progress update was provided at the 29 July Governing Body meeting.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Strategic context

12.     During the last term of council, the Value for Money Programme was introduced to meet council’s ongoing requirements under Section 17A of the Local Government Act 2002 to continually assess the cost-effectiveness of council services.

13.     The Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031) outlines a $90 million savings target for each of the 2022-2024 financial years and while there is uncertainty in how this will be achieved, it is anticipated that projects within the Optimise our Service Outcomes Programme will play an important role in contributing to filling this gap.

14.     On 7 June 2022, the Governing Budget agreed the Annual Budget 2022/2023 which includes ongoing savings and cost reductions to address the emerging budget gap caused by rising inflation, stagnant revenue recovery, supply chain disruption and increasing climate action necessity.  One of the levers that will be used to address the budget gap will be the prioritisation of council services and the framework which was consulted on.

Context and the Optimise our Service Outcomes programme approach

15.     The Optimise our Service Outcomes Programme assesses whether parts of council are fit for purpose to address the needs of Aucklanders in the future.

16.     At the 24 June 2021 Governing Body meeting, the Optimise our Service Outcomes programme was confirmed as part of the Chief Executive’s performance objectives FY22 - FY24, (GB/2021/74) following recommendations of the Appointments and Performance Review Committee. Approaches to service delivery within council have developed over time, and can be inconsistent, meaning resources could be better utilised. The Optimise our Service Outcomes programme adopts a structured principle-based approach to assess whether council is delivering or commissioning the services Aucklanders need in the right way.

 

17.     The first group of services to be assessed as part of the Optimise our Service Outcomes programme included Amenities and Infrastructure Maintenance Services (AIMS), active recreation (pools and leisure), waste assets (Waitākere Transfer Station), and the management of holiday parks.  This group is at different phases of review.

18.     As opportunities are identified, a principles-based approach is used across a three-phase service review process where options are analysed, and recommendations are made before being approved to move into delivery.

19.     Depending on the service review findings, recommendations may be brought to elected members for decision-making with the Value for Money Committee playing an important role as contributors to the development of the future pipeline, and what is prioritised for delivery.

20.     Service assessments are currently underway. These services are a mix in terms of scale, complexity, number of staff and customers impacted, risks and length of time required to review. This mix of projects allows us to test the review approach and identify any improvements that may be needed.

Optimise our Service Outcomes status update

21.     The scope and status of projects within the first group of services are outlined in Table 1.

Table 1: ‘Optimise our Service Outcomes’ in-flight projects

Projects

Benefits

Update

Status

Project Whakapai (AIMS)

Sale of the AIMS business via a “carve out” of contracts, plant, and staff from council.  Scope includes transition to a new service provider.

Service provision – other contractors have higher service performance than AIMS

Staff development – increased opportunities for staff in larger contracting organisation

Value for money – improved by scale, innovation, and technology

Financial – proceeds from sale

Simplification – simplifies council operating model

Transition was successfully completed on 4 April 2022. The sale of AIMS will improve service delivery and provide better career opportunities for staff than if council remained as owner. Other benefits include future cash investment of $15 million avoided and $1.3 million reduction in the back-office costs including finance and information technology.

Completed

Pools & Leisure

Review of leisure centre operating model and strategy. A mixed management model exists for leisure centres with outsource contracts expiring in June 2023. Scope includes S17A compliance

Benefits will be determined during the review. The scoping of this opportunity indicates potential benefits may include:

Service provision – consistent service delivery model across the city to meet future needs of Auckland

Equity – focus in areas where there is less private provision and who need council services

Value for money – a consistent service provision is likely to increase value for money

The current state assessment has been completed

Investigation of future delivery models are underway to inform the procurement process

 

On Track

Holiday Park Management

Review the business model of the three council-owned and managed holiday parks.

Service provision – standard service delivery model

Improved value for money – through specialised management

Simplification – simplifies council operating model

Relevant local boards engaged

Procurement process to select an operator is underway

 

On Track

Auckland Film Studios

Sale of Auckland Film Studio’s to release cash to Auckland Council

Value for money – through increased investment in film services in Auckland

Financial – proceeds from sale

Simplification – simplifies council operating model

Approval for divestment from the Finance and Performance Committee in May including input from the Henderson-Massey Local Board

Commenced early market engagement

Engagement of Transaction Advisor

 

On Track

Waste assets

Investigation of the appropriate ownership model for waste assets with initial focus on Waitākere Transfer Station

Value for money – improved by scale, innovation, and technology

Financial – proceeds from sale

Simplification – simplifies council operating model

Initial investigation completed

Further work has reduced priority as limited benefit anticipated in the short to medium term

On Hold

Alternative Commercial Opportunities

Confidential service reviews that are still in the assessment phase and require confidentiality due to commercial sensitivity.

Value for money – through increased utilisation and provision of service

Financial – proceeds from sale

Simplification – simplifies council operating model

An update will be provided post-elections to the new council.

On Track

Pools and Leisure Service Review

22.      A S17A[4] review of the Pools and Leisure Services has identified several opportunities for improvements (Attachment A), primarily because the existing services are still being delivered through a model created to meet the intents of the legacy Auckland councils. There is currently a mixed model including 25 facilities operated by council, 19 contracted out to three different parties to operate on council’s behalf, and one leased out to a trust.

 

 

23.     A better understanding of our communities today, incorporating their differing needs, along with improving the quality of information around the costs and revenues attached to the services being provided, will enable a better service strategy to be developed. With current arrangements for contracted services and leasing of the site coming up for renewal in 2023, there is an opportunity to deliver the right services to our communities, through an updated strategy, supported by the right operating model.

24.     The recommendations arising from the current state assessment are summarised as:

·    Improve the quality and consistency of information

·    Ensure fit for future operating model

·    Review and look to improve the delivery model

·    Continue and complete existing pieces of work

·    Review and determine the role of our services in the community and market

 

Work has commenced on implementing the service delivery model to inform a procurement process and future decision-making by the incoming council.

Service Prioritisation Framework

25.     To assist with the strategic review of council services, council proposed a service prioritisation framework (Figure 1) to focus on the high priority services and how the service should be delivered (e.g., do more, less, or do differently). This framework was developed to help meet savings targets. This was included as part of the Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation and the feedback was in majority support for the implementation of the framework and the Governing Body has agreed to its future use.

Figure 1 – Service Prioritisation table included in Annual Budget 2022/2023 consultation

Table

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26.     The Value for Money Committee has recommended the use of the prioritisation framework when assessing services. It has successfully been implemented in two service reviews since March 2022. The committee will have an on-going role in the implementation of the framework.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

27.     Our climate commitments are set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan. The Optimise our Service Outcomes Programme will consider our commitments to ensure the decisions we make positively contribute to achieving the targets.

28.     Climate adaptation has also been included as part of the priority objective criteria in the service prioritisation framework for determining the next group of services for review.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

29.     The Optimise our Service Outcomes programme is largely focused on Auckland Council. However, some initiatives do require input, guidance and leadership from CCOs such as Auckland Film Studio which is supported by Tātaki Auckland Unlimited and Eke Panuku.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The involvement of local boards in the various service reviews will align to the decision-making responsibilities set out in the long-term plan.[5]

31.     The programme will align with the approach, findings and future decisions of the Governance Framework Review - funding and service levels.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

32.     The Optimise our Service Outcomes Programme will contribute to the long-term priority of “An Empowered Organisation” in the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau - Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework.

33.     As part of the assessment of services, consideration will be given to how council services (and any decisions to change) advance Māori health and wellbeing, promote Māori success, and recognise and provide for Te Tiriti o Waitangi and Māori outcomes.

34.     Service decisions will also consider the Independent Māori Statutory Board Schedule of Issues of Significance 2021 – 2025, and where appropriate, the process will include engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

35.     Under the ‘Thriving Business Networks’ issue of significance, the optimisation of service outcomes may facilitate business opportunities for Māori businesses through future procurement processes. This has been undertaken throughout the AIMS procurement process.

36.     In addition, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outlines the following measures in relation to Māori employment in council-led service provision which will be considered in service reviews:

·        realising rangatahi potential – the number of Māori youth employed in permanent and fixed term roles across the council group

·        an empowered organisation - the percentage of council employees in fixed term and permanent roles who identify as Māori, and the percentage of council staff in senior leadership positions who identify as Māori.

37.     The proposed sale of AIMS presented an opportunity of potential economic development for Māori. All iwi were informed of the opportunity and invited to participate. The current service contracts have social procurement objectives built into the agreements which includes setting objectives for the make-up of the operational workforce from the priority social groups (Māori and Pacifika). The workforce requirements of these contracts did not change in a sale.

38.     The sale conditions included the protection of the current workforce and Programmed were required to employ staff on the equivalent terms and conditions (including living wage). This protected the employment of all staff including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     Optimise our Service Outcomes contributes to both the $90 million annual savings target for the duration of the Recovery Budget (10-year Budget 2021-2031) and the annual asset recycling target of $70 million.

40.     There are financial implications on the annual budget if the savings and asset recycling targets are not met.  This may result in higher debt levels with corresponding impact on increased operating costs or the need for rates increases above what is signalled in future years of the current long-term plan.

41.     Cost benefit analysis will form part of each service assessment and inform any potential service improvements or changes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     Optimise our Service Outcomes programme has two groups of risks.  Risks at a programme level and risks for each area being assessed.

43.     At a programme level, the key risk is working on the right opportunities with adequate resourcing to deliver the scale of programme at pace to contribute to the targets for savings and asset recycling. Development of the prioritisation framework mitigates part of this risk by focusing on the right opportunities.

44.     Other programme risks are engagement with staff and stakeholders, elected member decision-making, alignment with policies and activity already underway at council, perception of the public and media, and the ongoing impact of the extended COVID-19 pandemic.

45.     Risk assessments are completed as part of the planning for and throughout each service assessment.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     Staff will continue to deliver the first group of service reviews with progress updates provided to the Value for Money Committee and Governing Body as appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Pools & Leisure Services Review

29

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chantelle Subritzky - Senior Project Manager

Authorisers

Peter Gudsell - Group Chief Financial Officer

Ross Chirnside - General Manager Value For Money

 

 


Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

 

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Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

 

Summary of Value for Money Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 16 June 2022

File No.: CP2022/06005

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been held or been distributed to Value for Money Committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to Value for Money Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       There were no information items distributed.

5.       There were no workshops or briefings.

6.       Value for money activity delivered as part of the implementation of council-controlled organisation review recommendations will be reported to Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee rather than Value for Money Committee and the forward work programme has been updated accordingly.

7.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Value for Money Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Value for Money Committee:

a)      note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      receive the summary of information memoranda and briefings – 16 June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

43

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Ross Chirnside - General Manager Value For Money

 

 


Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

 

 

Kōmiti Tiaki Pūtea / Value for Money Committee
Forward Work Programme 2022

The Value for Money Committee looks for money saving opportunities and considers the cost-effectiveness of the governance, funding and delivery across the Auckland Council Group.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Auckland Council Governing Body Terms of Reference

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

2022

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Optimise our Service Outcomes

General Manager Value for Money

Auckland Council established the Optimise our Service Outcomes programme to evaluate whether council is providing the services Aucklanders need in the most effective and efficient way.

Receive programme progress updates and provide input as required

Progress to date:

Update received in November 2021 VFM/2021/5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Savings

General Manager Financial and Business Performance

A $90 million ongoing operating savings target has been included in the 10-year Budget 2021-2031 (Recovery Budget).

Receive updates on the savings target pipeline and progress

Progress to date:

Update received in November 2021 VFM/2021/4

Update received in February 2022 VFM/2022/4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value for Money Activity and Outcomes

General Manager Value for Money

Value for money activity and outcomes achieved by Auckland Council.

A report on the value for money outcomes achieved by Auckland Council during the 2019-2022 electoral term will be prepared for June 2022.

Progress to date:

Update received in November 2021 VFM/2021/3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Value for Money activity

Group Treasurer

 

Receive information on value for money activity across the council group and provide input as required

·    Benefits Realisation Framework (February 2022)

Update received in February 2022 VFM/2022/3

·    Group Shared Services (February and June 2022)

Update received in February 2022 VFM/2022/2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Value for Money Committee

16 June 2022

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Value for Money Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Group Shared Services update

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(c)(ii) - The withholding of the information is necessary to protect information which is subject to an obligation of confidence or which any person has been or could be compelled to provide under the authority of any enactment, where the making available of the information would be likely to damage the public interest.

s7(2)(i) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry on, without prejudice or disadvantage, negotiations (including commercial and industrial negotiations).

In particular, the report contains employee information that has been provided in confidence and disclosure at this stage would be likely to impact similar information being provided in the future. The information that supports this report may disadvantage negotiations which may flow from future decisions on this matter.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

 



[1] S17A Local Government Act 2002 requiring the assessment of cost-effectiveness of service delivery

[2] The programme was delayed in March 2020 as lockdowns prevented the final migrations.

[3] This is a confidential report

[4] S17A Local Government Act 2002 requiring councils to review the cost-effectiveness of service delivery

[5] The 10-year Budget 2021-2031 – Our Recovery Budget, Volume 2, Section 3.5 Decision-Making Responsibilities of Auckland Council’s Governing Body and Local Boards, p.277-290.