I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Whau Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 27 July 2022

6.00pm

This meeting will proceed via Microsoft Teams. Either a recording or written summary will be uploaded on the Auckland Council website.

 

Whau Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Kay Thomas

 

Deputy Chairperson

Fasitua Amosa

 

Members

Catherine Farmer

 

 

Ulalemamae Te'eva Matafai

 

 

Warren Piper

 

 

Jessica Rose

 

 

Susan Zhu

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Rodica Chelaru

Democracy Advisor

 

20 July 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 02185527

Email: rodica.chelaru@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

8.1     Deputation: Road Safety and Environmental Issues in Rosebank                5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Whau Ward Councillor's update                                                                                  9

12        Adoption of the 2022-2024 Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan, and the Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2021/2022 Quarter Three Update                          15

13        Local board feedback on the strategic direction of Auckland's Future Development Strategy                                                                                                                         61

14        Whau Local Board Workshop Records                                                                     69

15        Governance Forward Work Calendar                                                                        77

16        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have. Specifically, members are asked to identify any new interests they have not previously disclosed, an interest that might be considered as a conflict of interest with a matter on the agenda.

 

The following are declared interests of the Whau Local Board:

 

Member

Organisation

Position

Kay Thomas

·         New Lynn Citizens Advice Bureau

·         Friends of Arataki

·         Western Quilters

·         Citizens Advice Bureau
Waitākere Board

·         Literacy Waitākere

·         West Auckland Heritage Conference

Volunteer

Committee member

Member

Chair

Board member

Committee member

Susan Zhu

·         Chinese Oral History Foundation

·         The Chinese Garden Steering Committee of Auckland

·         Chinese Medicine Council of New Zealand

Committee member

Board member

 

Board member

Fasitua Amosa

·         Equity NZ

·         Massive Theatre Company

·         Avondale Business Association

Vice President

Board member

A family member is the Chair

Catherine Farmer

·         Avondale-Waterview Historical Society

·         Blockhouse Bay Historical Society

·         Portage Licensing Trust

·         Blockhouse Bay Bowls

·         Forest and Bird organisation

·         Grey Power

Member

 

Member

Trustee

Patron

Member

Member

Te’eva Matafai

·         Pacific Events and Entertainment Trust

·         Miss Samoa NZ

·         Malu Measina Samoan Dance Group

·         Aspire Events

Co-Founder

 

Director


Director/Founder

 

Director

Warren Piper

·         New Lynn RSA

·         New Lynn Business Association

Associate member

Member

Jessica Rose

·         Women in Urbanism-Aotearoa, Auckland Branch

·         Forest & Bird

·         Big Feels Club

·         Frocks on Bikes

·         Bike Auckland

·         Department of Conservation

Committee member


Member

Patron

Former co-chair

Former committee member

Employee

Member appointments

Local board members are appointed to the following bodies. In these appointments the local board members represent Auckland Council.

External organisation

Leads

Alternate

Aircraft Noise Community Consultative Group

Warren Piper

Catherine Farmer

Avondale Business Association

Kay Thomas

Warren Piper

Blockhouse Bay Business Association

Warren Piper

Fasitua Amosa

New Lynn Business Association

Susan Zhu

Kay Thomas
Warren Piper

Rosebank Business Association

Fasitua Amosa

Warren Piper

Whau Coastal Walkway Environmental Trust

Fasitua Amosa

Jessica Rose

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Whau Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Wednesday, 22 June 2022, as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Whau Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation: Road Safety and Environmental Issues in Rosebank

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Stefan Crooks, Chair of the Rosebank Business Association (RBA), and Kim Watts, Executive Engagement Manager of the Rosebank Business Association (RBA), will be in attendance to present to the Whau Local Board issues impacting the road and environmental safety in Rosebank area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Rosebank Business Association (RBA) is concerned about road safety and environmental issues that affect the Rosebank area.

3.         The Rosebank Business Association (RBA) provides services that promote the social and economic development of the commercial/industrial Rosebank area.

4.       The association continues to develop and manage key relationships with stakeholders, and to advocate with and on behalf of its members through local boards, Auckland Council, Auckland Transport, and the Government.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the presentation of the Rosebank Business Association on issues impacting road and environmental safety in Rosebank area, and thank Stefan Crooks and Kim Watts for their attendance.

 

Attachments

a          Rock and rubble in Rosebank area................................................................ 85

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

Whau Ward Councillor's update

File No.: CP2022/09396

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive an update from Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland.

2.       A period of 10 minutes has been set aside for the Whau Ward Councillor to have an opportunity to update the Whau Local Board on regional matters.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the report and thank Whau Ward Councillor, Tracy Mulholland, for her update.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Ward Councillor's Update

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

Adoption of the 2022-2024 Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan, and the Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2021/2022 Quarter Three Update

File No.: CP2022/10055

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

To adopt the Whau Local Board Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024. 2.        To provide a quarterly update on the Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2021/2022 for the period of 1 January to 31 March 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2021/2022 was adopted by the Whau Local Board on 28 July 2021 (resolution number WH/2021/68) and the 2021/2022 plan is available as an agenda attachment to that meeting via the Auckland Council website: https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/.

4.       The development of Joint CCOs Local Board Engagement Plans for 2022-2024 was discussed during workshops held in April and May, and through subsequent follow-up conversations.

5.       The Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan (the plan) 2022-2024 is appended as Attachment A to this report. The plan includes four attachments setting out the individual engagement work programmes for the substantive CCOs. The plan and the four appended CCO work programmes will be amended throughout the two years of its intended duration to ensure they are up to date and fit for purpose.

6.       The CCOs will provide updates to local boards each quarter on their work programmes and any proposed changes to these.

7.       This report also provides the Quarter Three update to the 2021/2022 Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan, and summarises the changes between that plan and the new plan for adoption for the 2022-2024 period.

8.       A final quarterly update report for the period of 1 April to 30 June 2022 will be provided in September 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      adopt the Whau Local Board Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report), as an agreement between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-controlled Organisations: Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku), Tātaki Auckland Unlimited and WaterCare.

b)      note that the agreed work programmes of the four substantive Council-controlled Organisations are appended to the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 (Attachment A to the agenda report) and these work programmes will be updated as needed by the CCOs, with changes reported to the local board each quarter.

c)      authorise the Chair of the local board to sign this agreement on behalf of the local board, alongside representatives from the four Council-controlled Organisations.

d)      receive the quarter three update to the Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2021/2022.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

9.       In 2020, the CCOs Review report recommended the introduction of a joint CCOs local board engagement plan for each local board. In mid-2021, the first Joint CCOs Local Board Engagement Plans were agreed and adopted. Since then, staff have worked to develop and refine both the process to agree the documents, and the format of the documents themselves.

10.     It is noted that the individual CCO work programmes that make up the plans were intended, and adopted, as living documents with incremental change possible with each quarterly update.

11.     During April and May 2022, workshops were held between each local board and representatives from the four substantive CCOs. Staff have subsequently worked to ensure that the final document is representative of the discussions held at workshops, and that any outstanding questions have been resolved. 

12.     The substantive part of the engagement plan (appended as Attachment A to this report but excluding its four attached work programmes pertaining to each CCO) is designed to be in place for two years, though it may be subject to minor changes to ensure accuracy. In subsequent years, this document is likely to remain in use for three years, following the completion of the Local Board Plan.

13.     The four CCO work programmes attached to the substantive plan include information that is likely to require updating, and will be amended throughout the year to ensure the plan is up to date and fit for purpose.

14.     The CCOs will provide regular updates to each local board to show both changes to the plan itself, and updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Workshops between local boards and CCOs staff provided local boards with the opportunity to share their views on CCOs delivery and engagement in their area. Each workshop included an outline of each CCO’s work programme within the local board area, and local boards have provided their views on the degree of engagement they expect for each project or programme.

16.     The Joint CCOs Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 addresses key elements of recommendations made by the CCOs Review, including:

·        documenting key contacts, including senior CCOs representatives of the organisation well placed to quickly respond to and resolve local concerns

·        giving local boards the opportunity to highlight projects likely to be most significant to them as governors, contributing to a “no surprises” environment

·        ensuring the communication of clear, up-to-date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

17.     While it is still early days in terms of local board members and staff adjusting to the new way of working together, initial feedback has been positive.

18.     Work programme items that will be confirmed with the formal adoption of 2022/2023 budgets will be included as they become available. The same applies to future work programme items that are subject to budget availability and other factors in the 2023/2024 financial year.

Changes to the engagement plan for the 2022-2024 period

19.     The substantive part of the Joint Council-controlled Organisation (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 is very similar to the 2021/2022 plan. Staff have updated the plan where there have been:

·        new board members

·        changes to local board members delegations

·        staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

20.     It is noted that the 2021/2022 plan was explicitly adopted as a living document, subject to change with each quarterly update. There are therefore some substantive differences between the CCO work programmes adopted in July 2021 as part of the 2021/2022 Local Board Engagement Plans and the work programmes (appended as Attachment A to this report) for 2023/2024.

21.     When compared to the 2021/2022 CCO work programmes, the new work programmes attached to the 2022-2024 plan have significant changes in terms of the focus, prioritisation, level of detail, format, wording, and style.

22.     For example, Auckland Transport has submitted a work programme with fewer than half the number of activities listed in the 2021/2022 work programme, choosing to focus on those activities that are of higher relevance to the local board and where more local board involvement is anticipated. Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, on the other hand, has chosen to expand its work programme, incorporating a broader regional view.

23.     It is also noted that the engagement approach, established with a five-point scale in 2021, has now been revised and uses a simplified three-point scale to indicate the expected level of involvement of the local board in each activity.

New activities included in the 2022-2024 CCO work programmes include:

CCO name

New activity

Auckland Transport

Hepburn Road Raised Crossing

 

South Lynn Road improvements

 

Rizal Boardwalk crossing wayfinding

 

Avondale Town Centre Review and Implementation

Eke Panuku

Development at 28 Racecourse Parade, Avondale

 

Future options for 93- 99 Rosebank Road, Avondale

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

Supporting a resilient and regenerative Māori economy - Taki Hua economic Strategy

 

Activating Auckland’s innovation network – Click Studios 2

WaterCare

No new activities

24.     The above, and any other, changes introduced to the four CCO work programmes as part of development of the Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 were workshopped with local board members and have been subsequently discussed with staff.

25.     It is noted that several of the projects that are “new” since the adoption of the 2021/2022 plan have already started and are already listed as having an update for the third quarter of the 2021/2022 year, highlighting the relative fluidity of this process as CCO Local Board work programmes are not subject to the strict financial planning timeframes that internal local board work programmes must adhere to.

Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2021/2022 Quarter Three update

26.     This report also provides the Quarter Three update to the 2021/2022 Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan.

27.     A final quarterly update report for the period of 1 April to 30 June 2022 will be provided in September 2022.

28.     The Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) Local Board Engagement Plan 2021/2022 was adopted by the Whau Local Board on 28 July 2021 (resolution number WH/2021/68) and the 2021/2022 plan is available as an agenda attachment to that meeting via the Auckland Council website: https://infocouncil.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/.

29.     It is noted that the individual CCO work programmes that make up the plans were intended, and adopted, as living documents with incremental change possible with each quarterly update.

Activity highlights for Quarter Three update 2021/2022

Auckland Transport

30.     New Lynn to Avondale Shared Path: Local Board Site visit was held on 15 March, with planning underway for a formal opening.

31.     Rata Street pedestrian signalisation and raised pedestrian crossing: a workshop was held in March and minor changes were subsequently made to the design.

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

32.     Landowner approval – screen production: Four film permits were issued in Quarter Three.

33.     FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023: engagement approach re-assigned from “inform” to “consult” noting the shortlisting of Olympic Park New Lynn as a training venue.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku)

34.     Crayford Street West improvements, Avondale: Works are progressing with only minor delays due to COVID-19 contractor shortages; collaborative engagement continues with Avondale Primary School to ensure safe access for their students during school hours and the consultation on proposed parking time limit changes on Crayford Street West closed on 26 March 2022.

35.     OAGs Building, New Lynn (18 Totara Avenue): In December 2021 Eke Panuku sold the site to Kāinga Ora to develop a mixed-use residential development in accordance with key design requirements.

WaterCare

36.     Titirangi Road reopened to traffic in both directions from late-May 2022 following lengthy closure as part of the Huia Number 1 Watermain replacement.

37.     The Central Interceptor: Miranda Reserve (PS25) sewer bypass works are complete and storm water diversion works are underway.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however many of the projects it refers to will.

39.     Each CCO must work within Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

40.     Adopting the updated Joint CCOs Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the Council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

41.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give Council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCOs work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

43.     The engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

44.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCOs Engagement Plan 2022-2024 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

45.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advanced planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.     The adoption of the Joint CCOs Local Board Engagement Plan 2022-2024 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

47.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

48.     Changes will be made within the attachments of the Joint CCOs Engagement Plan 2022-2024 to ensure that information is kept up to date. The substantive document will not change until after the development of the next Local Board Plan. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

49.     The local board will receive Quarter Four updates in September 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board - Joint CCOs Local Board Engagement Plan 2022/2023

21

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mary Binney - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on the strategic direction of Auckland's Future Development Strategy

File No.: CP2022/09873

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board feedback on the strategic approach to the Future Development Strategy (FDS).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It should assist with the integration of land use and infrastructure planning and funding decisions and set out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·    achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·    achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·    provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium, and long-term

·    coordinate critical development infrastructure and additional infrastructure required and explain how this integrates planning decisions with infrastructure and funding decisions.

3.       The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050 and will incorporate the new requirements of the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS UD). New information on environmental and social changes such as responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic will also be included.

4.       During the early development of the FDS, topics and issues will be researched at a regional scale. As the FDS work develops and becomes more detailed, local board specific material will be available and workshopped with local boards. This is planned for Quarter One and Quarter Two 2023.

5.       Over the first half of 2022 seven ‘big issues’ facing Auckland were discussed at series of Planning Committee workshops. These issues were: hapū and iwi values, and aspirations for urban development; climate change, emissions reduction and urban form; inundation and natural hazards; intensification – dispersed or focused; infrastructure; greenfields and future urban areas; business and employment.

6.       Local board feedback is sought on this direction, prior to seeking endorsement from the Planning Committee in August and/or September 2022. If endorsed, the staff will use the strategic direction as a basis for developing the draft FDS over the second half of 2022.

7.       An updated FDS is needed in time to inform the Long-term Plan 2024-2034 (LTP). To provide strategic direction that will usefully feed into the LTP process the FDS will need to be completed by mid-2023.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      provide feedback on the strategic direction for the Future Development Strategy.

 

Horopaki

Context

What is the Future Development Strategy?

8.       The purpose of the Future Development Strategy (FDS) is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It sets out how, where and when Tāmaki Makaurau is expected to grow over the next 30 years and outlines where and when investment in planning and infrastructure will be made. The updated FDS will replace the existing Development Strategy in the Auckland Plan 2050. It sets out how Tāmaki Makaurau will:

·   achieve outcomes across the four well-beings

·   achieve a well-functioning urban environment

·   provide sufficient development capacity to meet housing and business land demand over the short, medium, and long-term

·   coordinate critical development infrastructure and additional infrastructure required, and explain how this integrates planning decisions with infrastructure and funding decisions.

9.       The FDS will show how the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 will be achieved spatially and it will incorporate a clear statement of hapū and iwi values, and aspirations for urban development.

10.     It will identify the existing and future location, timing and sequencing of growth and infrastructure provision. It will also identify constraints on development.

11.     Sequencing of development areas within the existing urban areas and future urban areas will be assessed as part of this update.

Why is it being updated now?

12.     There have been many changes since the Development Strategy was adopted as part of the Auckland Plan 2050, nearly four years ago, including central government initiatives under the Urban Growth Agenda and new national policy statements such as the National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS UD). In addition, Council has led strategy and policy work focused on environmental and social challenges, including responses to climate change and the COVID-19 pandemic. The growth model is also being reviewed and updated to support the spatial evidence for the FDS.

13.     This changing context, but specifically the requirements of the NPS UD, means Tāmaki Makaurau’s long-term spatial plan requires updating. The update will consider the detailed NPS UD changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan, such as intensification around train and bus rapid transit stops, however the purpose is different as it has a long-term (30 year) strategic focus.

14.     At its 30 November 2021 meeting, the Planning Committee approved the development of an update to the FDS and endorsed the high-level work programme (committee resolution PLA/2021/137).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Strategic direction on the ‘big issues’

15.     Over the first half of 2022 seven ‘big issues’ facing Auckland were discussed at series of Planning Committee workshops. The Future Development Strategy (FDS) will need to address these issues (set out below).

16.     Local board feedback is sought on this direction, prior to seeking endorsement from the Planning Committee in August and/or September 2022. If endorsed, the staff will use the strategic direction as a basis for developing the draft FDS over the second half of 2022.

Hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development

17.     The NPS UD directs that the FDS is informed by ‘Māori, and in particular tangata whenua, values and aspirations for urban development’. These values could provide a strong framework for taking a longer term, more sustainable approach to development in Auckland.

18.     Strategic direction:

·   hapū and iwi values and aspirations are a key aspect to the FDS and should be an overarching theme throughout, rather than a separate section or workstream

·   a thorough engagement approach is critical to understanding directly from hapū and iwi what their values and aspirations for urban development are

·   mataawaka and relevant Māori organisations should be included in the engagement.

Climate change, emissions reduction and urban form

19.     An increased focus on climate change is a key aspect of updating the FDS. The Council has committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieving net zero emissions by 2050. Auckland needs to prepare for the impacts of climate change and plan for a potential 3.5 degree temperature increase. Urban form plays a major role in our ability to reduce emissions, as well as our exposure to natural hazards (see below).

20.     Strategic direction:

·   climate change related outcomes are non-negotiable and every decision needs to consider climate change implications

·   achieving climate change related outcomes should be an overarching theme throughout the FDS.

Inundation and natural hazards

21.     There are areas of Auckland that are, and with the impacts of climate change (discussed above), increasingly will be, exposed to natural hazards such as inundation, flooding and erosion.

22.     Strategic direction:

·   take a strong approach to development in hazardous areas and provide clear public messages about risks and liability.

Intensification – dispersed or focused

23.     Recent government direction relating to intensification under the NPS UD (around centres and rapid transit stations) and the Medium Density Residential Standards (MDRS) impact the Council’s ability to influence where intensification could or should occur.

24.     Intensification that is dispersed (what MDRS enables) is likely to result in low(er) levels of intensification across most of the urban area. This will impact on the ability to provide services over time, for example, public transport.

25.     Focused intensification would direct growth to specific areas or locations, for example, around centres, areas with good public transport access or near areas of high employment.

26.     A combination of these two approaches would allow intensification across much of Auckland but would also allow greater intensification in specific areas. This approach may undermine the level of intensification in places that are best suited, as growth would also be happening in many other places.

27.     Strategic direction:

·   work within the legal parameters, use the levers we still have available to focus intensification

·   quality aspects are increasingly important with intensification, including the value of greenspace.

 

Infrastructure

28.     Funding and financing all the infrastructure needed in Auckland is a significant challenge. The Council cannot provide infrastructure everywhere at the same time and reconsideration is needed of where funding will be focused / provided, and who funds what aspects and to what extent.

29.     Strategic direction:

·   strong, clear signals are needed that the Council will use infrastructure as a lever to support or not support development

·   the timing and sequencing of development in strategic plans must be followed.

Greenfields and future urban areas

30.     The current Development Strategy (and the Auckland Unitary Plan) provide for 15,000 hectares of greenfields / future urban land, sequenced for development over a 30-year period. In the first decade (2017-2027) 32 per cent of that land was live-zoned and more future urban land is being considered for live-zoning through private plan changes.

31.     Live-zoning is happening much faster and in a haphazard way, creating major infrastructure issues. Additionally, some of this future urban land will, in future, be exposed to greater flooding risk and other natural hazards.

32.     Strategic direction:

·   reconsider and possibly pull back some Future Urban zone areas, particularly:

o areas at risk of flooding and natural hazards

o other areas given the direction on emissions reduction

·   the FDS should give strong signals regarding non-live zoned Future Urban zone land e.g., in terms of sequencing of development and infrastructure provision.

Business and employment

33.     Business operations and future needs are changing, for example, the impacts of COVID-19 and working from home, increases in online retail, the needs for large footprint businesses, and the role that local centres may play in future.

34.     Auckland Council’s data on business land, needs and trends needs updating and work is underway to address this.

35.     Strategic direction:

·   business land, operations and future needs is an important aspect of the FDS, and further research is supported, particularly in relation to the demand for industrial space, robotic warehousing, the weightless economy and the impacts of COVID-19

·   access to business and employment is a critical issue, both in terms of reducing the need to travel through proximity to residential areas, and accessibility by public transport and active modes

·   the importance of access to and provision of quality employment opportunities for Māori and Māori businesses.

Work programme – timeframes, key milestones

36.     The high-level milestones of the FDS are set out below. The FDS will be completed by mid-2023 to provide clear strategic direction to the 2024 Long-term Plan, as directed by the National Policy Statement on Urban Development.

37.     Research, stakeholder engagement and development of the draft FDS will be on-going in 2022. Engagement with Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and key stakeholders is planned throughout 2022 and the first half of 2023. Public consultation is expected in the first half of 2023.

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38.     It is noted that local body elections will take place in October 2022, and the timeframes acknowledge that there will be a break in Planning Committee and local board meetings at this time.

39.     Local board Chairs (or alternates) were invited to a series of Planning Committee workshops in the first half of 2022.

40.     Indicative timeframes and the proposed format for local board involvement are set out in the table below.

Indicative timeframe

Proposed format

July 2022

Introductory briefing

July / August 2022

Reports to business meetings

August / September 2022

Planning Committee – endorse strategic direction

October 2022

Local body elections

Quarter 1 2023

Planning Committee – approval for public consultation

Quarter 2 2023

Workshops

Quarter 2 2023

Reports to business meetings

Quarter 3 2023

Planning Committee – adopt updated FDS

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

41.     There is an increasing national focus on climate change through legislation[1] and through initiatives such as declaration of climate emergencies[2] and the report of the Climate Change Commission (June 2021). The Council adopted Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in 2020. The plan provides a long-term approach to climate action, with a target to halve regional emissions by 2030 and transition to net zero emissions by 2050. The built environment is one of the priority areas within the plan and the associated action areas focus on reducing emissions and adapting to the impacts of climate change.

42.     The government’s Emissions Reduction Plan (May 2022) and the Council’s Transport Emissions Reduction Plan (TERP) being developed are recent plans seeking to reduce emissions. The TERP will provide a pathway for achieving a modelled 64 per cent reduction in transport emissions by 2030 in Auckland. Staff are working to align land use aspects of the TERP and the FDS to 2030, while acknowledging that land use and planning decisions typically see climate impacts over the longer-term. This means that decisions need to be made now to realise the benefits as soon as possible.

43.     Land use and planning decisions, particularly those around urban form, development and infrastructure are fundamental to climate action. The impacts of different growth scenarios on climate change mitigation and adaptation are essential to the development of the FDS. These decisions influence and lock in our emissions trajectory and our ability to deal with the risks and impacts of a changing climate for decades to come.

44.     For example, in relation to transport emissions, more expansive urban forms generally lead to longer travel distances. Longer trip lengths typically result in higher transport emissions and less propensity for mode shift. Strategic land use decisions consider climate change risks and impacts such as the effects of coastal inundation and sea level rise.

45.     The approach taken in the FDS and the Council’s approach to implementation have the potential for significant long-term implications. These aspects will be further researched and developed over the course of the project.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

46.     The FDS provides Auckland-wide alignment on growth and development approaches, and influences Council strategies, programmes of work and investment decisions. Involvement, information and support from staff across the Council group is a critical aspect needed to achieve alignment.

47.     A range of relevant staff from across the organisation, including the Council-controlled Organisations, are involved in the project’s topic areas or workstreams.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

48.     The FDS is the long-term strategic spatial plan for Tāmaki Makaurau. The FDS provides information on how, when and where growth is anticipated. This is a topic which is of relevance to local boards as growth and development can have significant impacts at a local board level, and informs local board plans.

49.     This report seeks local board views on the strategic approach to the Future Development Strategy prior to agreement being sought from the Planning Committee.

50.     As the FDS work develops and becomes more detailed, local board specific material will be available and will be workshopped with local boards. This is planned for Quarter One and Quarter Two 2023.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

51.     The purpose of the FDS is to provide the basis for integrated, strategic and long-term planning. It will reflect the direction and outcomes in the Auckland Plan 2050 spatially. The updated FDS will include a clear statement of hapū and iwi values and aspirations for urban development based on engagement with relevant hapū and iwi (as required by the NPS UD).

52.     Council has committed to achieving Māori outcomes through Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau, influenced by the Māori Plan and Issues of Significance, and Auckland Plan 2050. These documents provide guidance in understanding the priority areas for Tāmaki Makaurau Māori and a number of these priority areas are relevant to the development and implementation of the FDS, for example:

·   involve Māori early in the decision-making process

·   Māori housing aspirations

·   protection of existing natural resources

·   allowing for kaitiakitanga

·   benefits to Māori, for example, housing, economic opportunities, and improved access

·   impacts of climate change, for example, on marae, whānau, and sites of significance

·   opportunities to showcase Māori identity.

53.     The priority areas already identified, along with feedback from previous engagement will be incorporated in the development of the FDS. This requires a review of past Māori engagement and provides a starting point for engaging with Māori, in a way that supports their capacity to genuinely participate in the development of the FDS.

54.     Staff have developed a Māori engagement plan and are in the beginning phases of engaging with Māori across Tāmaki Makaurau.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

55.     Costs for developing the FDS largely fall in the financial year 2023. This includes engagement and consultation aspects of the programme. Funding is provided in the 2022/2023 Annual Budget.

56.     The FDS, once adopted, plays a significant role in future asset and service planning, especially assets and services related to growth. Decisions on this are subsequently made through Annual Plans, Long-term Plans, Regional Land Transport Plans, etc.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.     The Council faces significant risks (achieving desired development outcomes, financial and reputational) in the absence of a clear, cohesive and strategic approach responding to the FDS requirements of the NPS UD and LGACA. The development of an FDS seeks to address those risks.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Workshops are planned for the first half of 2023, when information specific to each local board will be available.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Claire Gray - Principal Advisor Growth and Spatial Strategy

Authorisers

Jacques Victor – General Manager Auckland Plan Strategy and Research

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

Whau Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/09441

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the records of the workshop held by the Whau Local Board on 1, 8 and 15 June 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Briefings provided at the workshop were as follows:

1 June May 2022 (Attachment A)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Community Facilities (CF) Update

·    Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) Update

·    Community-led Hubs and Houses.

 

8 June 2022 (Attachment B)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Local Board Annual Planning #8 – Finalise Local Board Agreement 2022/2023

·    Auckland Transport (AT) monthly update

·    Parks, Sport and Recreation (PSR) Avondale and Rosebank Parks Needs Assessment: Update

·    National Policy Statement on Urban Development (NPS-UD) intensification provisions.

15  June 2022 (Attachment C)

·    Staff and members check-in: informal session

·    Grants – 2021/2022 Whau Quick Response Round Three

·    Connected Communities – Update.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)   note the records of the workshops held on 1, 8 and 15 June 2022.

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Whau Local Board workshop records - 1 June 2022

71

b

Whau Local Board workshop records - 8 June 2022

73

c

Whau Local Board workshop records - 15 June 2022

75

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar

File No.: CP2022/09444

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present to the local board the updated governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance forward work calendar for the Whau Local Board is appended as Attachment A. The calendar is updated monthly, reported to business meetings and distributed to council staff.

3.       The governance forward work calendars are part of Auckland Council’s quality advice programme and aim to support local boards’ governance role by:

·        ensuring advice on meeting agendas is driven by local board priorities

·        clarifying what advice is expected and when

·        clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar also aims to provide guidance for staff supporting local boards and greater transparency for the public.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Whau Local Board:

a)      receive the governance forward work calendar for July 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Governance Forward Work Programme – July 2022

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Rodica Chelaru - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Adam Milina - Local Area Manager

 

 


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

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Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    Rock and rubble in Rosebank area                 Page 85


Whau Local Board

27 July 2022

 

 

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[1] Legislation includes Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Act 2019.

[2] Auckland Council declared a climate emergency in June 2019 while central government announced a climate emergency declaration in December 2020.