I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 21 July 2022

2.00pm

Via Microsoft Teams

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Charlie Inggs

Democracy Advisor

 

15 July 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027 208 5284

Email: charlie.inggs@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Deputation: David Abercrombie - Yachting New Zealand Strategic Options 5

8.2     Deputation: Lorraine Sampson - Road Crossing Safety Concerns of Residents on Hibiscus Coast Highway Silverdale    6

8.3     Deputation: Chris Bettany - Friends of Okura Bush (FOOB)                                    6

8.4     Deputation: Mark Tasker - Browns Bay Bowling Club                                               7

9          Public Forum                                                                            7

10        Extraordinary Business                                       7

11        Manly Beachfront - approval for installation of bollards along The Esplanade                            9

12        Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan                                                                       17

13        Proposed new community lease to Orewa Bridge Club Incorporated at Victor Eaves Park, Orewa                                                                   27

14        Proposed new community lease to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated at Centennial Park, 184 Beach Road, Campbell's Bay                                                                        41

15        Local board feedback on the strategic direction of Auckland's Future Development Strategy                                                                51

16        New Private Road Name For Subdivision at 64 Glenvar Ridge Road, Long Bay                         59

17        New Public Road and New Private Road Names for Subdivision at 20 Kumukumu Road, Long Bay                                                              67

18        Governance Forward Work Calendar               77

19        Deputations Update                                            81

20        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Workshop Records                                                              137

21        Members' Reports                                            141

22        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

Mr Smith will lead the meeting in prayer – or whatever set text we decide will appear here.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 23 June 2022as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: David Abercrombie - Yachting New Zealand Strategic Options

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       David Abercrombie from Yachting New Zealand has requested a deputation to update the local board on their proposal to store 10-15 sailboats on Aitkin Reserve for 2-3 years while Yachting New Zealand builds a dedicated Centre of Excellence

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank David Abercrombie for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          YNZ - Gulf Harbour Mockup................................. 151

b          YNZ - Torbay Birds Eye View............................... 153

c         YNZ Torbay Screenshot....................................... 155

 

 

8.2       Deputation: Lorraine Sampson - Road Crossing Safety Concerns of Residents on Hibiscus Coast Highway Silverdale

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Lorraine Sampson a Silverdale resident has a requested a deputation to update the local board on road crossing safety concerns of residents on Hibiscus Coast Highway Silverdale

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Lorraine Sampson for her presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Road Safety Concerns of Residents on Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale.. 157

 

 

8.3       Deputation: Chris Bettany - Friends of Okura Bush (FOOB)

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Chris Bettany from the Friends of Okura Bush (FOOB) has requested a deputation to update the local board on their request for inclusion in the Board’s future work programmes for work done on Local Board Parks in the Okura – Stillwater areas.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Chris Bettany for her presentation and attendance at the meeting

 

Attachments

a          Friends of Okura Bush Update................... 175

 

 

8.4       Deputation: Mark Tasker - Browns Bay Bowling Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Mark Tasker from the Browns Bay Bowling Club has requested a deputation to update the local board on their proposal for land rezoning.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      thank Mark Tasker for his presentation and attendance at the meeting.

 

Attachments

a          Browns Bay Bowling Club Future Vision............................................................ 191

b          Browns Bay Bowling Club Property Site Plan.................................................... 195

c         Browns Bay Bowling Club Area Proposed for Rezonig........................ 199

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Manly Beachfront - approval for installation of bollards along The Esplanade

File No.: CP2022/09908

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the installation of bollards along The Esplanade at Manly beachfront as per Attachment A – Manly Beachfront bollards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A project to install bollards along The Esplanade at Manly Beachfront was approved by the local board as part of the 2021-2022 Customer and Community Services work programme (HB/2021/64).

3.       The project proposed installing bollards along a 330-meter section of the reserve, to protect the reserve, trees and sand dunes from damage caused by vehicles.

4.       In October 2021, works commenced and members of the public raised significant concerns about the project and restricting vehicle access to this area. Consequently, works were stopped.

5.       To understand the overall impact on users, Auckland Council undertook public consultation. The consultation was conducted via the ‘Have your Say’ website between 22 November - 10 December 2021. A proposal document was developed for the community consultation to provide information about the bollard installation. This proposal document has been included as Attachment B to the agenda report - Consultation Proposal Big Manly Reserve.

6.       One hundred and seventy-six responses were received to the survey and a ‘Survey Responses Report’ was prepared (Attachment C – Final Report Manly Bollards HYS to the agenda report). This report includes the full summary of the consultation material received.

7.       Four options on how to proceed with the project were presented to the local board in February 2022 and a site walk-over took place with the local board in May 2022 to better understand the local impact of the proposed options.

8.       After considering the public feedback and local board members views, staff recommend that bollards are installed along The Esplanade at Manly Beach in areas where there is the most damage to the dunes and to limit cars parking on the roots of the trees.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the installation of bollards at Manly Beachfront along The Esplanade to protect the reserve, trees and sand dunes from damage caused by vehicles, as per Attachment A of this agenda report, and request staff to progress the project to procurement and construction.

b)      allow staff to make any required minor changes on the exact placement of the bollards due to site topography and location of tree roots so long as placement is in general accordance with Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

Horopaki

Context

Background

9.       A project was approved as part of the 2021-2022 Customer and Community Services, Community Facilities CAPEX delivery, work programme (Resolution HB/2021/64) to install round timber bollards along a section of The Esplanade at Big Manly Beach, between the Manly Sailing Club and Cross Street. Repairs to existing damaged bollards were also proposed between Cross Street and Beach Road.

10.     In October 2021, bollards were scheduled to be installed and a traffic management plan for the duration of works was obtained. The works were however stopped due to concerns raised on site from members of the public.

11.     Two separate petitions, one ‘for’ and one ‘against’ the installation of the bollards, were started by the community. These were named ‘Save our Manly Beach Parking & Access’ and ‘Stop Manly Beach from being a car park’.

12.     Installing the bollards aims to protect the reserve, trees and sand dunes from damage caused by vehicles parking in this area.

13.     The installation of bollards will reduce the ability to park along some of the 330-meter section of the reserve. It will also prevent vehicle movement on the dunes and around the trees in this area.

14.     The installation of bollards will not fully restrict parking along The Esplanade. There will be parking on the beach side of the road, in areas that will cause the least harm to the dunes and trees. The berms on the southern side of The Esplanade will remain as they are.

Aerial view of a city

Description automatically generated with low confidence

Image 1: Project location along The Esplanade, Manly

 

15.     The installation of bollards will increase green spaces and protect picnic areas, with natural shade, for the community to enjoy.

16.     The eastern section along The Esplanade, which provides access from Beach Road, will remain in its current state. No changes are proposed for this area and all parking facilities will remain unchanged.

Engagement

17.     To better understand the overall impact on the users, and to gain greater insights into the views of the community, Auckland Council undertook consultation via the Have Your Say (HYS) web page. The consultation was open from 22 November to 10 December 2021.

18.     The full proposal for what is planned and the reason for installing the bollards is summarised in Attachment B - Consultation Proposal Big Manly Reserve. This document was provided as part of the community consultation.

19.     On 24 February 2022 Auckland Council Community Facilities staff presented the community consultation results to local board in the local board workshop.

20.     The consultation results have been summarised in a report and are attached as Attachment C – Final Report Manly Bollards HYS.

21.     A total of 176 responses were received. Twelve responses were received via email and 164 from the online survey.

22.     Of the 176 people that provided feedback, 77 individuals downloaded/ viewed the proposal documentation, to understand what was being proposed and why. 

23.     Of the responses received, 89.6 per cent (155) lived within 5-10 minutes’ drive of Big Manly Beach.

24.     To the question, ‘Do you support the installation of bollards along the beach front to protect the reserve, dunes, trees, and providing additional shaded grass areas for picnicking, especially at high tide?’ Forty-three per cent of respondents were in support and 56 per cent were opposed.

25.     To the question, ‘The proposal to install bollards, will result in limited parking along an approximately 330-meter stretch on The Esplanade. There are no changes proposed to the eastern end of the reserve. Do you agree or disagree with the proposal?’. Forty-one per cent of respondents agreed and 55 per cent disagreed.

26.     There were many comments received, providing further insight into the communities’ views. The details of which are included in Attachment C – Final Report Manly Bollards HYS.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.     Community Facilities staff outlined four possible options for local board consideration on how to proceed with this project. These options were presented at local board workshop on 24 February 2022.

28.     The options are summarised in the table below:

 

Table 1: Options Analysis

 

Option

Advantages

Disadvantages

A.

Proceed with project as proposed:

Installation of bollards between Cross Street and Manly Sailing Club.

Repair existing damaged bollards and fence at the end of Cross Street.

 

Immediate protection of tree roots and dunes as outlined in proposal document.

Creating vehicle free areas for shaded picnic areas.

Limiting opportunity to unnecessary vehicle movement and night-time nuisance.

No changes to parking between Beach Road and Cross Street section.

Loss of car parking spaces on dunes/ grass areas under trees.

Displacing car parking to surrounding berms and neighbourhood streets.

 

B.

Do not install bollards between Cross Street and Sailing Club.

Repair existing damaged bollards and fence at the end of Cross Street.

 

No changes to status quo.

 

No changes to status quo.

C.

Repair existing damaged bollards and fence at the end of Cross Street.

Installation of 3 to 4 bollards around each tree trunk.

(Further specialist arborists input required – adding additional organic matter around trees and build up dunes.)

Minimises the overall loss of parking.

Balance between protection of trees/ dunes and car park reduction.

 

Does not achieve all objectives.

Only partial dune/ tree protection as vehicles can still drive on the dune and smaller tree root

D.

Put project on hold and create a new project to undertake a service assessment that will identify development objectives and feasible long term management options for the Big Manly beachfront area.

This work would need to be included at the appropriate time in a future work programme and would be delivered by the Parks and Places team. An LDI Opex allocation will be required to complete the service assessment.  

No Changes to status quo.

 

Takes a holistic view of the issues and challenges at Big Manly Beach and prepares a plan on how to address them.

 

No changes to status quo in the short term

 

Delay in implementation of any protection measures.

 

29.     A site walkover was undertaken on 6 May 2022 with members of the local board and representatives from Community Facilities, including arborist and coastal specialists, to provide a better understanding of these proposed options.

30.     Post the public consultation and the site visit a new compromise option is recommended. This is shown in Attachment A – Manly Beachfront bollard placement. The location of the bollards aims to protect the tree roots within the drip line of the Pohutukawa trees but still allows car parking in areas where it is appropriate and will have less of an impact on the trees and the sand dunes.

31.     The placement of bollards as proposed in Attachment A will retain the majority of parking currently available. No changes along the eastern end of The Esplanade are proposed.

32.     Once bollards are installed council staff will monitor the effect the installation of the bollards has on car parking on the Esplanade and on the surrounding streets and if serious issues are being caused the car parking situation will be reviewed. Staff will look to remediate the areas of grass that are behind the bollards and re plant with grass.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Action Plan sets out two core goals:

            • to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and 

            • to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.  

 

34.     Carbon emissions are anticipated from construction, including contractor emissions. This includes embodied emissions from construction materials and vehicle fuel. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions through implementing Auckland Council's sustainability guidelines.

35.     Overall, the project has the potential to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions over the life of the asset as the bollard installation will encourage walking, cycling and public transport and may reduce the use of vehicle movement around this area.

36.     The installation of bollards has a positive impact on coastal erosion, and tree and dune protection by minimising the exposure to motor vehicles.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     The bollard placement for The Esplanade was developed in collaboration with staff from local board services, community facilities and with arborists and coastal specialists.

38.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing to ensure that the installation of bollards is appropriately integrated into the operational maintenance and asset management systems once completed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     The project aligns with the following Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:

Outcome

Objective

Project alignment

Outcome 1: A connected community.

Our people are involved and have a strong sense of pride in the look and feel of their local areas.

Engagement with the local community was undertaken and feedback was incorporated into the bollard placement.

Outcome 4: Open spaces to enjoy

Our communities enjoy access to quality parks, reserves, beaches and facilities for leisure, sport, and recreation.

Installation of the bollards will protect the trees, green spaces and beaches for more people to enjoy. The installation of bollards will provide opportunity for picnicking and still leave room for some parking.

 

40.     The proposed options were presented to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board during the 24 February workshop and discussed on site at The Esplanade, Manly Beachfront on 6 May 2022.

41.     Feedback was sought from the community through a Have Your Say online campaign in November/ December 2021.

42.     The installation of bollards has a positive impact on the community, enabling the use and enjoyment of additional green spaces in our local parks and along our beaches.

43.     There will be some loss of parking on the beach reserve, but the majority of the car parking will be retained.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori.

45.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau -Māori Outcomes Performance Measurement Framework and Local Board Plans.

46.     When investigating and delivering projects, consideration is given to how the activities can contribute to Māori well-being, values, culture, and traditions.

47.     The installation of bollards along The Esplanade will protect the beach reserve, sand dunes and Pohutukawa trees.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     total budget of $45,018 was approved by the local board for this project in financial years 2021/2022 and 2022/2023 from the Locally Driven Initiatives capex funding. The budget will fund the engagement, design plans, material cost and installation of the bollards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     The community has been very vocal about the installation of the bollards and the risk remains that some members of the public may still not agree with the installation of the bollards. Whereas other community members would welcome the installation.

50.     Possible disturbance by members of the public during the installation can be managed through site fencing and traffic management onsite, before and during the installation of bollards. However, there is the risk that the bollards will be damaged once they have been installed.

51.     Most of the material was sourced in 2021, however, some additional bollards need to be obtained due to the amendments of the plans. The material lead times are around 7-8 weeks for this type of material.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

52.     Subject to approval of the plans detailed in Attachment A, it is anticipated that the bollard installation will commence between August and October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Big Manly Beach - Bollard Placement (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Big Manly Reserve - Consultation Proposal (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Manly Bollards - Have Your Say - final report (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sandra May - Programme Manager

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/05830

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the hearings panel draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan recommendations and submissions.

2.       Following the approval of the hearings panel recommendations for the local board to approve the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan.

3.       To approve the classification of two parcels of land held under the Reserves Act 1977 to correct an administrative error.

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan has been finalised following public consultation and a hearing.

5.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan includes all local parks held under the Local Government Act 2002 and Reserves Act 1977 in the local board area except for parks contained within the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan 2015.

6.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan will provide a policy framework to manage use, protection and development of the parks within the local board area.

7.       The local board approved the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan for public consultation in March 2020 (resolution number HB/2020/44). Due to the COVID-19 pandemic response, public consultation on the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan was delayed until July 2020.

8.       A picture containing text, sky

Description automatically generatedThe draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan is presented in two volumes, with appendices:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9.       Submissions on the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan closed on 4 September 2020, following the two-month submissions period required by the Reserves Act 1977. 103 submissions (of which two were late submissions) were received on the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan and 24 submitters requested the opportunity to speak to their submission at a hearing.

10.     In November 2020, the local board appointed a hearing panel, consisting of an independent hearing commissioner and two local board members (resolution number HB/2020/150).

11.     The role of the hearing panel was to hear objections and submissions; and make recommendations to the local board about amendments to the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan following the hearing process, and the extent to which objections and submissions are allowed or accepted or disallowed or not accepted.

12.     Following receipt of submissions and having considered the submission points made, the hearing panel recommended a number of changes to the notified draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan. These are included as attachments to the Hearing Report (Attachment A to the agenda report).

13.     The local board has the decision to approve/reject the panel’s recommendations for submissions in the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan, and to approve/reject the panel’s recommendation to approve the amendments to the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan.

14.     Following the acceptance of the panel’s recommendations, we recommend that the local board approve the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan with any minor amendments being delegated to the local board chairperson for approval.

15.     A decision of the local board is also required to correct an administrative error made in the classification of two parcels of land under s.14(1) instead of s.16(2A) of the Reserves Act. There are no changes to the classifications and no public notification is required.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the hearing panel’s recommendations for the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan 2020

b)      approve the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan 2022

c)       delegate to the local board chairperson approval of minor amendments to the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan 2022

d)      revoke the resolution regarding the declaring and classification of Lot 55 DP 11689 (Manly Park) and Lot 102 DP 99834 (Penguin Drive Reserve), being part of resolution b) HB/2018/154

e)      approve the classification of Lot 55 DP 11689 (Manly Park) as recreation reserve and Lot 102 DP 99834 (Penguin Drive Reserve) as scenic reserve 19(1)(b) pursuant to section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Horopaki

Context

Background information

16.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

17.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires a reserve management plan be developed for most types of reserves administered by the local board.

18.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan which initially was called the Open Space Management Plan, is a statutory reserve management plan prepared in line with section 41 of the Reserves Act 1977.

19.     The local parks management plan will provide a policy framework to manage use, protection and development of parks within the local board area.

20.     The scope of the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan (the plan) is shown in the table below:

In scope

Out of scope

ü land held under this Reserves Act 1977

ü land held under the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA)

û reserves included in the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan 2015

û land for which the local board does not have allocated decision-making responsibility, e.g.  roads

û regional parks land

21.     The final plan, once adopted, will replace all existing reserve management plans in the local board area, except the Mairangi Bay Beach Reserves Management Plan 2015.

22.     It will establish a policy for the management of all local parks in the local board area and mean that the council will comply with the requirements of the Reserves Act 1977 to have a reserve management plan (for most types of reserves held under the Reserve Act 1977).

23.     The timeline below gives an overview of key decisions in developing the plan:Arrow: Down: Engagement with mana whenua throughout development of plan

The Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan – in a nutshell

24.     The plan structure is outlined below and covers 284 parks that extend over approximately 604 hectares of land. 

25.     Volume 1 contains background information, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board context and the management planning framework and general policies that apply to all local parks in the local board area.

26.     Volume 2 contains the individual parks information and management intentions for all local parks under the local board’s jurisdiction.

A picture containing text, sky

Description automatically generated 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice https://aklcouncil.sharepoint.com/sites/how-we-work/SitePages/climate-impact-statement-reports.aspx

27.     The draft plan was open for public feedback between 2 July and 4 September 2020. Council received 103 submissions on the draft plan and 24 submitters requested the opportunity to speak to their submission at a hearing.

28.     An analysis of the submissions and staff-recommended changes to the draft plan were reported to the hearing panel which comprised of an independent commissioner as chairperson and two local board members.

29.     The hearing was held on 11 February 2021 and following deliberations, the hearings panel produced a report on their recommendations.

30.     The hearing panel’s report can be found in Attachment A.  We have summarised the changes to the draft plan as recommended by the hearing panel below:

Recommended changes to plans

Overview of submissions the changes respond to

Strengthen introductory provisions in Volume 1

Volume 1 introductory framework to clarify

·        how the current draft plan is different from previous management plans

·        the overall scope of the draft plan

·        the review of the draft plan

·        the relationship with other relevant statutory plans and instruments, such as bylaws and strategic plans

·        how the draft plan will be applied.

Clarify bylaws

Queries raised about:

·        how loss of off-leash dog areas is compensated for and how areas for this activity are considered when planning new parks

·        difference between Auckland Transport and Auckland Council bylaws

·        aim of the Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw (2019) and Waste Management and Minimisation Plan Plan (2018).

Amend map keys

Highlight that management focus areas (MFAs) apply only to recreation reserves and Local Government Act 2002 land only.

Hyperlink concept plans

To hyperlink concept plans and/or include them as an appendix to the plan

Provide an index which lists all parks by suburb

Order the plan by suburb/area

Strengthen Greenways network information

Inclusion of information for parks being part of the greenways network as adopted via the Hibiscus and Bays Greenways | Local Paths Plan (2016)

Strengthen policy relating to plants and animals

Include factors relevant for plant selection when planning restoration plantings

Adding references to

·    the importance of education programmes, and getting public involvement

·    the importance of community gardens and planting of fruit trees

·    planting plants that are used in rongo (traditional Māori medicine) or for traditional cultural harvest

·    importance of nature for play and provision of shade.

Strengthen policy relating to park development

Reference the need for shade within parks and the need to consider impacts of climate change and sea level rise when developing or re-developing parks

Strengthen leases and licences information

Identify parks within which leases or licences are currently held, and broadly indicate the area of lease (typically by lot description). The plan includes current and contemplated activity types rather than specific organiastion details (lessees). If there are changes within the contemplated activity types, then no public notification is required. The lease information can be updated, and the LB can authorize changes without public notification.

Identify connectivity

Signaling connectivity with nearby parks

Identify parks at risk of coastal inundation

Identifying those parks potentially at risk of coastal inundation during storm events

Identify parks under the jurisdiction of other agencies

Noting where parts of the park are under the jurisdiction of other agencies - the Department of Conservation (marginal strips), Auckland Transport (unformed or formed legal roads)

Identify endangered species or significant natural features

Amended significant natural values for endangered species or significant natural features not identified in the draft plan

Identify key persons after whom a park is named or associated

Amended heritage values identifying key persons after whom a park is named or associated

Acknowledgement of the involvement and role of volunteers and friends

Include acknowledgement of the involvement and role of volunteers and friends

Clarify and strengthen management principles and management intentions

Browns Bay Village Green, Campbells Bay (Huntly Road) Reserve, Centennial Park, Edith Hopper Park, Freyberg Park, Gulf Harbour Village Reserve, Hardley Reserve, Jelas/Moffat Esplanade Reserve, Karaka Cove, Link Crescent Reserve, Manly Park, Metro Park East, Orewa Reserve, Silverdale War Memorial Park, Shadon - Springtime Reserve, Stanmore Bay East Beach Reserve, Stanmore Bay Park, Tindalls to Coal Mine Bay Esplanade, Western Reserve

Clarify and strengthen Other Information section

Bushglen Reserve, Campbells Bay (Huntly Road) Reserve, Centennial Park, Karaka Cove, Pacific Parade Coastal Reserve, Whangaparāoa Community Centre

 

31.     Subject to the approval of the hearing panel’s recommendations, the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan has been amended to reflect these recommendations. We recommend the final Local Parks Management Plan be approved (Attachments B – F of the agenda report).

Correcting decisions to classify two parcels pursuant to s.16 of the Reserves Act

32.     During the gazettal process, we determined that two parcels of land contained in two parks as described below, were incorrectly declared, and classified under s.14(1) of the Reserves Act being part of resolution b) HB/2018/54.

33.     The two parcels were already held under the Reserves Act and did not need to be declared reserves under s.14(1), rather, as they were vested with council pursuant to the Resource Management Act 1991, they require classification under s.16(2A) of the Reserves Act. 

Reserve name

Physical address

Appellation

Survey area (m2)

Reserve classification

Reserves Act section

Title

Manly Park

56 Laurence Street

Lot 55 DP 11689

1062

Recreation reserve

16(2A)

NA5B/1122

Penguin Drive Reserve

R 53 Bellbird Rise

Lot 102 DP 99834

1254

Scenic reserve 19(1)(b)

16(2A)

Held in cancelled title NA44C/1052

34.     To correct this administrative error, we recommend revoking the early resolution as it related to the two parcels of land and correctly classifying them under s.16(2A) as indicated in the table below. Public notification is not required.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     The decisions in this report are largely administrative and we anticipate them to have no direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions. However, the future management direction set in the plan for local parks, emphasises the role of local parks in climate change mitigation and adaptation.

36.     Part C in Volume 1 of the draft plan includes a climate change and natural hazards policy, which sets objectives to manage parks in a way that minimises and mitigates the impacts of climate change and improves the resilience of parks by adapting to the effects of climate change, especially in coastal areas.

37.     Other policies which aim to manage the impacts of climate change are:

·    access and parking - by not providing for peak use parking and encouraging active forms of transport

·    plants and animals - by encouraging plantings to increase urban canopy cover and manage riparian margins

·    park development - by encouraging utilisation of green building practices in design, construction and operation of park development.

38.     Part D in Volume 2 of the draft plan identifies potential coastal hazards at an individual park level and in some cases includes management intentions which aim to address potential hazards.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     A council project group has met regularly to support the project, understand implications of the plan and ensure alignment with other council plans and projects. This group included staff from Community Facilities, Parks, Sport and Recreation and Community and Social Policy.

40.     Other council departments and Council Controlled Organisations have provided specialist input into the development of the plan including Infrastructure and Environmental Services, Legal Services, Local Board Services, the Chief Sustainability Office, Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku and Auckland Unlimited. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

41.     Input from the community has helped staff to draft and refine the plan as outlined above and in the March 2020 report to approve the draft plan (HB/2020/44). During the consultation period we received 103 submissions on the draft plan.

42.     The local board are the decision makers for the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan. Two local board members sat on the hearing panel and had input on the recommended changes to inform final amendments to the plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The Reserves Act 1977 is one of the acts in the First Schedule to the Conservation Act 1987. In performing functions and duties under the Reserves Act 1977, the local board must give effect to the principles of te Tiriti o Waitangi.

44.     The plan acknowledges council’s obligation to iwi under the Te Tiriti o Waitangi / the Treaty of Waitangi in local parks management planning.

45.     Mana whenua were invited to be involved in the development of the plan. This opportunity was taken up by Ngāti Manuhiri, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, and Ngaati Whanaunga.

46.     Points of interest and input from mana whenua related to the management of natural and coastal areas, sites and areas of cultural significance and the ability for mana whenua to provide input into future decisions on local parks.

47.     The plan seeks to embed te ao Māori / the Māori world view and values throughout the document. Section 7 of the document outlines core Māori values and how they should be considered in the management of local parks.

48.     Many of the above can also contribute to the hauora (well-being) of both mana whenua and mataawaka.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     Adoption of the final plan will not incur any immediate financial implications for the local board but implementing the management intentions and policies as outlined in the final plan will need the local board to consider financial implications as part of any future decisions and changes.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations.

Risk

Mitigation

The plan does not include information regarding financial implications for any future decisions and changes for the parks.

Specialist input will provide further information on financial costs and implications to assist local board with any future decision making.

 

Effective handover of the final plan and identification of priority decisions and changes for parks will be crucial.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     The next step following the approval of the plan will be to publish the plan on the Auckland Council website and have written copies available in local libraries and the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board office.

52.     We will also provide a handover to departments responsible for implementation of the plan.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Volume 1 - Part A to C (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Volume 2 - Part D East Coast Bays (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Volume 2 - Hibiscus Coast (A - L) (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Volume 2 - Hibiscus Coast (M - Z) (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Volume 2 - Appendices (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Volume 1 Submissions analysis and staff recommendations (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Volume 2 Submissions Analysis and staff recommendations (Under Separate Cover)

 

h

Hearing Panel Report - 2022 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sheryne Lok - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Orewa Bridge Club Incorporated at Victor Eaves Park, Orewa

File No.: CP2022/08998

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community lease to Orewa Bridge Club Incorporated for land located at Victor Eaves Park, Orewa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Orewa Bridge Club Incorporated (the club) seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from the group-owned building at Victor Eaves Park, Orewa.

3.       The club currently holds a community ground lease which reached final expiry on 31 October 2021. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their 17 June 2021 local board meeting (resolution HB/2021/64).

5.       The club aims to provide within the Hibiscus Coast area a place where bridge players can meet to enjoy the game of bridge in all or any of its forms. These activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcome one – a connected community.

6.       The club has provided all required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds and that it is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

7.       As this is a group-owned building, they have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.

8.       The previous lease commenced before the club had built their facilities, and as such a larger area was granted (Attachment A to the agenda report - site plan, outlined in red marked A). However, under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 staff recommend that the new lease is for the footprint of the building only (Attachment A, outlined in red marked B) which is approximately 460m2 and not for the carpark (Attachment A, outlined in red marked C) which is approximately 400m2. The local board have the delegated authority to amend this recommendation.

9.       The club is contemplated in the current Victor Eaves Reserve Management Plan adopted 7 May 2009. Public notification and iwi engagement for any proposed new lease will not be required as there is no change in activity.

10.     A site visit was undertaken in February 2022 where it was found the club rooms were well maintained.

11.     A community outcomes plan has been agreed on and is attached to the report.

12.     Staff from Parks Sports and Recreation, Park Specialists and Connected Communities have been consulted and support a new lease.

13.     This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the club for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 July 2022 with one 10-year right of renewal.

14.     If the local board approves the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      grant, a new community lease to the Orewa Bridge Club Incorporated for an area comprising approximately 460 m2 located at 121 West Hoe Road, Victor Eaves Park on the land legally described as Lot 2 DP 201105 (as per Attachment A – site plan area, outlined in red and marked B), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)    term – 10 years, commencing 1 July 2022, with one 10-year right of renewal.

ii)   rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded.

iii)  Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B – Community Outcomes Plan).

b)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

Horopaki

Context

15.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

16.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their local board meeting on 17 June 2021 (resolution HB /2021/64).

17.     The new lease to the club at Victor Eaves Park was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

18.     Victor Eaves Park is located at 121 West Hoe Road, Orewa (refer to Attachment A – Site Plan). Part of the land is legally described as Lot 2 DP 201105 and classified as a recreation reserve.

19.     This is a group owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the club.

20.     The clubrooms have been recently refurbished and are in good condition.

21.     The building is primarily used by the club to play the game of bridge and engage in tournaments.

Orewa Bridge Club Incorporated

22.     Orewa Bridge Club Incorporated was established in 1981 and its primary objectives are to provide:

promote the amateur game of bridge

•        provide within the Hibiscus Coast area a place where bridge players can meet to enjoy the game of bridge

• promote tournaments, duplicate matches and other bridge games

• arrange matches against other clubs in Auckland and elsewhere

• promote friendly relations among members

23.     The club has 240 members, 2 part-time staff, is open for 19 hours per week generally in the afternoon and is open to sharing facilities with other community groups on a casual basis.

24.     The group has been operating from Victor Eaves Park since April 1984. The building and other improvements are owned by the lessee.

25.     The club’s current community lease with the council commenced on 1 November 2001 and has expired on 31 October 2021. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

26.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club is exercising this right by applying for a new lease. The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

Public notification and engagement 

27.     The club is contemplated under the current Reserve Management Plan which was adopted on 7 May 2009. A new omnibus Local Board Parks is in the process of being adopted, however in the meantime the current Reserve Management Plan is still operative, therefore public notification and iwi engagement is not required.  

Assessment of the application

28.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver on the local board plans. 

29.     The current area leased to the club consists of approximately 2,172m2 and is outlined in Attachment A to the agenda report – Site Plan marked in red and marked “A”. However, under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, staff recommend that the new lease is for the footprint of the building only, which would be approximately 465m2 (Attachment A, area outlined in red marked “B”) and not the carparks as previously leased (Attachment A, area outlined in red marked “C”). The Club was requested to provide feedback on the site plan and have responded that they have no issues with it. The Local Board have the delegated authority to amend this recommendation.

30.     The club has provided financials which show funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

31.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

32.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained by the club.

33.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement and is attached to the report (Attachment B to the agenda report - COP for Orewa Bridge Club)

34.     Staff recommend that a new community ground lease be granted to the club for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 July 2022 with one 10-year right of renewal. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·        include other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

36.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

37.     A small part of the leased area has exposure to potential climate change hazards as it sits on a flood plain (Attachment C to the agenda report - Site Plan for Orewa Bridge Club - Flood Plains).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.     Community facilities operational maintenance, parks, sports and recreation, parks specialists and connected communities have been consulted. They are all supportive of the proposed community ground lease

39.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.     This item is on the Community Facilities Work programme for 2021/2022.

41.     This item was discussed with the local board through a memorandum that was circulated to all elected members to comment and provide feedback. No concerns were raised on the proposed new lease.

42.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Auckland Unitary Plan and local board plans.

44.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development projects.

45.     A new Local Parks Management Plan is in the process of being developed and adopted, however in the meanwhile the current Reserve Management Plan is still operative, therefore iwi engagement is not required.  

46.     The club has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community as per Attachment B of this report. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through supporting opportunities that celebrate Maori identity and heritage such as Maori language week activities.

47.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

48.     There are no cost implications for the local board approving a new lease to the club. Rent for the current lease is $1 per annum and the new lease will remain $1 per annum.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

49.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community ground lease to the club this decision will materially affect the club’s ability to undertake its core activities.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

50.     Subject to the grant of a new community lease, council staff will work with the group to finalise the lease documentation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan for Orewa Bridge Club

33

b

Community Outcomes Plan Orewa Bridge Club

37

c

Site Plan for Orewa Bridge Club - Flood Plains

39

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chan Park - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Proposed new community lease to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated at Centennial Park, 184 Beach Road, Campbell's Bay

File No.: CP2022/09632

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community ground lease to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated, to be located at 184 Beach Road, Centennial Park, Campbell’s Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Campbell’s Bay Tennis Club Incorporated seeks a new community lease to continue occupation and operation from a group-owned building at 184 Beach Road, Centennial Park, Campbells Bay.

3.       The club held a community ground lease which reached final expiry on 31 January 2022. The lease has been holding over on a month-by-month basis until a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their 17 June 2021 local board meeting (resolution HB/2021/64).

5.       The Campbell’s Bay Tennis Club Incorporated aims to promote and deliver tennis to the community. These activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcome 1 – a connected community and outcome 4 – open spaces to enjoy.

6.       The club has provided all required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds and that it is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place. 

7.       As this is a group-owned building, The Campbell’s Bay Tennis Club Incorporated has an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.

8.       Auckland Council Staff conducted a site visit and found the site to be well-maintained and commensurate with a building of its age.

9.       A community outcomes plan has been prepared by The Campbell’s Bay Tennis Club Incorporated.

10.     The Campbell’s Bay Tennis Club Incorporated is contemplated in the Centennial Park Reserve Management Plan 2010, therefore public notification and iwi engagement for a new lease is not required.

11.     Auckland Council Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated for a term of ten years commencing from 1 February 2022 with one right of renewal for a further ten years.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated for an area comprising approximately 5790m2 located at 184 Beach Road, Centennial Park, Campbells Bay on the land legally described as Lot 1 DP 194867 (as per Attachment A to the agenda report – Site Map), subject to the following terms and conditions: 

i)    term – 10 years, commencing 1 August 2022, with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)   rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)  no maintenance fee or operational charge

iv)  compliance with the Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B to the agenda report)

b)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport, and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

13.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their local board meeting on 17 June 2021 (resolution HB/2021/64).

14.     A new lease to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated (the Club) located at 184 Beach Road, Centennial Park, Campbells Bay was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

15.     The Club are in a group-owned building suitable for their needs as a tennis club.

16.     The previous lease commenced in 2002 for an initial term of 10 years plus one 10-year right of renewal. The lease has expired, and a new lease has been requested.

17.     This report recommends granting a new community ground lease to the Club.

Land and buildings

18.     The Campbells Bay Tennis Club occupies part of the land parcel legally described as Lot 1 DP 194867 and is held in fee simple by Auckland Council as a classified recreation reserve.

19.     For a group-owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.

20.     Resurfacing of court three and upgrading to LED lighting systems is planned for 2022 dependent on successful grant applications.

21.     The building is primarily used by the club to provide a place for the community for all tennis related activities.

22.     The programmes carried out by the club provide tennis coaching, tennis matches and social play, and are underpinned by Tennis Northern Incorporated. They also work closely with Kiwi Tennis to source funding for tennis lessons to Campbells Bay School.

The Campbells Bay Tennis Club

23.     The Club was founded in 1948 and has been operating from its present site since February 1948 with the aim of fostering and playing the game of tennis, encouraging social interaction for members and supporters, providing coaching and training services for adults and children at school and holiday programmes.

24.     The Club has an open membership with 334 members in total and they range across different age groups. They have 10 volunteers with no paid staff. They operate 14 hours a day, seven days per week. They support the local community by making its facility available for hire.

25.     Courts one and two were resurfaced in January 2021 funded by grants.

26.     The hot water cylinder was replaced by an instant gas system.

27.     The floodlights’ switchboard connector was upgraded, and shelter was installed alongside court five.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

28.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated is exercising this right by applying for a new lease. The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

Public notification and engagement 

29.     The Club is contemplated under the Centennial Park Reserve Management Plan 2010, therefore public notification and iwi engagement is not required.

Assessment of the application

30.     The Club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver tennis services to the community.

31.     The area proposed to be leased to the club Incorporated consists of approximately 5790m2 and is outlined in the site map contained in Attachment A to the agenda report.

32.     The Club is a registered society and has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

33.     The Club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place. 

34.     A site visit has been undertaken by council staff and the facility is well managed and maintained. All management and operational costs are funded by membership fees, grants, and fundraising.

35.     The Club has also undertaken improvements including resurfacing of courts one and two, lighting switchboard upgrade, erection of shelter alongside court five and changing the hot water cylinder to instant gas system.

36.     The club provides a valuable service to the local community catering to all tennis players, from social to advanced and junior to veteran. Their vision is Building community through tennis. They offer coaching to juniors, seniors, members, and non-members. They offer opportunities to play at junior and senior days, and host community events like Love Tennis. In addition, they provide casual play through an ‘honesty box’ system. Their clubhouse and courts can also be hired by the community for events.

37.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement and is attached to the report as Attachment B to the agenda report. 

38.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.  

39.     Council staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 February 2022 as per recommendations with one 10-year right of renewal. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

40.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy, and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

41.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050, and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

42.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

43.     Council staff within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will include positive outcomes.

44.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

45.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote community engagement and a healthy lifestyle from the Campbells Bay Tennis Club, Centennial Park for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

46.     Consideration of a new lease to the club is in the Hibiscus and Bays Community Lease Work Programme 2021 - 2022.

47.     The delivered activities align with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes.

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 1: A connected Community

Hibiscus and Bays communities are supported, connected and vibrant

Outcome 4: Open spaces to enjoy

Provide a range of play and active recreation opportunities for all ages and abilities in our parks, reserves, and coastal environment

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

49.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents: the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Auckland Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.  

50.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

51.     Community leasing supports a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests, and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.     The current rent is the same as the proposed rent, therefore there are no cost implications for the local board approving a new lease to the club.

53.     Ongoing maintenance of the building will be covered by the lessee.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

54.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to The Campbells Bay Tennis Club Incorporated at Campbells Bay Tennis Club, 184 Beach Road, Centennial Park, Campbells Bay, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcomes.

55.     The new lease affords the groups security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the building remain unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the asset regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals. The renewal of the building will also not appear in the annual work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.     If the local board resolves to grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with The Campbells Bay Tennis Club to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Map

47

b

Attachment B - Community Outcomes Plan

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chan Park - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Table

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on the strategic direction of Auckland's Future Development Strategy

File No.: CP2022/09715

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the strategic approach to the Future Development Strategy (FDS).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The purpose of the Future Development Strategy is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It should assist with the integration of land use and infrastructure planning and funding decisions and set out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·    achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·    achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·    provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium, and long-term

·    coordinate critical development infrastructure and additional infrastructure required and explain how this integrates planning decisions with infrastructure and funding decisions.

3.       The updated Future Development Strategy  will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050 and will incorporate the new requirements of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS UD). New information on environmental and social changes such as responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic will also be included.

4.       During the early development of the  Future Development Strategy, topics and issues will be researched at a regional scale. As the  Future Development Strategy work develops and becomes more detailed, local board specific material will be available and workshopped with local boards. This is planned for Quarter one and Quarter two in 2023.

5.       Over the first half of 2022 seven ‘big issues’ facing Auckland were discussed at a series of Planning Committee workshops. These issues were: hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development; climate change, emissions reduction, and urban form; inundation and natural hazards; intensification – dispersed or focused; infrastructure; greenfields and future urban areas; and business and employment.

6.       Local board feedback is sought on this direction, prior to seeking endorsement from the Planning Committee in August and/or September 2022. If endorsed, the staff will use the strategic direction as a basis for developing the draft  Future Development Strategy over the second half of 2022.

7.       An updated  Future Development Strategy is needed in time to inform the Long-term Plan 2024-2034. To provide strategic direction that will usefully feed into the Long-term Plan  process the  Future Development Strategy will need to be completed by mid-2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the strategic direction for the Future Development Strategy.

 

Horopaki

Context

What is the Future Development Strategy?

8.       The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It sets out how, where and when Tāmaki Makaurau is expected to grow over the next 30 years and outlines where and when investment in planning and infrastructure will be made. The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050. It sets out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·   achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·   achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·   provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium, and long-term

·   coordinate critical development infrastructure and additional infrastructure required and explain how this integrates planning decisions with infrastructure and funding decisions.

9.       The FDS will show how the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 will be achieved spatially and it will incorporate a clear statement of hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development.

10.     It will identify the existing and future location, timing and sequencing of growth and infrastructure provision. It will also identify constraints on development.

11.     Sequencing of development areas within the existing urban areas and future urban areas will be assessed as part of this update.

Why is it being updated now?

12.     There have been many changes since the Development Strategy was adopted as part of the Auckland Plan 2050, nearly four years ago, including central government initiatives under the Urban Growth Agenda and new national policy statements such as the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS UD). In addition, council has led strategy and policy work focused on environmental and social challenges, including responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic. The growth model is also being reviewed and updated to support the spatial evidence for the FDS.

13.     This changing context, but specifically the requirements of the NPS UD, means Tāmaki Makaurau’s long-term spatial plan requires updating. The update will consider the detailed NPS UD changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan, such as intensification around train and bus rapid transit stops, however the purpose is different as it has a long-term (30 year) strategic focus.

14.     At its 30 November 2021 meeting, the Planning Committee approved the development of an update to the FDS and endorsed the high-level work programme (committee resolution PLA/2021/137).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Strategic direction on the ‘big issues’

15.     Over the first half of 2022 seven ‘big issues’ facing Auckland were discussed at a series of Planning Committee workshops. The Future Development Strategy will need to address these issues (set out below).

16.     Local board feedback is sought on this direction, prior to seeking endorsement from the Planning Committee in August and/or September 2022. If endorsed, the staff will use the strategic direction as a basis for developing the draft FDS over the second half of 2022.

Hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development

 

17.     The NPS UD directs that the FDS is informed by ‘Māori, and in particular tangata whenua, values and aspirations for urban development’. These values could provide a strong framework for taking a longer term, more sustainable approach to development in Auckland.

18.     Strategic direction:

·   hapū and iwi values and aspirations are a key aspect to the FDS and should be an overarching theme throughout, rather than a separate section or workstream

·   a thorough engagement approach is critical to understanding directly from hapū and iwi what their values and aspirations for urban development are

·   mataawaka and relevant Māori organisations should be included in the engagement.

 

Climate change, emissions reduction and urban form

19.     An increased focus on climate change is a key aspect of updating the FDS. The council has committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieving net zero emissions by 2050. Auckland needs to prepare for the impacts of climate change and plan for a potential 3.5 degree temperature increase. Urban form plays a major role in our ability to reduce emissions, as well as our exposure to natural hazards (see below).

20.     Strategic direction:

·   climate change related outcomes are non-negotiable, and every decision needs to consider climate change implications

·   achieving climate change related outcomes should be an overarching theme throughout the FDS.

 

Inundation and natural hazards

21.     There are areas of Auckland that are, and with the impacts of climate change (discussed above), increasingly will be, exposed to natural hazards such as inundation, flooding and erosion.

22.     Strategic direction:

·   take a strong approach to development in hazardous areas and provide clear public messages about risks and liability.

 

Intensification – dispersed or focused

23.     Recent government direction relating to intensification under the NPS UD (around centres and rapid transit stations), and the Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS) impact the council’s ability to influence where intensification could or should occur.

24.     Intensification that is dispersed (what MDRS enables) is likely to result in low(er) levels of intensification across most of the urban area. This will impact on the ability to provide services over time, for example, public transport.

25.     Focused intensification would direct growth to specific areas or locations, for example, around centres, areas with good public transport access or near areas of high employment.

26.     A combination of these two approaches would allow intensification across much of Auckland but would also allow greater intensification in specific areas. This approach may undermine the level of intensification in places that are best suited, as growth would also be happening in many other places.

27.     Strategic direction:

·   work within the legal parameters, use the levers we still have available to focus intensification

·   quality aspects are increasingly important with intensification, including the value of greenspace.

 

Infrastructure

28.     Funding and financing all the infrastructure needed in Auckland is a significant challenge. The council cannot provide infrastructure everywhere at the same time and reconsideration is needed of where funding will be focused / provided, and who funds what aspects and to what extent.

29.     Strategic direction:

·   strong, clear signals are needed that the council will use infrastructure as a lever to support or not support development

·   the timing and sequencing of development in strategic plans must be followed.

 

Greenfields and future urban areas

30.     The current Development Strategy (and the Auckland Unitary Plan) provide for 15,000ha of greenfields / future urban land, sequenced for development over a 30-year period. In the first decade (2017-2027) 32 per cent of that land was live-zoned and more future urban land is being considered for live-zoning through private plan changes.

31.     Live-zoning is happening much faster and in a haphazard way, creating major infrastructure issues. Additionally, some of this future urban land will, in future, be exposed to greater flooding risk and other natural hazards.

32.     Strategic direction:

·   reconsider and possibly pull back some Future Urban zone areas, particularly:

o areas at risk of flooding and natural hazards

o other areas given the direction on emissions reduction

·   the FDS should give strong signals regarding non-live zoned Future Urban zone land e.g., in terms of sequencing of development and infrastructure provision.

 

Business and employment

33.     Business operations and future needs are changing, for example, the impacts of COVID-19 and working from home, increases in online retail, the needs for large footprint businesses and the role that local centres may play in future.

34.     Auckland Council’s data on business land, needs and trends needs updating and work is underway to address this.

35.     Strategic direction:

·   business land, operations and future needs is an important aspect of the FDS, and further research is supported, particularly in relation to the demand for industrial space, robotic warehousing, the weightless economy and the impacts of COVID-19

·   access to business and employment is a critical issue, both in terms reducing the need to travel through proximity to residential areas, and accessibility by public transport and active modes

·   the importance of access to and provision of quality employment opportunities for Māori and Māori businesses.

 

Work programme – timeframes, key milestones

36.     The high-level milestones of the FDS are set out below. The FDS will be completed by mid-2023 to provide clear strategic direction to the 2024 LTP, as directed by the NPS UD.

37.     Research, stakeholder engagement and development of the draft FDS will be on-going in 2022. Engagement with Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and key stakeholders is planned throughout 2022 and the first half of 2023. Public consultation is expected in the first half of 2023.

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38.     It is noted that local body elections will take place in October 2022 and the timeframes acknowledge that there will be a break in Planning Committee and local board meetings at this time.

39.     Local board chairs (or alternates) were invited to a series of Planning Committee workshops in the first half of 2022.

40.     Indicative timeframes and the proposed format for local board involvement are set out in the table below.

Indicative timeframe

Proposed format

July 2022

Introductory briefing

July / August 2022

Reports to business meetings

August / September 2022

Planning Committee – endorse strategic direction

October 2022

Local body elections

Quarter 1 2023

Planning Committee – approval for public consultation

Quarter 2 2023

Workshops

Quarter 2 2023

Reports to business meetings

Quarter 3 2023

Planning Committee – adopt updated FDS

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     There is an increasing national focus on climate change through legislation[1] and through initiatives such as declaration of climate emergencies[2] and the report of the Climate Change Commission (June 2021). The council adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in 2020. The plan provides a long-term approach to climate action, with a target to halve regional emissions by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050. The built environment is one of the priority areas within the plan and the associated action areas focus on reducing emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change.

42.     The government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (May 2022) and the council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) being developed are recent plans seeking to reduce emissions. The TERP will provide a pathway for achieving a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030 in Auckland. Staff are working to align land use aspects of the TERP and the FDS to 2030, while acknowledging that land use and planning decisions typically see climate impacts over the longer-term. This means that decisions need to be made now to realise the benefits as soon as possible.

43.     Land use and planning decisions, particularly those around urban form, development and infrastructure, are fundamental to climate action. The impacts of different growth scenarios on climate change mitigation and adaptation are essential to the development of the FDS. These decisions influence and lock in our emissions trajectory and our ability to deal with the risks and impacts of a changing climate for decades to come.

44.     For example, in relation to transport emissions, more expansive urban forms generally lead to longer travel distances. Longer trip lengths typically result in higher transport emissions and less propensity for mode shift. Strategic land use decisions consider climate change risks and impacts such as the effects of coastal inundation and sea level rise.

45.     The approach taken in the FDS and the council’s approach to implementation has the potential for significant long-term implications. These aspects will be further researched and developed over the course of the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     The FDS provides Auckland-wide alignment on growth and development approaches and influences council strategies, programmes of work and investment decisions. Involvement, information and support from staff across the council group is a critical aspect needed to achieve alignment.

47.     A range of relevant staff from across the organisation, including the Council-Controlled Organisations, are involved in the project’s topic areas or workstreams.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The FDS is the long-term strategic spatial plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. The FDS provides information on how, when and where growth is anticipated. This is a topic which is of relevance to local boards as growth and development can have significant impacts at a local board level and informs local board plans.

49.     This report seeks local board views on the strategic approach to the Future Development Strategy prior to agreement being sought from the Planning Committee.

50.     As the FDS work develops and becomes more detailed, local board specific material will be available and will be workshopped with local boards. This is planned for Quarter one and Quarter two 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It will reflect the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 spatially. The updated FDS will include a clear statement of hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development based on engagement with relevant hapū and iwi (as required by the NPS UD).

52.     Council has committed to achieving Māori outcomes through Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, influenced by the Māori Plan and Issues of Significance, and Auckland Plan 2050. These documents provide guidance in understanding the priority areas for Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and a number of these priority areas are relevant to the development and implementation of the FDS, for example:

·   involve Māori early in the decision-making process

·   Māori housing aspirations

·   protection of existing natural resources

·   allowing for kaitiakitanga

·   benefits to Māori, for example, housing, economic opportunities, and improved access

·   impacts of climate change, for example, on marae, whānau, and sites of significance

·   opportunities to showcase Māori identity.

53.     The priority areas already identified, along with feedback from previous engagement will be incorporated in the development of the FDS. This requires a review of past Māori engagement and provides a starting point for engaging with Māori, in a way that supports their capacity to genuinely participate in the development of the FDS.

54.     Staff have developed a Māori engagement plan and are in the beginning phases of engaging with Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     Costs for developing the FDS largely fall in financial year 2023. This includes engagement and consultation aspects of the programme. Funding is provided in the 2022/23 Annual Budget.

56.     The FDS, once adopted, plays a significant role in future asset and service planning, especially assets and services related to growth. Decisions on this are subsequently made through Annual Plans, Long-term Plans, Regional Land Transport Plan).

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.     The council faces significant risks (achieving desired development outcomes, financial and reputational) in the absence of a clear, cohesive and strategic approach responding to the FDS requirements of the NPS UD and Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009. The development of an FDS seeks to address those risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Workshops are planned for the first half of 2023, when information specific to each local board will be available.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Gray - Principal Advisor Growth & Spatial Strat

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

New Private Road Name For Subdivision at 64 Glenvar Ridge Road, Long Bay

File No.: CP2022/09796

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to name a private road within the subdivision being undertaken by Templeton Long Bay North Limited at 64 Glenvar Ridge Road, Long Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of Auckland Council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development Templeton Long Bay North Limited shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval that set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Templeton Long Bay North Limited obtained local board approval of the name Kūkupa Lane for the private road located within Jointly Owned Access Lot 101, at its meeting held on 17 March 2022 (Resolution Ref No CP2022/-2348).

4.       Templeton Long Bay North Limited now requests the local board’s approval for a name for another private road located within Jointly Owned Access Lot 102 in the subdivision.

5.       The names presented below are in Templeton Long Bay North Limited’s order of preference and are the same as those presented at the previous meeting, except for Kūkupa Lane:

6.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by these guidelines.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      Approve the following preferred road names within the subdivision being undertaken by Templeton Long Bay North Limited, at 64 Glenvar Ridge Road, Long Bay in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974:

i)       Koiora Lane, or the alternative names, Verglas Lane or Palisade Lane, for the private road located within Jointly Owned Access Lot 102.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The 51 residential lot subdivision, (Council Ref BUN60359896), currently under construction was approved on 18 February 2021.

8.       Site and location plans of the subdivision can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

9.       In accordance with Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines) and Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the standards), any road including private ways, jointly owned access lots (JOALs), and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

10.     Road frontage Lots 11 and 12 do not have direct vehicle access to the public road and are accessed via JOAL Lot 102 resulting in JOAL Lot 102 serving seven lots exceeding the five-lot threshold where no road name is required.

11.     The private road within JOAL Lot 102 shown on the scheme plan of subdivision in Attachment B is required to be named.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

13.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

14.     Templeton Long Bay North Limited (the applicant) has chosen a suite of names they consider appropriate for the area. These include a mix of Māori and English names reflecting either the biodiversity of the wider area, an abstract reference to the subterranean soil structures and a retaining wall construction methodology undertaken in subdivision.\

 

15.     In this regard the names and their relevance are as detailed in the table below:

Proposed Name

Meanings (as described by e applicant)

Koiora Lane

(Preferred)

Koiora - Māori meaning for life / general biological terms loosely related to skinks, (mokomoko), found on site

Verglas Lane

(alternative)

 

Palisade Lane

(alternative)

A thin layer of glaze ice on an exposed surface or rock as an abstract reference to the subterranean clay layers on the site underlaid by rock materials

A type of retaining wall construction used within the subdivision

 

 

16.     All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the Council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

17.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

18.     The road type Lane is an acceptable road type for the new private road.

19.     Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change.  Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

24.     Templeton Long Bay North Limited undertook consultation with 14 mana whenua groups identified on the Councils website as having an interest in the general area with the previous application. Through that consultation, the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust did not support Templeton Long Bay North Limited’s names and suggested and preferred the use of the name Kūkupa Lane, which Templeton Long Bay North Limited had adopted as their first alternative name with the previous application.

25.     No further mana whenua consultation has been undertaken with this application as their views are known.

26.     As the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust preferred name was approved by the Local Board at its meeting of 17 March 2022 for JOAL Lot 101, it is now considered reasonable that Templeton Long Bay North Limited’s original preferred name Koiora Lane now be considered by the local board for JOAL Lot 102.

27.     No other mana whenua groups responded to the consultation however that is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance. Not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

29.     Templeton Long Bay North Limited has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

64 Glenvar Ridge Road Long Bay  - Locality Map

63

b

64 Glenvar Ridge Road Long Bay - Scheme Plan

65

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

John Benefield – Senior Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

New Public Road and New Private Road Names for Subdivision at 20 Kumukumu Road, Long Bay

File No.: CP2022/09793

 

  

 

Change the & in the title to and

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to name the public road and private roads within the subdivision being undertaken by Templeton Long Bay North Limited  at 20 Kumukumu Road, Long Bay, being Long Bay Stage 15 West.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines  set out the requirements and criteria of the Council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development the Applicant shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval that set out the requirements and criteria of council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.

3.       Templeton Long Bay North Limited has proposed the names presented below in order of preference for consideration by the local board.

 

Preferred name

Alternatives

Road 1 – 

Kumukumu Road

No alternative as the road is an extension of Kumukumu Road

Road 2 –

Pākirikiri Street

Chiton Street or Āhuruhuru Street

Private Road in Jointly Owned Access Lot 1 –

Kōheru Close/Place

Kahurangi Close/Place
Kahawai Close/Place
Sand Dollar Close/Place
Araara Close/Place

Private Road in Jointly Owned Access  Lot 2 –

Makumaku Close/Place

Starfish Close/Place or Parore Close/Place  

 

 

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the following preferred road names in the Jointly Owned Access Lot (JOAL) 1 within the subdivision being undertaken by Templeton Long Bay North Limited, (the Applicant), at 20 Kumukumu Road, Long Bay, (being Long Bay Stage 15 West), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974:

i)       Kumukumu Road for public Road 1

ii)       Pākirikiri Street, or one of the alternative names, Chiton Street or Āhuruhuru Street, for public Road 2

iii)      Kōheru Close or Place, or one of the alternative names, Kahurangi Close or Place, or Kahawai Close or Place, or Sand Dollar Close or Place, or Araara Close or Place, for the private road

b)      approve the following preferred road name in the Jointly Owned Access Lot (JOAL) 2 within the subdivision being undertaken by Templeton Long Bay North Limited, (the Applicant), at 20 Kumukumu Road, Long Bay, (being Long Bay Stage 15 West), in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974:

i)       Makumaku Close or Place or alternatives Starfish Close or Place or Parore Close or Place for the private road.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.       The 92 residential lot subdivision, (Council Ref BUN60390589), currently under construction was approved on 9 March 2022.

6.       A location plan and scheme of the subdivision can be found in attachments A and B to the agenda report.

7.       In accordance with the Auckland Council Road Naming guidelines (the Guidelines) and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards) any new public road requires a road name.

8.       The public roads shown as Roads 1 and 2 and private roads shown as JOAL 1 and JOAL 2 on the scheme plan of subdivision in Attachment B are required to be named.

9.       Road 1 is an extension of the existing formation of Kumukumu Road.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Templeton Long Bay North Limited has chosen a suite of marine life names they consider appropriate for the area. These include a mix of Māori and English names of fish and/or shellfish species commonly found or observed in the Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve

13.     In this regard the names and their relevance are as detailed in the table below.

Proposed Name

Meanings (as described by the applicant)

Public Road 1

Kumukumu Road

 

Māori name for red gurnard fish species

Public Road 2 – (Preferred)

Pākirikiri Street

 

Public Road 2 – (Alternatives)

Chiton Street

 

Āhuruhuru Street

 

 

Māori name for a spotty reef fish, (rock cod), found in Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve


Invertebrate found in in Long Bay - Okura marine reserve  

Māori name for goat fish / red mullet found fish in Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve

Private Road JOAL 1 (Preferred)

Kōheru Close/Place

 

 

Fish species found in Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve

Private Road JOAL 1 (Alternatives)

Kahurangi Close/Place

 

Kahawai Close/Place

 

Sand Dollar Close/Place

 

Araara Close/Place

 

 

Māori word for blue

 

Fish species found in Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve

 

Shellfish found in Long bay - Okura Marine Reserve

 

Māori name for trevally, a fish species observed in Long Bay- Okura Marine Reserve

Private Road JOAL 2 (Preferred)

Makumaku Close/Place

 

Private Road JOAL 2 (Alternatives)

Starfish Close/Place

 

Parore Close/Place

 

Māori name for kingfish a fish species observed in Long Bay-Okura Marine Reserve

 

An echinoderm found in Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve

 

Māori name for Bream - a fish species found in Long Bay - Okura Marine Reserve

 

 

14.     All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the Council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

15.     Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed all the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

16.     The road types road, street, close & place are acceptable road types for the new roads.

17.     Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change.  Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group.  The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     In April 2022, the Applicant undertook consultation with 14 mana whenua groups identified on the council’s website as having an interest in the general area. In that consultation the Applicant originally proposed the name Takutai Street. Through the consultation Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust specifically supported Templeton Long Bay North Limited (the Applicant) names Kumukumu Road, Takutai Street, Kōheru Close/Place and Makumaku Close/Place. Takutai Street was subsequently rejected by LINZ as it has already been used elsewhere in the Auckland region and the Applicant has deleted it from its road naming options. The Applicant has supported Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust preferred names Kumukumu Road, Kōheru Close/Place and Makumaku Close/Place as their preferred names for Road 1 and private roads in JOAL 1 and JOAL 2, respectively. 

23.     No other mana whenua groups responded to the consultation however that is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance. Not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key part of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database which includes street addresses issued by councils.

DA Note

change Author to John Benefield – Senior Subdivision Advisor

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

20 Kumukumu Road Scheme Plan of Subdivision

73

b

20 Kumukumu Road Long Bay - Locality Map

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jan Asplet - Business Coordinator

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/09327

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

HIBISCUS AND BAYS LOCAL BOARD Governance Forward Work Calendar August-September 2022

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Deputations Update

File No.: CP2022/09326

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       As part of its monthly community forum, Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has set aside time for deputations/presentations during which time members of the public can address the local board on matters within the local board’s delegated authority.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Under Standing Orders there is provision for deputations/presentations to the local board. Applications for deputations/presentations must be in writing setting forth the subject and be received by the Local Area Manager at least seven working days before the meeting concerned.  Subsequently, requests for deputations are considered and approved by the local board chairperson.

3.       Requests, matters arising and actions from the deputations/presentations are recorded and updated accordingly.  The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board deputations/presentations update is attached as attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the deputation update from May 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Deputations to Hibiscus and Bays Local Board meetings July 2022

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/09328

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for June 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus And Bays Local Board June 2022 Workshops Record

139

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2022/09325

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the reports from local board members A Dunn and J Fitzgerald.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Members Report J Fitzgerald

143

b

Members Report - A Dunn

145

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

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ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    YNZ - Gulf Harbour Mockup         Page 151

Item 8.1      Attachment b    YNZ - Torbay Birds Eye View       Page 153

Item 8.1      Attachment c    YNZ Torbay Screenshot   Page 155

Item 8.2      Attachment a    Road Safety Concerns of Residents on Hibiscus Coast Highway, Silverdale      Page 157

Item 8.3      Attachment a    Friends of Okura Bush Update Page 175

Item 8.4      Attachment a    Browns Bay Bowling Club Future Vision Page 191

Item 8.4      Attachment b    Browns Bay Bowling Club Property Site Plan     Page 195

Item 8.4      Attachment c    Browns Bay Bowling Club Area Proposed for Rezonig        Page 199



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[1] Legislation includes Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019.

[2] Auckland Council declared a climate emergency in June 2019 while central government announced a climate emergency declaration in December 2020.