I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Puketāpapa Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 21 July 2022

10.00am

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams and either a recording or a written summary will be uploaded to the Auckland Council website.

 

Puketāpapa Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Julie Fairey

 

Deputy Chairperson

Jon Turner

 

Members

Harry Doig

 

 

Ella Kumar, JP

 

 

Fiona Lai

 

 

Bobby Shen

 

 

(Quorum 3 members)

 

 

 

Selina Powell

Democracy Advisor

 

14 July 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 531 686

Email: selina.powell@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Amanda Brien - Water Fountains                                                                       5

8.2     Citizens Advice Bureaux Auckland City (CABAC)                                           6

8.3     Three Kings Community Kindergarten                                                              6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  7

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                7

11        Te Kete Rukuruku Tranche One - Adoption of Māori names and installation of bilingual signage at Lynfield Reserve.                                                                        9

12        Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards                       21

13        Nga Tiriti Ngangahau - The Vibrant Streets - Auckland Transport                      123

14        Local Board Transport Capital Fund Decision                                                       129

15        Local board feedback on the strategic direction of Auckland's Future Development Strategy                                                                                                                       135

16        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           143

17        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                145

18        Board Member Reports                                                                                             151

19        Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes                                          163

20        Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar                                                171

21        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 16 June 2022, and the additional ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 23 June 2022 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Puketāpapa Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Amanda Brien - Water Fountains

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Amanda Brien to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Amanda Brien will be in attendance to deliver a presentation to the local board regarding Water Fountains in the local board area.

 

 

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      thank Amanda Brien for her attendance and Deputation presentation.

 

Attachments

a          20220721 Amanda Brien - Water Fountains presentation.......................... 187

 

 

8.2       Citizens Advice Bureaux Auckland City (CABAC)

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Kate Anderson, CABAC General Manager, Tess Porter, Manager Mt Roskill, CAB and a Board Member of the CABAC to present.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kate Anderson, Tess Porter and a board member of the CABAC will provide an update to the local board on the services that the Citizens Advice Bureaux provide through the Mt Roskill CAB.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      thank Kate Anderson, Tess Porter and board member for their attendance and Deputation.

 

Attachments

a          20220721 Citizens Advice Bureaux Auckland City (CABAC) presentation.................................................................................................. 193

 

 

8.3       Three Kings Community Kindergarten

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for the Three Kings Community Kindergarten to present.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Three Kings Community Kindergarten will present on their lease expiring and for the group to ask the local board how they could help.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      thank Three Kings Community Kindergarten for their attendance and Deputation.

 

 

Attachments

a          20220721 Three Kings Kindergarten presentation...................................... 203

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Te Kete Rukuruku Tranche One - Adoption of Māori names and installation of bilingual signage at Lynfield Reserve.

File No.: CP2022/09890

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt te reo Māori park and place names, as additional names for parks.

2.       To receive the narratives associated with the names.

3.       To approve the installation of bilingual signage in Lynfield Reserve.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.       Te Kete Rukuruku is a programme involving the collection and telling of the unique stories of Tāmaki Makaurau. It represents a partnership between Auckland Council and mana whenua.

5.       A subset of this programme is the Māori naming of parks and community places, which involves the restoration of existing, or identification of new Māori names and narratives across Tāmaki Makaurau.

6.       In September 2018, the local board resolved (PKTPP/2018/153) to invite mana whenua to name 32 parks as tranche one.

7.       At a workshop on 30 April 2020, the local board directed the Te Kete Rukuruku programme team to develop bilingual signage for Lynfield Reserve - a Māori outcomes initiative funded by Long-term Plan regional funding.

8.       Names and associated narratives were presented by mana whenua to the local board at a ceremony on 3 June 2020. The subsequent adoption of those names did not occur owing to concerns raised by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

9.       Further discussions and research has taken place over the last two years in order to mitigate these concerns and reach agreement among iwi on names that should be returned. Twelve names have now been confirmed as being suitable for adoption over 17 sites.

10.     This report seeks adoption of these names, receipt of the associated narratives, and approval to install bilingual signage in Lynfield Reserve.

11.     Communications to inform the stakeholders and communities about the naming of the parks will commence once the names have been adopted

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)   adopt the following 12 te reo Māori names as dual names for the 17 sites as shown below,

New Māori name

Existing Name

Address

Onepoto

Granny’s Bay Reserve

4 Filgate Street

Pae-mohani

Halsey Esplanade Reserve

Halsey Drive

Pae-mohani

Manukau Domain

137 Halsey Drive

Pourewa

Captains Bush

1 Kingswood Terrace

Pourewa

Hibiscus Reserve

368A Hillsborough Rd

Pourewa

Hillsdale Reserve

348B Hillsborough Rd

Pourewa

Kingswood Reserve

3 Kingswood Terrace 

Pourewa ki uta

Wesley Reserve

57A Aldersgate Rd

Puke-karoro

Hillsborough Reserve

1 Clifton Road

Taunahi

Sylvania Crescent Esplanade Reserve

41 Sylvania Crescent

Taunahi

Wattle Bay

51R Butler Stoney Cres

Te Ākinga

Bamfield Reserve

1A Bamfield Place

Te Pae Aumaro

Nirvana Reserve

13 Nirvana Way

Te Tapere

White Bluff Reserve

10 Bluff Terrace

Wairaki

Lynfield Reserve

21 The Avenue Lynfield

Wairaki ki tai

Wairaki Stream Reserve (1)

70A Gilletta Rd

Wairaki ki uta

Wairaki Stream Reserve (2)

9 Flavia Place

 

b)   receive the narratives that tell the story behind each of the names, as outlined in Attachment A.

c)   acknowledge that Auckland Council has agreed to enter into a mātauranga agreement that commits to upholding the correct use of the name and to use it only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose (non-commercial use).

d)   authorise the gazettal of park names listed in Attachment A, for parks classified under the Reserves Act 1977, in accordance with section 16 (10) of the Reserves Act.

e)   approve Lynfield Reserve as the preferred location for the installation of bilingual signage.

 

Horopaki

Context

12.     Te Kete Rukuruku (TKR) is a culture and identity programme that collects and tells the unique Māori stories of Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland. It is a partnership between Auckland Council and all 19 mana whenua groups that have interests across the region, led by mana whenua.

13.     The objectives of the programme are to:

·        build and strengthen relationships with mana whenua

·        celebrate the Māori identity which is Tāmaki Makaurau / Auckland’s unique identity in the world

·        enable te reo Māori to be seen, heard, spoken and learned in our daily lives.

14.     A key component of the programme is the reintroduction of ancestral and contemporary Māori names to the city’s parks and places.

15.     The adoption of dual or sole Māori names supports and delivers on multiple council policies and plans including:

a.   the Auckland Plan outlining council’s commitment to support te Reo to flourish

b.   the council’s Long-term Plan 2021-2031 strategic priority of the promotion of te reo Māori

c.   the Māori Language Policy whose actions include increasing bilingual signage and dual naming.

16.     As part of their local governance role, local boards have the authority to provide new or additional names for parks in their rohe. On 6 September 2018 the Puketāpapa Local board resolved to invite mana whenua to provide names for 32 parks (PKTPP/2018/153).

17.     The parks selected in this tranche will be dual named, adding the te Reo name to the existing English name of the park. There will be no removal of existing names, so no public consultation was considered necessary.

18.     The TKR programme includes all 19 mana whenua and the process incorporates the following six phases:

      Phase one - Selection of sites to be named

      Phase two - Agreement among iwi on who will name each site

      Phase three - Researching appropriate names for each site

      Phase four - Finalising the narratives, ensuring support of all the iwi naming each tranche and then presenting the names to the local board

      Phase five - Adoption of the names

      Phase six- Communicating and celebrating the adoption of the names with the community and key stakeholders. Gazettal.

19.     TKR process, as previously agreed with mana whenua and local boards, is that the local board decide on what sites to name and may use community input to assist with finalising those sites. Mana whenua however have the mātauranga and the mana for deciding on appropriate Māori names for each site once selected. The Māori names put forward should not be subject to public debate so consequently public feedback is not sought on those names.

20.     In some cases, the Māori names have been attached to the park or area for hundreds of years, well prior to the arrival of Europeans. All twelve names being adopted today reflect traditional names that historically were used by Māori for the areas and bays these parks sit within.

21.     Māori names may be adopted as either dual names, where the existing English name is retained and nothing is taken away, or sole names where the existing English name is removed and replaced with a sole Māori name.

22.     As part of the process one bilingual exemplar park is identified within each tranche. Signage in this park will be reviewed and either upgraded or replaced to include both Māori and English text. Upon project completion, all signage within the selected park will be bilingual.

23.     Once the names are adopted signage will be replaced only when it is due for renewal, except for the bilingual exemplar park selected. Should the local board wish to upgrade signage sooner to reflect the new names, funding would be required from its Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) budget.

Gazettal

24.     The council, as landowner, can name parks and places by resolution through the exercise of its power of general competence under section 12 of the Local Government Act 2002. Local boards are the allocated decision-makers for the naming of local parks as resolved by the Governing Body 28 June 2018 resolution GB/2018/106.

25.     Where the land is vested in council and held as reserve under the Reserves Act, the council may name or change the name of a reserve by notice in the Gazette (s16(10) Reserves Act).

26.     As part of the TKR process any sites subject to the Reserves Act 1977 will be gazetted once the local board has adopted the names.

27.     Manukau Domain is Crown owned land held by Council in trust as recreation reserve subject to the Reserves Act 1977. At the time of writing this report advice had not been confirmed on whether Department of Conservation approval is required to legally gazette a new name for this site. Should this be the case Te Kete Rukuruku will obtain any necessary approvals prior to gazettal and the local board will be informed.

Background

28.     The rationale and benefits of the TKR programme, as well as the process for identifying and adopting names and narratives, were agreed by Puketāpapa Local Board at its business meeting on 6 September 2018 (PKTPP/2018/153).

29.     All the names and associated narratives were presented by mana whenua to the local board at a ceremony on 3 June 2020. The subsequent adoption of those names did not occur owing to concerns raised by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

30.     Further discussions and research have taken place over the last two years in order to mitigate these concerns and to reach agreement among iwi on the names that should be returned. Twelve names have now been confirmed as being suitable for adoption over 17 sites.

31.     TKR process was also amended to ensure such a situation would not arise again in future.

32.     Twelve names have now been presented to the local board, by mana whenua, at a hui tuku ingoa on the 23 June 2022. They are now ready for adoption. The names along with a brief narrative outlining the meaning behind them is detailed in Attachment A.

33.     Fifteen sites remain for naming and have not yet been agreed among iwi. Discussions will continue in relation to the naming of these sites.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

34.     TKR process, as endorsed by the local board, includes the commitment to honour the names presented at the hui tuku ingoa and that they will be adopted as received.

35.     Dual names are two unique names where one takes nothing away from the other. All parks in tranche one are identified to receive dual names where the Māori name is added to the existing English name. No parks were identified for sole Māori naming.

36.     The local board may subsequently choose to remove an English name from a park and have a sole Māori name. Consultation with stakeholders and those with an interest in the park is at the local board’s discretion but is recommended if the board wishes to pursue this as an option.

37.     Some contiguous sites fall within an area where historically one traditional name applied. In these instances, iwi may choose to reflect this through their naming and present only one name for adoption. An example of this would be Wattle Bay and Sylvania Crescent Esplanade Reserve where the name Taunahi historically was used. Consequently, two or more parks with separate English names but form one contiguous park may have the same Māori name adopted.

38.     Conversely Wairaki Stream Reserve falls under one existing name but forms two separate parcels of land split by Halsey Drive. Iwi have chosen to reflect the separate locations of these sites through their naming, Wairaki ki tai showing the connection of this site with the coast and Wairaki ki uta being an inland site.

Bilingual signage in Lynfield Reserve

39.     In tranche one the board was offered the opportunity to select one park where all signage will be upgraded to be fully bilingual. This signage is funded from Long-term Plan regional funding for Māori outcomes.

40.     At a workshop on 30 April 2020, the local board directed the TKR programme team to develop bilingual signage for Lynfield Reserve. The new signage will include:

·    dual language entrance signage, stating the te reo Māori and English names

·    bilingual wayfinding, information and bylaw signage

·    a bilingual interpretative sign to tell the story behind the te reo Māori name.

41.     With a view to spending Aucklanders’ money wisely, existing signs will be reskinned, unless they are damaged or worn and need to be replaced. A signage audit is underway, and visuals will be provided to the local board prior to installation.

42.     Bilingual signage will visibly raise the profile of te reo Māori in the public domain. It will provide the opportunity to learn the story behind the name as well as making it easy for the public to familiarise themselves with, and use, te Reo.

43.     If the local board does not approve the installation of bilingual signage at Lynfield Reserve signage will remain the same until due for renewal. Alternatively capital funds would be required, either when another physical works project is planned or if the local board decides to allocate funding for signage from its Locally Driven Initiatives budget.

44.     For the reasons outlined above it is recommended that the local board approve the installation of bilingual signage in Lynfield Reserve.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

45.     There are no substantive climate change impacts relating to this matter.

46.     The inclusion of Māori names on signs, when adopted through the TKR programme, is planned to align with signage renewal projects. If renewal is not required existing signs may be re-skinned but in most cases the name is not updated until renewal occurs. This minimises environmental impacts and unnecessary wastage of resource.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

47.     Te Kete Rukuruku delivers on Auckland Council’s Māori Language Policy and Kia Ora Te Reo, which is a priority within Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, the organisation’s Māori Outcome Performance Management Framework. It also delivers on Kia Ora Te Ahurea (the Māori culture and identity outcomes) as the programme helps to reclaim Māori identity and our unique point of difference in the world.

48.     The programme aligns with the aspirations of the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), as articulated in the Schedule of Issues of Significance 2017, Māori Plan.

49.     This programme is a partnership programme with the naming and narratives being led by mana whenua. It seeks to bring rigour to the process of naming across the council group over time.

50.     The programme has also triggered the development of new bilingual signage templates that may be used across the organisation in the future.

51.     Community Facilities staff are responsible for renewal of existing signage and will incorporate the new dual names as and when signage is renewed.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     Through partnering with mana whenua on this project, it is envisaged that relationships between mana whenua and their local boards will be strengthened.

53.     The programme’s recommendation of dual naming adds an additional name and narrative to each park, as opposed to taking anything away from the community. Dual language naming signage and bilingual signage help to enrich park user experience.

54.     The provision of Māori naming and bilingual signage in parks is aligned to the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2020:

·    Key initiative: Work with mana whenua on key projects, such as te reo Māori names for parks.

55.     When the names have been adopted and their narratives received, the local board and Auckland Council are permitted to use them for community outreach and educational purposes (non-commercial).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

56.     Te Kete Rukuruku continues to establish a best practice approach to Māori naming and the collection and sharing of stories.

57.   This project helps to increase Māori identity and belonging and is aligned with outcomes in the Auckland Plan.

58.   The project contributes towards outcomes from the Te Reo Māori Action Plan 2020-2023. The action plan brings to life the Māori Language Policy (2016) and describes actions to champion a bilingual city where te reo Māori is seen, heard, spoken and learned.

59.     Adopting the Māori name and narrative for 17 parks will increase the visibility of te reo Māori in the local board area. It will safeguard the stories of mana whenua and help to ensure their survival.

60.     Mātauranga agreements are being developed to ensure that names and stories are protected by the council. It is important that the council upholds their correct use and uses them only for purposes that have a community outreach or educational purpose i.e. non-commercial uses.

61.     As a partnership programme, all aspects of providing names and narratives have been led by the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau. This is appropriate as mana whenua are those with the mana in this area to carry the responsibility for Māori naming.

62.     There are a large number of resident mataawaka (Māori who live in Auckland but are not in a mana whenua group) who will have a great interest in these new names and narratives. This provides an opportunity to engage with mataawaka Māori organisations and invite them to embrace and help champion the names and narratives once the names are adopted.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

63.     Puketāpapa Local Board carried forward $23,670 of its Locally Driven Initiatives funding from FY 2020/2021 into FY 2021/2022. This funding provides a partial contribution to mana whenua for their time in supporting the process including research and ratification.

64.     The local board may choose to hold a small community event (whaka-rewa-tanga) to unveil the bilingual signage in Lynfield Reserve and celebrate the adoption of the names. The board should advise the TKR team if they wish to hold such an event so this can be organised in liaison with the Civic Events team. There is enough budget remaining to fund this event.

65.     Considering all final costs and allowing for a whakarewatanga to be held $8,000 is required to be carried forward from FY 2021/2022 into FY2022/2023. This will complete delivery including final payments to iwi.

66.     Updated dual name signage for these parks will be delivered over time by Community Facilities teams within existing renewals programmes.

67.     Bilingual signage for Lynfield Reserve is funded by Long-term Plan regional funding for Māori outcomes

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

68.     Several risks and issues were highlighted at the outset of this programme or added as the programme has progressed. These risks are carefully managed throughout the process and mitigated in a variety of ways as outlined in the table below:

Potential Risks

Mitigation

Multiple mana whenua having an interest in the parks, with differing views on naming.

Timeframes are extended when required to allow robust discussion amongst iwi. Agreement must be reached on who names each site before any naming starts. The approach of the programme has been to focus on a quality agreed outcome.

Agreement between iwi is unable to be reached.

Sites remain on hold and discussions continue until objections are resolved.

Extended delays in the adoption of Māori names, continuing the predominance of English only names and missing renewal opportunities.

Splitting the tranche to allow for adoption of names as they are finalised rather than waiting for completion of the entire tranche.

Iwi have concerns about names being put forward from other iwi.

All iwi naming in each tranche are provided with a list of all names submitted in that tranche. Time is allocated to allow any concerns to be raised prior to the hui tuku ingoa.

Potential negative public reaction to Māori names.

The existing English name can be retained with the Māori name being added. Communications once the Māori names are adopted to ensure a full understanding of the names and their meanings.

High costs of replacement signage.

Signage will be replaced as it comes up for renewal with the only exception being the bilingual signage at Lynfield Reserve. Signage here will be reskinned if replacement is not warranted.

 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

69.     Once the names are adopted by the local board, communication and public notification will commence.

70.     Where land is vested in the council and held as a reserve under the Reserves Act the council may name or change the name of a reserve by notice in the Gazette. Where reserves are classified under the Reserves Act 1977, gazettal of the dual park names will occur once the names are adopted.

71.     The names will be entered into the council’s website as soon as possible after adoption.

72.     Upon Puketāpapa Local Board’s formal adoption, the process for installation of bilingual signs at Lynfield Reserve will commence, with anticipated delivery in November 2022.

73.     Community Facilities teams will be advised of the adopted names so any signage being renewed will include the new Māori name.

74.     If requested by the local board a small community event (whaka-rewa-tanga) can be organised in Lynfield Reserve to unveil the new signage and celebrate the adoption of the names. This will be organised by the Civic Events team in liaison with TKR and Local Board Services.

75.     Staff will organise a workshop to discuss potential sites for inclusion in tranche two for naming.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Te Kete Rukuruku Tranche One Puketāpapa Māori Names and Narratives List

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dawn Bardsley - Naming Lead

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Table

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Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards

File No.: CP2022/09716

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the final content of the Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards, provides a framework so that communities can help shape the area for the change that will come with growth and development in the suburbs of Mt Roskill, Ōwairaka, Sandringham, Wesley, Waikōwhai and Three Kings over the next 30 years.

3.       The area plan sets out the vision, outcomes and actions for the plan area relating to natural environment, heritage, Māori Identity and wellbeing, climate change responsiveness, healthy communities, housing, centres, open spaces, community facilities, transport and network infrastructure. The plan includes Mana Whenua cultural landscape maps and information, and desired outcomes for eight areas of special focus, where significant growth and change is anticipated.

4.       There have been two phases of public engagement. The first invited ideas for the draft plan during October and November 2020, and the second sought feedback on the draft plan during February and early March 2022.

5.       The content of the area plan is now ready for consideration and final approval by the local board. Once the content is approved and the plan endorsed by the Planning Committee, work will begin on the final publication version.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      approve the Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards shown in Attachment A.

b)      delegate the approval of any minor amendments, corrections or additional images in the plan as required for publication, to the Chair or Deputy Chair of the Puketāpapa Local Board.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The area plan is a 30-year plan that seeks to support the growth and development in the ‘Development Areas’ of Mt Roskill and Three Kings identified in the Auckland Plan 2050, and the significant redevelopment of Kāinga Ora’s (formerly Housing New Zealand) land holdings in Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Board areas for new homes.

7.       In the Mt Roskill area (encompassing the current Kāinga Ora development areas of Roskill South, Waikowhai and Ōwairaka), Kāinga Ora are proposing to replace approximately 3,000 state homes with up to 11,000 new homes on their landholdings over the next 15 to 20 years. Redevelopment of Kāinga Ora’s land holdings forms part of the regeneration of these suburbs, alongside private residential and commercial developments.

8.       A working group comprising two members from Albert-Eden Local Board, all six members of the Puketāpapa Local Board, and eleven mana whenua representatives have provided direction and developed content with the council’s project team.

9.       Development of the area plan has been informed by specialist inputs and feedback, and through engagement with the community, mana whenua, and key stakeholders. Specialists within council and the council-controlled organisations (CCOs) have provided information about the existing environment and priority issues and opportunities for the area.

10.     Utilising these inputs and feedback from engagement, the project team has now developed the final version of the area plan (Attachment A).

11.     The plan sets out a vision, outcomes and actions focused on the suburbs of Mt Roskill, Ōwairaka, Sandringham, Wesley, Waikōwhai and Three Kings. The vision in the plan is:

With Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) at its heart, linking Ōwairaka, Puketāpapa and Te Tātua-a-Riukiuta (Big King); this is an area with strong heritage and vibrant, diverse communities. 

Our vision is that future growth, in partnership with mana whenua as kaitiaki, will:

•      regenerate and develop this area

•      build a great place to live, work and visit 

•      be climate change resilient, with a low carbon footprint.

Our people celebrate the area’s rich history, care for the environment and are proud to call this place home.           

12.     The ten key outcomes in the plan are:

No

Theme

Outcome

1

Natural environment

A protected, regenerated and healthy natural environment.

 

2

Māori identity and wellbeing

The kaitiaki role of mana whenua is respected, and Māori identity and wellbeing supported and uplifted.

 

3

Cultural and social history

The area’s diverse history and community is recognised, celebrated and retained.

 

4

Climate change responsiveness

A low carbon community that is resilient to climate change and natural hazards.

 

5

Healthy communities

Engaged, healthy and connected communities.

 

6

Housing

 

Enable an increase in housing supply and choices to meet current and future community needs.

 

7

Centres and employment

Revitalised and growing centres, providing a range of employment choices for local residents.

 

8

Open spaces and community facilities

A high quality network of parks and open spaces that are accessible and safe, with active community spaces and places.

 

9

Transport

Connected, walkable neighbourhoods that are safe and easy to get around and prioritise the use of active and public modes of transport.

 

10

Network infrastructure

New and upgraded infrastructure that embodies water sensitive design, including enhancement of water quality, that is resilient to the pressures of a growing population and climate change.

 

 

13.     The plan will be designed and published after it is approved by the local board and endorsed by the Planning Committee. It will be available online, with a limited number of hard copies printed.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     Discussions with the local board, specialists at Council and CCOs, together with engagement with mana whenua and responses from stakeholders and the community, show support for the plan. 

15.     Feedback received through public consultation on the draft plan showed that 86 per cent of responses supported the plan’s vision, and 90 per cent of responses indicated that the ten key outcomes in the plan were fairly or very important. There was also support for the actions, and additional ideas and suggested amendments that emerged from feedback have been included in the final version of the plan.

16.     The plan content has now been completed. After seeking approval of the content of the plan and any subsequent minor amendments, the preparation of the publication version will start. The final plan is likely to be completed and published later this calendar year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The area plan addresses the impact of climate change through the climate change responsiveness outcome – A low carbon community that is resilient to climate change and natural hazards. Actions to achieve this outcome include supporting initiatives in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan 2020, and the Low Carbon Community Action Plans of the Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa Local Boards.

18.     The transport outcome of the area plan focusses on providing a range of transport options for people in, to and through the plan area and a strong focus on active modes (including bus, walking and cycling). The plan highlights the need to identify and implement improvements to bus, walking and cycling to support the large-scale housing redevelopments and redevelopment of centres within the plan area.

19.     The natural environment and open space outcomes of the plan seek to improve green spaces in the plan area, including increased tree coverage. The plan also highlights the need for more shade and trees in parks, to ensure that people are able to continue to enjoy these spaces in times of rain events.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The area plan has been developed in consultation with specialists from teams across council including Community and Social Policy, the Urban Design Unit, Parks Sport and Recreation, Community Facilities, and Healthy Waters. Staff from these teams have provided information about the current context for the plan area, as well as local issues, priorities and opportunities relating to their specialist subject area.

21.     Staff from Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku Development Auckland, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, and Watercare Services have been involved in the development of the plan.   

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The Puketāpapa Local Board has provided input into the area plan through monthly working group meetings and local board workshops. The working group meetings have provided guidance on the development of the plan, to discuss project updates, public feedback and the emerging content of the plan. The final area plan incorporates the feedback and suggestions made by local board members at the working group meetings held on 5 May and 23 June 2022.

23.     Local stakeholders and the community have provided inputs into the plan through attending engagement events, providing comments on social pinpoint an online engagement platform, completing feedback forms, and having discussions with the project team. The project team met in person or online with the Albert-Eden Youth Board, Puketāpapa Youth Foundation, Roskill Chinese Group, Puketāpapa Business Voice, Puketāpapa Local Board Community Forum, and Sandringham Project in Community Empowerment. Public engagement events were held at the Mt Albert and Mt Roskill Libraries, Cameron Pools, Wesley Market, Wesley Community Centre, and Sandringham Spring Festival.

24.     A number of agencies and groups provided feedback on the draft plan including Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Healthy Puketāpapa, Kāinga Ora, Ministry of Education, Tūpuna Maunga Authority, and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     In December 2019, the project team contacted representatives from fifteen mana whenua groups known to have an interest in the plan area to ascertain their interest in being involved in developing the area plan. Individual hui were held with representatives from Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngaati Whanaunga, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Ahiwaru, and Te Kawerau ā Maki.

26.     In addition, Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Maru, Te Patukirikiri and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua advised that they wished to be engaged on a collective basis in relation to developing the area plan.

27.     Cultural value assessments were provided by Ngāti Tamaoho, Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngaati Whanaunga and Te Kawerau ā Maki to describe their histories, whakapapa, and areas of interest.

28.     Development of the area plan has benefited from the expertise of mana whenua representatives, who served on the working group.

29.     The project team held a number of collective hui with mana whenua representatives to identify actions in the draft plan to support their aspirations including recognition of the status of mana whenua and their kaitiaki role, effective engagement and collaboration, recognising and protecting natural and cultural landscapes, greater planting of native trees and plants, for restoring the life force/mauri of the waterways, improving the water quality reaching Te Auaunga (Oakley Creek) and its receiving environments, greater use of active transport modes (walking, cycling and public transport), and sustainable development.

30.     Mana whenua representatives were also interested in raising the awareness of the communities of Albert-Eden and Puketāpapa to the importance of the historical cultural landscape. The cultural landscape is conveyed through maps and explanations by Mana Whenua including five tikanga themed maps, which form part of the plan. 

31.     The project team contacted two mataawaka groups, Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Ngā Maungarongo and the Te Roopu Kaumatua-Kuia O Owairaka Ki Tamaki Makaurau Trust to seek their feedback on the draft plan. No comments were received from these groups.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The area plan was allocated a budget of $15,000 for engagement by Plans and Places in 2020/21. The project team has undertaken all the specialist work on the draft plan with other teams from the council and CCOs. Almost $6,000 has been spent on engagement events and materials. An amount of $9,000 has been carried over into the 2021/22 financial year to contribute to plan engagement and document design and production. The publication costs associated with the plan are for printing and translation work.

33.     The publication and/or printing of the plan will be completed by the end of the 2022/2023 financial year.

34.     Funding will be required to achieve the outcomes identified in the plan. The annual local board funding agreement with the Governing Body is a key opportunity for the Local Board to seek this funding.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35.     There are no risks associated with finalising and publishing the plan.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

36.     After the plan is approved by the local board and endorsed by the Planning Committee, the project team will continue with the publication process.  This is expected to take between 8 and 12 weeks.

37.     During this time, the project team will work with the delegated member from the local board to confirm any minor editorial changes, additional images, and the appearance of the plan.

38.     The plan will be available online and in hardcopy. The project team will consult with the local board to confirm the number of hard copies.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Area Plan for parts of Puketāpapa and Albert-Eden Local Boards

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

David Wong - Senior Policy Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Nga Tiriti Ngangahau - The Vibrant Streets - Auckland Transport

File No.: CP2022/10014

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the Puketāpapa Local Board on its successful application to the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme and to seek formal support of the local board project Puketāpapa - He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau programme is a newly established $3 million fund, to be delivered by Auckland Transport over the first three years of Auckland Council’s 10-year climate action package. The programme aims to deliver trials and tactical urbanism interventions across the region, outside of the city centre, to reduce emissions through encouraging mode shift to walking, cycling and micromobility.

3.       The Puketāpapa Local Board made a successful application to the fund to develop a project called Puketāpapa – He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven. This project aims to see Council-family staff and community organisations working together with Kāinga Ora to connect children and families to existing cycling infrastructure and increase the number of children cycling to local schools and community hubs.

4.       To be part of the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme, the local board must meet 10% of the costs of the project. Initially this contribution will be met by the allocation of dedicated staff time.

5.       The report requests that the local board formally support the project and requests it to delegate two local board members to be involved in the Project Steering Group that will support the development and delivery of Puketāpapa - He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      formally supports through a resolution the Puketāpapa - He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven project in the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme.

b)      delegates two local board members to be involved in the Project Steering Group that will support the development and delivery of Puketāpapa - He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau programme is a newly established $3 million fund, to be delivered by Auckland Transport over the first three years of Auckland Council’s 10-year climate action package. The programme aims to deliver trials and tactical urbanism interventions across the region, outside of the city centre, to reduce emissions through encouraging mode shift to walking, cycling and micro mobility.

7.       The programme was open to applications from local boards, Auckland Council and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs).  This opportunity was also extended to Mana Whenua through AT’s engagement hui.

8.       Applications that met the eligibility criteria were assessed against the Primary and Secondary objectives for the programme.

9.       The primary objectives for the programme are to:

·    reduce transport emissions and improve air quality co-benefits outside of the city centre by encouraging mode shift to walking and cycling through the creation of more people-friendly streets.

·    respond to local enthusiasm for people-friendly streets through undertaking interventions in areas where there is strong local board and community support.

10.     The secondary objectives for the programme are to:

·    encourage the use of tactical urbanism techniques / initiatives that can be rolled out rapidly and at relatively low cost, with a linkage to an existing funding stream to fund a permanent solution if the trial is successful (e.g. projects included for funding in the Regional Land Transport Plan).

·    support Māori outcomes, for example by encouraging active Māori participation, and improving low carbon access to marae, kura, kohanga, employment and services.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Puketāpapa – he tuanga pahikara/ Puketāpapa – a cycling haven

11.     The Puketāpapa Local Board made a successful application to the fund with Puketāpapa - He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven. This project aims to see Council-family staff and community organisations working together with Kāinga Ora to connect children and families to existing cycling infrastructure and increase the number of children cycling to local schools and community hubs.

12.     The proposal includes a dedicated resource:

·        to establish relationships with parents and students at school events, home visits, social media, letterbox drops and word-of-mouth.

·        review existing cycling infrastructure on riding routes, and the provision of safe cycle storage at schools with recommendations being made addressing shortcomings.

·        arrange access to (via the Roskill Bike Kitchen) and maintenance of bicycles.

13.     The project would be developed and established on a school by school basis, taking into consideration where the increase in new family homes are being finalised.

Local Support and Enthusiasm

14.     There is extensive community feedback supporting an increase in cycling, increased use of the existing Greenways infrastructure and support for locals to have increased access to opportunities for movement.

15.     These include insights from the recent Fit for Growth insights report that stated a community desire for:

·        Safe spaces for our children to grow and play. We heard from children that they want to be outside and using local green and meeting spaces for free play with their friends and family. Children connect at a very local level – within a few streets radius or to close destinations like the local park, playground or school grounds. Parents wanted to know their children were safe and could play near home. Particular concern was for traffic and increased cars on roads due to intensification.

16.     The project has local support from these organisations:

PATH – Puketāpapa Active Transport Haven (Active Transport Trust is the legal entity)

17.     PATH identified in 2016 after running a Mobility Survey that a lot of people in Puketāpapa want to ride but didn’t have access to a bicycle. As a result, the Roskill Bike Kitchen was established and to date has repaired and distributed over 1,200 bicycles that otherwise would have gone to landfill and repaired a similar number of locally owned bicycles.

18.     The contract will be undertaken by Seacliffe Productions Limited, and managed by Richard Barter, a director.

Global Hope

19.     Global partnered with PATH and the local board to deliver the 2019 Bike Train Pilot with great success. Peter and Tilley Leilua from Global indicated strong support to expand the programme when presenting to the local board in August 2021.

Kāinga Ora

20.     In recent meetings with Auckland Council’s Strategic Broker, staff from both the Community Engagement Team and the Placemaking team committed to support the project,and include it in their future work programmes.

Project Steering Group

21.     A project steering group (PSG) is being established to provide executive oversight and governance for the project. To be effective, the PSG should be made up of key project delivery team members, a Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau programme team representative, key stakeholders and partners. The members could be both internal and external to the council family group.

22.     The PSG is tasked with overseeing, supporting and providing direction to the project to ensure the attainment of the project goals, outcomes and benefits. It would be ideal if the PSG met at regular monthly intervals to provide consistency, but not overburden the members.

23.     The PSG is expected to meet monthly until 2024, when the project ends.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

24.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities. This project supports those outcomes.

25.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

26.     This project supports the Auckland Plan 2050 and the Auckland Climate Action Plan and its priorities and supports AT’s role in promoting active travel.

He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven aligns with and fulfils actions in the following plans:

27.     Healthy Puketāpapa Action Plan – Item 3.1 promotion of cycling is a high priority.

28.     Te Taruke a Tawhiri Auckland's climate plan - sets a goal of 7% of trips being by bike by 2030).

29.     Puketāpapa Greenway Plan - The project will activate the infrastructure that has been laid out in the Puketāpapa Greenways Plan by equipping and encouraging students and whanau to utilise the existing network.

30.     Puketāpapa low Carbon Plan – Encouraging more cycling is one of the primary objectives of this plan.

31.     Auckland Plan 2050 - Focus Area 4 - make walking and cycling a preferred choice.

32.     Auckland Regional Land Transport Plan – the “Cycling is important and/or should be the priority” theme was ranked 5th by number of feedback comments on the draft plan.

33.     Kāinga Ora Access and Movement Framework - Inclusive & Accessible Communities: Equitable access to opportunities - available through a range of modes / Safe and healthy Communities: Ensuring safe travel and enabling active trips / Sustainable & Resilient Communities & Neighbourhoods: Minimising harm to the environment through reducing car based travel with travel and increasing nature in our movement corridors.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     The projects supports objectives and key initiatives as stated in the Puketāpapa Local Board Plan 2020-2023

·        A range of transport options that are less polluting

§ A shift towards carpooling, trip reduction, public transport, walking and cycling

·        Making getting around Safer

§ Invest in cycling safety and education

·        More walking and cycling and use of public transport

§ Encourage and enable safe walking and cycling connections for community and leisure.

35.     The local board has supported the development of shared paths in its area both with its Greenway Plan and the application of its local board transport capital programme to support that plan.

36.     Staff are seeking delegation of two local board members to be involved in the Project  Steering Group that will support development and delivery of Puketāpapa - He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     The 2020 Puketāpapa Local Board Plan indicates that Māori make up 5% of the total population of 60,000 or 3,000 individuals. It is quite possible that it could grow as part of the new residential Kāinga Ora housing developments.

38.     The local kura Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Nga Maungarongo sits outside the local board area and is not currently closely connected with the Greenways network, but the project will look to work closely with the kura and support Puketāpapa students to find suitable, safe cycling routes to the kura.

39.     Mt Roskill Intermediate also has 9% Māori enrolled in the school, the highest in the area. They have successfully engaged in the pilot Bike Train, to further engage Māori students at the school, the project team would look to continue engagement with the school and identify opportunities.

40.     The project would also look to establish and support a Local Māori active transport champion to support Māori engagement in the project and its benefits.

41.     The Puketāpapa Local Board has a formal relationship with Ngati Tamaoho and this partnership has a focus on the protection of the natural and non-built environment.  This project supports increasing access and use of the Greenways. Project staff will work closely in partnership with the iwi to ensure the project stays in keeping with Ngati Tamaoho’s aspirations for the area.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     To be part of the Nga Tiriti Ngangahau – The Vibrant Streets programme the local board must meet 10% of the costs of the project.

43.     Initially the contribution from the Puketāpapa Local Board for Puketāpapa - He Taunga Pahikara, a Cycle Haven will be met by the allocation of dedicated staff time.

44.     There are no additional financial implications for the local board as this project is funded by Auckland Council’s 10-year climate action package.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     There are no risks identified with the local board endorsing this project.

46.     Any future risks and mitigations in planning and delivery of the project will be notified to the board through both regular updates and delegated attendance at steering group meetings.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.     Stakeholder and community information mapping is currently underway, this will provide the project team with a clear understanding of the environment the programme will be delivered in.

48.     Initial meetings have started with key community members and representatives of local schools and services and the process for codesign sessions with the community are currently being considered.

49.     Once the local board has delegated members to be part of the Project Steering Group, invitations will be sent out and monthly meetings will commence.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart – Elected Member Partner, Auckland Transport

Kat Teirney – Strategic Broker, Connected Communities

Authorisers

Allyn Sims – Programme Manager, Business Performance, Auckland Transport

Stephen Rainbow – Head of Community Engagement, Central Hub, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Local Board Transport Capital Fund Decision

File No.: CP2022/10040

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       This report informs the local board of unforeseen budget increases in two of the local board’s contracted LBTCF projects and requests the local board to increase its allocated budget to those projects.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In September 2021 the local board passed resolutions to allocate $410,000 to the 244 Hillsborough Road crossing project and $440,000 to Greenways Route D Part 2 (Resolution number PKTPP/2021/187).

3.       Due to unforeseen delays in the Greenways D project due to resourcing and supply issues plus escalating construction costs, the Greenways D project budget has now increased to $480,586.00.

4.       In addition, service investigations during the design of the Hillsborough Road signalised crossing project uncovered a clash between traffic signal poles and a water and gas main. This clash has been unable to be worked around and in order to deliver the project the gas and water mains must be relocated. The cost of this project has now risen to $686,961.00.

5.       The local board’s remaining LBTCF budget of $66,290 will not be enough to cover the budget shortfalls. AT is now seeking direction from the local board on reallocation of the LBTCF budget to deliver these projects.

6.       As both Greenway D and 244 Hillsborough Road both have existing construction contracts the report asks the local board to reallocate funding from other approved LBTCF projects (Melrose Road pedestrian refuge and Hillsborough Rd/Mt Albert Rd intersection improvements and Hillsborough Road pedestrian refuge) and in the case of Melrose Road and Mt Albert Road/Hillsborough Road projects, defer their construction in order to complete the Greenways D and the 244 Hillsborough Road projects.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      allocate its remaining local board transport capital fund as follows:

i)        That $40,586 of unallocated budget be allocated to the Greenways D project.

ii)       That $25,704 of unallocated budget be allocated to the 244 Hillsborough Road crossing project.

b)      request Auckland Transport to put on hold the construction of the Mt Albert Road/Hillsborough Road safety improvements and the Melrose Road pedestrian refuge.

c)      request Auckland Transport to reallocate $251,257 of local board transport capital fund to the Greenways D and 244 Hillsborough Road projects from the projects listed below:

·    Hillsborough Rd/Mt Albert Road - $164,792

·    Melrose Road Pedestrian Refuge– $79,792

·    65 Hillsborough Road Pedestrian Refuge - $6,673

d)      note that the reallocation of $6,673 from the 65 Hillsborough Road pedestrian refuge to 244 Hillsborough Road project is on the understanding that the 95 Hillsborough Road project will be absorbed into the construction contract for Greenways D, resulting in budget efficiencies.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Auckland Transport (AT) is responsible for all of Auckland’s transport services, excluding state highways. As set out in our Local Board Engagement Plan we report on a regular basis to local boards. The regular reporting commitment acknowledges the important role local boards play in the governance of Auckland on behalf of their local communities. 

8.       AT has been reporting in 2022 on projects and operations in the local board areas by way of a monthly central bulletin. Information on local board consultations and updates on  the status of the Community Safety Fund (CSF) and the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) have been conveyed by memo or email.

9.       The CSF is a capital budget established by AT for use by local boards to fund local road safety initiatives. The purpose of this fund was to allow elected members to address longstanding local road safety issues that are not regional priorities and are therefore not being addressed by the AT work programme.

10.     The LBTCF is a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT. Local boards can use this fund to deliver minor transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important but are not part of AT’s work programme. Projects must also be:

a)      safe

b)      not impede network efficiency

c)      be in the road corridor (although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Puketāpapa Local Board Transport Projects

11.     The projects noted below were previously allocated funding through the LBTCF process.

Project

Description

Update

Estimates

Greenways D

Cycling and Walking Improvements

Contracted

$440.000

65 Hillsborough Rd

Pedestrian Refuge

To be added to Greenways D contract

$150,000

244 Hillsborough Rd Crossing

Signalised Pedestrian Crossing

Contracted

$410,000

Melrose Road

Pedestrian Refuge

In design

$110,000

Hillsborough Road/Mt Albert Rd

Improvements at the intersection to improve pedestrian safety

In design

$195,000

Lynfield Reserve and Waikowhai Park

Cycle Parking

With Community Facilities

$6,300

Greenways Route D Part 2

12.     Since the resolution to complete the Greenway D project was passed in late 2021, construction plans have been finalised and the price from the contractor has been received. Delays on the project have been due to resourcing and supply issues including a shortage of lighting luminaires. At the moment there is a 26 week lead time for luminaires. Over that time construction costs have continued to rise at unprecedented rates and the tendered prices recently received from contractors came in above estimates.

13.     A cost breakdown can be seen below:

Type of Work

Description

Amount

Civil works

Award Value

$                 295,484

10% contingency

 $                   29,549

Streetlight

Quote

 $                 137,248

10% contingency

 $                   13,725

Arborist

Quote

$                      4,580

 

Total =

 $                 480,586

Additional Budget required

 $                 40,586

 

14.     Note: 10% contingency has been allowed for to cover any onsite unknowns that may lead to contract variations.

244 Hillsborough Road Signalised Crossing

15.     Over the past few months, designs for the signalised crossing have been finalised and utility service investigations have been completed. These investigations discovered a clash between traffic signal poles and a water and gas main. Alternative pole locations and crossing locations were investigated to avoid the clash but due to site constraints these were not feasible. Below is a break down of costs:

Type of Work

Description

Amount

Civil works

Award Value

$                 534,200

10% contingency

$                   53,420

Utility Service Connections and Relocations

Quote

$                   90,310

10% contingency

$                     9,031

 

Total =

$                 686,961

Additional budget required

$                 276,961

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommended Reallocation of LBTCF

16.     Puketāpapa Local Board currently has $66,290 unallocated LBTCF budget. We recommend that $40,586 of this budget be allocated to the Greenway Route D part 2 project.

17.     It is recommended that the remaining $25,704 of unallocated budget be allocated to the 244 Hillsborough Road Crossing project and $251,257 of budget be reallocated from the projects below:

·    Hillsborough Rd/Mt Albert Road - $164,792

·    Melrose Road Pedestrian Refuge - $79,792

·    65 Hillsborough Road Pedestrian Refuge - $6,673

18.     This will leave enough budget for design to continue to progress for the projects above but construction for Hillsborough Rd/Mt Albert Road and Melrose Road pedestrian refuge will need to be placed on hold until funding can be sourced. Construction of 65 Hillsborough Road pedestrian refuge is expected to continue under the Greenway D contract.

19.     We are recommending that the Hillsborough Road crossing and Greenways D (Stage 2)  projects proceed because:

·        Stage 1 of Greenway D is already complete and the contractor is ready to begin work on Stage 2 and this project will add to active mode outcomes.

·        The Hillsborough Road crossing at Goodall Street is also recommended as there is a construction contract in place and there is a community need for safe crossing places on Hillsborough Road.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Auckland Transport engages closely with council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan and council’s priorities.

21.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian, active modes or support public transport therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT. Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.     AT attended workshops with the Puketāpapa Local Board in June 2022 to discuss project shortfalls and confirm the prioritisation of the projects.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

24.     The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori. Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     As the local board has two projects with contractual obligations it is recommended that these projects be given priority in funding decisions.

26.     Auckland Transport will be updating local boards on the outcome of Auckland Council’s budget decisions and the impacts on the local board transport capital fund for the new political term.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The impact of last year’s COVID-19 lockdown has been factored into these recommendations.

28.     Projects that have construction contracts will continue to be delivered. Projects that have been paused or only carried through to design completion will need to be reconsidered by the incoming local board in the new political term.

29.     Auckland Transport will encourage new local boards to pursue paused projects from the previous term as a considerable amount of funding will already have been committed by taking these projects through design processes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     If the budget reallocation recommended is confirmed, Auckland Transport will continue with the delivery of Greenways D, 65 Hillsborough Road pedestrian refuge and the 244 Hillsborough Road signalised crossing.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Lorna Stewart – Elected Member Partner, Auckland Transport

Matthew Ah Mu – Programme Support Manager, Local Boards, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Stephen Rainbow – Head of Community Engagement, Central Hub, Auckland Transport

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on the strategic direction of Auckland's Future Development Strategy

File No.: CP2022/09704

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the strategic approach to the Future Development Strategy (FDS).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It should assist with the integration of land use and infrastructure planning and funding decisions and set out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·   achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·   achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·   provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium, and long-term

·   coordinate critical development infrastructure and additional infrastructure required and explain how this integrates planning decisions with infrastructure and funding decisions.

3.       The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050 and will incorporate the new requirements of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS UD). New information on environmental and social changes such as responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic will also be included.

4.       During the early development of the FDS, topics and issues will be researched at a regional scale. As the FDS work develops and becomes more detailed, local board specific material will be available and workshopped with local boards. This is planned for Quarter1 and Quarter 2 2023.

5.       Over the first half of 2022 seven ‘big issues’ facing Auckland were discussed at series of Planning Committee workshops. These issues were: hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development; climate change, emissions reduction and urban form; inundation and natural hazards; intensification – dispersed or focused; infrastructure; greenfields and future urban areas; and business and employment.

6.       Local board feedback is sought on this direction, prior to seeking endorsement from the Planning Committee in August and/or September 2022. If endorsed, the staff will use the strategic direction as a basis for developing the draft FDS over the second half of 2022.

7.       An updated FDS is needed in time to inform the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP). To provide strategic direction that will usefully feed into the LTP process the FDS will need to be completed by mid-2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the strategic direction for the Future Development Strategy.

 

Horopaki

Context

What is the Future Development Strategy?

8.       The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It sets out how, where and when Tāmaki Makaurau is expected to grow over the next 30 years and outlines where and when investment in planning and infrastructure will be made. The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050. It sets out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·   achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·   achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·   provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium, and long-term

·   coordinate critical development infrastructure and additional infrastructure required and explain how this integrates planning decisions with infrastructure and funding decisions.

9.       The FDS will show how the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 will be achieved spatially and it will incorporate a clear statement of hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development.

10.     It will identify the existing and future location, timing and sequencing of growth and infrastructure provision. It will also identify constraints on development.

11.     Sequencing of development areas within the existing urban areas and future urban areas will be assessed as part of this update.

Why is it being updated now?

12.     There have been many changes since the Development Strategy was adopted as part of the Auckland Plan 2050, nearly four years ago, including central government initiatives under the Urban Growth Agenda and new national policy statements such as the NPS UD. In addition, council has led strategy and policy work focused on environmental and social challenges, including responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic. The growth model is also being reviewed and updated to support the spatial evidence for the FDS.

13.     This changing context, but specifically the requirements of the NPS UD, means Tāmaki Makaurau’s long-term spatial plan requires updating. The update will consider the detailed NPS UD changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan, such as intensification around train and bus rapid transit stops, however the purpose is different as it has a long-term (30 year) strategic focus.

14.     At its 30 November 2021 meeting, the Planning Committee approved the development of an update to the FDS and endorsed the high-level work programme (committee resolution PLA/2021/137).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Strategic direction on the ‘big issues’

15.     Over the first half of 2022 seven ‘big issues’ facing Auckland were discussed at series of Planning Committee workshops. The Future Development Strategy will need to address these issues (set out below).

16.     Local board feedback is sought on this direction, prior to seeking endorsement from the Planning Committee in August and/or September 2022. If endorsed, the staff will use the strategic direction as a basis for developing the draft FDS over the second half of 2022.


 

Hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development

17.     The NPS UD directs that the FDS is informed by ‘Māori, and in particular tangata whenua, values and aspirations for urban development’. These values could provide a strong framework for taking a longer term, more sustainable approach to development in Auckland.

18.     Strategic direction:

·   hapū and iwi values and aspirations are a key aspect to the FDS and should be an overarching theme throughout, rather than a separate section or workstream

·   a thorough engagement approach is critical to understanding directly from hapū and iwi what their values and aspirations for urban development are

·   mataawaka and relevant Māori organisations should be included in the engagement.

 

Climate change, emissions reduction and urban form

19.     An increased focus on climate change is a key aspect of updating the FDS. The council has committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieving net zero emissions by 2050. Auckland needs to prepare for the impacts of climate change and plan for a potential 3.5 degree temperature increase. Urban form plays a major role in our ability to reduce emissions, as well as our exposure to natural hazards (see below).

20.     Strategic direction:

·   climate change related outcomes are non-negotiable, and every decision needs to consider climate change implications

·   achieving climate change related outcomes should be an overarching theme throughout the FDS.

 

Inundation and natural hazards

21.     There are areas of Auckland that are, and with the impacts of climate change (discussed above), increasingly will be, exposed to natural hazards such as inundation, flooding and erosion.

22.     Strategic direction:

·   take a strong approach to development in hazardous areas and provide clear public messages about risks and liability.

 

Intensification – dispersed or focused

23.     Recent government direction relating to intensification under the NPS UD (around centres and rapid transit stations) and the Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS) impact the council’s ability to influence where intensification could or should occur.

24.     Intensification that is dispersed (what MDRS enables) is likely to result in low(er) levels of intensification across most of the urban area. This will impact on the ability to provide services over time, for example, public transport.

25.     Focused intensification would direct growth to specific areas or locations, for example, around centres, areas with good public transport access or near areas of high employment.

26.     A combination of these two approaches would allow intensification across much of Auckland but would also allow greater intensification in specific areas. This approach may undermine the level of intensification in places that are best suited, as growth would also be happening in many other places.

27.     Strategic direction:

·   work within the legal parameters, use the levers we still have available to focus intensification

·   quality aspects are increasingly important with intensification, including the value of greenspace.

 

Infrastructure

28.     Funding and financing all the infrastructure needed in Auckland is a significant challenge. The council cannot provide infrastructure everywhere at the same time and reconsideration is needed of where funding will be focused / provided, and who funds what aspects and to what extent.

29.     Strategic direction:

·   strong, clear signals are needed that the council will use infrastructure as a lever to support or not support development

·   the timing and sequencing of development in strategic plans must be followed.

 

Greenfields and future urban areas

30.     The current Development Strategy (and the Auckland Unitary Plan) provide for 15,000ha of greenfields / future urban land, sequenced for development over a 30-year period. In the first decade (2017-2027) 32% of that land was live-zoned and more future urban land is being considered for live-zoning through private plan changes.

31.     Live-zoning is happening much faster and in a haphazard way, creating major infrastructure issues. Additionally, some of this future urban land will, in future, be exposed to greater flooding risk and other natural hazards.

32.     Strategic direction:

·   reconsider and possibly pull back some Future Urban zone areas, particularly:

o areas at risk of flooding and natural hazards

o other areas given the direction on emissions reduction

·   the FDS should give strong signals regarding non-live zoned Future Urban zone land e.g., in terms of sequencing of development and infrastructure provision.

 

Business and employment

33.     Business operations and future needs are changing, for example, the impacts of Covid and working from home, increases in online retail, the needs for large footprint businesses and the role that local centres may play in future.

34.     Auckland Council’s data on business land, needs and trends needs updating and work is underway to address this.

35.     Strategic direction:

·   business land, operations and future needs is an important aspect of the FDS and further research is supported, particularly in relation to the demand for industrial space, robotic warehousing, the weightless economy and the impacts of covid

·   access to business and employment is a critical issue, both in terms reducing the need to travel through proximity to residential areas, and accessibility by public transport and active modes

·   the importance of access to and provision of quality employment opportunities for Māori and Māori businesses.

 

Work programme – timeframes, key milestones

36.     The high-level milestones of the FDS are set out below. The FDS will be completed by mid-2023 to provide clear strategic direction to the 2024 LTP, as directed by the NPS UD.

37.     Research, stakeholder engagement and development of the draft FDS will be on-going in 2022. Engagement with Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and key stakeholders is planned throughout 2022 and the first half of 2023. Public consultation is expected in the first half of 2023.

A picture containing timeline

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38.     It is noted that local body elections will take place in October 2022 and the timeframes acknowledge that there will be a break in Planning Committee and local board meetings at this time.

39.     Local board chairs (or alternates) were invited to a series of Planning Committee workshops in the first half of 2022.

40.     Indicative timeframes and the proposed format for local board involvement are set out in the table below.

Indicative timeframe

Proposed format

July 2022

Introductory briefing

July / August 2022

Reports to business meetings

August / September 2022

Planning Committee – endorse strategic direction

October 2022

Local body elections

Quarter 1 2023

Planning Committee – approval for public consultation

Quarter 2 2023

Workshops

Quarter 2 2023

Reports to business meetings

Quarter 3 2023

Planning Committee – adopt updated FDS

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     There is an increasing national focus on climate change through legislation[1] and through initiatives such as declaration of climate emergencies[2] and the report of the Climate Change Commission (June 2021). The council adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in 2020. The plan provides a long-term approach to climate action, with a target to halve regional emissions by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050. The built environment is one of the priority areas within the plan and the associated action areas focus on reducing emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change.

42.     The government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (May 2022) and the council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) being developed are recent plans seeking to reduce emissions. The TERP will provide a pathway for achieving a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030 in Auckland. Staff are working to align land use aspects of the TERP and the FDS to 2030, while acknowledging that land use and planning decisions typically see climate impacts over the longer-term. This means that decisions need to be made now to realise the benefits as soon as possible.

43.     Land use and planning decisions, particularly those around urban form, development and infrastructure, are fundamental to climate action. The impacts of different growth scenarios on climate change mitigation and adaptation are essential to the development of the FDS. These decisions influence and lock in our emissions trajectory and our ability to deal with the risks and impacts of a changing climate for decades to come.

44.     For example, in relation to transport emissions, more expansive urban forms generally lead to longer travel distances. Longer trip lengths typically result in higher transport emissions and less propensity for mode shift. Strategic land use decisions consider climate change risks and impacts such as the effects of coastal inundation and sea level rise.

45.     The approach taken in the FDS and the council’s approach to implementation has the potential for significant long-term implications. These aspects will be further researched and developed over the course of the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     The FDS provides Auckland-wide alignment on growth and development approaches and influences council strategies, programmes of work and investment decisions. Involvement, information and support from staff across the council group is a critical aspect needed to achieve alignment.

47.     A range of relevant staff from across the organisation, including the Council-Controlled Organisations, are involved in the project’s topic areas or workstreams.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The FDS is the long-term strategic spatial plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. The FDS provides information on how, when and where growth is anticipated. This is a topic which is of relevance to local boards as growth and development can have significant impacts at a local board level and informs local board plans.

49.     This report seeks local board views on the strategic approach to the Future Development Strategy prior to agreement being sought from the Planning Committee.

50.     As the FDS work develops and becomes more detailed, local board specific material will be available and will be workshopped with local boards. This is planned for Quarter 1 and Quarter 2 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It will reflect the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 spatially. The updated FDS will include a clear statement of hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development based on engagement with relevant hapū and iwi (as required by the NPS UD).

52.     Council has committed to achieving Māori outcomes through Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, influenced by the Māori Plan and Issues of Significance, and Auckland Plan 2050. These documents provide guidance in understanding the priority areas for Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and a number of these priority areas are relevant to the development and implementation of the FDS, for example:

·   involve Māori early in the decision-making process

·   Māori housing aspirations

·   protection of existing natural resources

·   allowing for kaitiakitanga

·   benefits to Māori, for example, housing, economic opportunities, and improved access

·   impacts of climate change, for example, on marae, whānau, and sites of significance

·   opportunities to showcase Māori identity.

53.     The priority areas already identified, along with feedback from previous engagement will be incorporated in the development of the FDS. This requires a review of past Māori engagement and provides a starting point for engaging with Māori, in a way that supports their capacity to genuinely participate in the development of the FDS.

54.     Staff have developed a Māori engagement plan and are in the beginning phases of engaging with Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     Costs for developing the FDS largely fall in FY23.  This includes engagement and consultation aspects of the programme.  Funding is provided in the 22/23 Annual Budget.

56.     The FDS, once adopted, plays a significant role in future asset and service planning, especially assets and services related to growth.  Decisions on this are subsequently made through Annual Plans, Long-term Plans, Regional Land Transport Plans etc.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.     The council faces significant risks (achieving desired development outcomes, financial and reputational) in the absence of a clear, cohesive and strategic approach responding to the FDS requirements of the NPS UD and LGACA. The development of an FDS seeks to address those risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Workshops are planned for the first half of 2023, when information specific to each local board will be available.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Gray - Principal Advisor Growth & Spatial Strat

Authorisers

Jacques Victor - GM Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2022/09919

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey’s verbal updates.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Chairperson's Report

 

File No.: CP2022/09920

 

  

 

Te take mō te p,ūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Chairperson, Julie Fairey, with an opportunity to update local board members on the activities she has been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that the Chairperson will speak to the report at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive Chair, Julie Fairey’s report for June 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chair, Julie Fairey's June 2022 Report

147

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

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Board Member Reports

 

File No.: CP2022/09921

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo / Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update to the local board members on the activities they have been involved with since the last meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua / Executive summary

2.       It is anticipated that Local Board members will speak to their reports at the meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga / Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the member reports for June 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga / Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Harry Doig's member report, 01 June - 30 June 2022

153

b

Ella Kumar's member report, May - June 2022

155

c

Bobby Shen's member report, May - June 2022

159

d

Jonathan Turner's member report, 01 June - 30 June 2022

161

     

Ngā kaihaina / Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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21 July 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Record of Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Notes

File No.: CP2022/09922

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide a summary of Puketāpapa Local Board (the Board) workshop notes.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The attached summary of workshop notes provides a record of the Board’s workshops held in June 2022.

3.       These sessions are held to give informal opportunity for board members and officers to discuss issues and projects and note that no binding decisions are made or voted on at workshop sessions.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the Puketāpapa Local Board workshop notes for: 09 June 2022, 16 June 2022 and 07 July 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 09 June 2022

165

b

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 16 June 2022

167

c

Puketāpapa Local Board Workshop Record, 07 July 2022

169

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Programme Calendar

File No.: CP2022/09923

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Puketāpapa Local Board with its updated governance forward work programme calendar (the calendar).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The calendar for the Puketāpapa Local Board is in Attachment A.  The calendar is updated monthly reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The calendar was introduced in 2016 as part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is expected and when

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Puketāpapa Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work programme calendar for July 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme July 2022

173

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Selina Powell - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    20220721 Amanda Brien - Water Fountains presentation                                                   Page 187

Item 8.2      Attachment a    20220721 Citizens Advice Bureaux Auckland City (CABAC) presentation                                   Page 193

Item 8.3      Attachment a    20220721 Three Kings Kindergarten presentation Page 203



Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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Puketāpapa Local Board

21 July 2022

 

 

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[1] Legislation includes Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019.

[2] Auckland Council declared a climate emergency in June 2019 while central government announced a climate emergency declaration in December 2020.