I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Waiheke Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 22 June 2022

5.15pm

Local Board Office
10 Belgium Street
Ostend
Waiheke

 

Waiheke Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Cath Handley

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kylee Matthews

 

Members

Robin Tucker

 

 

Bob Upchurch

 

 

Paul Walden

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Dileeka Senewiratne

Democracy Advisor

 

16 June 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 840 914

Email: dileeka.senewiratne@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                5

11        Councillor's Update                                                                                                       7

12        Chairperson's report                                                                                                   21

13        Auckland Transport Report - June 2022                                                                   27

14        Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                  33

15        Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)   45

16        Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 1 June 2022                                        207

17        Quick Response Grant Round Three 2021/2022 grant allocations                      215

18        Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme 2022 - proposed grant allocation Waiheke Kai Charter 2022                                           315

19        Connected Communities Waiheke Māori Responsiveness programme 2022 - proposed projects for grant allocations                                                                 321

20        Approval of the 2022/2023 Waiheke Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                                                        331

21        Approval of the 2022/2023 Waiheke Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme                                                                                       407

22        Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023                                                                                               423

23        Draft Auckland golf investment plan update - stakeholder feedback in response to board resolution                                                                                                         429

24        Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings                                      437

25        List of resource consent applications - 8 May to 3 June 2022                             447

26        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Kua uru mai a hau kaha, a hau maia, a hau ora, a hau nui,

Ki runga, ki raro, ki roto, ki waho

Rire, rire hau…pai marire

 

Translation (non-literal) - Rama Ormsby

Let the winds bring us inspiration from beyond,

Invigorate us with determination and courage to achieve our aspirations for abundance and sustainability

Bring calm, bring all things good, bring peace… good peace.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its additional meeting, held on Wednesday, 15 June 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Waiheke Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Councillor's Update

File No.: CP2022/07995

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor Pippa Coom with an opportunity to update the Waiheke Local Board on Governing Body issues.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)         receive Waitemata and Gulf Ward Councillor, Pippa Coom’s update.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor's Update - June 2022

9

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Chairperson's report

File No.: CP2022/08031

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide Chairperson Cath Handley with an opportunity to update the local board on the projects and issues she has been involved with and to draw the board’s attention to any other matters of interest.

2.       The supporting Chairperson’s report attachment was not available at time of publishing and will be tabled at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Chairperson, Cath Handley’s report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair's Update - to be tabled at the meeting.

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport Report - June 2022

File No.: CP2022/08032

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board on transport related matters in their area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

This report covers:

2.       A general summary of operational projects and activities of interest to the Waiheke Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the Auckland Transport June 2022 update.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       Auckland Transport is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. We report monthly to local boards, as set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan. This reporting commitment acknowledges the important engagement role local boards play within the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

4.       This report updates the Waiheke Local Board on Auckland Transport (AT) projects and operations in the local board area.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF)

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport. Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.

6.       The current amount of funding proposed in the Regional Land Transport Plan is $400,000 per annum.

7.       The local board prioritised four projects (WHK/2022/49) and asked AT to scope and provide a rough order of costs to determine what can best be achieved with the funds available to them. These projects are generally planned to fit in with future resealing programmes.

8.       A Decision Report with recommendations for the local board’s formal approval is included within this agenda.

Community Safety Fund (CSF)

9.       The CSF is a capital budget established by Auckland Transport for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund is to allow elected members to address long-standing local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the Auckland Transport programme.

10.     This project is to provide a separated sealed shoulder from the Yacht Club to Shelly Beach Rd            

11.     A local planning specialist experienced with coastal work on the island has been engaged by the project team. The following processes are underway:

·    Preparation of the plan showing proposed sealed shoulder over the topographical survey and the Mean High Water Spring line.

·    Preliminary discussions commenced with Auckland Council regarding the Land Use and Coastal Permit application.

·    Discussion on structural design details.

·    The tree consent and owner approval process.

Update on Auckland Transport operations:

12.     The table below has a general summary of projects and activities of interest to the local board with their status. Please note that:

·    All timings are indicative and are subject to change.

·    The Waiheke Operations Manager will update the local board in the event of any amendments or changes to the summaries provided for below.

Activity

Update

EV chargers

AT is working on the approval for applications from Vector (on behalf of Electric Island) for the installation of new EV charging stations in Orapiu and Onetangi.

 

Road Maintenance

Programmed works

June works includes routine cyclic maintenance of signs, drains and potholes.

Various Roadworks sites

Causeway Road – cycleway maintenance and wheel stop repairs.

Mako Street – Road shoulder maintenance.

Ocean View Rd, Mako Street, Belgium Street – footpath repairs.

Man o War Bay Road and Cowes Bay Rd – grading.

102 Ostend Road.

Placemakers Corner

Design works are being completed to improve safety at the Placemakers / Ostend Road intersection. Improvements include widening the vehicle entrance into the centre, and provision of new line marking to move vehicles travelling westbound away from the shoulder. The new edge line provides an improved amenity for cyclists traveling westbound up the hill. New “SLOW” road marking, and a VMS (driver feedback) sign is planned to be installed at the end of the straight on the approach to the intersection.

The project is going through internal and ELT consultation prior to proceeding with the legal resolution process, and this is expected to be completed prior to the end of June.

 

The flush median in the proposal necessitates resolution, and whilst the “SLOW” road marking and VMS sign could be installed prior to this, the decision has been made to combine traffic management plans to save on overall cost.

 

Construction is currently planned for mid to late July at the earliest due to the resolution signoff/approval requirement.

 

Te Huruhi School pedestrian crossing

The proposal is for a new pedestrian crossing to be constructed outside the school.

External consultation closed on 8th June 2022. One response was received.

This response will be addressed, and once the external closeout process has been completed, detailed design will commence.

Upon completion of external consultation, the final design will be completed, whereafter procurement of a suitable contractor will take place to undertake the physical works.

Wharf works

Matiatia Wharf (main)

Preparations are underway for the second stage of AT’s wharf renewal project at Matiatia.

 

Site works are now not expected until August 2022 – any earlier site works will be to clean the pontoons to meet marine biosecurity requirements.

 

The new incoming infrastructure is almost identical to what is currently on site, except a new smaller pontoon to enable the separation of the northern and southern berths. These components are all currently being fabricated off site

 

The components will be barged in, and works will commence from a barge positioned on the southern berth approximately where the current ferries operate from.

 

First up will be the removal of the existing infrastructure, placement of two piles and then attaching the pontoon and the gangways, hydraulic and fixed platform.

 

The operating ferries relocate to the neighbouring wharf where local commercial and recreational operators berth currently.

Site works were expected to be 6-8 weeks but with the piling requirement this may go out to 12 weeks.

 

The project team are providing the local board with a comprehensive update on 22 June.

 

AT are also currently working with AC Biosecurity around procedures required regarding invasive fanworm present on the pontoons.

 

A meeting is planned on 17 June with the Department of Conservation to provide an understanding of the project as well as proposed timing.

 

230 Waiheke Rd lookout

AT is working with Auckland Council to block off vehicle access to the view site at 230 Waiheke Rd.

The vehicle access track has become practically inaccessible with the site being prone to dumping of rubbish. The wooden picnic furniture requires replacement due to vandalism.

It is intended to install wooden bollards able to be removed to allow contractor vehicle access for mowing or maintenance as required.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     Auckland Transport engages closely with Council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and Council’s priorities.

14.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The impact of the information in this report is confined to Auckland Transport and does not impact on other parts of the Council group. Any engagement with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

1.        Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no local, sub-regional or regional impacts.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

17.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

18.     There are no financial implications of receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

19.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no risks. Auckland Transport has risk management strategies in place for all their projects.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.     Auckland Transport will provide another update report to the local board at a future business meeting.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard La Ville – Operations Manager – Waiheke and Gulf Islands Airfields – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

John Strawbridge – Group Manager Parking Services and Compliance – Auckland Transport

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Allocation of Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2022/08572

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Waiheke Local Board (the Board) on its local board transport capital fund (LBTCF) and to recommend allocation of the remaining LBTCF budget.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report updates the Waiheke Local Board that it has $872,000 remaining in its LBTCF budget this political term following the June 2021 adoption of the regional land transport plan 2021 – 2031.

3.       The 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road roundabout Cycle infrastructure project is briefly described and recommended to be funded through the LBTCF. The report notes that this will expend all of the remaining LBTCF budget.

4.       There are risks that the latest COVID-19 lockdown may mean further budget cuts are necessary in the future, therefore it is expedient that prioritised projects are contracted out as soon as practicable.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      allocate the remaining balance of $872,000 of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund to the shared path and cycle lane 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road Roundabout Cycle Infrastructure project (outlined as Project 1a in attachment A).

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT.  Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme.  Projects must also be:

i.    Safe

ii.    not impede network efficiency

iii.   be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

6.       In April 2022, the local board resolved (WHK/2022/49) a request for Auckland Transport (AT) to prepare rough costings for a prioritized list of projects, these projects included (in order of priority):

i.      design appropriate cycling infrastructure and connectivity improvements along the main arterial route from 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road roundabout including pre-design for installation during road reseals FY 22/23.

ii.     improvement of walking, cycling and safety infrastructure and connectivity along   Sea View Road to Waiheke Primary School from Ostend Road to Erua Road.

iii.    improved pedestrian infrastructure from WISCA corner intersection from 85 Ocean View Road to 66 Jellicoe Parade.

iv.    improved walking and cycling infrastructure and connectivity along Onetangi Road from 75 Onetangi Road to 2 Trig Hill Road.

7.       On the 30th May 2022 these rough costings were presented in a workshop, and an indicative direction was given with regards to supporting staff recommendations to allocate all remaining LBTCF budget to the highest priority project, the 1 Surfdale Road to Donald Bruce Road Roundabout Cycle Infrastructure project.

8.       The scope of what could be delivered within this budget was outlined which included a hybrid approach based on options 4 and 2 within the Flow feasibility report completed in 2016. The costs were based on delivering a mix of both protected on road cycle lanes and off-road shared paths where required (i.e. where there is insufficient road width). 

9.       The cost for the recommended option was presented as being approx. $800k but it is recommended that the Local Board allocate their total remaining budget of $872,000 as costs are likely to continue to increase due to the current economic climate.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

11.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian and/or cyclist safety therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

12.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT.  Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.     AT attended a workshop with the Waiheke Local Board on 30 May 2022.  At this workshop matters discussed included:

i.    Presentation of rough costings for prioritised project list resolved in the April 2022 business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

14.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

15.     Allocating the local board transport capital fund budget as recommended will expend the balance of the outstanding funds in this political term.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

16.     The impact of the COVID pandemic has not been factored into these recommendations. There is a risk that budgets might be impacted by budget cuts resulting from current budget reviews.

17.     After the last lockdown in 2020, projects that were already contracted out once the Emergency Budget was resolved continued to be delivered, therefore the local board is advised to allocate funding to its preferred projects as soon as possible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

18.     Once the local board’s resolutions are finalised, AT will work to contract out the projects as soon as possible.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Presentation - Transport Capital Fund project options

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Richard La Ville – Operations Manager – Waiheke and Gulf Islands Airfields – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Matthew Ah Mu, Programme Support Manager – Local Boards

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 









Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Auckland Transport's Draft Parking Strategy (2022)

File No.: CP2022/07606

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek feedback from local boards on Auckland Transport’s Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Parking Strategy sets out the objectives, principles and policies relating to Auckland Transport’s management and supply of parking across Auckland and was last updated in 2015.

3.       Since 2015, numerous changes in both the central and local government context mean that a review of the Parking Strategy (2015) was required.

4.       The review has involved engagement with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community.

5.       In late May, Auckland Transport (AT) provided summaries of public engagement to all local boards. This report is to seek feedback from local boards, having had the opportunity to review feedback from their community, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      provide feedback, taking into consideration their community’s feedback, on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The current Parking Strategy (2015) was progressive at the time it was introduced, bringing about many changes in Auckland including wider acceptance of priced parking; however, it is no longer fit for purpose. Since it was developed there have been numerous changes to the policy and planning context including:

·        adoption of the Auckland Unitary Plan. Development signalled in the Unitary Plan will enable growth that may be difficult to service with public transport, meaning that some new suburbs will rely on car use for access

·        changes to travel behaviour, such as the emergence of micromobility (i.e., electric scooters) and the growth of the delivery economy

·        Auckland’s public transport network has matured over time, providing opportunities for further passenger uptake and efficiency related to park and ride management

·        market demand is pushing for more housing provision and density. Development is already showing evidence of less carparking provision and more issues with carparking compliance

·        the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) which guides direction on urban development through the Unitary Plan. The NPS-UD requires Auckland Council to remove parking minimum requirements from the Unitary Plan, which means that developments will not be required to provide onsite parking. This will contribute to society and transport becoming less car-centric over time; however, it will lead to increasing pressure on public parking resources, particularly on-street parking

·        both central government and Auckland Council have declared ‘climate emergencies’, prioritising policy initiatives and investment that will reduce carbon emissions. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan and other plans and strategies proposed by central government will require changes to the land transport system, including parking.

7.       The Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) is an important element of aligning and addressing Auckland’s response to these issues, particularly by managing parking in a way that:

·        supports public transport and alternative modes, which will make public transport and active modes such as walking and cycling safer and more convenient

·        responds to Auckland’s population growth and land-use intensification

·        acknowledges that space for carparking is a limited public resource.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.       The Draft Parking Strategy (2022) (Attachment A) sets out the strategic context and the need to manage the transport system, as well as the strategic objectives and agreed principles for parking management.

9.       The proposed approach to planning parking management is set out on pages 26-36 of Attachment A. The key elements of this are:

·        proactively applying parking management in areas that have land use intensity and good public transport access

·        repurposing road space away from parking where this is required to enable delivery of the Strategic Transport Network.

10.     The accompanying parking policies (p38-63 of Attachment A) provide more technical detail on how parking is proposed to be managed in order to align to the principles set out in the strategic direction. The policies are grouped by:

·        provision and approach

·        on-street and off-street

·        specific vehicle classes

·        specific situations.

11.     The strategy also includes a section on advocacy to central government for legislative and/or regulatory reform as there are some areas of parking management that are outside local government control. Including these areas also provides context on the limitations of regulation in areas we would like to effect change and achieve better outcomes. These areas include:

·        parking infringement fines

·        banning berm parking

·        residential parking permit cost-setting

·        influencing private parking through parking levies.

12.     In December 2021, Auckland Transport and Auckland Council released a Parking Discussion Document to start the conversation with the public on future parking management in Auckland. AT received 32 pieces of written feedback. Following this feedback, several areas of the draft Parking Strategy and its accompanying policies were updated, including:

·        developing the narrative to better link it to the broader transport story, strategic objectives and policy rationale, as well as regulatory areas in need of reform

·        focussing on the benefits of parking management to enable and support access, resulting in a more equitable transport system

·        articulating the benefits and implications of parking to the community

·        acknowledging the costs of parking provision

·        emphasising parking diversity to enable mode shift

·        emphasising that the roll-out of further parking management will happen over time, starting where there is most readiness for change, and that this is a ten-year plan

·        outlining indicators of success

·        ensuring that consultation materials acknowledge the existing context and public fatigue.

13.     Strategic direction provided by the Planning Committee has also guided development of the draft strategy.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     The National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) requires planning decisions to contribute to the development of urban environments that support reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and are resilient to the likely current and future effects of climate change.

15.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan outlines the need for Auckland to reduce its transport-related emissions significantly, to meet the target of 64% reduction by 2030. This means that business as usual for transport and land-use project planning and delivery, and management of the transport system, cannot continue.

16.     Parking management is a lever in managing the transport network, both in terms of the opportunities that repurposing of road space offers to enabling other modes, and in disincentivising car use.

17.     Implementing the Parking Strategy will include repurposing parking lanes on key roads in Auckland, increasing the diversity of transport options and improving safety and efficiency for people using sustainable modes and for goods and service delivery. This is a key change required to reduce transport-related emissions, meaning the Parking Strategy is of significant importance as an early step to transport-related climate action.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     Auckland Transport has engaged with key stakeholders across the council family, including raising awareness of the review with Auckland Council’s advisory panels.

19.     Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited provided feedback during engagement on the Parking Discussion Document. Their feedback was supportive of the proposed approach.

20.     Both the need for review and the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy (2022) prepared for public consultation have been endorsed by Auckland Council’s Planning Committee (Resolution number PLA/2022/24).

21.     Considerable liaison has taken place between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council departments ranging from Planning and Transport Strategy at a strategic level to Community Facilities about management of car parking in or near community parks.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Since Auckland Council and the Auckland Transport Board approved the review of the Parking Strategy in 2021, Auckland Transport has engaged with elected members, mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community. The objective of the engagement process has been to ensure that Aucklanders are aware of the review, have had an opportunity to find out more about the proposed changes, and have had an opportunity to provide feedback.

23.     The engagement process included the following key activities:

a)      in 2021, information about the review was sent to all local boards and presented to the Local Board Chairs’ Forum

b)      all local boards were offered a workshop in August 2021, and in September 2021 all were invited to provide feedback that would contribute to the initial thinking around development of an updated draft document

c)      in December 2021, a Parking Discussion Document was published, targeted at key stakeholders and calling for initial feedback. 32 pieces of written feedback were received

d)      in March 2022, information about upcoming wider public consultation was provided to local boards along with a further workshop with Auckland Transport subject matter experts. The public consultation was again promoted through the Local Board Chairs’ Forum in April 2022

e)      public engagement and consultation on the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy has recently closed. Auckland Transport received 943 submissions. Responses from the community have been collated and provided to local boards as area specific reports (Attachment B). Public engagement included:

i)       media (OurAuckland, radio) and social media (videos) marketing to let the public know about the engagement

ii)       online information

iii)      webinars at which Auckland Transport staff were available to discuss the proposal with members of the public

iv)     nine open days held in libraries around the region for members of the public to discuss the proposal with Auckland Transport staff

v)      discussions with key stakeholders including business associations, industry groups, emergency services, utilities, and other government agencies

vi)     a public debate about parking issues.

24.     This report provides the opportunity for the local board to give their feedback, based on consideration of their community’s feedback, on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     Parking management is a kaitiakitanga issue, in that it is about managing a limited public resource. Auckland Transport has engaged with the Tāmaki Makaurau Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum to establish how best to incorporate views from mana whenua into the review.

26.     Feedback from a series of AT hui with mana whenua representatives reinforced that parking is a topic of considerable concern to Māori. Other points raised include:

·        acknowledgement that, as well as the strategic concerns around air quality and resource management, parking enables access

·        that parking infringements can contribute to creating a cycle of debt

·        that communities are facing compounding pressures - parking management shouldn’t adversely impact people and places even further

·        the potential for parking management to further reduce access - particularly for less able-bodied kaumatua and kuia - to the whenua, the moana and to wahi tapu.

27.     Other potential impacts of increased parking management for Māori are likely to be similar to those for the wider population. Some members of the community are more reliant on cars for access, particularly if they do not have good access to public transport. Barriers to public transport, such as cost and network coverage, influence access to necessities such as education, healthcare, employment, shopping, and social services.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Parking management resourcing will be delivered through AT operational budgets. Initial work to understand the resourcing required to implement the strategy indicates that this will require significant resource increases for planning, design, compliance monitoring and enforcement. It is currently expected that the strategy would be at least revenue-neutral overall once compliance monitoring/enforcement revenue is considered.

29.     Revenue from parking management helps to offset AT operational costs and therefore reduce reliance on ratepayer funding.

30.     There are no financial implications for local boards associated with providing feedback on the Draft Parking Strategy (2022).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     There are significant risks associated with adopting a new approach to parking management in Auckland – however these must be weighed against the opportunity costs of not having an appropriate framework in place to manage parking. These include:

a)      persistent and increasing issues with over-reliance on on-street parking, particularly since the removal of onsite parking requirements in the Unitary Plan

b)      reduced ability to support development of the public transport and cycling network (both of which reduce emissions) and less ability to enable place-based improvements within the road corridor

c)      not having the ability to take an integrated and strategic approach that supports business when managing parking in town centres using collaborative parking management plans

d)      less flexibility with managing the impacts of increased population growth and intensification.

32.     Strong, considered feedback from local boards will enable Auckland Transport to make good decisions about the Parking Strategy while they balance these risks against the opportunity costs described above.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Feedback from local boards will be reviewed and taken into account as staff consider any amendments to the Draft Auckland Parking Strategy before recommendations to the Auckland Council Planning Committee are made in August 2022.

34.     Following endorsement of the Auckland Parking Strategy by the Auckland Council Planning Committee, approval will be sought from the Auckland Transport Board.

35.     Once approved by the Auckland Transport Board, the new Parking Strategy will be introduced.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft Auckland Transport Parking Strategy (2022)

51

b

Public consultation - summary of local feedback

127

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Claire Covacich, Principal Transport Planner, Auckland Transport

Kat Ashmead - Senior Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Andrew McGill, Head of Integrated Network Planning, Auckland Transport

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum 1 June 2022

File No.: CP2022/08033

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To present an update and minutes from the business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum (the forum) held on 1 June 2022 to the Waiheke Local Board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.   The business meeting of the Waiheke Transport Forum was held on 1 June 2022 and minutes are included as Attachment A.

1.         The following items were discussed:

i.        Discussion on the Waiheke Climate Action Plan: Leslie Stone - Low Carbon Activator and Greer Rasmussen Low Carbon Specialist, Auckland Council.

ii.       Transport Capital Projects update Mark Inglis, Local Board Services and Tony King Turner. Forum members supported the board’s prioritisation of cycling infrastructure development on the main route from Burrell Road to Donald Bruce Road.

iii.      Update from board member – discussed feedback on AT’s Safe Speed Programme - Bob Upchurch.

iv.      Matiatia parking issues new taxi stand arrangement appears to be

working for most users - Grant Crawford

v.       Clearance of drains beneath private drives Grant Crawford

vi.      Due to board recess there will be no meeting in July of the Waiheke

Transport Forum. The final meeting of the forum will take place on

Wednesday 3 August 2022 with all board members in attendance.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)          note the minutes of the Waiheke Transport Forum business meeting dated 1 

         June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

1 June 2022 - Waiheke Transport Forum Minutes

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Inglis - Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Quick Response Grant Round Three 2021/2022 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/07735

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund, or decline applications received for Waiheke Local Board for the Quick Response Grant Round Three 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board adopted the Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 (refer Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants submitted to the local board.

3.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Sixteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $52,782.00. $31,282 was allocated, leaving a total of $58,319 for one local grant round and three quick response rounds.

4.       The environmental grants budget was set at $30,000. The Environmental Grants Round One 2021/2022 received four applications requesting a total of $30,188.00. $16,438 was allocated, leaving a total of $13,562 for one remaining round.

5.       Fourteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round one 2021/2022, requesting a total of $26,739.28. $13,032 was allocated, leaving a total of 45,287 remaining for two quick responses and one local grant round.

6.       Five applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $7,574.50. $5,500 was allocated, leaving a total of $39,787 remaining for one quick response and one Local Grant round.

7.       $13,562 was transferred to the community grants round as no applications were received for the Waiheke Environmental Grant Round 2, leaving a total of $53,349 for one remaining Local Grant round and one remaining Quick Response round.

8.       15 applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Local and Multiboard grant round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $62,036. $36,773 was allocated in this round.

9.       $13,562 was added to the Community grants budget from underspend in the Waiheke Environmental Fund. $10,000 was added from the Arts and Culture response programme. $3,339 was added from film revenue. $1,000 was added through the community emergency resilience programme. $1,500 was added through the business emergency resilience programme. $771 was added through the local community response fund. This leaves a balance of $29,186 for one quick response round.

10.     23 applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick Response Grant round three 2022/2023 requesting a total of $73,304.81.

11.     This report presents applications received in Quick Response Grant Round Three 2021/2022 (refer to attachment B).

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      Agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in the Waiheke Local Board for the Quick Response Grant Round Three 2021/2022 listed below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2218-327

Kahui Creative Network

under the umbrella of Community Networks Waiheke

Arts and culture

Towards wages at Kahui Creative Network from 25 July 2022 to 30 November 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-326

Catherine Mitchell Arts Centre

Arts and culture

Towards pottery wheel, glazes and containers at Catherine Mitchell Arts Centre from 1 July 2022 to 31 July 2022

$3,005.18

Eligible

QR2218-325

Surfdale Food Forest

under the umbrella of Home Grown Waiheke Trust

Community

Towards pest proofing and land owner approval at Surfdale Food Forest from 4 July 2022 to 30 June 2023

$6,802.60

Eligible

QR2218-323

Carbon Neutral New Zealand Trust

Environment

Towards data purchasing of mapping data from 1 August 2022 to 1 October 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-322

Waiheke Sports Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards ferry tickets at Waiheke Sports Club from 1 July 2022 to 11 September 2022

$10,800.00

Eligible

QR2218-321

The Waiheke Resource Trust

Environment

Towards advertising and wages at 6 Tahi Rd from 1 July 2022 to 30 November 2022

$2,730.00

Eligible

QR2218-320

Waiheke Island Riding Club

Sport and recreation

Towards equestrian jump course at 165 Onetangi Road from 1 July 2022 to 30 July 2022

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR2218-319

Waiheke United AFC

Sport and recreation

Towards Ferry Tickets for Waiheke United Auckland Football Club from 1 July 2022 to 1 October 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-318

Waiheke Community Childcare Centre Incorporated

Community

Towards four gazeebos at Waiheke Ostend Market from 1 July 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-317

Waiheke Rugby Club

Community, Environment

Towards bins at Onetangi Sports Park from 4 July 2022 to 30 September 2022

$1,540.00

Eligible

QR2218-316

Waiheke Musical Museum Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards film license, venue hire, advertising and credit card fees at Whittaker's Musical Museum  & Waiheke Community Cinema from 1 November 2022 to 15 December 2022

$940.00

Eligible

QR2218-315

Waiheke Adult Literacy Inc

Community

Towards facilitation costs, advertising, catering and printing at Waiheke Adult Learning from 1 September 2022 to 30 November 2022

$1,750.00

Eligible

QR2218-313

Tessa O'Shea

under the umbrella of Community Networks Waiheke Incorporated

Environment

Towards digger hire, truck hire, wages and native plant purchase for a stream by Kennedy Road from 1 July 2022 to 29 July 2022

$8,870.00

Eligible

QR2218-311

Native Bird Rescue Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards wages at Native Bird Rescue Charitable Trust from 7 July 2022 to 22 June 2023

$9,600.00

Eligible

QR2218-310

Matiatia-Oneroa Ratepayers & Residents Association Incorporated

Community

Towards landscape architect costs at Morra Community Hall Gardens from 4 July 2022 to 30 June 2023

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-309

Waiheke Island Rudolf Steiner Education Trust

Community

Towards construction of a verandah and outdoor sink at Fossil Bay School and Kindergarten from 11 July 2022 to 30 September 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-308

Project Reach-Out Waiheke / Hapai Ki Te Hapori Trust

Community

Towards advertising and training costs at 13 Moa Avenue from 1 July 2022 to 31 December 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-307

Waiheke Playgroup

Community

Towards bikes, scooters, craft supplies and wages at Old Blackpool School Hall from 2 July 2022 to 30 June 2023

$3,674.03

Eligible

QR2218-306

Waiheke Community Art Gallery

Arts and culture

Towards gallery lighting at Waiheke Art Gallery from 4 July 2022 to 31 December 2022

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2218-305

Melanoma New Zealand

Community

Towards wages and ferry ticket at Morra Hall and Waiheke Recreation Centre from 1 July 2022 to 31 October 2022

$2,164.00

Eligible

QR2218-304

Waiheke Mountain Bike Club

Sport and recreation

Towards drainage and water supply at Onetangi Sports Park from 1 August 2022 to 31 August 2022

$1,967.75

Eligible

QR2218-303

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards overall costs at Youthline from 1 July 2022 to 31 March 2023

$1,500.00

Eligible

QR2218-301

Feather, Timothy John and Jacqueline Susan

Community

Towards  at Hekerua Bay from 22 June 2022 to 23 June 2022

$461.25

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$73,304.81

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities, and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world-class city.

13.     The Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

14.     The local board grants programme sets out:

·    local board priorities

·    lower priorities for funding

·    exclusions

·    grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·    any additional accountability requirements

15.     The Waiheke Local Board adopted their grants the Grants Programme 2021/2022 on 21 April 2021 and will operate three quick response, two local grants and two environmental rounds for this financial year

16.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications, radio, and community networks.

17.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year and an environmental grants budget of $30,000 for the 2021/2022 financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Local board grants can contribute to climate action through support of projects that address food production and food waste, support alternative transport methods, support community energy efficiency education and behaviour change, build community resilience, and support tree planting.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     According to the main focus of the application, each one has received input from a subject matter expert from the relevant department. The main focuses are identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

21.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Waiheke Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the local board grant programme

23.     The board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states; ‘we will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time’.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2018-2028 and local board agreements.

26.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $89,601 for the 2021/2022 financial year. Sixteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke Local Board for the Local and Multiboard Grant Round One 2021/2022, requesting a total of $52,782.00. $31,282 was allocated, leaving a total of $58,319 for one local grant round and three quick response rounds.

27.     The environmental grants budget was set at $30,000. The Environmental Grants Round One 2021/2022 received four applications requesting a total of $30,188.00. $16,438 was allocated, leaving a total of $13,562 for one remaining round.

28.     Fourteen applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round one 2021/2022, requesting a total of $26,739.28. $13,032 was allocated, leaving a total of 45,287 remaining for two quick responses and one local grant round.

29.     Five applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick response grant round two 2021/2022, requesting a total of $7,574.50. $5,500 was allocated, leaving a total of $39,787 remaining for one quick response and one Local Grant round.

30.     $13,562 was transferred to the community grants round as no applications were received for the Waiheke Environmental Grant Round 2, leaving a total of $53,349 for one remaining Local Grant round and one remaining Quick Response round.

31.     15 applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Local and Multiboard grant round two 2021/2022 requesting a total of $62,036. $36,773 was allocated in this round.

32.     $13,562 was added to the Community grants budget from underspend in the Waiheke Environmental Fund. $10,000 was added from the Arts and Culture response programme. $3,339 was added from film revenue. $1,000 was added through the community emergency resilience programme. $1,500 was added through the business emergency resilience programme. $771 was added through the local community response fund. This leaves a balance of $29,186 for one quick response round.

33.     23 applications were received for consideration by the Waiheke local board for the Quick Response Grant round three 2022/2023 requesting a total of $73,304.81.

This report presents applications received in Quick Response Grant Round Three 2021/2022 (refer to attachment B).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Following the Waiheke Local Board allocating funding for the round, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2021 2022 Waiheke Community Grants Programme

225

b

2021 2022 Waiheke Quick Response Grant Round Three Grant Allocations

229

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

James Boyd - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme 2022 - proposed grant allocation Waiheke Kai Charter 2022

File No.: CP2022/08565

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve a grant of $10,000 for Kai Waiheke from the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board has $10,000 available in the 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme. One of the key outcomes is ‘development of sustainable food systems and greater food security.’

3.       Kai Waiheke is an independent food network that includes a wide range of island stakeholders and activities involved in every aspect of the food system.

4.       Kai Waiheke is seeking a local board grant of $10,000 to finalise and implement a community-led Waiheke Kai Charter, which aims to create a strong community food vision that can support the community and businesses to work together to build a more secure, sustainable, and resilient food system.

5.       The Kai Charter is named as a flagship project of the Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan 2021. It aligns with the local board’s priorities for sustainable economy, resilient community, and responding to the challenges of climate change. 

6.       The Kai Charter has the potential to focus community efforts and build greater resilience. It aims to support a thriving local food economy which uses regenerative practices that enhance the environment, and where everyone in the community has access to affordable and nutritious food.

7.       Staff recommend that the local board allocate $10,000 from the Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme to Kai Waiheke, under the umbrella of Home Grown Waiheke Trust, to support the development and activation of the Waiheke Kai Charter.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve a grant of $10,000 for Kai Waiheke from the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme.

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Waiheke Local Board has $10,000 available within its 2021/2022 Work Programme for Community Resilience and Local Economic Development. 

9.       The local board previously allocated $10,000 from this fund in December 2021 to Waiheke Island Tourism Inc for a Covid Recovery Package, leaving $10,000 remaining to be allocated.

10.     The purpose of the Community Resilience and Local Economic Development fund is to ‘support the development of local community and business networks, fund community groups to facilitate sustainable economic development through social enterprise and entrepreneurship, support innovative community-led improvements to local food systems and food security, build community resilience and support economic recovery.’

11.     One of the key outcomes is ‘development of sustainable food systems and greater food security.’

12.     To support this outcome, Kai Waiheke is seeking a local board grant of $10,000 to finalise and implement the Waiheke Kai Charter. Kai Waiheke presented an update on the project at the local board’s Community Forum on 8 September 2021.

13.     Kai Waiheke is an independent community-led network that encompasses people and groups working across all aspects of food on Waiheke. It was formed in 2020 as a response to the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing climate crisis.

14.     Kai Waiheke is currently in the process of facilitating and drafting the Waiheke Kai Charter following a series of community workshops to seek input from a range of stakeholders across the food system.

15.     A local board grant will enable further engagement with mana whenua, restaurant groups and hospitality, rangatahi and educators to ensure their input into the charter.

16.     Once the charter is finalised, Kai Waiheke proposes to follow up with a programme of activations and ongoing communications to embed the vision and values of the charter and to ensure it is a living document.

17.     Kai Waiheke also intends to create an emergency response plan relating to food resources on the island to support community resilience.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

18.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 outcome two ‘A Sustainable Economy’ includes a key initiative to ‘Support initiatives that increase business and community resiliency’.

19.     The Kai Charter is a community-led initiative that supports both resiliency and sustainability. Food resilience is the ability to prepare for, withstand, and recover from disruptions in the food supply chain to ensure that healthy food is accessible for everyone in the community.

20.     Waiheke’s food system currently faces numerous challenges including rising costs of food and living, more residents accessing food banks, reliance on off-island food supplies, transport and freight issues, volume of food waste, depletion of marine ecosystems, and the cumulative impacts of climate change on the local growing environment.

21.     The Waiheke Local Climate Action Plan 2021 states that through the development and implementation of a Kai Charter ‘we have the chance to build a more secure, sustainable and resilient food system – one that is healthier and supports people more fairly’.

22.     The idea for a Waiheke food charter developed from a community food hui at Piritahi Marae attended by over 120 stakeholders in November 2020, which focused on the food challenges facing the island and brainstormed solutions and project ideas.

23.     A food charter is an internationally recognised tool to help create a strong community food vision, support individuals and organisations in their own decision making and shape community projects and actions.

24.     The food system includes a wide range of activities and participants including composting, community gardens, māra kai, school programmes, food rescue, food production, tourism and hospitality, volunteers, and businesses.

25.     Waiheke benefits from a strong volunteer culture with many skilled and knowledgeable people. However, the capacity of volunteers is currently stretched by the level of need faced by the island’s community and environment.

26.     Kai Waiheke has therefore identified a need to contract facilitators to lead and organise the Kai Charter to ensure that the project can engage as wide as possible a range of stakeholders, who can then be supported as they implement the vision and objectives of the charter.

27.     Kai Waiheke has significant momentum towards addressing food system issues following the successful 2020 Food Hui and development of the Climate Action Plan, both of which enabled the community to come together to reflect on the existing work being achieved and brainstorm future solutions.

28.     The Kai Charter is a tool to enable better coordination across the food system to support the community with enough healthy food, mitigate the impacts of climate change, and prepare for future food system disruptions.

29.     It has the potential to focus community efforts and build greater resilience. It aims to support a thriving food economy where there is local cultivation and consumption of healthy seasonal produce, and where everyone in the community has access to affordable and nutritious food.

30.     It also aims to ensure that Waiheke can develop regenerative practices that benefit the natural environment and reduce climate impacts, food waste is eliminated or utilised as a resource, the community is well-prepared for emergencies, and the island’s food system grows and is interconnected.

31.     Staff recommend the local board approve a grant of $10,000 to Kai Waiheke under the umbrella of Home Grown Waiheke to support the development and implementation of the Waiheke Kai Charter.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     Climate change impacts on food production through increased drought, storms, pests, and diseases. At the same time food production, transportation and waste can contribute to climate emissions. Most of Waiheke’s food is transported from off-island.

33.     The Kai Charter aims to mitigate the impacts of climate change by engaging a wide range of stakeholders to create and implement a vision of a healthier, more interconnected and resilient local food system.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.     The Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme is administered by staff from the Connected Communities department.

35.     As a key initiative in the Waiheke Climate Action Plan, the Kai Charter is also supported by staff from the Community Climate Action team and the Waiheke Climate Activator.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 outcome 2 ‘A sustainable economy’ includes the objective to ‘Strengthen our economy in keeping with the island’s character and our need to increase our resiliency’.

37.     Kai Waiheke’s proposal aligns with this objective by supporting the development of a thriving, abundant and healthy food system where everyone has access to affordable, nutritious food that reflects Waiheke’s cultural diversity.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

38.     Kai Waiheke aims to ensure mana whenua perspectives and knowledge are incorporated in the food charter and included in the food network. Matauranga Māori is a key element in developing regenerative food practice. Kai Waiheke’s proposal includes budget to enable mana whenua participation and engagement.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     The 2021/2022 Community Resilience and Local Economic Development work programme has $10,000 available to support social enterprise and community networks, build capacity and resilience, and ‘support innovative community-led improvements to local food systems and food security’.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

40.     The aim of the Waiheke Kai Charter is to respond to and mitigate the emerging risks of the island’s current food system. These include increased community dependance on food banks, reliance on food produced off-island, transport and freight issues, and the impact of the climate crisis on food production.

41.     If the project is not funded, there is a risk that the Kai Charter will have less stakeholder engagement and more limited scope for implementation and activation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

42.     Staff from Connected Communities will work with Kai Waiheke, under the umbrella of Home Grown Waiheke, to develop a funding agreement.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Food resilience proposal from Kai Waiheke 2022

319

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Fiona Gregory – Strategic Broker – Connected Communities

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager Connected Communities

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Text, letter

Description automatically generated

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Connected Communities Waiheke Māori Responsiveness programme 2022 - proposed projects for grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/08560

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve grants from the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Māori Responsiveness work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Waiheke Local Board has $20,000 available in its 2021/2022 work programme allocated to Māori Responsiveness to respond to key aspirations and priorities for Māori in the local area.

3.       Connected Communities staff have worked with local groups to identify projects that achieve Māori outcomes on Waiheke. Staff recommend the local board supports two Māori-led projects proposed by Waiheke Adult Learning and Piritahi Marae.

4.       Waiheke Adult Learning has requested a grant of $10,000 to support a year-long programme to increase Māori participation in Te Reo Māori classes.

5.       The Te Reo Māori programme is led by kaiako (teacher) Jackie Rhind of Ngāti Pāoa and aims to create improved equity and access for Māori students through targeted fee subsidies, wānanga, resources, and whanaungatanga.

6.       The project aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 initiatives to ‘Work with mana whenua and mātāwaka to identify ways to protect ngā taonga tuku iho (treasures handed down)’ and ‘Promote the use of Te Reo Māori’.

7.       Piritahi Marae has requested a grant of $10,000 to build resilience and prepare for reopening the marae following Covid-related closures.

8.       The marae proposes to install two solar heat pump hot water cylinders, improve its cleaning facilities and bedding to meet Covid-19 health and safety guidelines, and facilitate hui and waiata sessions to support community reconnection at the marae.

9.       The marae’s proposal aligns with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 initiatives to ‘Support Piritahi Marae in its aspirations to further develop as a local community centre’.

10.     Staff recommend that the local board distribute the available $20,000 Māori Responsive ness budget across the two projects as follows: $10,000 to Waiheke Adult Learning to increase Māori participation in Te Reo Māori courses and $10,000 to Piritahi Marae to increase resilience and assist with reopening the marae to the community.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve a grant from the 2021/2022 Māori Responsiveness work programme by allocating $10,000 to Waiheke Adult Learning to increase Māori participation in Te Reo Māori community education courses.

b)      approve a grant from the 2021/2022 Māori Responsiveness work programme by allocating $10,000 to Piritahi Marae to increase resilience and assist with reopening following Covid restrictions.

Horopaki

Context

11.     The local board has allocated $20,000 within its 2021/2022 Work Programme for Local Māori Responsiveness.

12.     The purpose of Māori Responsiveness is to engage with mana whenua and mataawaka, build strong relationships with Māori in the local area, and ‘identify and respond to the needs and aspirations for local Māori with Māori-led initiatives that support social and economic outcomes.’

13.     Connected Communities staff have connected with Māori in the local area, including ngā uri o Ngāti Pāoa (descendants) and the Piritahi Marae Komiti, to identify Māori-led initiatives on the island. This report outlines two proposals for the local board to support Māori aspirations: Te Reo Māori at Waiheke Adult Learning and Piritahi Marae Resilience (see Attachment A).

14.     Staff discussed the proposals outlined in this report with the local board during a workshop on 11 May 2022.

Option A – Te Reo Māori at Waiheke Adult Learning

15.     Waiheke Adult Learning provides community-based adult education services, based at its dedicated learning centre at Artworks, Oneroa. Waiheke Adult Learning has offered Te Reo Māori courses for many years, depending on the availably of qualified kaiako.

16.     Te Reo Māori classes at Waiheke Adult Learning are well-attended with 42 adult students currently enrolled across different four separate groups. However, most students attending are non-Māori.

17.     Waiheke Adult Learning has requested a local board grant of $10,000 to support a year-long programme to increase Māori participation and ensure Māori have the opportunity to learn the language of their tupuna.

18.     The programme acknowledges that Māori adult learners may face additional psychosocial and economic barriers to learning te reo Māori compared to non-Māori and may therefore require additional support to re-engage with learning as adult students.

19.     Barriers include feeling whakamā (shame, embarrassment) about their language use, not having enough people to speak with, and having limited time and resources due to work and whānau commitments or lack of disposable income (Manawa ū ki te reo Māori, 2019).

20.     The mamae (pain, trauma) associated with loss of language through colonisation is strongly felt by Māori, who may therefore experience a high level of emotional vulnerability through the process of engaging in Te Reo Māori education.

21.     Yet, when students experience a positive learning environment that values whanaungatanga (relationships) and manaakitanga (support), historical trauma can be healed through engagement with te reo Māori and the connections that are made between speakers of the language.

22.     The programme at Waiheke Adult Learning aims to address these barriers and create improved equity and access for Māori students through targeted fee subsidies, wānanga, resources, and whanaungatanga.

Option B – Piritahi Marae Resilience Proposal

23.     Piritahi Marae is located at 53 Tahatai Road and is the only marae on Waiheke Island. It is a community marae, welcoming people of all iwi and cultural backgrounds. It is governed by the Piritahi Marae Trust.

24.     The marae is a key community and cultural centre for the island, hosting tangihanga, hui and community events. Also onsite is Piritahi Hau Ora, one of the island’s major primary health providers, Piritahi Childcare Centre, and a flourishing māra kai that provides food for the community.

25.     Piritahi Marae has requested a grant of $10,000 from the local board to build resilience and sustainability and to prepare for reopening. The marae has been closed for marae bookings since August 2021 due to Covid-19 restrictions and will reopen to the community during Matariki in June 2022.

26.     The marae wishes to install two solar heat pump hot water cylinders, which will be used to store power in hot water and to ultimately stop using gas. The marae already has the cylinders but does not have funding for installation.

27.     Prior to reopening, the komiti has identified the need for cleaning equipment to ensure the marae is able to comply with Covid health and safety guidelines, new pillows and linen storage facilities for hygiene purposes, and the cost of hui to reconnect with the community.

28.     The local board previously granted $15,000 to Piritahi Marae from the 2021/2021 Māori Responsiveness budget to support its Kaiwhakahaere Marae pilot project to establish the role of a Marae operations manager.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Option A – Te Reo Māori at Waiheke Adult Learning

29.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 outcome 5 ‘Māori Outcomes’ includes the initiatives to ‘Work with mana whenua and mātāwaka to identify ways to protect ngā taonga tuku iho (treasures handed down)’ and to ‘promote the use of Te Reo Māori’.

30.     Auckland Council’s Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau framework for Māori wellbeing outcomes and performance states that ‘Te reo Māori is… fundamental to a thriving Māori identity for Tāmaki Makaurau. Investment and support are needed to create opportunities to see, hear, speak and learn te reo Māori.’

31.     The proposed programme at Waiheke Adult Learning aims to improve Māori participation in Te Reo Māori classes and create equity of access for Māori learners, who are currently under-represented in Te Reo Māori enrolments.

32.     The programme is led by kaiako Jackie (Kaiwai) Rhind of Ngāti Pāoa / Hapū o Te Uri Karaka me Ngāti Hura ki Waiheke. She is a qualified and registered teacher of over 30 years, with a bachelor’s degree in Māori Education and certificate from Te Wānanga o Takiura Rumaki. Kaiwai attended the local board’s Community Forum on 9 March.

33.     In the proposed programme, a range of approaches will be incorporated to enable access and equity, starting with whanaungatanga and relationship building in the community.

34.     Classes are designed using a wānanga approach of karakia, mihi, pepeha, kōrero ā waha (conversational language), games, sharing of learning experiences, valuing the ākonga (students) as kaiako (teachers) who bring their knowledge, experiences, and inquiry. Classes utilise Tainui dialect in acknowledgement of Ngāti Pāoa as mana whenua.

35.     The proposal also acknowledges socioeconomic barriers such as the cost of attending classes and ensuring that classes are whānau-friendly. For some learners, weekend wānanga will be more accessible than weekly evening classes.

36.     Having easily accessible community Te Reo Māori classes on the island is important, due to the cost and time of travel to other free language programmes in Auckland, such as those offered by Te Wananga o Aotearoa and AUT.

37.     The proposed programme also includes a range of learning resources, as language anxiety can be reduced through use of fun activities, games and waiata.

38.     Outcomes for the programme will be measured by enrolment and retention of Ngāti Pāoa, other mana whenua and mātāwaka students and by use of student evaluations.

39.     Staff recommend that the local board allocate $10,000 of the available $20,000 budget to Waiheke Adult Learning to increase Māori participation in Te Reo Māori courses

Option B – Piritahi Marae Resilience Proposal

40.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 states the local board will ‘Support Piritahi Marae in its aspirations to further develop as a local community centre’.

41.     Installing the solar heat pump cylinders will increase the marae’s long-term sustainability and reduce reliance on mains power and gas water heating. It is the next step in the marae’s Solar Power Plan. The marae already has solar panels.

42.     Piritahi Marae is a civil defence hub that can provide support to the community during emergencies and natural disasters. The solar heat pump cylinders would increase the marae’s resilience in case of loss of mains power.

43.     In the shorter term, the marae has identified the importance of becoming Covid-resilient prior to reopening the marae for tangihanga, hui and community events. It has requested support to install cleaning cupboards and equipment to meet Covid-19 health and safety guidelines.

44.     The marae komiti has also identified the need to replace the existing pillows and to improve linen storage facilities in the wharenui.

45.     In addition, the marae would like to facilitate community reconnecting with the marae post-Covid restrictions. These connections are important for the mate hinengaro (mental health) of Piritahi Marae whānau whānui (extended family).

46.     It proposes to recommence holding monthly Māori Women’s Welfare League and waiata sessions at the marae, with budget required for kai and koha for the facilitators.

47.     Staff recommend that the local board allocate $10,000 of the available $20,000 budget to Piritahi Marae towards its resilience initiatives including the installation of solar water heaters, health and safety planning, and facilitating community reconnections at the marae.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     Piritahi Marae is committed to reducing carbon emissions and utilising mātauranga Māori (indigenous knowledge) to mitigate climate change. The marae’s plan to install solar hot water cylinders will reduce climate impact and ensure greater resilience.

49.     Increasing community connectedness through activities such as hui and community education plays a role in increasing community resilience.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     Ngā Mātārae (Māori Outcomes Department) supports Piritahi Marae to be a sustainable cultural hub for Māori and the wider community.

51.     Budget in the Waiheke Local Board’s 2021/2022 Māori Responsiveness work programme is administered by Connected Communities staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 outcome 6 is: ‘Māori Outcomes’. The plan includes the objectives to ‘Sustain and celebrate Māori identity, knowledge and practice’ and support ‘Marae [to be] sustainable cultural centres’.

53.     Supporting Te Reo Māori classes and Piritahi Marae resilience plans helps to meet outcome 6 by taking a community-led approach to supporting Māori-led priorities and initiatives on Waiheke.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     The projects outlined in this report are led by mana whenua and mataawaka with the goal of enhancing Māori identity and cultural values on Waiheke. The projects align with the board’s commitment to supporting Māori aspirations and Māori-led initiatives.

55.     Waiheke Adult Learning’s Te Reo Māori programme is mana whenua-led, having been developed by Kaiwai Rhind who is a qualified and experienced kaiako of Ngāti Pāoa descent. She has received support for the initiative from the Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust.

56.     Piritahi Marae has identified that building resilience and preparing for reopening after Covid-related closures is its current priority towards the aspiration of becoming a community hub for the island.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     The 2021/2022 Māori Responsiveness work programme has remaining budget of $20,000 to identify and respond to the needs and aspirations for local Māori with Māori-led initiatives that support social and economic outcomes.

58.     Budgets for each of the projects are included in Attachment A.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

59.     Te Reo Māori at Waiheke Adult Learning risks lack of engagement from Māori learners. This risk will be offset by Kaiwai’s mana whenua connections to Waiheke and through her knowledge and experience as a kaiako, which enables her to create a positive and welcoming learning environment. If the programme succeeds it will contribute to the community of Māori heritage language speakers on Waiheke.

60.     The proposal from Piritahi Marae focuses on building resilience and mitigating risks associated with the Covid pandemic and other emergencies.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     Following approval from the local board, staff will prepare funding agreements for Waiheke Adult Learning and the Piritahi Marae Trust.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment Māori Responsiveness Proposals 2022

327

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Fiona Gregory – Strategic Broker – Connected Communities

Authorisers

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager - Connected Communities

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Waiheke Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/07955

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Waiheke Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the 2022/2023 Waiheke Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme for approval from the following departments:

·    Connected Communities

·    Community and Social Innovation

·    Community Facilities

·    Parks, Sports, and Recreation

·    Regional Service Planning, Investment and Partnerships

3.       In addition, the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme and the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities Department work programme are presented for approval in principle.

4.       To support the delivery of the local board’s outcomes and aspirations highlighted in the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020, Customer and Community Services presents a work programme for local board approval each financial year.

5.       The work programme details the activities to be delivered by departments within the Customer and Community Services directorate.

6.       The work programme has been developed with the local board providing feedback to staff on project and activity prioritisation through a series of workshops, held between October 2021 and May 2022.

7.       The work programme development process takes an integrated approach to planning activities, involving collaboration between the local board and staff from across the council.

8.       Within the Customer and Community Services work programme, the Community Facilities Department has identified several projects for the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 financial years as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP).

9.       Approval is sought for the planning and design of the RAP projects to commence during the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

10.     The work programme includes projects proposed to be funded from regional budgets subject to approval by the Parks, Art, Community and Events Committee, including Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets. The local board can provide formal feedback on these regional projects by way of resolutions to this report.

11.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19-related disruptions, some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

12.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi – The Treaty of Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

13.     Once approved in June 2022, the local board will receive quarterly progress updates on the delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme and its associated budget (Attachment A to the agenda report).

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

c)      approve in principle the 2024/2025 Customer and Community Services - Community Facilities only work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report), noting that the LDI Opex allocations will be balanced to budgets in the associated future years’ work programme.

d)      approve the Risk Adjusted Programme projects identified in the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme (Attachment A to the agenda report).

e)      provide feedback for consideration by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on projects funded from the Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets (Attachment D to the agenda report).

f)       note that funding for the Coastal Renewals, Landslide Prevention, Local Parks and Sports Field Development budgets is subject to approval by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee.

g)      note that there may be minor changes to year one of the 2022/2023 Local Board C&CS Work Programme, and other changes in years 2 and 3 which are approved in principle, due to Annual Budget decisions affecting capital budgets and that changes required will be discussed with and reported to the local board early in the new financial year.

 

Horopaki

Context

14.     The Auckland Plan 2050 (Auckland Plan) is council’s long-term spatial plan to ensure Auckland grows in a way that will meet the opportunities and challenges ahead.  It aims to contribute to Auckland’s social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing.

Diagram

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15.     Local board plans align with the Auckland Plan and set out local community priorities and aspirations. The 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme in turn aligns to not only the local board plans but the appropriate Auckland Council plans, policies and strategies.

16.     Work programme activities align to one or more of the following 2020 Local Board Plan outcomes:

·        Outcome 1 - Sustainable development and liveable places

·        Outcome 2 - A sustainable economy

·        Outcome 3 - Waiheke’s environment is protected, restored and enhanced

·        Outcome 4 - Thriving, strong and engaged communities

·        Outcome 5 - Māori outcomes

·        Outcome 6 - Vibrant places for people

·        Outcome 7 - Resilient transport and infrastructure

17.     Development of the work programme is based on consideration of community needs and priorities, availability of resources and funding, Treaty of Waitangi obligations, external partnerships and risk assessment.

18.     The Customer and Community Services directorate provides a wide range of services, facilities, open spaces and information that support communities to connect, enjoy and embrace the diversity of Auckland’s people, places and natural environment. These are designed and implemented to meet the unique needs of the local community.

19.     Development of the work programme follows an integrated approach to planning activities by the following departments of the directorate:
:

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     The work programme demonstrates the phasing of programme and project delivery for the 2022/2023 financial year.

21.     Delivery of the work programme commences from 1 July 2022, and in some cases comprises a continuation of implementation from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or projects and ongoing programmes.

22.     New activities and investments, and potential carry-forward items also form part of the work programme.

23.     Table one summarises the approval status required for the three financial years presented within the work programme.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Table one: Customer and Community Services local board work programme approvals

Department

2022/2023

2023/2024

2024/2025

Community Facilities

Approve

Approve in principle

Approve in principle

All other Customer and Community Services departments

Approve

Approve in principle

N/A

 

24.     Community Facilities presents a three-year rolling work programme so that delivery and financial commitments against the capital works programme can be planned.

25.     Approval of unique multi-year projects, particularly capital works, in the 2022/2023 work programme may lead to contractual commitments to the future budget needed to complete the project in 2023/2024 or 2024/2025.

26.     The remainder of Customer and Community Services presents the work programme in descending three-year increments and are therefore only presenting years two and three of the three-year work programme.

27.     The local board will be updated by staff on the delivery of the programme by way of quarterly performance reports.

Proposed amendments to the 2022/2023 work programme

28.     The local board approved the 2021/2022 Customer and Community Services work programme in June 2021 and approved in principle the 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 work programmes.

29.     The 2022/2023 work programme contains variations to the version that was approved in principle last year. These include the addition of new activities, changes to existing activities, such as required budget allocation and delivery timeframes, and identifies some activities that have been stopped.

30.     Table two highlights the new activities in the work programme:

Table two: work programme activities that are new

ID

Activity name

Lead department

Budget

3005

WHK: Play provision assessment

CCS: PSR – Park Services

$10,000

3007

WHK: Sport and active recreation facilities plan development

CCS: PSR – Active Recreation

$15,000

3104

Waiheke Local Board Community Occupancies FY2023/2024

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3105

Waiheke Local Board Community Occupancies FY2024/2025

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3374

Waiheke Island Artworks: Waiheke Adult Literacy Incorporated

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3375

29 Belgium Street, Waiheke and part of Anzac Reserve: Royal New Zealand Returned and Services' Association Incorporated (Waiheke Returned and Services' Association)

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3376

32 Putiki Road, Waiheke and part of Anzac Reserve: The Catherine Mitchell Arts Centre Incorporated

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

$0

3479

Waiheke Youth Needs Assessment

CCS: Connected Communities – Community Delivery

$30,000

31656

Artworks and Community Centre - comprehensive renewal

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$150,000

31985

Carpark and Roading - Renewals - Waiheke

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$343,822

36658

Citizens Advice Bureau - interior and exterior renewals

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$180,000

36652

Golf Clubhouse - interior and exterior renewals - Onetangi Sports Park

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$200,000

32060

LDI minor capex fund FY2022/2023 - Waiheke

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$40,474

31953

Pohutukawa Reserve (Onetangi) - protect kumara pits

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$20,000

32067

Walkways and Paths - Renewal - Waiheke

C&CS: Community Facilities – Project Delivery

$460,000

 

31.     Table three highlights the activities that were approved in principle in June 2021 but have stopped, or proposed activities that did not start, and are therefore not included in the 2022/2023 work programme:

 

Table three: work programme activities that have been removed from the work programme

Previous ID

Activity name

Lead department

416

Youth: Youth Hub placemaking

CCS: Connected Communities – Community Delivery

589

Waiheke Pathways Plan - prioritisation review

CCS: PSR – Park Services

1419

Mātiatia Gateway Masterplan

CCS: PSR – Park Services

1496

Community Response Fund Waiheke

CCS: Connected Communities – Community Delivery

2773

CFWD Matiatia parks: Initiating a parks related Matiatia Gateway Masterplan

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2780

Carry over for completion - CARRY FORWARD Waiheke Island strategic response fund

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2805

CFWD WHK:Ngahere (Urban Forest) - Knowing phase

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2813

Carry over for completion - WHK: Ecological restoration community partnership

CCS: PSR – Park Services

2822

CFWD WHK: Swimming pool development fund

CCS: PSR – Active Recreation

2827

CFWD CARRY FORWARD Feasibility study for swimming pool

CCS: PSR – Active Recreation

3377

Waiheke Island Artworks: Waiheke Community Art Gallery Incorporated

CCS: Community Facilities – Community Leases

 

COVID-19 considerations for Customer and Community Services

32.     The work programme includes activities that respond to the impacts of COVID-19 by providing:

·     safe and welcoming spaces

·     inclusive events to bring the community back together

·     community support, including grants

·     stronger connections with other organisations, including Council Controlled Organisations, iwi and Māori organisations, business associations, community organisations and central government agencies, which also serve Auckland’s communities.

33.     There is still a degree of uncertainty about the delivery of these activities due to the unpredictability of COVID-19. In the event of further COVID-19 related disruption some activities within the work programme are able to be modified should changes to restrictions and resourcing eventuate. Changes to some activities may lead to delays in delivery and/or the need to adjust project budgets.

34.     Current capex delivery challenges include increased material and labour costs, as well as shortages in both sectors, this in turn will lead to increased overall project costs.

35.     Current supply chain issues, obtaining building materials, may lead to delays in project delivery. Increased costs and delays will be managed as part of the ongoing management of work programmes via additional RAP projects, and the rephasing of projects to accommodate increased budget and address material shortages.

Māori Outcomes

36.     Local boards play a vital role in representing the interests of all Aucklanders and are committed to the Treaty-based obligations and to Māori participation and development.

37.     Auckland Council has important statutory obligations with respect to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Honouring Te Tiriti o Waitangi and supporting Māori Outcomes is implicit within the entire work programme.

38.     A thriving Māori identity is Auckland’s point of difference in the world. It advances prosperity for Māori and benefits all Aucklanders.

39.     The local boards recognise the importance of building meaningful relationships with mana whenua, maatawaka and whānau, and understanding Māori aspirations.

40.     Table four shows the outcomes, objectives and key initiatives from the local board plan recognise these areas of common interest.

Table four: local board plan Māori outcomes, objectives and initiatives

Outcomes

Objectives

Initiatives

Outcome 1: Sustainable development and liveable places

Advocate and act to promote and integrate the outcomes sought in the Waiheke Area Plan in the council’s operations, strategies, policies and, to the extent possible, regulatory frameworks

·    Recognise the Māori world view – te ao Māori – in all programmed work

Outcome 5: Māori outcomes

Strengthen collaboration and partnership with Māori

 

·    Develop mana whenua relationship agreements to advance partnership and support mana whenua aspirations

·    Develop a partnership with Ngāti Paoa to support their aspirations, including involvement in the development of Mātiatia and reconvening the Rangihoua/ Tawaipareira Reserve management subcommittee

·    Create opportunities for effective Māori participation and influence in decision making

·    Provide forums for dialogue with mana whenua and mātāwaka

Sustain and celebrate Māori identity, knowledge and practice

 

·    Work with mana whenua and mātāwaka to identify ways to protect ngā taonga tuku iho (treasures handed down)

·    Ensure sites of significance are appropriately identified, marked and managed

·    Honour and experience Māori history through placemaking that includes the establishment of Māori place names, and provides cultural and heritage interpretation such as signage or pou

·    Designate appropriate areas for the internment of koiwi tangata (burial of human remains)

·    Promote the use of Te Reo Māori

Marae are sustainable cultural centres

 

·    Support Piritahi Marae in its aspirations to further develop as a local community centre

·    Support the development of kaupapa Māori-based learning and wānanga facilities

Enhance Māori wellbeing and potential

 

·    Support initiatives that grow the local Māori economy, as well as employment

·    Increase opportunities for rangatahi skill development and leadership

·    Recognise traditional activities that support Māori health and wellbeing within te whare tapa whā model (the four cornerstones of Māori health)

41.     There is a wide range of activity occurring across Tāmaki Makaurau to advance Māori outcomes. Much of this is led by mana whenua and Māori organisations, as well government organisations, non-government organisations and businesses. 

42.     The Auckland Plan’s focus on Māori culture and identity is encapsulated in the outcome: Māori Identity and Wellbeing.

43.     Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, council’s Māori Outcomes performance measurement framework, captures the majority of council’s Māori outcome strategy and planning. The framework responds to the needs and aspirations that Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau, both mana whenua and mataawaka, have expressed to council. 

44.     The work programme includes activities that have an objective to deliver outcomes for and with Māori. Attachment B sets out the activities in the work programme that aim to achieve high Māori outcomes in one or more of the strategic priority areas.

45.     Table five shows the strategic priority areas and alignment to Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcomes.

Table five: local board work programme Māori outcome areas

Strategic priority area

Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau outcome

Kaitiakitanga

Kia Ora te Taiao

Māori business, tourism and employment 

Kia Ora te Umanga

Māori identity and culture 

Kia Ora te Ahurea

Marae development

Kia Ora te Marae

Papakāinga and Māori housing 

Kia Ora te Kāinga

Realising rangatahi potential 

Kia Ora te Rangatahi

Te reo Māori 

Kia Ora te Reo

Whānau and tamariki wellbeing

Kia Ora te Whānau

 

46.     The Customer and Community Services directorate lead or contribute to programmes that align with all outcomes. Particular priorities are Kia Ora te Marae, Kia Ora te Whānau and Kia Ora te Reo. 

47.     In a COVID-19 recovery environment there is increasing focus on Kia Ora te Umunga /   Māori Business, Tourism and Employment and the role that the council can play, not only in supporting economic recovery, but in a thriving Māori economy. 

48.     Kia Ora te Ahurea / Māori Identity and Culture is often a focus for local boards as events and place-based design often plays an important part in many local programmes.

Work programme budget types and purpose

49.     Work programme activities are funded from various budget sources, depending on the type of delivery. Some activities within the work programme are funded from two or more sources, including from both local and regional budgets.

50.     Table six outlines the different budget types and their purpose that fund the work programme.

Table six: work programme budget types and purpose

Budget type

Description of budget purpose

Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

A development fund used to advance local operational and capital activities at the discretion of the local board

Asset Based Services (ABS)

Allocated to deliver local activities based on decisions regarding region-wide service levels, including allocation of funds for local asset-based services, grants and staff time to deliver activities

Local renewals

A fund dedicated to the partial renewal or full replacement of assets including those in local parks and community facilities

Growth (local parks and sports field development)

Primarily funded through development contributions, a regional fund to improve open spaces, including developing newly acquired land into parks, and existing open space to increase capacity to cater for growing population needs

Coastal

A regional fund for the renewal of Auckland’s significant coastal assets, such as seawalls, wharves and pontoons

Landslide prevention

A regional fund to proactively develop new assets for the prevention of landslides and major slips throughout the region

Specific purpose funding

Funds received by the council, often from external sources, held for specific local board areas, including compensation funding from other agencies for land acquisitions required for major projects

One Local Initiative (OLI)

Funds allocated to a local board priority project in alignment with the Long-term Plan 2018-2028

Long-term Plan discrete

Funds associated with activities specifically named and listed in previous long-term plans, including new libraries, community centres and major sports and community infrastructure

Kauri Dieback Funding

Part of the Natural Environment Targeted Rate (NETR) Fund, this is a regional fund used to implement the national kauri dieback programme standards

External funding

Budget from external parties, not yet received and held by Customer and Community Services

Capital projects and budgets

51.     The capital projects to be delivered in the Waiheke Local Board area, together with identified budgets and main funding sources, are shown in Attachment A.

52.     The budgets associated with the capital works programme are estimates only, costs are subject to change and may need to be refined as the project progresses through the design and delivery process. Once activity details are more clearly defined, staff will update the work programme for approval in subsequent years.

53.     The capital works projects have been geo-spatially mapped to indicate the location of projects within the local board area (Attachment C). Some projects are unable to be mapped as they reference multiple locations, or the work locations are yet to be determined.

Risk Adjusted Programme

54.     The Risk Adjusted Programme was first implemented in 2019 and is designed to mitigate risk so that the total budget is delivered.

55.     Several capital projects in the 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 work programme have been identified as part of the Risk Adjusted Programme and outlined in Attachment A.

56.     Local board approval is sought for the commencement of these projects in the 2022/2023 financial year, so that they can be prioritised if other already approved projects cannot be delivered or are delayed due to unforeseen reasons.

Regionally funded activities included in the local board work programme

57.     Some activities from the Landslide Prevention and Local Parks and Sports Field Development (growth) budgets are funded regionally and will be presented to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee for approval after 30 June 2022.

58.     The local board has decision-making responsibility for these activities within parameters set by the Governing Body, which include project location, scope, and budget. These activities are therefore included in the work programme. 

59.     The local board can provide feedback on the activities outlined in Attachment D. Staff will present this feedback to the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee when they consider regionally funded activities.

Process for changes to the approved work programme

60.     Some projects in the work programme require further local board decisions as they progress through the delivery process.

61.     Where further decisions are anticipated they have been indicated in the work programme, and decisions will be sought as required through local board business meetings.

62.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects may also be required as projects progress, in response to more detailed design and costing information, community consultation, consenting requirements and similar factors.  

63.     Amendments to the work programme or specific projects will be managed in accordance with the established local board delegations to staff.

64.     The work programme includes community leases. Lease renewals without variations will be processed by way of a memo, in accordance with agreed delegations.

65.     Should the local board signal their intent to change or pursue a new lease that is not contemplated in the leasing work programme, a deferral of an item already programmed for delivery will need to be accommodated.

66.     Staff will workshop expired and more complex community leases with the local board and then report on them at a business meeting.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

67.     As Customer and Community Services is a significant service provider and property owner, the directorate has a leading role in delivering Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

68.     In providing asset-based services, Customer and Community Services contributes most of council’s operational greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through its facilities and infrastructure.

69.     Property managed by the directorate, in particular coastal assets, will be adversely affected by climate change. The work programme includes actions, consistent with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri to halve council’s operational GHG emissions by 2030, and to adapt to a changing climate.

70.     Actions include reducing operational GHG emissions through phasing-out gas heating in aquatic centres, improving the efficiency of facilities, investing in renewable energy, and adopting the Sustainable Asset Policy.

71.     At the same time, the directorate will mitigate GHG emissions and improve climate resilience through delivering tree planting programmes across the region. This includes delivering the Mayor’s tree planting initaitives, transitioning unproductive farmland on regional parks to permanent native forest, and delivering ecological restoration projects with community groups.

72.     Work is ongoing to build on the above actions and embed climate change considerations into investment decision-making, planning, and corporate policies, including asset management plans and Local Board Plans.

73.     As approved through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, council’s mandated approach to ‘deliver differently’ is also anticipated to help reduce the council carbon footprint by creating a sustainable service network. This may include a shift to digital service models or the consolidation of services into a smaller footprint.

74.     Each activity in the work programme has been assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions, and affect Auckland’s resilience to climate change.

75.     The activities in the Waiheke Local Board work programme identified as having a positive or negative impact on climate change are outlined in Attachment E.

76.     Types of activities in the work programme that will have positive impacts on emissions and improve community resilience to climate change, include community-led environmental and educational programmes, supporting volunteer planting, delivering council-led planting and sustainable design.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

77.     The Customer and Community Services work programme was developed collaboratively by staff from the directorate’s departments and Local Board Services to ensure that the activities and delivery of the work programme are integrated, complementary, and reflect council wide priorities.

78.     An example of collaboration on delivery is the kauri dieback programme which is delivered by the Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the Infrastructure and Environmental Services directorate.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

79.     The feedback received from the local board through a series of workshops from October 2021 to May 2022 has informed the proposed Customer and Community Services work programme.

80.     A focus area of the work programme is to respond to the Recovery Budget, the communities of greatest need and build capacity within the community, including through community-led delivery and partnerships.

81.     Planning and delivery of some activities involves consultation with the community to ensure that their aspirations are understood and responded to.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

82.     The provision of services, facilities and open spaces support the realisation of the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connection to the natural environment and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapū and iwi Māori.

83.     Attachment B shows local board projects or programmes that are ranked as delivering ‘high’ Māori Outcomes. They involve ongoing collaboration with Māori or are delivered by Māori. 

84.     Projects or programmes in Attachment A may also contribute to Māori Outcomes but are not highlighted as they are identified to have a moderate or low impact. 

85.     Engagement with Māori is critical and, if not already completed, will occur on a programme or project basis, prior to any work commencing, and be reported back separately to the local board. 

86.     Further information about the response to Māori aspirations as described in the work programme, is captured in the Analysis and Advice section.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

87.     Each activity line has a budget allocation in one or more of the financial years e.g. 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025. Where activity lines show a zero-dollar operating expense (opex) budget, this reflects implementation costs met through staff salary or other funding sources.

88.     The 2022/2023 activities recommended for local board approval can be accommodated within 2022/2023 budgets and staff resources.

89.     The budgets allocated to activities in the financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 are indicative and are subject to change due to any increased costs, inflation or reduction to the overall available annual council budget that may occur.

90.     Table seven summarises the budget sources and allocation for each work programme financial year.

Table seven: Waiheke Local Board budget allocation

Local budgets

2022/2023 (approve)

2023/2024 (approve in principle)

2024/2025 (approve in principle – Community Facilities only)

Operational (Opex): Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

604,740

                652,242

                663,982

Opex: Asset Based Services (ABS)

6,490,944

            5,099,607

            5,142,621

Capital (Capex): Local Asset Renewals - Budget (ABS)

2,272,962

2,674,320

2,723,822

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Proposed Allocation (ABS)

2,258,267

2,674,320

2,723,822

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Local Asset Renewals - Unallocated budget (ABS)

14,695

0

0

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) – Budget

70,000

70,000

304,155

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Proposed Allocation

70,000

70,000

304,155

Advanced Delivery RAP*

0

 

 

Capex: Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) - Unallocated budget

0

0

0

Capex: Growth projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Coastal projects Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: Landslide Prevention projects Allocation

99,408

110,000

318,808

Capex: Specific Purpose Funding - Allocation

0

0

0

Capex: One Local Initiative

0

0

0

Capex: Long-term Plan discrete

0

0

0

Capex: Natural Environment Targeted Rate

0

176,550

0

Capex: External Funding Allocation

0

0

0

* See paragraph 54-56 for RAP explanation

91.     The budgets are based on the allocations in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031. Budgets are subject to change during council’s Annual Budget and future Long-term Plan processes. If decisions on the Annual Budget result in budget reductions, the work programme will need to be amended to align to these budgets via future decisions of the local board.

92.     Any 2021/2022 opex budget unspent on 30 June 2022, will be assessed for carry-forward to the 2022/2023 work programme. Carry-forwards will be added to the work programme as separate activity lines and will be reflected in the revised budget.

93.     During delivery of the 2022/2023 work programme, where an activity is cancelled or no longer required, the local board can reallocate the associated budget to an existing work programme activity or create a new activity within that financial year. This process will include agreement from each department and will need to be resolved on by the local board.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

94.     The most significant risk is that delivery of the Customer and Community Services work programme is dependent on the local board approving the work programme by 30 June 2022. Approval of the work programme after the start of the financial year could result in delays to delivery.

95.     The majority of operational (opex) activities in the work programme are ongoing and annually occurring. Risks associated with these activities have been identified in previous years and are managed on an ongoing basis.

96.     Table eight outlines the key risks and mitigations associated with the work programme once it has been approved.

Table eight: risks and mitigations

Risk

Mitigation

Non-delivery, time delays and budget overspend of activities that are managed through the work programme.

Having agreed processes to amend the work programme if activities need to be changed or cancelled.

Utilising the Risk Adjusted Programme to progress those activities identified as ready to proceed under the Risk Adjusted Programme at the beginning of the financial year.

Unknown risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year.

Risks and mitigations for new activity lines are considered during the scoping phase, continually assessed and reported to the local board.

Health, safety and wellbeing factors, including external influences relating to work programme delivery may impact the delivery of activities, resulting in activities requiring adjustment.

Health and safety assessments will be conducted prior to commencement of projects. Work programme activities and projects will be adjusted accordingly where these risks occur during the delivery phase.

The COVID-19 pandemic may continue to negatively impact on the progress and deliverability of the work programme.

Development of the work programme has included consideration of potential impacts on delivery due to COVID-19 for all activities.

Timeframes for some activities are set to enable delivery within the agreed timeframe despite possible delays. 

Where activities need to be cancelled the local board can reallocate the budget to other activities.

The COVID-19 pandemic and other geopolitical factors may result in further inflationary and supply chain pressures.

Potential inflationary pressures have been modelled into key forecasts; however, uncertainties remain.

The ongoing cost increase may become unsustainable, and may require a reprioritization of potential work programmes, capital spend and a potential discontinuation of some programmes.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

97.     Delivery of the Customer and Community Service work programme is scheduled to start on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023.

98.     Regionally funded projects are an exception and will commence after they have been approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee in July 2022.

99.     The local board will receive progress updates on a quarterly basis, with the first quarterly report available in November 2022.

100.   When further decisions for activities are needed at project milestones, these will be brought to the local board at the appropriate time.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A Waiheke CCS Work Programme 22-23

349

b

Attachment B - Maori Outcomes Waiheke

373

c

Attachment C - Capital Works and Leasing Work Programme Map

375

d

Attachment D - Waiheke - Regional Feedback v2

377

e

Attachment E - Climate Impacts Waiheke

379

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Mace Ward - General Manager - Parks, Sports and Recreation

Mirla Edmundson - General Manager - Connected Communities

Tania Pouwhare - General Manager - Community & Social Innov

Taryn Crewe - General Manager - Community Facilities

Authorisers

Claudia Wyss – Director - Customer and Community Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the 2022/2023 Waiheke Local Board Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme

File No.: CP2022/07382

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022/2023 Waiheke Local Boards Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and approve in principle the 2023/2024 work programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Waiheke Local Board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets for approval for the 2022/2023 financial year, and for approval in principle for the subsequent financial year of 2023/2024 (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years. 2022/2023 is year two of the three-year cycle. Many of the programmes included in this report were approved in principle in the 2021/2022 work programme.

4.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020.

5.       The work programme has been developed through a series of workshops between December 2021 and May 2022, where the local board provided feedback to staff on programme and activity prioritisation.

6.       The local board indicated its support for the following activities to be delivered in 2022/2023, with budgets as listed below:

·    Bike Hub - $10,000

·    Climate Action Activator - $25,000

·    Conservation Advisor - $15,000

·    Construction Waste Leadership on Waiheke - $19,000

·    The Waiheke Marine Education Initiative - $39,000

·    Waiheke Water Quality Programme - $30,000

·    Waiheke Environmental Fund - $30,000

7.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $168,000, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year. Approval in-principle is also being sought for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year.

8.       The indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes.

9.       The proposed work programme also includes $175,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the Putaki Bay and Ostend Domain coastal renewal.

10.     Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve its 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme and associated budgets, as summarised in the table below (Attachment A to the agenda report):

Activity name

2022/2023 budget for approval

Bike Hub

$10,000

Climate Action Activator

$25,000

Conservation Advisor

$15,000

Construction Waste Leadership on Waiheke

$19,000

The Waiheke Marine Education Initiative

$39,000

Waiheke Environmental Grants Fund

$30,000

Waiheke Water Quality Programme

$30,000

Total

$168,000

b)      approve in principle the 2023/2024 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programmes (Attachment A to the agenda report)

c)      note that the indicative programmes and budgets for 2023/2024 are subject to change, and will be confirmed on an annual basis through the approval of the respective work programmes

d)      note the allocation of $175,000 asset-based services capital expenditure budget towards the Putaki Bay and Ostend Doman – renew coastal assets programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

Horopaki

Context

11.     Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops has informed the development of the Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme (Attachment A).

12.     The proposed work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives identified in the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020. The specific objectives reflected in the work programme are:

·    restore, enhance, and protect our natural environment in partnership with our community

·    respond to the challenge of climate change

·    improve conservation of our marine and coastal environment

·    reduce the waste stream.

13.    The following adopted strategies and plans also guided the development of the work programme:

·    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan

·    National Policy Statement on Freshwater Management

·    Tīkapa Moana – Hauraki Gulf Islands Waste Plan

·    Regional Pest Management Plan

14.     The development of the work programme has been informed by staff assessments and identification of local environmental priority areas, and feedback received from the local board at workshops.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The proposed work programme is made up of activities continuing from previous financial years, including annually occurring events or ongoing programmes. It also includes new initiatives supported by the local board. These programmes contribute towards the delivery of the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 environmental objectives, as detailed above.

16.     The work programme (Attachment A) provides a three-year view that demonstrates the phasing or continuation of programme delivery over the 2021/2022, 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 financial years.

17.     This report seeks local board approval for budgets and activities in year two of the three-year work programme (2022/2023), and approval in principle for year three (2023/2024).

18.     Approving in principle does not commit the local board to funding in future years, as the budget for year three will still need to be approved on an annual basis. However, approval in principle will help staff, contractors, and community groups to plan activities and resourcing in the longer-term.

19.     Budgets for year three are subject to change, as the programmes are further refined or if local board priorities shift.

20.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s 2022/2023 Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme are detailed below, alongside indicative plans and budgets for the 2023/2024 financial year:

Bike Hub - $10,000

21.     The board has indicated it would like to continue to fund the bike hub on Waiheke in the 2022/2023 financial year. Staff recommend that the board allocate $10,000 to this programme in 2022/2023.

22.     This budget will continue to support the Waiheke Cycle Action group to deliver a sustainable business model to operate a bicycle repair, cycling education, and advocacy centre based in Alison Park (adjacent to the Waiheke Sustainability Centre).

23.     Funding will contribute to the bike hub's operating costs including wages for a coordinator, which will enable the facility to be open to the public at least two days per week. The coordinator will also seek partnerships and grants from other sources, plus volunteer support with a view to reducing the level of funding provided by the local board over time.

24.     Approval in principle is also sought for $10,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Climate Action Activator - $25,000

25.     The board has indicated that it would like to continue funding to support and expand low carbon initiatives on Waiheke in the 2022/2023 financial year. The board contributed $25,000 towards the continued development and adoption of a Waiheke Climate Action Plan, and the appointment of a Climate Activator in the 2021/2022 financial year. Staff recommend that the board allocate $25,000 to this programme in 2022/2023.

26.     This programme line is a continuation of the Climate Action Programme. The name of the programme has been changed to reflect that the budget supports the wages and budget for the Climate Action Activator.

27.    The climate activator will coordinate and drive implementation of the Waiheke Climate Action Plan. They will also work on investment, collaboration, and amplification of low carbon community action. A work programme with specific actions will be developed.

28.    Approval in-principle is also sought for $25,000 towards the continuation of this programme in 2023/2024.

Conservation Advisor - $15,000

29.     The board has indicated that it would like to continue funding the Conservation Advisor in the 2022/2023 financial year. Staff recommend that the board allocate $15,000 towards this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year.

30.     The part-time conservation advisor will provide specialist biodiversity advice, increased support for landowners and community-led conservation activities, and undertake project management. The position will also assist in the delivery of critical pathogen, biodiversity and wetland programmes, including education and advocacy for high priority areas.

31.     Match-funding for this role will be provided through natural environment targeted rate funding, making the total budget for the role at least $30,000.

32.     Approval in principle is also sought for $15,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Construction Waste Leadership on Waiheke - $19,000

33.     The local board has indicated it would like to contribute funding towards a new programme to support construction waste leadership on Waiheke in the 2022/2023 financial year. Staff recommend that the board allocate $19,000 to this programme in 2022/2023.

34.     This programme will establish a fixed term role of a construction and demolition waste advisor to work with builders and developers to improve site practices and act as a link between the industry and waste minimisation measures.

35.     The focus areas of the advisor will be on developing relationships with all participants in the building sector on Waiheke and completing monthly site visits to promote installation of measures for improved on-site practices. The advisor will also connect the sector to recycling or reuse alternatives for construction and demolition waste and highlight the success of builders showing leading and innovative practice.

36.     Approval in-principle is also sort for $19,000 towards the programme in 2023/2024.

The Waiheke Marine Education Initiative - $39,000

37.     The board has indicated that it would like to continue supporting the Sustainable Schools marine education initiative in the 2022/2023 financial year. The board contributed $35,400 towards this programme in the 2021/2022 financial year. Staff recommend that the board allocate $39,000 to this programme in 2022/2023.

38.     In the 2021/2022 financial year, this programme received high uptake from schools including Te Huruhi School, Waiheke High School, Waiheke Primary School, and Waiheke Steiner School (Fossil Bay School).

39.     The focus of this programme for 2022/2023 will remain on experiential learning and citizen science leading to student-led action to restore and protect the marine environment. Educational sessions will focus on identifying local issues and exploring potential solutions, and local experiences will connect students to the marine environment and surrounding catchment. This will include activities such as snorkel surveys, shellfish monitoring, freshwater quality and fish monitoring, rocky shore studies, beach clean-ups, and bird or pest surveys.

40.     Each school term in 2022 will include:

·    a Sustainable Schools cluster meeting to provide training, support, and resources for teachers

·    a student day outside the classroom, including experiential learning, citizen science, taking action, reflecting, and sharing with the wider community

·    a student action group meeting where leaders from each school share stories, ideas and programmes with other schools while taking new learning and ideas back to their own school.

41.     A new cohort of students are engaged each calendar year for three years. Students take actions which build momentum and engagement of the community in environmental protection.

42.     Approval in-principle is also sought for $39,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Waiheke Environmental Grants Fund - $30,000

43.     The board has indicated that it would like to continue to fund Waiheke environmental grants in the 2022/2023 financial year. The board contributed $30,000 towards this fund in 2021/2022 and has indicated that it would like to continue this funding in 2022/2023. Staff recommend that the board allocate $30,000 towards this programme in the 2022/2023 financial year.

44.     This fund supports projects with ecological restoration and management outcomes which are aligned with the local board's environmental priorities. The fund will support and grow community and landowner environmental restoration and management initiatives in the Waiheke Local Board area which create safe, healthy, and connected habitat in priority areas within the local board area.

45.     This budget will cover a once-yearly funding round, administered by the council’s grants team alongside other Waiheke community grants. Environmental Services will coordinate assessment and grant allocation following the local board's grant funding guidelines.

46.     Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Waiheke water quality programme $30,000

47.     The board has indicated that it would like to continue supporting the Waiheke water quality programme in the 2022/2023 financial year (previously known as Project Little Oneroa). Staff recommend that the board allocate $30,000 to this programme in 2022/2023.

48.     This programme will build upon existing education and civic engagement around waterway health on Waiheke. Other benefits of this initiative include working towards recreational water contact standards to avoid risks to public health, and restoring the mauri, cultural and community values of waterways.

49.     This programme will support communities to protect and restore waterways, with a focus on the management of onsite wastewater systems. Key catchment focus areas include Little Oneroa, Omiha, Palm Beach and Onetangi, however if additional catchments are identified as high need areas the programme can be reprioritised to move focus to the newly identified area.

50.     Activities for 2022/2023 will include community workshops, further surveys with local residents to raise awareness around water quality, and discounted septic tank inspections.

51.     Healthy Waters will supplement the local board budget by continuing to enable Wai Care monitoring of streams in the catchments

52.     Approval in principle is also sought for $30,000 towards this programme in 2023/2024.

Putaki Bay and Ostend Domain – renew coastal assets - $175,000

53.     This is a regionally-funded coastal renewal programme. It is a renewal of the minor coastal assets in Putaki Bay/Ostend Domain. This covers the coastal access staircase and the boat ramp by the Sea Scouts Hall at Putaki Reserve and the Ostend Seawall at Ostend Domain.  In 2021/2022 the works focused on investigation, design and consenting. Physical works are scheduled to commence 2022/2023.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

54.     In June 2019 Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and in response to this the council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

55.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions and contributing towards climate change adaptation.

56.     Table 1 outlines the key activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Bike Hub

Community climate action involves local residents’ reducing or responding to climate change in personal lifestyle or local community-based ways, and creating new social norms. This programme aims to reduce emissions by increasing access to active transport. This programme aims to increase community resilience by reduced reliance on fossil-fuel transport and increased community connections.

Climate action activator

This programme aims to reduce emissions and increase community resilience by identifying gaps and strategic opportunities in the Waiheke Low Carbon Action Plan and creating collaborations that will build on existing local activity.

Conservation Advisor

Engaging a Waiheke-based person in this position will help to minimise Auckland Council’s greenhouse gas emissions by reducing travel emissions. This position will also support offsets by enabling the planting and restoration of a number of high priority ecosystems.

Construction Waste Leadership on Waiheke

This main aim of this programme is to assist building contractors and developers to reduce construction and demolition waste to landfill which will directly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It also supports greater integration of on-island facilities (such as the Community Recycling Centre) into building waste solutions.

The Waiheke Marine Education Initiative

Learning through experience will engage students in action and behaviour change to protect and enhance our marine environment. The impact of understanding and making the required behaviour change will contribute to climate change resilience.

Waiheke water quality programme

This programme will provide resilience to the community by ensuring waterways are protected and enhanced through native planting. Riparian margins are important in ensuring that flooding and erosion impacts are minimised in increased rainfall events as a result of climate change. Freshwater ecosystems provide many ecosystem services such as flood mitigation, habitat for native biodiversity, and carbon sequestration. These services are enhanced when the ecosystems are restored.

Waiheke Environmental Grants Fund

The local board aims to support and grow community and landowner conservation efforts and environmental initiatives within the Waiheke Local Board area. Grant outcome four identifies that a programme ‘contributes towards resolving global environmental issues’, for instance, reducing greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change. This is one of the criteria under which projects might qualify for the grants.

Putaki Bay and Ostend Domain – renew coastal assets

Physical works for the coastal access stairway and the boat ramp at Putaki and the seawall at Ostend domain will have a negligible carbon footprint. Where possible, staff will adopt sustainable, low carbon options for project delivery. The renewal will improve the resilience of these coastal assets.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

57.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

58.     In particular, the attached Infrastructure and Environmental Services work programme reflects the integrated activities developed by Environmental Services, Healthy Waters, Waste Solutions and Resilient Land and Coasts.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

59.     The programmes proposed for inclusion in the board’s Infrastructure and Environmental Services work Programme will have positive environmental outcomes across the Waiheke Local Board area. Particular focus areas for the 2022/2023 work programme include Blackpool, Palm Beach, and Onetangi.

60.     The programmes noted above align with the local board plan outcome ‘Waiheke’s environment is protected, restored and enhanced’.  The proposed work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from December 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

61.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

62.     The work programme includes activities that aim to deliver outcomes for and with Māori, in alignment with the strategic priority areas outlined in Kia ora Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland Council’s Māori Outcome Framework). Progress on how the activities are achieving these outcomes will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

63.     Staff recognise that environmental management, water quality and land management have integral links with the mauri of the environment and concepts of kaitiakitanga.

64.     Table 2 outlines the activities in the 2022/2023 work programme that contribute towards the delivery of specific Māori outcomes.


Table 2: Māori outcome delivery through proposed activities

Activity name

Māori outcome

Māori outcome description

Climate action activator

Kaitiakitanga

 

Representatives from mana whenua and the Māori community are participants in the stakeholder working group that has developed the Climate Action Plan. The activator will work with mana whenua and mātāwaka to identify and deliver low carbon outcomes for Māori, as identified in the local board’s climate action plan.

Conservation Advisor

Kaitiakitanga

 

This role will involve engagement with mana whenua and local iwi on biodiversity protection on iwi land.

The Waiheke marine education initiative

 

Te reo Māori, kaitiakitanga, realising rangatahi potential

 

As the programme matures, a collaborative relationship with Ngāti Pāoa is being established. Staff are working with Piritahi Marae and partners of this programme to maximise rangatahi leadership and engagement.

 

65.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

66.     The proposed environment work programme for 2022/2023 totals to $168,000 of the board’s locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2022/2023.

67.     The proposed work programme also includes $175,000 in asset-based services capital expenditure for the coastal renewal programmes. Please note that the coastal renewal budgets are current estimates and are subject to change through the design and works stages. If there is any significant changes throughout the financial year these will be reported back to the board.

68.     Budgets for activities in the 2023/2024 financial year are indicative. While local board approval in principle is being sought for a future year through this report, formal approval will be sought on an annual basis, once budgets and programme costs are confirmed.

69.     An overall LDI opex carry-forward provision for projects to be carried forward from 2021/2022 to 2022/2023 was approved by the Finance and Performance Committee as part of the annual budget. Work programme activities to be carried forward from 2021/2022 will be finalised post 30 June 2022. Local boards will receive detail of carry-forwards in their first scheduled performance report for 2022/2023.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

70.     If the proposed Infrastructure and Environmental Services Work Programme is not approved before the start of the financial year, there is a risk that activities may be delayed or not delivered within the financial year.

71.     Risks and mitigations for new activity lines were considered during the scoping phase. There may be risks associated with trialling a new activity for the first year. These will be continually assessed and reported to the local board.

72.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a negative impact on the delivery of local board work programmes. Some activities may not be able to be delivered fully if COVID-19 restrictions are increased.

73.     Resourcing of the work programme is based on current staff capacity within departments. Therefore, changes to staff capacity may also have an impact on work programme delivery.

74.     Table 3 shows the key risks associated with activities in the proposed 2022/2023 work programme, as well as proposed mitigations.

Table 3: Key risks and mitigations for activities

Activity name

Risk

Mitigation

Rating after mitigation

Bike Hub

There is a risk of low interest from the community to use the bike hub.

This is considered low risk as Cycle Action Waiheke are very engaged with the community. In addition, some of

the budget will be used for events to promote the bike hub in the community.

Low

Climate action activator

 

There is a risk of lack of community engagement in the advisory group.

 

This is being mitigated through engaging specifically with community members who were part of the climate action plan consultation and expressed an interest in being part of an advisory group. Some budget has been set aside to support participants if needed.

Low

Conservation Advisor

There is a risk the workload exceeding the allocated part-time hours of the advisor.

Staff will work with the advisor to strategise to re-balance workloads or find alternative resourcing.

Low-medium

Construction Waste Leadership Waiheke

There is a risk of lack of awareness or willingness by builders to engage with the project.

A consistent presence of the Construction and Demolition Waste Advisor will raise profile of problematic waste practices and regular engagement with participants will create wider awareness.

Low

The Waiheke marine education initiative

 

This programme is dependent on all four schools continuing to commit to involvement for a whole year.

 

The schools have been involved for four years to date therefore this is considered a low risk.

 

Low

This programme is also dependent on Waiheke community and business support to facilitate the experiential workshops and coordinate the programme.

 

Local businesses have been engaged with this programme for several years and are available and willing to deliver in the next financial year.

 

Low

Waiheke Environmental Grants Fund

There is a risk of no or few suitable applicants

If this occurs, another round of grant applications will be held. Staff will ensure that the grant is well publicised.

Low

Waiheke Water Quality Programme

This programme is dependent on the willingness of residents to change behaviour.

In past years there has been significant community uptake of education opportunities and inspection subsidies, therefore this is considered a low risk.

Low

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

75.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence once approved and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

76.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board IES Work Programme 22-23

419

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Donna Carter - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 



Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Approval of the Waiheke Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/07954

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the Waiheke Local Board Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme and associated budgets for approval for delivery within the 2022/2023 financial year (see Attachment A).

3.       The work programme responds to the following outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Outcome - Thriving, strong and engaged communities.

·    Objective - A resilient and connected community.

·    Outcome - A sustainable economy.

·    Objective - Strengthen our economy in keeping with the island’s character and our need to increase our resiliency. 

4.       The board provided feedback to staff on the projects it would like to fund in a series of workshops. The board indicated its support for the following projects, with budgets as listed below:

·    Community emergency resilience programme – $1,000.

·         Business emergency resilience programme - $1,500.

5.       The proposed work programme has a total value of $2,500, which can be funded from within the board’s draft locally driven initiatives (LDI) budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.       Updates on the delivery of this work programme will be provided through the board’s quarterly performance reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

7.       That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      approve the Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023 (Attachment A to the agenda report)

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Each year, the local board decides which activities to allocate its annual budget toward, through a series of workshops. The local board feedback in these workshops have informed the work programme.

9.       The work programme responds to the outcomes and objectives that the local board identified in the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020. The specific outcomes that are reflected in the work programme are:

·    Thriving, strong and engaged communities.

·    A sustainable economy.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The proposed activities for delivery as part of the board’s Auckland Emergency Management work programme 2022/2023 are detailed below. See Attachment A for further detail.

Community emergency resilience programme – $1,000.

11.     Waiheke Island: Supporting the annual Community Resilience Hui and subsequent support for any further community requested disaster resilience building workshops, community response scenario exercising, emergency preparedness resources for Neighbours Day engagement, tourist emergency readiness information and youth engagement resources as required.

12.     Rakino Island: Community resilience building partnership with Fire and Emergency New Zealand and support for further disaster resilience building initiatives that the community identifies. These will be advised to the Local Board prior to initiation.

Business emergency resilience programme - $1,500.

13.     Auckland Emergency Management will partner with Waiheke’s business networks to host resilience workshops for the island’s business owners and managers. Following the workshops, ongoing support will be provided as required. Information packs will be made available to those businesses who were unable to attend the workshops.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Table 1 outlines the activities in the 2021/2022 work programme that have an impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards climate change adaptation.

Table 1: Climate impact assessment of proposed activities

Activity name

Climate impact

Community emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this work increases community resilience to emergencies and climate change impacts.

Business emergency resilience programme

Positive impact on our resilience to climate change, as this work increases the business community’s resilience to emergencies and climate change impacts.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     The work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in the integrated team that presented the draft work programme to the local board at a series of workshops.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme has been considered by the local board in a series of workshops from November 2021 to May 2022. The views expressed by local board members during the workshops have informed the recommended work programme.

17.     The activities in the proposed work programme align with the Waiheke Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activity of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19.     The proposed Auckland Emergency Management work programme budget for 2022/2023 is $2,500 of the boards locally driven initiatives (LDI) operational budget. This amount can be accommodated within the board’s total draft budget for 2021/2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

20.     Where a work programme activity cannot be completed on time or to budget, due to unforeseen circumstances, this will be signalled to the local board at the earliest opportunity.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

21.     Delivery of the activity in the approved work programme will commence on 1 July 2022 and continue until 30 June 2023. Activity progress will be reported to the local board on a quarterly basis.

22.     Where the work programme identifies further decisions and milestones for each activity, these will be brought to the local board when appropriate.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board AEM Work Programme 22-23

427

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rachael Mercer - Resilience Advisor LB & Community

Authorisers

Paul Amaral - General Manager Auckland Emergency Manager

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Draft Auckland golf investment plan update - stakeholder feedback in response to board resolution

File No.: CP2022/08593

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive stakeholder feedback on the draft Auckland golf investment plan as requested through resolution.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At its meeting held 25 May 2022 the Waiheke Local Board considered a report regarding the draft Auckland golf investment plan (Attachment F). The following resolutions were passed:

19

Draft Auckland golf investment plan

 

Resolution number WHK/2022/1

MOVED by Member P Walden, seconded by Chairperson C Handley: 

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      receive the draft Auckland golf investment plan titled Where all Aucklanders benefit from publicly owned golf land attached to the agenda report (Attachment A)

b)      tautoko / support the three policy objectives set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan:

i)       increased equity, sport and recreation by opening up publicly owned golf land to all Aucklanders

ii)      increased equity and participation by providing a broad range of golf experiences that attract and retain participants and services targeted at low participation groups

iii)     best practice in ecosystem management and biodiversity conservation of publicly owned golf land.

c)      request that the intrinsic value of open space is given greater acknowledgement within the strategy.

d)      tautoko / support the decision-making framework set in the draft Auckland golf investment plan, in which future use of publicly owned golf land will be considered in the context of local needs, increased equity, participation and environmental outcomes.

e)      note the Rangihoua Reserve and Onetangi Sport Park Reserve Management Plan, currently under development,  and once adopted, will guide future land use activities within this reserve, and management of these activities, including the Waiheke Golf Club which is located within the reserve.

CARRIED

 

Resolution number WHK/2022/2

MOVED by Member R Tucker, seconded by Member B Upchurch:  

That the Waiheke Local Board:

f)       ask council to review the draft plan having regard to the concerns raised by Golf New Zealand around the accuracy of data and information which form the basis of many of the plan’s fundamental assumptions, premises, and recommendations. 

g)       expresses strong concern that local boards have not seen the feedback from key stakeholders, as this process is still underway, and requests that local boards be provided with all stakeholder feedback and be given the opportunity to provide further feedback at that time. 

h)      does not support any public land currently used as a golf course to be sold or otherwise released for housing or business land, noting that population growth as well as council’s role in climate change mitigation necessitates retention of council’s green belt. 

i)       notes the plans statements that “over 100,000 Aucklanders play golf annually – the highest number of participants in any sport in Auckland”, and that the plan acknowledges that participation in golf is increasing. 

CARRIED

Note:  Under Standing Orders 1.9.7 Member Paul Walden requested that his dissenting vote       against item 19 clause g) be recorded.

3.       In line with resolution g) staff have prepared a memorandum including detailed information on feedback on the draft Auckland golf investment plan (Attachments A-E). Attachments B & C are local board specific and Attachments D & E are regional.

4.       If the board decides to make further feedback it will be added to previous resolutions. The board may also decide to rescind earlier resolutions and provide new ones or provide no further feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      consider further feedback on the draft Auckland golf investment plan following review of the stakeholder feedback.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Memorandum regarding stakeholder feedback on the Auckland golf Investment Plan

433

b

Draft Golf Investment Plan Waiheke People's Panel Written Feedback Vol.1 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Draft Golf Investment Plan Waiheke AKHYS Written Feedback Vol.1 (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Mana whenua submissions (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Key stakeholder submissions (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Draft Golf Investment Plan report 25 May 2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Janine Geddes - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

Waiheke Local Board Workshop record of proceedings

File No.: CP2022/08042

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the Waiheke Local Board proceedings taken at the workshops held 18 and 25 May and 1 and 8 June 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under section 12.1 of the current Standing Orders of the Waiheke Local Board, workshops convened by the local board shall be closed to the public. However, the proceedings of every workshop shall record the names of members attending and a statement summarising the nature of the information received, and nature of matters discussed.

3.       The purpose of the local board’s workshops is for the provision of information and local board members discussion.  No resolutions or formal decisions are made during the local board’s workshops.

4.       The record of proceedings for the local board’s workshops held on 18 and 25 May and 1 and 8 June 2022 are appended to the report.

5.       These can also be viewed, together with workshop agendas, at this link https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/local-boards/all-local-boards/waiheke-local-board/Pages/waiheke-local-board-public-and-business-meetings.aspx

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the record of proceedings for the local board workshops held on 18 and 25 May and 1 and 8 June 2022. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 18 May 2022

439

b

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 25 May 2022

441

c

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 1 June 2022

443

d

Waiheke Local Board Workshop Proceedings - 8 June 2022

445

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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22 June 2022

 

 

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Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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22 June 2022

 

 

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22 June 2022

 

 

List of resource consent applications - 8 May to 3 June 2022

File No.: CP2022/08047

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Attached is the list of resource consent applications related to Waiheke Island received from 8 May to 3 June 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Waiheke Local Board:

a)      note the list of resource consents applications related to Waiheke Island. 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Weekly Resource Consents Applications

449

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dileeka Senewiratne - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason – General Manager - Local Board Services

Glenn Boyd - Local Area Manager – Aotea/Great Barrier and Waiheke Local Boards

 

 


Waiheke Local Board

22 June 2022

 

 

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