I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 20 September 2022

2.00pm

This meeting will proceed via MS Teams and a written summary will be uploaded to the Auckland Council website.

 

Albert-Eden Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Margi Watson

 

Deputy Chairperson

Kendyl Smith

 

Members

Lee Corrick

 

 

Graeme Easte

 

 

Rachel Langton

 

 

Julia Maskill

 

 

Will McKenzie

 

 

Christina Robertson

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Michael Mendoza – Democracy Advisor

 

15 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 809 149

Email: Michael.Mendoza@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

6.1     Acknowledgement - The recent passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    6

8.1     Deputation - Joanne Harland - 2022 Moth Plant Competition                         6

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Notices of Motion                                                                                                           7

12        Notice of Motion - Member Christina Robertson - Traffic safety measures in Point Chevalier                                                                                                                         9

13        Notice of Motion - Chairperson Margi Watson - Open space provision in the Carrington Development                                                                                             13

14        Albert-Eden Local Grants and Multiboard Round One 2022/2023 grant allocations                                                                                                                                       21

15        Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022                                                39

16        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021/2022   55

17        Adoption of the ‘Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032’ for the Albert-Eden Local Board.                                                                                           79

18        Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan                                                                   125

19        Expressions of interest applications and the granting of two new community leases at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden                                                      199

20        Proposed new community ground lease to Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated at Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham              211

21        Land classification and new community ground lease to Central United Football Club at Freyberg Field, 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham                                   223

22        Local board views on private plan change 75 for 3A, 81A and 119A Carrington Road, Mt Albert (Mason Clinic)                                                                                237

23        Local board feedback on Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori                                                                                                                          249

24        Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 257

25        Amendment to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan    327

26        2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations                                                                341

27        Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates                                           345

28        Chairperson's Report                                                                                                347

29        Board Members' Reports                                                                                          355

30        Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records                                                        359

31        Valedictory reflections: end of term address                                                         377

32        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)         confirm the minutes of its ordinary meeting, held on Tuesday, 16 August 2022, as  true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1       Acknowledgement - The recent passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       For the local board to note a formal acknowledgement on the meeting agenda.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The local board acknowledges the recent passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, at the age of 96.

3.       Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II reigned as Head of State for Aotearoa New Zealand for over 70 years.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      acknowledge the passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at the age of 96, noting her reign as Head of State for Aotearoa New Zealand for over 70 years, which has been both remarkable and compassionate, and notes that she will be remembered fondly around Aotearoa, the Commonwealth and the world.

 

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Albert-Eden Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Joanne Harland - 2022 Moth Plant Competition

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To enable an opportunity for Joanne Harland – Community Volunteer, and Eva Wadsworth and Greeshma Kasuganti – Mt Albert Grammar School Environment Group, to deliver a presentation during the Deputation segment of the business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Joanne Harland – Community Volunteer, and Eva Wadsworth and Greeshma Kasuganti – Mt Albert Grammar School Environment Group, will be in attendance to deliver a presentation regarding the recent Moth Plant Competition and to highlight the success of the event, as well as to seek support for 2023’s competition.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      thank Joanne Harland – Community Volunteer, and Eva Wadsworth and Greeshma Kasuganti – Mt Albert Grammar School Environment Group, for their attendance and Deputation presentation.

 

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”

 

11        Notices of Motion

 

Under Standing Order 2.5.1, Notices of Motion have been received from Member Christina Robertson and Chairperson Margi Watson, for consideration under items 12 and 13 respectively.

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Notice of Motion - Member Christina Robertson - Traffic safety measures in Point Chevalier

File No.: CP2022/13978

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Member Christina Robertson has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Member Christina Robertson and Member Graeme Easte as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note that rat-running through the Bird Streets is likely to increase during and following construction of the Point Chevalier to Westmere project along Meola Road and Point Chevalier Road with consequences for safety on these residential streets.

b)      note that measures to mitigate this are needed ahead of significant construction starting on Meola Road and Point Chevalier Road, in order to embed behaviour change and prevent the practice of rat-running becoming further entrenched.

c)      note that Point Chevalier and the Bird Streets are areas of high active mode demand, particularly among school students (with a 10-14 per cent mode share of walking or cycling to education in the latest census figures).

d)      note that uptake of cycling facilities is increased by the availability of safe routes to and from the facility itself (such as through residential streets, if speed limits are slow enough for different modes to share safely).

e)      note the value of an area-wide approach to neighbourhood speed management.

f)       request that Auckland Transport reinstate the threshold treatments at the five entrances to the Bird Streets from Point Chevalier Road and Meola Road as part of the project, as discussed with the project team at the Community Liaison Group meetings for the cycleway held several years ago during the design phase.

g)      request that Auckland Transport investigate and implement other short and long-term strategies to increase active mode share in the area, improve safety for those riding or walking to local schools and reduce potential deaths and serious injuries.

h)      request that Auckland Transport survey existing measures in the area and undertake further work to mitigate rat-running in the Bird Streets in order to address the long-term safety impact of an increase in rat-running traffic and to pursue the strategic goals of increasing active travel and expanding access to the core cycling network.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Member Christina Robertson - Traffic safety measures in Point Chevalier

11

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Notice of Motion - Chairperson M Watson - Open space provision in the Carrington Development

File No.: CP2022/13980

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       Chairperson Margi Watson has given notice of a motion that they wish to propose.

2.       The notice, signed by Chairperson Margi Watson and Member Julia Maskill as seconder, is appended as Attachment A.

 

Motion

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      express concern about the application of the Open Space Provision Policy and Open Space Acquisition Policy in relation to the Carrington Development.

b)      note that the open space provision metrics do not account for the population requiring use of the space given that the intensive nature of development could mean up to 10,000 people will live on site.

c)      note that the walkable catchments and ped sheds may be interrupted by geography, indirect routes, lack of human scale to the buildings, drainage reserves and roading networks.

d)      note that the local board will be asked to make a land acquisition decision and based on current advice received they do not believe they could proceed with a decision, and wish to signal this before reaching the formal decision-making stage.

e)      request staff review the application of the open space policy and provision metrics to this site and provide an updated assessment and advice - given the unique context and scale of this development within the already urbanised environment of Auckland isthmus.

f)       advise Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee of the issues related to this high-density, inner city, urban development and the issues that the application of the current open space provision policy creates when trying to achieve an urban, well-designed, low carbon, compact city.

g)      request Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee consider the Carrington Development as an ideal case study for applying new, appropriate scale, open space provision metrics for high-density, inner city, urban developments noting that the open space policy review is not due for completion until 2024.

h)      note that the structure of Auckland Council committees for the 2022-2025 term is not yet available so request this Notion of Motion is also forwarded to the relevant Auckland Council committee in November 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Notice of Motion - Chairperson M Watson - Open space provision in the Carrington Development

15

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Grants and Multiboard Round One 2022/2023 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/13614

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To fund, part-fund or decline the applications received for Albert-Eden Local Grants Round One and the Multiboard Round One 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022/2023 on 17 May 2022 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

3.       This report presents applications received for the for Albert-Eden Local Grants Round One 2022/2023 (Attachment B) and the Multiboard Round One 2022/2023 (Attachment C).

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2022/2023 financial year. A total of $17,960.60 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $122,539.40 to be allocated to two quick response and one local grants round.

5.       Twenty-seven applications were received for Local Grants Round One 2022/2023, requesting a total of $173,196.15 and ten applications were received for Multiboard Round One 2022/2023 requesting a total of $45,130.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)     agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application in Albert-Eden Local Grants Round One 2022/2023 listed in the following table:   

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

LG2301-116

Harps Aotearoa Foundation

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of a printer, presentation folders, customised notepads, flyers, product labels, printed corflute sign, twist handle paper bags, rectangle hinged boxes for guest gifts, printed lanyards, and cardholders for the "Harps Fest NZ 2023" held from 3 to 6 February 2023 at the Dilworth Senior Campus, Newmarket

$3,700.00

Eligible

LG2301-120

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Arts and culture

Towards the cost of hosting a Diwali celebration at the Mount Eden War Memorial Hall on 22 October 2022, including the venue hire, decorations, marketing, sound, photography, videography, subsidised transport for the seniors, performers koha, volunteer appreciation, and recognition trophies.

$6,085.60

Eligible

LG2301-129

Manukau Beijing Opera Society Incorporated

Arts and culture

Towards the venue hire cost for the Beijing Opera rehearsals at the Outhwaite hall.

$3,300.00

Ineligible

LG2301-143

Alanah Knibb

Arts and culture

Towards the purchase of audio-recording equipment, microphone, bus shelter exhibition(billboards), workshop materials, marketing, artist fee, and relief teacher costs for an art and storytelling exhibition by Montessori Preschoolers and residents of Eden Village retirement home.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-108

Bhartiya Samaj Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the counsellor's cost for the "Elder Support Programme".

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-110

The Salvation Army New Zealand - Mt Albert

Community

Towards the purchase of Lego and equipment including tables, milkshake machine, reusable cups, and straws for the "Owai Create" programme.

$3,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-114

Roopa Aur Aap Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of staff wages, office rent, website management, and social media from October 2022 to September 2023.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-119

The Kindness Collective Foundation

Community

Towards the cost of running the "Kindness Collective Community Hub" in Mt Eden, including the lease of the hub, internet, energy bill, shelving for the warehouse, and the purchase of a chest freezer.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-121

Hindu Council of New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards the venue hire cost for the "Hindu Elders meet" fortnightly every month between 1 October 2022 to 30 June 2023.

$5,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-123

Afghan Funeral Services Charity in New Zealand

Community

Towards education and sports activities for the charity.

$4,000.00

Ineligible

LG2301-126

The Mt Albert Contract Bridge Club Incorporated

Community

Towards the purchase and installation of ventilation grills, ducting, and fun.

$7,800.00

Eligible

LG2301-128

The Girl Guides Association New Zealand Incorporated

Community

Towards venue hire costs.

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-133

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Community

Towards the cost of training the youth worker team and counsellors from 1 October 2022 to 30 June 2023.

$7,500.00

Ineligible

LG2301-134

Mountains To Sea Conservation Trust

Community

Towards the project costs to run the "Motu Manawa Kayak Day" events and the "Te Auaunga Spotlighting event", including the kayak hire, waste-free workshop, Kairaranga, and MTSCT programme costs.

$7,932.52

Eligible

LG2301-135

Maungawhau School

Community

Towards the promotional cost of the "Maungawhau School Spring Fair" on 5 November 2022.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-138

Sandringham Playgroup

Community

Towards the venue hire, poster printing, waste management, catering, art installation materials, decorations, kids' entertainment, and developmental activities for the Halloween event on 30 October 2022 at the Sandringham Community Centre.

$5,583.03

Eligible

LG2301-140

New Zealand Council Of Victim Support Groups Incorporated

Community

Towards the operational costs of the "Volunteer Support" programme, including the cost of including staff expenses, volunteer expenses, administration, and operational travel from 1 October 2022 to 31 March 2023.

$7,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-146

Koha Apparel

Community

Towards the Mt Albert Warehouse rent and pop-up equipment cost.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-101

Aotearoa Africa Foundation

Events

Towards the costs of venue hire, sound, catering, project development, volunteer, and facilitation cost to host "Africa Week" from 15 to 20 November 2022.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-115

Community Collective Limited

Environment

Towards the cost of planning, and delivery of the programme including workshops, social media promotion, and evaluation of the "Sustainable Living Festival" in March 2023.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-124

Friends of Oakley (Te Auaunga) Creek Incorporated

Environment

Toward the part-time Outreach Coordinator's wages(contractor fees) for the "Waterview Heritage Protection Project".

$5,760.00

Eligible

LG2301-131

The Helping Paws Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards cat food and kitty litter from 1 October 2022 to 30 September 2023 for the "Albert-Eden Community Desexing Programme".

$3,500.00

Eligible

LG2301-139

Aotearoa Sustainability Group

Environment

Towards the cost of delivering the "Reduce Waste to landfill" programme at schools and early childhood centres within the Albert-Eden Local Board area, including staff wages, games, interactive video making, koha, and miscellaneous costs.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-122

Point Chevalier Croquet Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of the kitchen upgrade, interior storage, and appliances.

$8,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-132

Mt Albert Bowling Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the marketing costs to celebrate the 125 Years Anniversary of the Mt Albert Bowling Club.

$8,000.00

 Eligible

LG2301-136

The Metro Mount Albert Softball Club Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the cost of "Auckland Softball" junior registration fees, purchasing softball uniform jerseys, and pants for junior softball players.

$4,000.00

Eligible

LG2301-144

Asian Sport & Culture Association Incorporated

Sport and recreation

Towards the purchase of whistles(hiking), badminton rackets and shuttles, guest speakers, facilitators, and coaching costs for a series of workshops, and physical activities.

$4,035.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$173,196.15

 

 

b)       agree to fund, part-fund or decline each application received in Multiboard Round One 2022/2023, listed in Table Two below:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2223-115

African Film Festival New Zealand Trust

Arts and culture

Towards film rights, website, and marketing of the African Film Festival online and in Rialto Cinemas Newmarket from September 2022 to December 2022.

$2,700.00

Ineligible

MB2223-120

Shager Ethiopian Entertainment NZ Inc

Arts and culture

Towards weekly workshop hiring for dance practices, decorations, volunteer costs, and venue hire of Mt Roskill War Memorial Hall from January 2023 to June 2023.

$1,250.00

Ineligible

MB2223-101

Visionwest Community Trust

Community

Towards equipment hire and portaloos for the “Christmas From the Heart” event in December 2022

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-111

The Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards free or subsidised classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in various locations in Auckland from October 2022 to May 2023.

$5,415.00

Eligible

MB2223-122

Body Positive Incorporated

Community

Towards costs to run the Body Positive Men's Wellness Retreat in Vaughan Park Anglican Retreat Centre in March 2023.

$4,800.00

Eligible

MB2223-123

Charlotte Museum Trust

Community

Towards project lead researcher and project collection technician’s wages to capture the history of “LGBTIQ+ Community Places & Spaces” in New Lynn from October 2022 to May 2023.

$8,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-130

Pregnancy Help Incorporated Auckland

Community

Towards operational costs to run the Pregnancy Help programme in Central Auckland from October 2022 to September 2023.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-133

Guardians of our Children Charitable Trust

Community

Towards costs to run the “Make Them Proud - Parental Disputes” workshops at various venues across Auckland from October 2022 to October 2023.

$4,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-137

CNSST Foundation

Community

Towards coordination and implementation costs of delivering five social work counseling cases, five social media publishing, three community workshops, and 10 community cultural days at the CNSST Head Office and Jubilee Building from November 2022 to June 2023.

$5,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-114

Auckland Events Company T/A Food Truck Collective

Events

Towards live music, face painting, and waste collection for the “Food Truck Collective - Street Food Summer Series” all over Auckland from October 2022 to May 2023.

$4,965.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$45,130.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

7.       Auckland Council’s Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

8.       The local board grants programme sets out:

·        local board priorities

·        lower priorities for funding

·        exclusions

·        grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close any additional accountability requirements.

9.       The Albert-Eden Local Board adopted the Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022/2023 on 17 May 2022 (Attachment A). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

10.     The community grants programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

11.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2022/2023 financial year. A total of $17,960.60 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $122,539.40 to be allocated to two quick response and one local grants round.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grants programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups with projects that support community climate change action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include:

·        local food production and food waste reduction

·        decreasing use of single-occupancy transport options

·        home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation

·        local tree planting and streamside revegetation

·        education about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

14.     Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

15.     The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

16.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants.  The Albert-Eden Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

17.     Staff will provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they can increase their chances of success in the future.

18.     A summary of each application received through Albert-Eden Local Grants Round One 2022/2023 (Attachment B) and Multiboard Round One 2022/2023 (Attachment C) is provided.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

19.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grants processes.

20.     Seventeen applicants applying to Albert-Eden Local Grants Round One and five applicants applying to Multiboard Grants Round One indicate projects that target Māori or Māori outcomes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements.

22.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $140,500 for the 2022/2023 financial year. A total of $17,960.60 was allocated in the previous grant round. This leaves a total of $122,539.40 to be allocated to two quick response and one local grants round.

23.     Twenty-seven applications were received for Local Grants Round One 2022/2023, requesting a total of $173,196.15 and ten applications were received for Multiboard Round One 2021/2022 requesting a total of $45,130.

24.     Relevant staff from Auckland Council’s Finance Department have been fully involved in the development of all local board work programmes, including financial information in this report, and have not identified any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grants Policy and the local board grants programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26.     Following the Albert-Eden Local Board allocating funding for round one of the local and multiboard grants, grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022/2023

31

b

Albert-Eden Local Grants Round One 2022/2023 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Albert-Eden Multiboard Round One 2022/2023 - grant applications (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moumita Dutta - Senior Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/12413

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2021/2022 Annual Report for the Albert-Eden Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2021/2022 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 September 2022. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the local board chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2021/2022.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2021/2022 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2022

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 September 2022

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 September 2022

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Draft 2021/2022 Albert-Eden Local Board Annual Report

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisory

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/13982

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Albert-Eden Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) work programme items in its area, along with updates to the Albert-Eden Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in June 2022. However, this quarter four update is for the 2021/2022 CCO Engagement Plan.

3.       Updates will be provided to local boards each quarter to show both changes to the plan itself, and to provide updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

4.       An updated version of the engagement plan is provided as Attachment A.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter Four 2021/2022.

b)      receive updates to the Joint Council-controlled Organisations (CCO) Engagement Plan 2022-2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2022/2023 local work programme. 

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This update may include the following types of changes:

·        Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·        Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·        Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.     No changes have been made.

Auckland Transport

12.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment B.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

13.     No changes have been made.

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

14.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment C.

Updates to the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme

15.     No changes have been made.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

16.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment D.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

17.     No changes have been made.

Watercare

18.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

19.     No changes have been made.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive CCOs does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

21.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Receiving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 addresses key elements of recommendations made by the CCO Review, including ensuring the communication of clear, up to date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

23.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focused on those priority areas.

25.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

27.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

29.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

31.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter One in late 2022.

32.     A workshop will be held in early 2023 to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2023/2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022/2023 Albert-Eden Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

59

b

Auckland Transport 2021/2022 Q4 Report - Albert-Eden Local Board

65

c

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited 2021/2022 Q4 Report - Albert-Eden Local Board

69

d

Eke Panuku Development Auckland 2021/2022 Q4 Report - Albert-Eden Local Board

75

e

Watercare Work Programme 2021/2022 Q4 Report - Albert-Eden Local Board

77

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacob van der Poel, Senior Advisor, Operations and Policy

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Adoption of the ‘Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032’ for the Albert-Eden Local Board

File No.: CP2022/12886

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the ‘Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032’.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the Albert-Eden Local Board Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032, (referred to as the ‘enhancement plan’ in this report) for the board’s consideration and adoption (see Attachment A).

3.       In the 2021/2022 financial year the local board allocated $4,500 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the development of an ecological enhancement plan for Chamberlain Park (resolution AE/2021/211). 

4.       The enhancement plan aligns with the Albert-Eden Local Board vision for Chamberlain Park, which is to provide:

·      18 holes of golf on the land on the eastern side of Waitītiko/Meola Creek.

·      a local/suburb park at the western end of Chamberlain Park, commencing at Waitītiko/Meola Creek for the purposes of passive recreation.

·      the restoration of Meola Creek, including a wetland, as per the Waitītiko/Meola Creek Restoration Landscape Concept Plan March 2018.

·      improved walking and cycling connections.

5.       Staff engaged Te Ngahere to develop the enhancement plan, and draft versions of the plan were presented to the local board for feedback at workshops on 5 May and 2 August 2022.

6.       The enhancement plan (Attachment A) includes, current ecology, threats, restoration actions, and community opportunities for restoration, including a ten-year programme of works and draft costings for the first two years.

7.       Community Facilities have provisionally scheduled to initiate this work in financial year 2023/2024, continuing into 2024/2025. Confirmation of funding allocation from the locally driven initiatives to meet this schedule, will be part of the recommendation Community Facilities presents to the local board as part of their three-year work programme.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the ‘Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032

b)      delegate to the Chair the ability to approve minor amendments to the Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The ecological enhancement plan for Chamberlain Park aligns with the Albert-Eden Local Board November 2019 vision for Chamberlain Park (AE/2019/84), which is to provide:

·    18 holes of golf on the land on the eastern side of Waitītiko/Meola Creek.

·    a local/suburb park at the western end of Chamberlain Park, commencing at Waitītiko/Meola Creek for the purposes of passive recreation.

·    the restoration of Meola Creek, including a wetland, as per the Waitītiko/Meola Creek Restoration Landscape Concept Plan March 2018.

·    improved walking and cycling connections.

9.       In November 2021, the Albert-Eden Local Board allocated $4,500 as part of the local environment work programme (resolution AE/2021/211) to fund the development of an environmental enhancement plan to:

·    identify and prioritise pest animals and pest plants for control

·    identify and assess current biodiversity needing protection

·    plan for the revegetation needs and opportunities

·    identify potential for the local community to become involved

·    provide indicative costings for the first two years of a ten-year programme of works.

10.     Environmental Services staff engaged Te Ngahere to assess the current state of the biodiversity of the golf course section of the park including biodiversity highlights, pest plant and animal species and environmental features specific to the site.

11.     The following steps were also undertaken to inform the development of the enhancement plan:

·    an internal discussion with Healthy Waters Wai Ora Partnerships in February 2022

·    identifying community stakeholders to engage with the plan and future implementation.

12.     In a workshop attended by staff on the 5 May 2022, the local board requested minor revisions to the draft plan, including:

·    revised title from the Chamberlain Park Golf Course Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032 to the Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022-2032

·    reference to continuing other restoration work from other funding streams  

·    inclusion of the Albert Eden Local Board vision

·    the list of stakeholders and volunteers have been expanded to include the boards recommended community groups.

13.     These changes were confirmed at a workshop on the 2 August 2020 and have been incorporated into the final version of the plan (Attachment A).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The plan details the ecological values of existing habitats and vegetation types, native and exotic plant species, and fauna inclusive of any threatened or at-risk species. This informed a ten-year plan guiding the restoration actions to improve the ecological values of the site, through:

·    best-practice layout and methods for pest animal control and monitoring

·    identifying pest plant issues to be addressed

·    recommending restoration planting areas and schedules of appropriate species

·    identifying potential opportunities for stakeholder and community involvement.

Recommendations in the plan

15.     The plan recommends to control pest plants based on those listed in the Auckland Regional Pest Management Plan 2020-2030 and target species which will impact plantings.

16.     The least toxic method for weed species control and practical in terms of labour required is recommended to minimise risk to users and the environment. Special care is recommended around waterways.

17.     Plant species selection should be appropriate to the ecosystems which would naturally be present at the site. The suggested natural ecosystems for the site are pūriri forest. This is based on climate, geography, geology, soil characteristics and/or historic vegetation spatial datasets. The species for the site are primarily terrestrial, amenity tree and amenity plantings and species suitable for riparian planting.

18.     The location and extent of planting areas are draft, and the exact areas will need to be further revised with course staff while balancing the key outcomes of suppression of weed regrowth and enhancing ecological values.

19.     Planting maintenance is critical to ensure the successful establishment of all plantings. This should be carried out until 90 per cent canopy closure or groundcover occurs and the plants should have established enough that additional attention outside of minimal site maintenance should not be necessary.

20.     Uninterrupted implementation, maintenance and monitoring as specified in the enhancement plan over the ten-year period will be required to improve the ecological values of the site. This will ensure that additional funding is not required to amend lapses in operational delivery.

21.     Community engagement will support the implementation of the plan and connectivity to the park. A select group of community groups and stakeholders have been identified for Community Facilities to liaise with in undertaking the enhancement programme.

Implementation of the plan

22.     The enhancement plan provides a schedule for implementation over a ten-year period. The first two years of the plan are detailed and costed for contracting purposes. The following eight years are also detailed but not costed and will require an annual assessment to confirm the work required for the following season.

23.     Community Facilities have programmed to initiate this work in financial year 2023/2024, continuing into 2024/2025 which will cover the first two years of the programme. Future funding allocation will be part of a recommendation to the local board as part of the Community and Customer Services Community Facilities three-year work programme.

24.     This plan does not cover the ecological restoration work along the extent of the Waitītiko/Meola Creek outside of the park boundary. These areas include work funded through Watercare Services, the proposed continuation downstream, including the streamside of Rawalpindi Reserve through Healthy Waters, and future wetland creation/stream realignment planned by Albert-Eden Local Board. However, it is recommended that enhancement undertaken at the site is taken concurrently with other funding streams and in close liaison with interlinked projects..

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

25.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

26.     The enhancement plan focuses on the Natural Environment priority areas within the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan which will deliver on actions within some of the priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan including natural environment by building resilience of indigenous biodiversity, habitats and ecosystems and growing our urban ngahere (forest).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The recommendations included in the plan are proposed to support Auckland Council’s environmental plans and strategies including the Indigenous Biodiversity Strategy, Regional Pest Management Plan, Wai Ora Healthy Waterways Programme and Weed Management Policy.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The Albert Eden Local Board declared its support of environmental restoration and biodiversity in the local board plan 2020, outcome three: “High-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles with the objective: Our environment is protected and restored’.

29.     As part of the development of the plan, staff have attended workshops to obtain feedback from the local board on 5 May 2022 and 2 August 2022. This feedback has been incorporated into the plan.

30.     The implementation of the plan’s recommendations will contribute to high quality natural environments in the local board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The Albert-Eden Local Board Plan describes the way that the local board will work with Māori in Albert-Eden Local Board area on restoration initiatives, and these mechanisms will guide implementation of this enhancement plan.

32.     The enhancement plan specifies engagement with Te Mahuruhuru Marae in implementing the plan. This will be part of community engagement that Community Facilities will incorporate into the plan’s delivery.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     In November 2021 the Albert-Eden Local Board approved $4,500 for the enhancement plan from their locally driven initiatives budget as part of the 2021/2022 Albert Eden Local Infrastructure and Environmental Work Programme (AE/2021/211).

34.     The local board agreed in May 2022 to fund in principle of the enhancement plan in financial year 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 and Community Facilities have provisionally scheduled to initiate this work accordingly. Confirmation of funding allocation from the locally driven initiatives to meet this schedule will be part of the recommendation Community Facilities presents to the local board as part of their three-year work programme in May 2023.

35.     Recommendations included in the plan will require further funding, as set out in Table.1 which could include the Albert-Eden Local Board’s locally driven initiatives funding and other funding sources.

Table.1 Estimated and Provisional Funding to Implement the Chamberlain Park Restoration Plan in Years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025.

Estimated Delivery by Financial Year

Estimated Cost

Provisional Local Driven Initiative Funding

2023/2024

$25,437

$25,000

2024/2025

$21,135

$10,000

 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     There is a risk that the plan may not be implemented due to budgetary constraints from council and that the quality of the restoration is set back by a lack of continuity over the ten-year period.

37.     Iwi and community engagement with the restoration implementation may support meeting the outcomes of the plan over the ten-year period, but this cannot be quantified at this stage.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

38.     Implementation of the first two years of the plan will be undertaken if funded by Community Facilities in 2023/204 and 2024/2025.

39.     Community Facilities will explore funding options with the local board to fully fund the first two years of the programme and future years as identified in the enhancement plan.

40.     On approval of funding for the first two years of implementation, Community Facilities will engage with community groups and iwi to support the enhancement plans outcomes.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chamberlain Park Ecological Enhancement Plan 2022 - 2032

85

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hana Perry - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan

File No.: CP2022/12887

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To adopt the Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      This report presents the Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan, (referred to as the ‘action plan’ in this report) for the board’s consideration and adoption (see Attachment A).

3.      The local board allocated $20,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the development of a local climate action plan in 2021/2022 (resolution AE/2021/80). 

4.      The action plan was developed to align with The Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These two plans lay the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a resilient, zero carbon community which is actively adapting to the impacts of climate change. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri sets a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

5.      The action plan was developed in alignment with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020. In particular, the action plan supports the Local Board’s Plan (2020) outcome for ‘high-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles’ and aspiration to respond to the climate emergency by ‘supporting activities which reduce emissions and build our resilience’. 

6.      A draft action plan was developed during 2021/2022 based on a stock take of existing low carbon projects, informed by a virtual meeting held with more than 26 community stakeholders. Additional meetings with Auckland Council staff and council-controlled organisations, and workshops with local board members were held during plan development.

7.      Several hui were also held with mana whenua representatives on the local climate action plans. These identified the need for further work by staff and local board members to build relationships with mana whenua and identify opportunities for Māori-led climate initiatives.

8.      The action plan builds on existing initiatives of the council at the regional level and by local board, council-controlled organisations and key community-based organisations that are active in the board area. This includes Gribblehirst Community Hub, Eco-Neighbourhood groups, Earth Action Trust, and various environmental restoration initiatives.

9.      The action plan identifies several opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through extending existing initiatives or starting new projects. It also highlights the departments or community groups that will have a leading role in the implementation of these opportunities.

10.    Once adopted, staff will support implementation of the action plan where possible. This will be achieved using a combination of support by the local board and advocacy for new and existing projects, direct local and regional funding, and partnerships with businesses and community organisations to leverage investment and grant funding from external sources.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      adopt the ‘Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan’ as per Attachment A

b)      work with mana whenua to identify more opportunities to partner with them on climate/te taiao projects in the board area

c)      note that an allocation of $40,000 of the Albert-Eden Local Board’s 2022/2023 locally driven initiatives budget has been approved to support the establishment of a Albert-Eden Climate Action Activator through the board’s approval of its 2022/2023 environment work programme at the June 2022 business meeting

d)      delegate to the Albert-Eden Local Board Chair the ability to approve minor amendments of the action plan document ahead of publication.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.    In 2019 Auckland Council declared a Climate Emergency and in 2020 Auckland Council launched ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’.

12.    The Auckland Plan and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan lay the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a resilient, zero carbon community which is actively adapting to the impacts of climate change.

13.    Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out a decarbonisation pathway and two core goals:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050

·    to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway.

14.    The opportunity to examine the connection between the Auckland-wide plan and local action was identified by the Albert-Eden Local Board in their 2020/2021 local board work programme. The local board allocated $20,000 to this project.

15.    Using these funds, staff have worked with the community to develop a local climate action plan. The plan defines focus areas at a local level that align with ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ and will contribute to Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emission reduction target.

16.    The action plan was developed in alignment with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020. In particular, the action plan supports the Local Board’s Plan (2020) outcome for ‘high-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles’ and aspiration to respond to the climate emergency by ‘supporting activities which reduce emissions and build our resilience’. 

17.    Over fifty stakeholders, including representatives from key community organisations and businesses, Auckland Council staff, and council-controlled organisations, contributed to developing a draft plan. These community contributors are identified in the appendix to the action plan document (Attachment A).

18.    Due to impacts of COVID-19, face-to-face community engagement was limited. Instead, an online hui to develop the draft plan was held with community engagement on 10 March, 2022, facilitated by Community Collective. This was followed by interviews with key stakeholders and subject matter experts for additional input.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.    The action plan focuses on promoting actions by individuals, households and businesses, which will lead to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. It also includes consideration of how the board can reduce emissions from infrastructure and buildings in the board area. It gives effect to both local board and regional outcomes which relate to sustainability, carbon reduction and caring for the environment.

20.    The action plan aligns with council’s regional Live Lightly programme, launched in October 2017. The Live Lightly programme involves collaboration between community groups, Auckland Council and partners, to engage with Aucklanders about how they can take impactful action to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and live a low carbon lifestyle.

21.    Feedback from the community during development of the Live Lightly programme indicated a need to focus on low or no-cost solutions and initiatives enabling behaviour change. This feedback has been considered through the development of the action plan.

a)            Structure of the climate plan – Eight priority areas for action

22.    The action plan builds on Albert-Eden Local Board’s existing environmental and sustainability initiatives and focuses on the eight action priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These action areas are listed below, and are further detailed in Attachment A to this report:

·    Natural Environment

·    Built Environment

·    Transport

·    Economy

·    Community and Coast

·    Food

·    Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai

·    Energy and Industry.

23.    For each of these action areas, the action plan includes:

·    goals based on achieving regional, national, and global greenhouse gas emission reduction targets

·    opportunities to amplify existing regional and local initiatives

·    actions suggested through consultation with community stakeholders, including:

-      flagship climate action projects for which seed funding should be prioritised by the board where needed and as funding allows over the next three years

-      a monitoring framework for measuring progress against these targets.

24.    The action plan includes quantitative detail on specific targets, as well as a proposed mechanism to measure progress against these (see Attachment A).

25.    The draft action plan was discussed with the local board at workshops held on 5 May 2022, 23 August 2022, and 30 August 2022, the action plan incorporates the local board’s feedback into the final version.

b)            Mechanisms for implementing the plan

26.    The intention of the action plan is for implementation and ownership by the whole community. The Albert-Eden Local Board will support the implementation of the action plan where possible through a variety of mechanisms including:

·    advocacy

·    funding to enable community project delivery

·    further investigation of potential climate initiatives

·    leadership (delivering projects directly as well as enabling and encouraging others)

·    partnerships

·    promotion

·    monitoring and recognition.

c)            Key areas for action in the board area – Top priorities and flagship projects

27.    The plan identifies priority areas for the board to support emissions reductions (particularly in relation to the built environment, active transport, energy, and the economy) and key areas to promote climate resilience (particularly in relation to food and the natural environment).

28.    Within the action plan, six flagship projects have been identified. Flagship projects are activities identified as being particularly impactful in reducing carbon emissions and/or empowering community resilience within key priority areas. Flagship projects are detailed in Table One.

Table 1 Albert-Eden Climate Action Plan flagship projects

Projects

Key Action Areas

Support and grow EcoNeighbourhoods – a network of neighbourhood action groups

Food, Communities and Coast, Built Environment, Transport

Advocate for implementation of the Local Paths Plan

Transport, Built Environment

Support existing bike hub in the board area and investigate feasibility of new hubs

Transport, Built Environment

Support a sustainable food pilot based on similar regional programs

Food

Implement the Urban Ngahere Action Plan for the local board area

Natural Environment

Appoint a Climate Action Activator to amplify and coordinate community climate activity

All

Development of a physical climate action hub

All

 

 

Implementation of the Plan – Appointment of a local climate activator

29.    The Albert-Eden Local Board approved in principle a three-year climate action programme.  In year one (2021/2022) progress was made towards developing a local climate action plan.

30.    The local board has approved $40,000 to support the plan’s implementation in the 2022/2023 financial year through the activator role (AE/2022/106). Once the plan has been adopted, staff will recruit a local climate activator to drive community implementation of the climate action plan. The activator will work with the community to try and identify initial potential sources of investment to support collaboration and amplify community climate action.

31.    The local board has in principle approved a further $40,000 to support the plan’s implementation in the 2023/2024 financial year through the activator role. Staff will seek approval of budgets for this project through the respective work programme approval process each financial year.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.    The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

33.    The ‘Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan’ provides a roadmap for Albert-Eden to become a low carbon community and deliver on the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

34.    The plan covers all eight priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan as outlined above. Key priorities for the Albert-Eden board area include achieving a more compact urban form and energy efficient built environment, reducing transport emissions, educating and engaging communities and protecting the natural environment.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.    Staff from across the council group contributed to the development of the action plan, including representatives from the Chief Sustainability Office, Community Facilities, Auckland Emergency Management, Resilient Land and Coasts, Environmental Services, Parks Services, Local Board Services, Auckland Transport and Tātaki / Auckland Unlimited.

36.    Goals in the action plan relating specifically to the council group are those outlined in existing council group plans and strategies.

37.    Input from key staff from across the council group will continue throughout the implementation of the action plan and will also contribute to periodic review and update of the action plan

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.    The action plan supports the Albert-Eden Local Board’s Plan (2020) outcome for ‘high-quality natural environments and sustainable lifestyles’ and aspiration to respond to the climate emergency by ‘supporting activities which reduce emissions and build our resilience’. 

39.    Albert-Eden Local Board members considered draft versions of the action plan at workshops held on 5 May 2022, 23 August 2022 and 30 August 2022. Feedback received in the workshops from board members was positive, and staff have incorporated members’ feedback into the final version.

40.    The intention of the action plan is for implementation and ownership by the whole community. The Albert-Eden Local Board will support the implementation of the action plan including through establishing a climate activator position.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.    A Te Ao Māori lens was used for development of the action plan to help frame approaches to climate change. This helped ensure that taiao (nature), whenua (land) and tangata (people) remain the focal point for all climate-related decisions. Key values and principles of the Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau Wellbeing Framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan were considered. These values will also be applied as the action plan is implemented.

42.    Staff also presented to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Hui, which includes operational kaitiaki representatives of Ngā Iwi Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau to seek their feedback on development of five local climate action plans, including the Albert-Eden plan, in November 2021 and April 2022. Staff also asked mana whenua for feedback on how they would like to be engaged on this project in more depth.

43.    Informal feedback from mana whenua representatives at this hui covered topics such as:

·    the need for local boards to work in partnership with mana whenua to develop climate projects and to support mana whenua as kaitiaki of Auckland’s natural environment

·    desire to be engaged in projects that respond to climate change through a partnership approach

·    the urgent need for more support for mana whenua to respond to climate impacts, particularly in relation to sea level rise and coastal change

·    the need for regional support to be offered to mana whenua to support them with drafting their own climate response plans.

44.    Mana whenua also asked that staff hold one-on-one hui with any iwi that would like to be engaged further. At that hui, staff also invited iwi to indicate if they would like to have a one-on-one hui to discuss the local climate action plans alongside other climate projects. At the time of writing, only one iwi representative from Waikato-Tainui requested a one-on-one hui.

45.    The rohe of Waikato-Tainui does not include the board area, but their feedback was still useful to staff in drafting the plan. Some points that were raised at this hui included:

·    need for local boards to reduce their own operational carbon footprint and ‘walk the talk’ by leading efforts to reduce emissions

·    local boards should invest in educating communities about the risks of climate change and supporting them to reduce emissions as quickly as possible

·    more support for Māori-led and rangatahi led climate initiatives, including innovative responses to the climate challenge that draw on matauranga Māori and indigenous knowledge systems.

46.    The draft plans were also emailed to mana whenua with an interest in the Albert-Eden local board area in late August 2022. No written feedback had been received from iwi at the time of writing.

47.    Feedback from mana whenua to the Albert-Eden Local Board as part of Auckland Council 10-year Budget 2021-2031 was also informed development of the plan. Four iwi (Ngāti Tamaterā, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei, and Waikato-Tainui) provided feedback.

48.    All four mana whenua entities supported the local board’s intention in the ten-year budget to “Consider climate change impacts in our decisions and projects, and support education, awareness raising and action.” Additional feedback from Te Ākitai Waiohua iwi was “this is a high priority for us. Climate affects the coast where our urupa (burial grounds) are as well as coastal settlements and places and sites of significance”.

49.    In response to this feedback, practical ways of supporting kaitiakitanga outcomes have been identified and included in the Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai section of the action plan including supporting rangatahi Māori leadership on climate change, the protection and restoration of our natural environment, strengthening awareness of tikanga, taonga species, and continuing to identify and protect sites of cultural heritage which may be impacted by climate change.

50.    The plan proposes that ongoing engagement with mana whenua be carried out to guide implementation of the action plan and future reviews and updates of the plan.

51.    Staff will also work with the local climate activator to identify additional opportunities for the local board to support Māori-led climate or te taiao projects in the future.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.    The Albert-Eden Local Board currently provides funding for some of the climate actions identified in the Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan through its locally driven initiatives budget and environmental grants programme. For example, the local board funds Eco-Neighbourhoods ($55,000 in 2022/2023) and Tumeke Cycle Space ($10,000 in 2022/2023). The local board has also allocated $40,000 in 2022/2023 to employ a local climate activator to amplify and support community initiatives in the local climate action plan (AE/2022/106).

53.    The Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan is aspirational and as such, many of the proposed actions are not currently funded within regional or local board budgets.

54.    Implementing the plan is not solely reliant on investment derived from Auckland Council-related funding. Central government incentives and programmes, philanthropic funding entities, as well as investment decisions of local businesses all have a part to play. The local climate activator will work to try and identify opportunities for partnerships with businesses and community organisations to leverage funding from external sources to deliver on the aspirations of the action plan.

55.    Auckland Council is also establishing a new Auckland Climate Grant. This will expand the pool of contestable funding that Albert-Eden community groups can apply for to deliver community-led actions in this plan.

56.    The intention of the action plan is implementation and ownership by the whole community. As such, flagship projects outlined in the action plan may be subject to change, due to community interest and changes in central government policies and legislation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

57.    There is a risk that some actions within the plan may not be implemented due to budgetary constraints from council and non-council sources. To minimise the risk, it has been communicated in the action plan that the intention of the plan is implementation and ownership by the whole community.

58.    Flagship projects outlined in the action plan may also be subject to change, due to factors such as community interest, funding, and legislative changes. The action plan is designed to be a living document with regular updates in anticipation of a rapidly changing environment as Auckland and Aotearoa’s climate response accelerates.<Enter text>

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

59.    Following the local board’s approval of the ‘‘Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan’ recruitment for the local climate activator position will commence. This position will support and amplify community initiatives to implement the board’s local climate action plan. A work programme will be developed and agreed with the Albert-Eden Local Board.

60.    The local board has allocated $40,000 to support recruitment of the local climate activator in 2022/2023 (AE/2022/106). Approval of budgets for this project will be sought through the respective work programme approval process each financial year.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Climate Action Plan

133

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Hana Perry - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Expressions of interest applications and the granting of two new community leases at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden

File No.: CP2022/13782

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To conclude the expressions of interest applications to occupy the former bowling clubroom building and the green at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden and recommend to grant two new community leases for the site.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On the 17 August 2021, the Albert-Eden Local Board resolved for staff to call for expressions of interest to lease the council-owned building (approximately 200m²) and/or greens area (approximately 1200m²) located on Nicholson Park Reserve, 25 Poronui Road, Mt Eden (resolution AE/2021/127).

3.       Ten applications were received, and an analysis and assessment of these applications were undertaken by staff.

4.       All applications were discussed with the Albert-Eden Local Board at four workshops held between June 2022 and August 2022.

5.       Staff’s final recommendation is for two community leases for the site, one for the building to the Handweavers and Spinner Guild Incorporated (HWS) and one for the green to Auckland Futsal Federation Trust (AFFT).

6.       This allows for maximum use of the site and aligns with the Local Board Plan Outcome Five: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs.

7.       Nicholson Park is held by Department of Conservation as a classified recreation reserve under the Reserves Act 1977 and vested in Auckland Council for recreation purposes.

8.       The approved 1993 Park Management Plan for Nicholson Park contemplates leasing to a bowling club only.  Public notification and iwi consultation on the intent to lease to any alternative group is therefore required.

9.       Community outcome plans will be negotiated with both groups and will be attached to the lease.

10.     It is anticipated that activation of the building and park will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission.

11.     This report recommends that two new community leases be granted, one to Handweavers and Spinner Guild Incorporated for the occupation of the building and one to Auckland Futsal Federation Trust for occupancy of the green for a term of three years commencing from 1 November 2022 with one three year right of renewal.

12.     If the local board decides to grant the leases, staff will progress with public notification and iwi engagement and work with the lessees to finalise the lease agreements.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      Delegate to the local board chairperson to appoint a hearings panel, if required to consider any objections received following public notification of council’s intention to grant two new leases to Handweavers and Spinners Guild Incorporated and Auckland Futsal Federation Trust for land and buildings at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden and delegate the panel to make a decision. 

b)      Iwi engagement is to be undertaken and any concerns will be worked through with the local board.

c)      grant a community lease, under Section 73 (3) of the Reserves Act 1977 to the Handweaver and Spinners Guild Association for an area comprising approximately 200m2 located at 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden on the land legally described as Lot 49 Section 6 Suburbs of Auckland (as per Attachment A – Site Plan) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – three (3) years, commencing 1 November 2022 with one right of renewal for a further three (3) years, and final expiry on 31 October 2028.

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested.

iii)      maintenance fee - $500.00 plus GST per annum.

iv)      request a community outcomes plan be prepared for approval by the local board and that this be attached as a schedule to the lease.

v)      A signed Memorandum of Understanding on the shared maintenance and operational responsibilities of Handweavers and Spinners Guild Association and Auckland Futsal Federation Trust to be provided to council.

vi)      note all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. 

d)      grant a community lease, under Section 54 (2) of the Reserves Act 1977 to the Auckland Futsal Federation Trust for an area comprising approximately 1200m2 located at 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden on the land legally described as Lot 49 Section 6 Suburbs of Auckland (as per Attachment A – Site Plan) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – three (3) years, commencing 1 November 2022 with one right of renewal for a further three (3) years, and final expiry on 31 October 2028.

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if requested.

iii)      request a community outcomes plan be prepared for approval by the local board and that this be attached as a schedule to the lease.

iv)      A signed Memorandum of Understanding on the shared maintenance and operational responsibilities of Handweavers and Spinners Guild Association and Auckland Futsal Federation Trust to be provided to council.

v)      note all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

13.     The current lease for the former bowling club building at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden expired on 30 June 2020.

14.     The Handweavers and Spinners Guild Auckland Incorporated (HWS) are the current tenants of the building. Their current lease commenced 1 July 2010 with final expiry on 30 June 2020. This lease remains operative on a month-by-month basis, until a decision is made on future occupancy.

15.     When the lease of a council owned building expires, an expression of interest (EOI) process is recommended to canvas the community for proposals to ensure the best community outcomes are delivered.

16.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms. 

17.     On 24 May 2017, the Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for council owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term.

18.     The local board resolved (AE/2021/127) for staff to initiate an Expressions of Interest (EOI) for parties interested to occupy both the building and the entire green, which has been unused for many years. Staff advertised and sought applications, including contacting groups on the council interest register and emailed iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

19.     Ten applications were received, no applications were submitted from iwi groups. Staff assessed all applications, the results were workshopped with the local board over various workshops and this report recommends two community leases, one for the building and one for the green, which will allow for maximum usage of the site.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

The Land

20.     Nicholson Park is located at 25 Poronui Street Mt Eden (Attachment A Site Plan). The land is legally described as Part Allotment 49 Section 6 Suburbs of Auckland and is classified recreation reserve by gazette 1981 p2927.

21.     The approved 1993 Park Management Plan for Nicholson Park contemplates leasing to a bowling club only.  Public notification and iwi consultation on the intent to lease to any alternative group is therefore required.

The building

22.     The former bowling club building is situated at the south side of Nicholson Park, Mt Eden. The building is owned by council and is approximately 200sqm in area.

23.     The building comprises of a large meeting room, a kitchen, bathrooms and two smaller rooms.

24.     The building is in good condition but would benefit from an upgrade to the kitchen and bathrooms. The building also lacks a heating source.

25.     This work has been added to Community Facilities’ renewals programme.

Expressions of Interest Process

26.     At the expressions of interest closing date, ten applications were received. The ten applications are listed below:

·      Auckland Central Volleyball Club

·      Handweavers and Spinners Guild Auckland Incorporated

·      Auckland Futsal Federation Trust

·      Auckland Normal Intermediate School

·      Auckland Rugby League Referees Association

·      Big Buddy Mentoring Trust

·      Gardner Road Kindergarten

·        Earth Action Trust

·        NZ Hindu Temple Society

·        Pacific Masters Trust

 

27.     The applications were assessed using a weighting table to rate a range of criteria including:

·        Eligibility – is membership open or restricted.

·        Financial stability – did the group provide accounts, were the accounts audited, is the group reliant on council funding, is the group affiliated to a regional/national body.

·        Group sustainability – is the group fully self-supporting or do they require greater outside support.

·        References – do the groups have supporting references?

·        Building size, configuration, location – does the building meet the needs of the group, are any modifications required.

·        Extent of usage – the hours per week the facility will be utilized.

·        Sharing & collaboration – who are the group willing to share and collaborate with.

·        Activity complies with land status – does the activities align with the classification of the land.

·        Any requirements for resource and building consents

·        Is there any identified need in the community for this service

·        Does the groups outcomes align with the local board plan and Auckland Plan.

 

28.     After assessment of the applications staff presented their findings to the local board at a workshop on 28 June 2022. The top two applicants were HWS and Auckland Central Volleyball Club (ACVC) and a shared occupancy was recommended.

29.     On 5 July 2022, the local board directed staff to reassess the application received from AFFT following new information that the group was interested to utilise the space as it is, rather than construct a new building as outlined in their original application.

30.     As a result of the re-assessment AFFT scored higher than previously ranked and was equal with the two top applicants HWS and ACVC.

31.     Staff progressed Phase two discussions and a re-assessment of the final three applicants, HWS, ACVC and AFFT which included:

·        the possibility of a shared the lease – maximising use of the site

·        clarification of the works required to develop the greens for sporting activities.

32.     Staff met with all three groups to discuss the proposal and the option of a shared occupancy and to work through any concerns or issues, including ongoing maintenance, access, agreed responsibilities and a safe space for equipment and storage.

33.     Staff from Community Facilities and Parks, Sport and Recreation met with both AFFT and ACVC to clarify the requirements for the use of the green, this included:

·        A Geotech assessment of the soil is required prior to development of the green

·        Any necessary resource consent and Landowner approval (LOA) to remove soil from the green

·        all costs would be borne by the successful applicant

·        the rock retaining walls are historic and protected.

Auckland Central Volleyball Club

34.     ACVC would like to create a sand sport facility at Nicholson Park, led by central Auckland’s largest and longest serving volleyball club, this will benefit the growing community of volleyball and sand sport participants and positively contribute to Auckland City’s livability.

35.     ACVC’s initial request was to co-share the building, with the mid-long-term plan to have more access as the volleyball programme grows.

36.     ACVC met onsite with HWS and discussed possible ways to collaborate and share the space.

37.     After discussions were held around the work required on the green, ACVC provided a detailed explanation of how they would develop the green. This included a detailed, costed comprehensive, stepwise plan, including numerous contingencies that would yield a professional level facility for multi-sport use at all levels, from community groups to international-tier sports.

38.     ACVC would be able to utilise the green straight away for playing volleyball. The development of the green would take approximately 12 months to transform the green into a sand court.

39.     ACVC would apply for funding to develop the green.

40.     The assessment of the ACVC application after the phase two stage process, confirmed that they would best utilise the site by leasing both the building and the green. The building would be able to provide storage for all their equipment and have a staff member onsite to co-ordinate access, and programmes. Overtime and as funding is sourced, the green would be developed into a sand court. ACVC would be able to operate and start playing volleyball on the greens as they currently are.

Auckland Futsal Federation Trust

41.     AFFT wish to transform the vacant Nicholson Park greens area into a vibrant hub for the local community to gather and enjoy the sport of Futsal. Currently Futsal is operated and played in schools across Auckland.

42.     After discussions were held around the work required on the green, AFFT confirmed that they understand the responsibilities for the development of the green sits with them.  They recognise that an Geotech assessment is required and that 300mm of topsoil would need to be removed to develop the green into a futsal hard surface.

43.     AFFT clarified that after completing the futsal court, they eventually would like to provide covering to protect the courts and put in lighting. They would use the public toilets and recognise the need for additional services.

44.     Given the scale of change to the greens it is anticipated it would be 12-16 months before futsal is established and able to play regularly onsite. This includes planning, fundraising, acquiring LOA, resource consent and construction.

45.     AFFT met with HWS and believe they could work together and share the building and activate the green under a shared lease.

46.     AFFT would be applying for funding to develop the green.

47.     The assessment of the AFFT application after the phase two stage process, confirmed that they would be happy to partner with HWS and share the building using it as an office to hold meetings and planning. They would develop the green into a futsal court over the next 12-16 months.

Handweavers and Spinners Guild

48.     Handweavers and Spinners Guild Auckland Incorporated (HWS) are the current tenants and have been leasing the former bowling club since 2006 and wish to remain in these premises so that they can continue to promote sustainable, traditional fibre crafts and support the connectedness and wellbeing of group members and continue to develop the site to become a Textile Hub.

49.     Having met on site separately with ACVC and AFFT, a successful sharing arrangement would require good communication, consideration, and a willingness to compromise. HWS showed both groups around the inside of the building, including the kitchen and the proposed shared bathroom. They discussed all the potential issues and HWS are happy to work with either ACVC or AFFT on a shared occupancy.

50.     HWS recognise the need to share facilities for community leases on council sites. This would allow for HWS and members to continue to operate at the site and work alongside a sports group to activate the green.

51.     The assessment of the HWS application after the phase two stage process, confirmed that they would be happy to partner with either ACVC and AFFT and work through all the challenges they would face, as this would allow them to remain on site and continue to provide their services to their members.

Conclusion

52.     The local board direction for the EOI was to explore the potential to gain maximum use of the site including the building and green.

53.     Considering all of the options, staff conclude that a shared occupancy would be a positive opportunity for maximum use of the site.

54.     A single lease to ACVC or AFFT would likely reduce the use of the building as they would become clubrooms for members of either sport or for the storage of sporting equipment.

55.     After all the discussions were completed, each group provided feedback on how they thought they would deal with these issues and how they saw the potential of a possible shared lease.

56.     After meeting with HWS and viewing the site, ACVC conferred with their subcommittee, they confirmed that sharing the building space is untenable for their longer-term plans to activate the site. ACVC are now wanting to acquire the clubrooms as well as a playing area as a single lease. This is a change from originally wanting to share the site, something ACVC could do for the short term only.

57.     HWS and AFFT agreed to share the site with the building be primarily used by both groups; For HWS they will promote sustainable, traditional fibre crafts and support the connectedness and wellbeing of group members and continue to develop the site to become a Textile Hub. For AFFT they will utilise the building as meeting space and for use during running Futsal activities on the green.

58.     There are some possible challenges for shared occupancy over the current layout of the building. But both HWS and AFFT are committed to working through and resolving these challenges.

59.     A MOU is recommended for a shared use of the building, which will cover maintenance costs, utilities and shared use of the site.

Public notification and engagement

60.     The approved 1993 Park Management Plan for Nicholson Park contemplates leasing to a bowling club only.  Public notification and iwi consultation on the intent to lease to any alternative group is therefore required.

61.     The proposed new community leases HWS and AFFT will appear in the Central Leader and the Auckland Council website’s Have Your Say webpage with a submission deadline for one month.

62.     The cost of the public notification will be met by the Community Facilities department of the council.   

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

63.     It is anticipated that activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission. A shared community space will however decrease overall energy use, as users will not consume energy at individual workspaces. The shared space will provide opportunity and enable people to enjoy positive healthy lifestyles and will increase capability and connections within local community.

64.     There is potential for the activation of the park will result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission this will be due to the development of the green into a sporting surface. All mitigation proceeds will be advocated during this process.

65.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·      use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·      use eco labelled products and services

·      seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

66.     Asset improvements and maintenance undertaken by the council will strive for maximum re-use and recycling of existing material. This will be in alignment with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle) to ensure minimum impact on greenhouse gas emission.

67.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·      to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·      to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

68.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

69.     Council staff from within the Community Facilities operational management and maintenance; Parks, Sports and Recreation; and Community Empowerment have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed leases as it will include positive outcomes for the community and will allow for increases usage of the site.

70.     The proposed new leases have no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

71.     The proposed leases will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote handweaving and textiles activities as well as sporting activities which benefit the community through wellbeing and inclusion for the Albert-Eden Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

72.     The assessment of the applications was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board from June 2022 to August 2022. The local board indicated in principle support of the proposed leases.

73.     The delivered activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Table One: 2020 Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome Five

Objective

Park and Community facilities meet a wide range of needs

We will continue to work with our community lease groups to adapt the spaces and processes we have to enable more sharing of spaces and the creation of hubs for informal get-togethers and formal groups.

·    Our people live healthy active lifestyles

·    Our parks and open space meet the needs of growing populations and diverse communities

·    Our community services and buildings provide diverse and inclusive spaces that meet the changing needs of our community.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

74.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden will be undertaken with the number of iwi groups identified as having an interest in land in the Albert-Eden Local Board area.

75.     The lessee will agree, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through health and well-being.

76.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  

77.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

78.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

79.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

80.     All costs relating to the advertisement of the council’s intention to grant the proposed lease will be borne by the Community Facilities department of Auckland Council.

81.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. No concerns were raised regarding the financial implications for the new lease.

82.     Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be covered by the council which is accounted for in current and future budgets. A maintenance fee of $500.00 is charged to the group towards maintenance of the building.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

83.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community leases to council owned building and greens at Nicholson Park, 25 Poronui Street, Mt Eden, both group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome.

84.     Should the building become unoccupied, there is a risk associated with the lack of maintenance and possible improvements. Council will be liable for the assets regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

85.     Subject to the Albert-Eden Local Board granting two community lease and there being no objections received following the public notification and iwi consultation, council staff will work with key representatives to finalise the lease agreement. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for Nicholson Park ex Bowling Clubrooms and green

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Proposed new community ground lease to Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated at Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham

File No.: CP2022/13385

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval to grant a new community ground lease to Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated for land at Warren Freer Park located at 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated (the club) seeks a new community ground lease to continue occupation and operation from a group-owned building at Warren Freer Park,15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham.

3.       The club currently hold a ground lease which reached final expiry on 31 May 2018. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the local board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their 15 June 2021 local board meeting (resolution AE/2021/81).

5.       The club aims to promote and encourage the game of softball, both competitively and recreationally. These activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 Outcome Five - Parks and Community Facilities meet a wide range of needs.

6.       The club has provided all the required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds, and they are being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

7.       As this is a group-owned building, they have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.

8.       The proposed new community ground lease to the club for the land at Warren Freer Park will be publicly notified. The notification will appear in the Central Leader in September 2022 and the Auckland Council website.

9.       A site visit was undertaken in March 2022 and established that the premises are being well managed and maintained.

10.     Council has staff negotiated a community outcomes plan with the club, which will be appended to the lease (Attachment B).

11.     Staff have engaged with Iwi who have an identified interest in the land. No comments or concerns were raised on the proposed new lease to the club at Warren Freer Park.

12.     Staff have engaged with various internal council stakeholders including, Community Facilities operational staff and the Parks and Places Specialist to obtain feedback on the proposed new lease to the club. No objections were received.

13.     It is anticipated that activation of the park will not result in any climate impacts.

14.     This report recommends that a new community ground lease be granted to Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated for a term of three (3) years on 20 September 2022, with one three (3) year right of renewal, reaching final expiry on 20 September 2028.

15.     If the local board decides to grant the lease, staff will work with the lessee to finalise the lease agreement.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      delegate to the local board chairperson to appoint a hearings panel, if required, to consider any objections received following the public notification of council’s intention to grant a new community ground lease to the Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated for land at Warren Freer Park located at 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham and delegate the panel to make a decision.

b)      grant, under Section 4 of the Local Government Act 2002, a new community ground lease to the Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated for an area comprising approximately 449m2 located at Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham on the land legally described as Lot 6 DP 46669 (as per Attachment A – site plan), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)      term – three (3) years, commencing on 20 September 2022, with one three (3) year right of renewal and reaching final expiry on 20 September 2028.

ii)     rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded.

iii)     Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (Attachment B).

c)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and Local Government Act 2002.

d)      note that iwi engagement for Auckland Council’s intention to grant a new community ground lease to Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated located at Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham has been undertaken and no concerns were raised.

 

Horopaki

Context

16.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

17.     The Albert-Eden Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their local board meeting on 15 June 2021 (resolution AE/2021/81).

18.     The progression of this lease to the club at Warren Freer Park located at 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building/s and lease

19.     Warren Freer Park is located at 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham (refer to Attachment A Site Plan). The land is legally described as Part Lot 1 DP 31914 and Part Lot 6 DP 46669 comprise a total area of 1.8595 hectares and are both contained in NA1881/27 held in fee simple (owned) by Auckland Council under the Local Government Act 2002.

20.     The club holds a community ground lease for the land situated at Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham.

21.     For a group owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.

22.     The building is primarily used by the group to provide premises where they promote and encourage the game of softball, both competitively and recreationally.

23.     The club’s activities align with the local board plan 2020 Outcome Five - Parks and Community Facilities meet a wide range of needs.

Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated

24.     The club was established in 1951and its objective is to promote and encourage the game of softball, both competitively and recreationally.

25.     The club has been successful and well managed with a membership of 325 catering for all age groups.

26.     The club caters for softball of all ages from 6 years to over 50 years old, including both boys’ and girls’ teams.

27.     Future plans for the club are to continue to grow their youth base by providing training, coaching, and playing facilities to the highest standard to develop into future New Zealand representative players.

28.     The group has been operating from Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue Sandringham since 1991. The building and other improvements are owned by the club.

29.     The club’s current community ground lease with the council commenced on 1 June 2013 and expired on the 31 May 2018. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new ground lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club is exercising this right by applying for a new lease.

31.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

32.     On 24 May 2017, the Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for community owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term

Public notification and engagement

33.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, Auckland Council must publicly notify its intention to grant a new community ground lease if the term is longer than six-months in duration.  

34.     The proposed new community ground lease to the club for the land at Warren Freer Park will be publicly notified. The notification will appear in the Central Leader in September 2022 and the Auckland Council website’s Have Your Say webpage.

35.     The cost of the public notification will be met by the Community Facilities department of the council.   

36.     A hearings panel, if required, will consider any objections received following the public notification of council’s intention to grant a new community ground lease.

Assessment of the application

37.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver their sporting services.

38.     The area proposed to be leased to the club consists of approximately 449m2 and is outlined in Attachment A – site map.

39.     The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

40.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.  

41.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained. All management and operational costs are funded by the club.

42.     The group provides a valuable service to the local community by promoting and encouraging the game of softball both competitively and recreationally.

43.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement (Attachment B). 

44.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.  

45.     Staff recommend that a new community ground lease be granted to the club for a term of three (3) years commencing from 20 September 2022, with one three (3) year right of renewal, reaching final expiry on 20 September 2028.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

46.     It is anticipated that activation of the park will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission.

47.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

48.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

49.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood plain.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

50.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate – Community Facilities operational management and maintenance; Parks, Sports and Recreation; and Community Empowerment have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will include positive outcomes for the community.

51.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

52.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote and encourage the game of softball for the Albert-Eden Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

53.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board on 30 August 2022. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposal.

54.     The delivered activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Table One: 2020 Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs

Our people can live healthy active lifestyles.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

55.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease for Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham was undertaken and no objections were received from any groups who identified as having an interest in the land in the Albert-Eden Local board area.

56.     The lessee has worked through via the Community Outcomes Plan (Attachment B) to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community. The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through health and well-being.

57.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  

58.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

59.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

60.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

61.     All costs relating to the advertisement of the council’s intention to grant the proposed lease will be borne by the Community Facilities department of Auckland Council.

62.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. No concerns were raised regarding the financial implications for the new ground lease to the club.

63.     Ongoing maintenance of the asset will be covered by the club.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

64.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community ground lease to Mount Albert Ramblers Softball Club at Warren Freer Park, 15 Watson Avenue, Sandringham the club’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcome.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community ground lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site plan for Mt Albert Ramblers Softball Club Incorporated

219

b

Community Outcomes Plan

221

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Description automatically generated with medium confidence


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Table

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Table

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Land classification and new community ground lease to Central United Football Club at Freyberg Field, 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham

File No.: CP2022/13377

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify the relevant parcels of land at Freyberg Field and grant a new community ground lease to Central United Football Club (club) for land at Freyberg Field, 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Central United Football Club (the club) seeks a new community ground lease to continue occupation and operation from their group-owned building at Freyberg Field, 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham.

3.       The club currently holds a ground lease which reached final expiry on 2 November 2020. The lease is holding over on a month-by-month basis until terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The new lease was identified and approved by the Albert-Eden Local Board as part of the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their 15 June 2021 local board meeting (resolution AE/2021/81).

5.       The club occupies Freyberg Field, 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham. The land is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation as an unclassified reserve and vested in Auckland Council, in trust, for recreation purposes. (Attachment A).

6.       Classification of the park is required prior to a new lease being granted to Central United Football Club as per the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977.

7.       The Albert-Eden Local Board has delegated authority under Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977 to resolve to classify the land parcels at Freyberg Field. It is recommended the land parcels be classified as recreation reserve.

8.       The club aims to promote and encourage the game of football, physical training, games and sports and recreation. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome five – parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs.

9.       The club has provided all the required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds and that the club is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

10.     As this is a club-owned building, they have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term.

11.     Public notification and iwi consultation is not required as the City of Mount Albert Approved Management Plan 1981, recognises the club and its activities.

12.     A site visit was undertaken in July 2021 and established that the premises are being well managed and maintained.

13.     The community outcomes plan has been worked through with the club and is attached to the lease (Attachment C).

14.     It is anticipated that activation of the park will not result in any climate impacts.

15.     This report recommends the classification of Freyberg Field as a recreation reserve and a new community ground lease be granted to Central United Football Club for a term of three (3) years commencing from 20 September 2022, with one three (3) year right of renewal, reaching final expiry on 20 September 2028.

16.     If the local board decides to grant the ground lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      resolve pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserve Act 1977, to classify Lot 247 and 248 Titirangi Parish and Lot 4 DP 130586 as a recreation reserve (Attachment A)

b)      grant a new community ground lease to the Central United Football Club for an area comprising approximately 850m2 located at 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham (Attachment B) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)      term – three (3) years, commencing 20 September 2022, with one three (3) year right of renewal, reaching final expiry on 20 September 2028.

ii)     rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded.

iii)     Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (Attachment C).

c)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

Horopaki

Context

17.     Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

18.     This report considers the classification of Freyberg Field and a proposed new ground lease to the club.

19.     The Albert-Eden Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their local board meeting on date June 2022 (resolution AE/2022/81).

20.     The progression of this ground lease to Central United Football Club at Freyberg Field, 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham was part of the approved work programme. This report considers the new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Land and lease

21.     Freyberg Field is located at 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham (refer to Attachment A Site Plan). The land is legally described as Allotments 247 and 248 Parish of Titirangi, and Lot 4 DP 130586 and are held by the Crown through Department of Conservation as an unclassified reserve.

22.     The Reserves Act 1977 requires Auckland Council as a reserve administering body, to classify all unclassified reserves. To align the activities on the land to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977, council staff propose that Freyberg Field be classified as a recreation reserve. It is a suitable classification considering the current activities and the reserve is intended for recreation purposes.

23.     Central United Football Club holds a community ground lease for group owned building on the council owned land situated at Freyberg Field.

24.     For a group owned building, all operational and maintenance costs are borne by the lessee.

25.     The building is primarily used by the group to provide and promote the game of football, both competitively and recreationally.

26.     These programmes align with the local board plan 2020 outcome five - parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs.

Central United Football Club

27.     Central United Football Club was established in 1966 and its primary purpose is to provide football to all age groups from four years of age to veterans, including both boys’ and girls’ teams, and to encourage and promote the game.

28.     The club appears to be successful and well managed with a membership of 950 catering for all age groups. Club teams have won a wide range of competitions, locally, nationally, and internationally.

29.     The club fields 40 junior/youth teams and nine senior teams. The number of junior players has doubled in the last ten years and the pressure is on to grow even more.

30.     The club has had considerable success in national competitions, winning numerous Northern Premier Leagues, Chatham Cups, and National Leagues. Its under 15 and 19 age group teams have also won titles nationally and internationally.

31.     The club has been operating from Freyberg Field since 1966 and during their tenure have undertaken significant works so that it is now considered one of the premier football grounds in the country. All the club’s facilities are maintained to a very high standard.

32.     The club’s current community ground lease with the council commenced on 3 November 2005 and has expired on the 2 November 2020. The lease to the club is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

33.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. Central United Football is exercising this right by applying for a new lease.

34.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

35.     On 24 May 2017, the Albert-Eden Local Board resolved, under Resolution number AE/2017/52, on a community occupancy policy that outlines the standard terms for community leases and licence to occupy council sites in the Albert-Eden Local Board area for community owned buildings with a three-year standard term with a single three year right of renewal, giving a six-year term.

Public notification and engagement

36.     Public notification and iwi consultation is not required as the City of Mount Albert Approved Management Plan 1981 recognises the club and its activities.

Assessment of the application

37.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request and is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver their sporting services.

38.     The area proposed to be leased to the Central United Football Club consists of approximately 850mand is outlined in Attachment B.

39.     The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet liabilities.

40.     The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.  

41.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained. All management and operational costs are funded by the club.

42.     The club has also undertaken upgrades including the replacement of the pitched roof.

43.     The club provides a valuable service to the local community by promoting and encouraging the game of football both competitively and recreationally.

44.     A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the Central United Football Club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. This will be attached as a schedule to the lease agreement (Attachment C).

45.     Auckland Council’s Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 sets out the requirements for community occupancy agreements and will be included as part of the lease agreement if approved by the local board.  

46.     Staff recommend that a new community ground lease be granted to Central United Football Club for a term of three years commencing from 20 September 2022, with one three year right of renewal, reaching final expiry on 20 September 2028.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

47.     It is anticipated that activation of the building will not result in an increase of greenhouse gas emission.

48.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities.

49.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

50.     Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

51.     Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate - Community Facilities operational management and maintenance; Parks, Sports and Recreation; and Community Empowerment have been consulted. They are supportive of the proposed lease as it will include positive outcomes for the community.

52.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     The proposed lease will benefit the community by enabling initiatives that promote and encourage the game of football for the Albert-Eden Local Board area and its surrounding communities.

54.     The assessment of the application was workshopped with the Albert-Eden Local Board on 30 August 2022. The local board indicated its in principle support of the lease proposal.

55.     The delivered activities align with the Albert-Eden Local Board Plan 2020 outcome and objective:

Table One: 2020 Local Board Plan outcome and objective

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 5: Parks and community facilities meet a wide range of needs

Our people can live healthy active lifestyles

 

56.     The local board has requested the Community Outcome plan include that during ticketed events at Freyberg Park, access through the path to Huntingtree Avenue must be kept open to the public.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     Iwi engagement about the council’s intention to grant a new community lease was not required as the City of Mount Albert Approved Management Plans 1981 recognises the club and its activities.

58.     The lessee has agreed, via the Community Outcomes Plan, to deliver Māori Outcomes that reflect their local community (Attachment C). The lease will benefit Māori and the wider community through specified benefits to Māori health and well-being.

59.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within a local government Tāmaki Makaurau context.  

60.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework.

61.     Community leasing aims to increase Māori wellbeing through targeted support for Māori community development projects.

62.     Community leases support a wide range of activities and groups. Leases are awarded based on an understanding of local needs, interests and priorities. The activities and services provided by leaseholders create benefits for many local communities, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

63.     Staff have consulted with the Financial Strategy and Planning Department of the council. No concerns were raised regarding the financial implications for the new lease to Central United Football Club for Freyberg Field.

64.     Ongoing maintenance is covered by lessee.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

65.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community ground lease to Central United Football Club at Freyberg Field, 47A Kiwitea Street, Sandringham, the group’s ability to undertake all current and future activities will be negatively impacted. This will have an adverse impact on the achievement of the desired local board plan outcomes

66.     The new lease affords the club security of tenure, enabling them to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

67.     If the local board resolves to classify the park and grant the proposed new community ground lease, staff will work with the Central United Football Club to finalise the lease agreements in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Freyberg Field site plan

229

b

Attachment B - Lease site plan

231

c

Attachment C - Community Outcomes Plan - Central United Football Club

233

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Heaven - Senior Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Local board views on private plan change 75 for 3A, 81A and 119A Carrington Road, Mt Albert (Mason Clinic)

File No.: CP2022/13669

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide local board views on a private plan change by Waitematā District Health Board for 3A, 81A and 119A Carrington Road, Mt Albert.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Decision-makers on a private plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan must consider local boards’ views on the plan change, if the relevant local boards choose to provide their views.

3.       Waitematā District Health Board (WDHB) (the requestor) lodged a private plan change for 3A, 81A and 119A Carrington Road, Mt Albert. The purpose of the plan change is to enable the expansion and intensification of the Mason Clinic – forensic psychiatric healthcare facility.

4.       The plan change proposes to do this by re-zoning 3A and 119A Carrington Road from Business – Mixed Use Zone to Special Purpose – Healthcare Facility and Hospital Zone, and amending provisions and plans in the Wairaka Precinct Chapter I334 in the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP).

5.       A local board can present local views and preferences when expressed by the whole local board. This report is the mechanism for the local board to resolve and provide its views on private plan change 75.  Staff do not recommend what view the local board should convey.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide local board views on private plan change 75 by Waitematā District Health Board for 3A, 81A and 119A Carrington Road, Mt Albert

b)      appoint a local board member to speak to the local board views at a hearing on private plan change 75

c)      delegate authority to the chairperson of Albert Eden Local Board to make a replacement appointment in the event the local board member appointed in resolution b) is unable to attend the private plan change hearing.

 

Horopaki

Context

Decision-making authority

6.       Each local board is responsible for communicating the interests and preferences of people in its area regarding the content of Auckland Council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws. Local boards provide their views on the content of these documents.  Decision-makers must consider local boards’ views when deciding the content of these policy documents (ss15-16 Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009).

7.       A private plan change request will be included in the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) if it is approved. Local boards must have the opportunity to provide their views on private plan change requests – when an entity other than council proposes a change to the AUP. 

8.       If the local board chooses to provide its views, the planner includes those views in the hearing report. The hearing report will address issues raised in local board views and submissions by themes. 

9.       If appointed by resolution, local board members may present the local board’s views at the hearing to commissioners, who decide on the private plan change request.

10.     This report provides an overview of the private plan change, and a summary of submissions’ key themes.

11.     The report does not recommend what the local board should convey, if the local board expresses its views on private plan change 75. The planner must include any local board views verbatim in the evaluation of the private plan change. The planner cannot advise the local board as to what its views should be, and then evaluate those views.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Plan change overview

12.     The private plan change applies to 3A, 81A and 119A Carrington Road, Mt Albert, shown in Figure 1. The land is zoned Business – Mixed Use and Special Purpose - Healthcare Facility and Hospital as shown below in Figure 2. The Wairaka Precinct I334 also sits over the land and controls development.

Map

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Figure 1: Aerial view of private plan change request area (blue outline) in Wairaka Precinct.

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Figure 2: Auckland Unitary Plan zoning of Wairaka Precinct and surrounding area.

13.     The WDHB states that the purpose of private plan change 75 is:

·       to enable the expansion and intensification of the Mason Clinic, in order to service forecast increases in demand for forensic psychiatry services; and

·       ensure that the growth of the Mason Clinic can be managed appropriately relative to the current and future environmental context of the Wairaka Precinct.

14.     The private plan change request seeks to:

·       re-zone 3A and 119A Carrington Road from Business – Mixed Use zone to Special Purpose – Healthcare Facility and Hospital zone (as shown below in Figure 4).

·       extend sub-precinct A of the Wairaka Precinct to include 3A and 119A Carrington Road (and amend this on the precinct plans), amend some precinct provisions and introduce new precinct provisions, and remove the “key open space (private)” as shown on 119A Carrington Road and the “shared path” as shown on 3A Carrington Road from I334.10.1 Wairaka: Precinct Plan 1. (as shown below in Figure 6).

·       Make changes to the precinct provisions as follows:

changes to the Precinct Description (I334.1) to better describe the nature of the Mason Clinic activity, and the provision of open space and connections

changes to the precinct objectives and policies to allow for intensification of the Mason Clinic

additional objectives and policies for sub-precinct A, including managing effects at boundaries, and recognising the functional and operational (including security) requirements of activities and development.

new activity table for sub-precinct A

changes to notification requirements for new buildings or additions to existing buildings in Sub-precinct A

new standards (including new landscape yard standards), matters of control/discretion and assessment criteria to achieve the outcomes sought by the objectives and policies.

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Figure 3: Operative zoning                                                                     Figure 4: Proposed zoning

 

Figure 5: I334.10.1 Wairaka: Precinct plan 1

Diagram, map

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Figure 6: proposed amended Precinct Plan 1 with extended sub-precinct A, deleted key open space (private) and deleted shared path

15.     The WDHB included technical reports that evaluate infrastructure, design, ecological, transport and landscape effects. The reports and other application details are available from council’s website at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/Pages/details.aspx?UnitaryPlanId=129. Council’s planner, and other experts, will evaluate and report on:

·       technical reports supplied by the requestor

·       submissions

·       views and preferences of the local board, if the local board passes a resolution.

Themes from submissions received

16.     Key submission themes are listed below.

·       Precinct description: Ensure that the Precinct description has an appropriate level of detail and acknowledges role of Precinct provisions in addressing interfaces between Mason Clinic and surrounding activities.

·       Buildings near boundary: Amend proposed activity 53 to provide that additions to existing buildings that would increase the building footprint by more than 20 % or 200m2 GFA (whichever is lesser) that are located within 10m of the eastern boundary are restricted discretionary activities.

·       Vehicle access: cumulative impact of trips and access, and whether roading upgrades are needed to support the development enabled by this Plan Change.

·       Site frontages: to be upgraded to include safe walking facilities and provision for separated cycling facilities prior to or, in conjunction with, development.

·       Active mode access between Carrington Road and the Mason Clinic.

·       Amend Wairaka Precinct Plan 1 to provide for appropriate alternative alignment(s) for any deleted active mode connections to Oakley Creek and the regional cycleway, including the connection through open space.

·       Concerns about effects including social, interfaces, flood plains, open space, and health and safety.

17.     Submissions were made by three people/organisations:

Table 1: Submissions received on plan change 75 (Mason Clinic)

Submissions

Number of submissions

In support (with amendments requested)

2

In opposition

1

Neutral

0

 

18.     Further submissions open on 9 September 2022 and will close on 23 September 2022.

19.     Information on individual submissions, and the summary of all decisions requested by submitters, is available from council’s website: https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/plans-projects-policies-reports-bylaws/our-plans-strategies/unitary-plan/auckland-unitary-plan-modifications/Pages/details.aspx?UnitaryPlanId=129.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Context

20.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out Auckland’s climate goals:

·       to adapt to the impacts of climate change by planning for the changes we will face (climate adaptation)

·       to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 (climate mitigation).

21.     The first of council’s climate goals is relevant because it relates to climate adaption.  That goal aligns with the legal principle for Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA) decision-makers to have particular regard to the effects of climate change (section 7(i) RMA)

22.     However, the RMA currently precludes the second goal: consideration of climate mitigation.  Consequently any local board views on climate mitigation will be disregarded by the plan change decision-makers.

23.     RMA amendments coming into force next year will enable climate mitigation to be considered.  These effects cannot be considered now, unless the private plan change proposes rules about particular greenhouse gas discharges.  No rules of that kind are proposed.

Implications for local board views

24.     Table 2 provides guidance as to what the local board may wish to consider in forming any view.

Table 2: Relevance of climate change to RMA decision-making

In scope for RMA decision-making

Out of scope for RMA decision-making

Climate adaption issues such as:

How should land be allocated to different activities when considering how climate change may affect our environment? How and where should physical resources be constructed?

For example:

·    will sea-level rise cause inundation of land where development is proposed? 

·    is the land in an area susceptible to coastal instability or erosion?

·    will Auckland be less- or better-prepared for flooding, stress on infrastructure, coastal and storm inundation?

·    is ecosystem resilience improved through ecological restoration or reduced by the loss of indigenous habitats?

Climate mitigation issues such as:

·     release of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere

·     increase in tail-pipe emissions from private car use, use of coal fired or natural gas burners.

Site information

25.     The council GIS data indicates the following hazards on the sites subject to the plan change:

·       Flood plains

·       Potential coastal inundation via Te Auaunga and Wairaka Stream

·       Filled/weak ground.

Submitters’ views

26.     Submissions outlined the following climate change matters:

·     Concern about development in a flood plain and the proposed reduction in riparian margin width.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     Healthy Waters, Parks and urban design have provided initial comments on the plan change:

·     Healthy Waters: Have considered infrastructure capacity, flooding and overland flow paths, water quality, and streams. Satisfied that any potential effects in relation to this plan change can be addressed through the plan change and resource consent processes.

·     Parks (open space): Noted inconsistencies between Wairaka Precinct plans and Open Space Provision Policy. Have had ongoing discussions and workshops with the local board regarding open space provision across the Wairaka Precinct.

·     Parks (shared path): The indicative shared path connection provides an important link from existing reserves (Oakley Creek and Waterview Reserve) to the proposed neighbourhood park. Removal of the indicative shared path connection does not enable to precinct to meet its own objectives. Relocation of this to a location which provides appropriate connection outside of the Special Purpose – Healthcare Facility and Hospital Zone may be supported.

·     Urban design: Satisfied that the proposed plan change provisions will manage interfaces to all boundaries of the Mason Clinic, and that the site will be appropriately integrated with future residential development within the Wairaka area.

28.     These departments will also review relevant submissions and provide expert input to the hearing report.

29.     Auckland Transport made a submission. The key matters raised are:

·     Vehicle access: cumulative impact of trips and access, and whether roading upgrades are needed to support the development enabled by this Plan Change.

·     Site frontages: to be upgraded to include safe walking facilities and provision for separated cycling facilities prior to or, in conjunction with, development.

·     Active mode access between Carrington Road and the Mason Clinic.

·     Amend Wairaka Precinct Plan 1 to provide for appropriate alternative alignment(s) for any deleted active mode connections to Oakley Creek and the regional cycleway, including the connection through open space.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

30.     The private plan change request is for 3A and 119A Carrington Road, within the Albert-Eden Local Board area. The site is adjacent to public land (Te Auaunga / Oakley Creek) for which the local board has some decision-making powers, and is approximately 500 metres from Pt Chevalier Library.

31.     This plan change relates to the Albert-Eden Local Board area only.

32.     Factors the local board may wish to consider in formulating its view:

·     interests and preferences of people in local board area

·     well-being of communities within the local board area

·     local board documents, such as local board plan, local board agreement

·     responsibilities and operation of the local board.

33.     The WDHB engaged with the local board prior to lodgement. The Albert-Eden Local Board were advised of proposed private plan change in May 2020, and WDHB have made regular presentations since then at local board workshops. Feedback at that stage is informal; restrictions on delegations prevent that informal feedback from being the views of the local board.

34.     This report is the mechanism for obtaining formal local board views. The decision-maker will consider local board views, if provided, when deciding on the private plan change.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

35.     If the local board chooses to provide its views on the plan change it includes the opportunity to comment on matters that may be of interest or importance to Māori people, well-being of Māori communities or Te Ao Māori (Māori worldview). 7005 residents in the local board area identify as Māori, in 2018 census results.

36.     The WDHB advised council that it sent correspondence about the private plan change request to 14 mana whenua groups (listed below) which were identified as having interests in the Wairaka Precinct area.

·       Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·       Ngāti Te Ata

·       Te Kawerau ā Maki

·       Te Ākitai Waiohua

·       Ngāti Maru

·       Ngāti Pāoa Iwi Trust

·       Ngāti Pāoa Trust Board

·       Ngāti Tamaterā

·       Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·       Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·       Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·       Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua

·       Waikato – Tainui

·       Ngāti Tamaoho.

37.     The requestor advises that formal/written feedback on the proposed plan change has not been received from any parties.

38.     Additional consultation, in the context of mana whenua as development partners in the precinct, has been undertaken by the requestor with Marutūāhu Rōpū, Waiohua-Tamaki Rōpū, and Ngāti Whātua Rōpū.

39.     The hearing report will include analysis of Part 2 of the Resource Management Act which requires that all persons exercising RMA functions shall take into account the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi/Te Tiriti o Waitangi. The hearing report will analyse the effects of the proposed plan change on the wider precinct development and the Rōpū-led developments, as well as the effects on Te Auaunga/Oakley Creek and the surrounding environment.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

40.     The private plan change request does not pose any financial implications for the local board’s assets or operations.

41.     Costs associated with processing the private plan change request will be recovered from the requestor.  Impacts on infrastructure arising from the private plan change request, including any financing and funding issues will be addressed in the hearing report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     There is a risk that the local board will be unable to provide its views and preferences on the plan change, if it doesn’t pass a resolution. This report provides:

·      the mechanism for the Albert Eden Local Board to express its views and preferences

·      the opportunity for a local board member to speak at a hearing.

43.     If the local board chooses not to pass a resolution at this business meeting, these opportunities are forgone.

44.     The power to provide local board views regarding the content of a private plan change cannot be delegated to individual local board member(s) (Local Government Act 2002, Sch 7, cls 36D)This report enables the whole local board to decide whether to provide its views and, if so, to determine what matters those views should include.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

45.     The planner will include, and report on, any resolution of the local board in the hearing report. The local board member appointed to speak to the local board’s views will be informed of the hearing date and invited to the hearing for that purpose. 

46.     The planner will advise the local board of the decision on the private plan change request by memorandum.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Elisabeth Laird - Planner

Authorisers

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Local board feedback on Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori

File No.: CP2022/13679

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek formal views from the Albert-Eden Local Board on the Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori project.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Community Bike Hubs is a project to accelerate Auckland Transport’s commitment to providing better access to bikes through the establishment of Community Bike Hubs.

3.       The project is funded through Auckland Council’s Ngā Tiriti Ngangahau - The Vibrant Streets (formerly Regional Streets for People) programme.

4.       In the new Community Bike Hub model, Auckland Transport owns the Bike Hubs and takes responsibility for set-up costs while the community runs and operates the Bike Hubs.

5.       This report is seeking views from the local board on:

·    what is the local board’s interest and preferred level of engagement in Community Bike Hubs?

·    does the local board support the Community Bike Hub approach?

·    are there any specific Bike Hub sites in addition to the ones proposed in Attachment A that the local board wants investigated?

·    does the local board have any community groups or individuals in particular they would like Auckland Transport to be engaging as part of this project?

6.       Auckland Transport will review the formal feedback from local boards. Auckland Transport will then evaluate and confirm Community Bike Hub Operators and progress landowner approvals.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide its formal views on the Community Bike Hubs project.

b)      provide its preferred level of engagement in the Community Bike Hubs project.

c)      provide any additional sites for consideration for Community Bike Hubs.

d)      provide any community groups or individuals for Auckland Transport to engage with on Community Bike Hubs.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori project is developing a new model of Bike Hubs that are owned by Auckland Transport and operated by the community.

8.       The project seeks to promote the successes of community Bike Hubs by funding the establishment and ongoing operation of Bike Hubs while empowering local communities to run and operate the Bike Hub.

9.       Bike Hubs, Bike Kitchens, Bike Spaces and Bike Boxes have been successful community initiatives in Auckland that improve access to bikes by fixing up and redistributing bikes as well as providing events, activations, information and education. These community initiatives are variously supported by Auckland Transport, other Council-controlled Organisations (CCO), local boards, other agencies and commercial partners and have been shown to be highly successful at the different scales they target.

10.     Bike Hubs were identified as the operating model best suited to growth, with strong organisational accountability, consistent hours, wide offerings and deep roots into the community.

11.     The Community Bike Hubs project has identified the following locations as being a good fit for the new model:

·    Papakura

·    Grey Lynn

·    Pakuranga

·    Manukau

·    Northcote

·    Epsom

·    Onehunga

·    Devonport

 

12.     The project also will scale up existing bike spaces in Mt Roskill and Waiheke into full Bike Hubs.

13.     Despite their success and their intention to grow, key barriers to growth have been identified for Bike Hubs such as set-up costs and uncertainty of ongoing funding. Auckland Transport’s Sustainable Mobility team has been leading a programme of work to address these barriers and enable growth of the Bike Hub network.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The new Community Bike Hub model is an Auckland Transport-owned, community-run model in which Auckland Transport takes ownership of landowner permissions, consenting, set-up costs and all ongoing site requirements. Auckland Transport then partners with and initially funds community organisations to operate these Bike Hubs, employing locals and developing extensive volunteer networks.

15.     Bike Hubs have historically been housed in two or three shipping containers and this is the model most appropriate to most locations. However, in some locations, CCO or other agency property, such as a town centre storefront or council facility, exists that could be used for a Bike Hub.

16.     Auckland Transport will fully fund these Community Bike Hubs in their first year and will aim in subsequent years to reduce funding to a sustainable level while adding other funding sources such as koha, donated bike sales, other grants or funders and commercial partnerships. Further, Auckland Transport will fully support these Bike Hubs and other existing spaces with dedicated resources, guidance and advice, connections to other Bike Hubs and the wider network, training and upskilling and more.

17.     This initiative supports Auckland Council’s strategic goals related to development of alternative modes of transport, especially cycling and its climate change goals.  Most local board plans across the region prioritise responses to climate change, including the promotion of alternatives to travelling by car. 

18.     Auckland Transport recommends that local boards support this initiative. Auckland Transport is seeking feedback and more information on:

·      Interest – Does the local board support the Community Bike Hub project?

·    Engagement level - Does the board wish to engage in this project. If so, would it like to:

o   Collaborate: fund or provide resources and participate as a partner with Auckland Transport (now or in the future)

o   Consult: engage actively, express its views and work with Auckland Transport

o   Be Informed: Auckland Transport will keep the local board informed about the project’s progress.

·    Site selection – Are there Bike Hub sites beyond those proposed in Attachment A that the local board thinks would be worth investigating? Community members have helped identify possible locations in each local board area. This report is seeking local boards to provide specific sites they think would be especially appropriate or inappropriate for this project.

·    Community groups – Are there any community groups or individiuals in particular the local board recommends Auckland Transport engage as part of this project?

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Auckland Transport engages closely with the council on developing strategy, actions and measures to support the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, Auckland’s Climate Action Plan and the council’s priorities.

20.     Auckland Transport’s core role is in providing attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reducing the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network.

21.     The primary climate change benefit of this plan is that Bike Hubs encourage more people to cycle, reducing the number of car journeys and therefore carbon emissions.

22.     The Community Bike Hubs project contributes to Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan as the hubs enable reduced emissions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     This project is engaging with Community Facilties, Parks Sports and Recreation, Eke Panuku and local boards in order to identify options for possible locations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     Workshops were held with local boards throughout August 2022. Informal steering from boards suggest strong support for this project and additional considerations for site selection.

25.     This report is seeking formal feedback from impacted local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     Auckland Transport is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader legal obligations in being more responsible or effective to Māori.

27.     Auckland Transport’s Māori Responsiveness Plan outlines the commitment to 19 mana whenua tribes in delivering effective and well-designed transport policy and solutions for Auckland. We also recognise mataawaka and their representative bodies and our desire to foster a relationship with them. This plan is available on the Auckland Transport website - https://at.govt.nz/about-us/transport-plans-strategies/maori-responsiveness-plan/#about

28.     The Community Bike Hubs project has te ao Māori woven throughout. The designs and marketing draw from Māori artists and designs, and the Bike Hub Operating Model explicitly calls out engaging with cultural groups and individuals.

29.     There is opportunity for mana whenua to operate and be involved with these Bike Hubs.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     Auckland Transport is fully funding the Bike Hubs for the first year of operation, and looking to slowly step down Auckland Transport funding to around 40 per cent of operating expenses in the long term. Auckland Transport expects the shortfall to be made up from sale of bikes, koha, other grants or funders and commercial partnerships.

31.     This decision has no financial implications for Albert-Eden Local Board at this time as Auckland Transport is funding the bike hub for the first year. If the local board wishes to contribute financially in future the implications will be reported then.

32.     Should the local board wish to contribute funding in the future, the project team would welcome a discussion on the matter. The outcome of that discussion would need to be recorded in a decision report, and that report would include detailed information about financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     The proposed decision to proceed with the Community Bike Hub project does not put the Albert-Eden Local Board at financial or legal risk.  The decision authorises feedback to an Auckland Transport process and that organisation carries the decision-making risk.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Auckland Transport will review the formal feedback from local boards. Auckland Transport will then evaluate and confirm community community bike hub operators.

35.     An estimate timeline of actions is provided in Table One below.

Table One – Estimated Timeline

Date

Action

September 2022

Auckland Transport will continue to work on site development and procurement of the physical assets such as containers, tools and fit-out, etc.

Local boards provide their formal views on potential sites by report.

October 2022

Auckland Transport evaluates and confirms Bike Hub Operators for Stage 1 Bike Hubs. 

There is targeted community engagement and hub operator training in the locations selected for Stage 1 Bike Hubs.

November 2022

Stage 1 Community Bike Hubs open. Stage 1 include Bike Hubs already identified as quick turnaround because of strong existing community support and reduced landowner permissions and consenting requirements.

November - March 2023

There is targeted community engagement and Bike Hub operator training in the locations selected for Stage 2 Community Bike Hub delivery.

April 2023

Stage 2 Community Bike Hubs open. These include Bike Hubs with less active support or with consent or permission required.

March - July 2023

There is targeted community engagement and Bike Hub operator training in the locations selected for Stage 3 Community Bike Hub delivery.

August 2023

Stage 3 Community Bike Hubs open. These include Bike Hubs where a greater level of engagement or site permissions or consents are needed.

July 2024

Project funding ends and Community Bike Hubs are supported through standard Sustainable Mobility funding and other funding sources.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Locations and Proposed Sites

255

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ben Mansfield - Auckland Transport, Community Bike Hubs Manager

Authorisers

Caroline Tauevihi - Head of Community Engagement, Central (Acting)

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

A picture containing application

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

File No.: CP2022/13676

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek high-level input from local boards on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020. This includes:

·    long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

2.       This report also provides an overview of the feedback received through the first stage of the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement that ran from 13 June to 17 July 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 provides national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991. The fundamental concept of the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

4.       Auckland Council is required to change the Auckland Unitary Plan to give full effect to Te Mana o te Wai, which must be reflected in all decisions made under the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020.  Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must be notified by December 2024. Action plans must also be prepared and published as soon as practicable to achieve environmental outcomes and freshwater management objectives.

5.       The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 sets the National Objectives Framework and steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow when implementing the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020. Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland.

6.       The first stage of National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value and use freshwater bodies and the environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

7.       Feedback from the first stage engagement will be used, along with existing information and further research and analysis, to develop freshwater management options that will be brought back for a second stage of engagement in the second half of 2023.

8.       There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the engagement period.

9.       Local boards are now invited to provide input to the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Local boards can view the feedback form provided during consultation to assist in preparation of feedback at Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      note the feedback received from communities through the first stage of public engagement with the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020, in Attachment D, Attachment E and Attachment F.

b)      provide feedback on the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 values including the:

i)        long-term visions for freshwater management

ii)       proposed Freshwater Management Units

iii)      values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) is a mandatory national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).  The Policy Statement applies to all freshwater (including groundwater) and, to the extent they are affected by freshwater, to receiving environments (which may include estuaries and the wider coastal marine area).

11.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·       first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·       second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·       third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

12.     Regional councils and unitary authorities are required to change regional policy statements and regional plans to give effect to the requirements of the NPS-FM, including Te Mana o te Wai.

13.     Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland. A plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is required for the NPS-FM implementation. The AUP plan change must be notified by December 2024.  The NPS-FM also requires the preparation of action plans to manage the effects of the use and development of land, freshwater and on receiving environments. Action plans must be prepared and published as soon as practicable.

14.     Every council must develop long-term visions for freshwater in its region and include those long-term visions as objectives in its regional policy statement. Long-term visions:

a)     may be set by Freshwater management Units (FMU), be part of a FMU, or at a catchment level; and

b)     must set goals that are ambitious but reasonable (that is, difficult to achieve but not impossible); and

c)     identify a timeframe to achieve those goals that is ambitious and reasonable (for example, 30 years after the commencement date).

15.     The National Objectives Framework (NOF) is a core part of the NPS-FM, and includes a series of steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow on implementation, including to:

·       identify FMU in the region

·       identify values for each FMU

·       set environmental outcomes for each value and include them as objectives in regional plans

·       identify attributes for each value and set a baseline for those attributes

·       set target attribute states, environmental flows and levels, and other criteria to support the achievement of environmental outcomes

·       set limits as rules and prepare action plans (as appropriate) to achieve environmental outcomes.

16.     FMUs are essentially the spatial arrangements adopted by council for the management of freshwater.  All fresh waterbodies and their related catchments must be within an FMU.  While the NPS-FM is primarily concerned with the management of freshwater, it does also require an integrated management approach – ki uta ki tai – including consideration of the relationship of freshwater and its management to the coastal receiving environment. 

17.     A public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022 through AK Have Your Say and other engagement activities including library events and online webinars. Feedback was sought on:

·       the long-term visions for freshwater management

·       the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·       how people value freshwater in FMUs and environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for these values.

18.     The public engagement on AK Have Your Say comprised the following:

·       the NPS-FM 2020

·       an overview of the NPS-FM implementation programme

·       NPS-FM implementation timeline

·       the proposed Auckland FMU map

·       the map of the Pukekohe specified vegetable growing area (when implementing the NPS-FM, the council must have regard to the importance of this area for domestic vegetables and food security, and may temporarily have a less stringent approach to water quality issues to ensure this is appropriately recognised)

·       an online feedback form with consultation questions and opportunity to provide comments on the proposed FMUs (also translated into numerous languages)

·       a social pinpoint map allowing people to provide feedback to a water body or within an area

 

·       Ministry for the Environment factsheets, infographics, and videos on freshwater management

·       access to freshwater planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

19.     Two online webinars and six library drop-in events were undertaken through the engagement period. These engagement activities introduced Auckland Council’s NPS-FM implementation programme and provided opportunities to the public to ask questions and to provide feedback directly.

20.     There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the consultation period, including:

·       128 online feedback forms

·       343 site-specific comments (from 84 submitters) via the Social Pinpoint mapping tool

·       12 hard copy feedback forms

·       23 emails

·       120 comments via library displays where feedback could be provided on post-it notes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The NPS-FM has a focus on the identification and management of freshwater values.  It includes four compulsory values (ecosystem health, human contact, threatened species, and mahinga kai) that must be applied and managed in each FMU. There are also other values that must be considered in managing freshwater if they are relevant to Auckland. The list of compulsory values and other values are provided in Attachment C to this report (and are identified as Appendices 1A and 1B of the NPS-FM).  Additionally, the council must identify any other relevant values (i.e. additional to those specifically identified in the NPS-FM) including any additional Māori Freshwater Values as identified by mana whenua.

22.     Overall, submitters raised over 200 individual sites of value to them, while many talked more generally about particular types of, or all, freshwater bodies. The sites named were most commonly located in the Franklin, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Waitematā local board areas.

23.     The values most commonly raised in relation to how submitters use, and would like to use, those freshwater bodies related to:

·       ecosystem health – including water quality and habitat (both generally and for threatened species) in particular

·       natural form and character

·       drinking water supply

·       human contact (that is, for recreational purposes such as swimming, boating, or fishing).

24.     Given the importance of the coastal environment in Auckland, and the impacts from key freshwater issues, such as sediment and E. coli, three FMUs have been proposed for freshwater management based on the three coastal receiving environments for catchments: the Kaipara Harbour, the Manukau Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf (map provided in Attachment B).  This proposed approach provides the opportunity to both address the management of freshwater for its own sake, while also explicitly considering its relationship to the coastal environment.

25.     While submitters were not asked directly whether they supported the Freshwater Management Units or not, comments were provided on a range of matters, including suggestions around amending the proposed boundaries, or rationale behind the boundaries, having more or less FMUs, more location specific detail, and having the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area as a separate FMU.

26.     Other submitters commented on non-FMU specific matters including wetlands, the need for more transparency and action, concern about water quality, the need to prioritise ecosystem health, farming/vegetable growing, and flooding.

27.     The NPS-FM provides for a specified vegetable growing area in Pukekohe that sits within the Manukau FMU. Some comments related to the provision for horticultural land use in Pukekohe.

·     3 supported the provision for continued horticultural use, including irrigation.

·     3 expressed concerns about the impact of horticultural activities on water quality (streams, and aquifers) particularly from fertiliser and nitrates.

28.     Demographic information from those submitters who provided it is detailed in Attachment D.

29.     Data tables naming sites, and their number of mentions by local board area is provided in Attachment E. A full Summary of Feedback report is provided in Attachment F.

30.     Staff are currently undertaking data analysis and a summary report of feedback will be published on AK Have Your Say.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM Te Mana o te Wai is about restoring and preserving the balance between the water, the wider environment, and the community. This concept is in line with the natural environment priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which sets the goal:

Oranga taiao, oranga tāngata: a healthy and connected natural environment supports healthy and connected Aucklanders. The mauri (life essence) of Tāmaki Makaurau is restored”.

32.     The NPS-FM includes the following policy direction in response to climate change:

Policy 4: Freshwater is managed as part of New Zealand’s integrated response to climate change.

33.     Every council must have regard to the foreseeable impact of climate change in following areas:

·    when setting limits on resource use, every regional council must:

3.14(2)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when setting environmental flows and levels, every regional council must:

3.16(4)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when assessing and reporting, as part of each review required by section 35(2A) of the RMA, every regional council must prepare and publish:

3.30(2)(g) predictions of changes, including the foreseeable effects of climate change, that are likely to affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in the region.

34.     The implementation of the NPS-FM will help to promote the resilience of freshwater ecosystems to the effects of climate change.  The development of freshwater action plans will require sustainable land and water management practices to enhance the mauri and health of waterways, which is in line with actions prioritised in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The NPS-FM is relevant to all of the council’s functions. All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) are involved in the NPS-FM implementation, including participation in a Steering Committee overseeing the development and implementation of the programme. This includes having an ongoing role in supporting the NPS-FM engagement, and providing input and review of responses developed to give effect to the NPS-FM.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, local boards are responsible for identifying and communicating to Auckland Council the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards have a detailed understanding of their areas including freshwater values and issues and are in a position to provide important input to the development of NPS-FM responses, including in relation to the matters covered by this round of public engagement. 

37.     Prior to the public engagement a memo titled “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland” was provided to all local boards on 26 May 2022. The memo advised the key principles, consultation and timeframe requirements of implementing the NPS-FM, and the opportunities for local board input through the process (attached in Attachment G).

38.     A webinar presentation titled “National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020” was also presented to local boards in the meeting on 3 June 2022.  In response to feedback from elected members, the period for providing input had been extended for local boards to September 2022 to allow local boards time to provide feedback following the close of public engagement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The NPS-FM says the council must “actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in freshwater management” including in identifying Māori values and decision-making processes relating to Māori freshwater values.

40.     Engagement with mana whenua in Auckland is being undertaken through an on-going process, directly with mana whenua entities throughout the preparation of a plan change and development of action plans.

41.     Engagement with the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau about the NPS-FM has also been undertaken in the broader context of Three Waters Reform and the development and implementation of the council’s Water Strategy, to enable mana whenua to provide a more holistic consideration of the management of water.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The first stage of the NPS-FM engagement was undertaken within the business-as-usual planning budget. This budget covers primarily staff time and the public engagement.

43.     The budget required for NPS-FM engagement in 2023, and for implementation of the project through to 2026 is presently under discussion.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The government has set a deadline of December 2024 for the council to publicly notify the AUP plan change in response to the provisions of the NPS-UD. Given the scale and complexity of the work, and limited resources, there is a risk that the council may not receive sufficient quality feedback from a wide range of interests. There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-FM and how the NPS-FM engagement links to previous water related engagements, for example the Auckland Water Strategy engagement and the Three Waters Reform engagement.

45.     These risks have been mitigated to date by communicating communications with communities and stakeholders during the engagement period, through meetings, emails, and online Question & Answer sessions. There will be further and ongoing communication to obtain quality engagement results to progress the NPS-FM implementation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The feedback received from the first stage engagement on the values and the environmental outcomes sought, together with the NPS-FM requirements, will inform the development of objectives and proposed management options to achieve the objectives.

47.     A second phase of public engagement will be undertaken to seek feedback on the proposed objectives and management approaches for FMUs and water bodies. This will be undertaken in the second half of 2023 to provide opportunity for communities and stakeholders, and local boards for further involvement.  

48.     The feedback received from the second phase of engagement will further inform the development of a proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan and the development of action plans.

49.     Elected representatives will have opportunities to review the proposed plan change and action plans as they evolve, and before the plan change is approved for public notification in the second half of 2024 to meet the NPS-FM deadline of notification before December 2024.

50.     Submissions to the plan change will be heard by an independent Freshwater Hearing Panel who will make recommendations back to council by 2026.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback Form

265

b

Map of Proposed Freshwater Management Units

273

c

NPS-FM freshwater values

275

d

Who we heard from

277

e

Local Board breakdowns

279

f

Summary of Feedback Report

289

g

Memo to local boards on 26 May 2022: Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland

319

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Xu - Senior Policy Planner

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager - Planning, Regional, North, West & Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Nichola Waugh - Service and Asset Planner

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Amendment to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan

File No.: CP2022/13678

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an overview of the proposed amendment to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan (IMP) and invite local board feedback, if any.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The governance and administration of Tūpuna Maunga (except Rarotonga / Mt Smart) in Auckland rests with the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority). This statutory co-governance authority has equal representation from Ngā Mana Whenua and Auckland Council, with one (non-voting) Crown representative (see Attachment B for more information).

3.       In 2016 the Tūpuna Maunga Authority adopted its Integrated Management Plan (IMP). The purpose of this plan is to facilitate the restoration of the natural, spiritual and indigenous landscape of the various maunga. The restoration programme sought to ensure that the remaining cultural and archaeological fabric on the maunga is protected and made visible by removing non-native trees that are having a negative impact.

4.       Following a judicial review and recommendations from the courts, the Tūpuna Maunga Authority has now agreed to amend the IMP. The proposed amendments to the Integrated Management Plan is outlined in Attachment A of this report and constitutes a new appendix to the IMP, which details proposed ecological restoration projects (including the planting of native species and the removal of non-native trees) for:

a)     Ōwairaka / Te Ahi Kā a Rakataura / Mt Albert (the Ōwairaka project)

b)     Pukewīwī / Puketāpapa / Mt Roskill

c)      Ōtāhuhu / Mt Richmond

d)     Te Tātua a Riukiuta / Big King.

5.       Public and local board feedback is required to be submitted by 5pm Saturday 8 October 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      provide feedback, if any, on the proposed amendment to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan.

 

Horopaki

Context

Tūpuna Maunga Authority

6.       The Tūpuna Maunga (ancestral mountains) of Tāmaki Makaurau are central to Auckland’s identity and a point of difference around the world. Human occupation of the city spans around 1,000 years, and over that time the interaction of people with the Maunga has changed from monumental and defendable settlements to strategic maritime locations and resources (rock and water), through to a network of open spaces that are enjoyed by and meaningful to many Aucklanders.

7.       The governance and administration of the Tūpuna Maunga (except Rarotonga / Mt Smart) is undertaken by the Tūpuna Maunga o Tāmaki Makaurau Authority (Tūpuna Maunga Authority). The Tūpuna Maunga Authority has developed a set of plans and policies to guide how the Tūpuna Maunga are valued, protected, restored, enhanced, and managed in the future. These plans include:

·         Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan

·         Tūpuna Maunga Integrated Management Plan Strategies

·         Tūpuna Maunga Authority Operational Plan 2022/2023

·         Alcohol-free and Smoke-free Policy

·         Drones Policy

·         Memorials and Plaques Policy

·         Research Policy

·         Weddings Policy.

Integrated Management Plan

8.       Prior to the formation of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority in 2014, each maunga was managed according to a separate reserve management plan developed by various former legacy councils. In some cases the plans were unchanged since initial drafting as far back as the early 1980s.

9.       In 2016, following an Auckland-wide public engagement, submission and hearing process, the Tūpuna Maunga IMP was adopted.

10.     This consultation process responds to a court finding that the large-scale removal of exotic trees is a significant decision and should have been the subject of express inclusion in the Integrated Management Plan.

11.     The proposed amendment to the IMP constitutes a new appendix which provides details of the proposed ecological restoration projects (including the planting of native species and the removal of non-native trees) for:

a)      Ōwairaka / Te Ahi Kā a Rakataura / Mt Albert (the Ōwairaka project)

b)      Pukewīwī / Puketāpapa / Mt Roskill

c)      Ōtāhuhu / Mt Richmond

d)      Te Tātua a Riukiuta / Big King

12.     The Authority has resolved to undertake public consultation on the proposed amendment pursuant to Ngā Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act 2014 and the Reserves Act 1977.

13.     Additional information about the IMP and the proposed amendment can be viewed on the Tūpuna Maunga Authority website.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Summary of Tūpuna Maunga Authority Integrated Management Plan

Purpose

14.     The purpose of the plan is to facilitate the restoration of the natural, spiritual and indigenous landscape of the maunga. This will include extensive planting of native species and the removal of non-native trees that are negatively impacting the cultural features of the Maunga. This will help restore and enhance the mauri and wairua of the Tūpuna Maunga.

15.     Returning native vegetation is a key step in healing the Tūpuna Maunga. Over many decades, native trees have been removed from the Maunga. Non-native trees have been planted without comprehensive plans for their future management or consideration of the cultural landscape. Many non-native trees, including weed species (some being identified in the Regional Pest Management Plan (RPMP)), have been allowed to self-seed by legacy administering entities. This has adversely affected the integrity of the cultural landscapes of the taonga tuku iho that are the Tūpuna Maunga.

16.     The restoration programme will ensure that the remaining cultural and archaeological fabric on the maunga is protected, and made visible by removing non-native trees that are having a negative impact. Sight lines from the maunga to other maunga/pā will be opened to ensure that the connection from maunga to maunga is prominent.

17.     All plant species identified in the RPMP will be removed.

18.     Further guidance has been given regarding non-native trees as part of the Tūpuna Maunga Biosecurity Strategy[1].

19.     As a matter of priority, non-native trees on the outer slopes of the maunga will be removed to emphasise and protect the cultural features of the maunga such as terracing and rua. To protect the archaeological values and the health and safety of people on the maunga, native and non-native trees may also need to be removed.

20.     The amendment intends to plant a range of native species to create a representation of the forest and ecosystems in each of the four maunga (location specific information is below). In addition:

a)      Among the native plantings, culturally-significant species will be planted to ensure that cultural traditions such as whakairo, raranga, and rongoa collection can continue into the future.

b)      Pest control will be intensified over time to ensure the protection of the continuous ngāhere established near the tihi.

c)      All native trees will be retained.

21.     The methodology of the programme will include:

a)      Retaining the tihi in grass.

b)      Planting in areas where in situ archaeology has been destroyed by historic quarrying.

c)      Selecting appropriate plants that can be planted near archaeological features.

d)      Removing trees in a way that avoids ground disturbance and has minimal impact on archaeological features.

e)      Ensuring that all trees that present a health and safety risk are removed.

 

Ōwairaka/ Te ahi-kā-a-rakataura/Mt Albert

22.     To achieve the cultural, spiritual and ecological restoration of Ōwairaka-te Ahi-kā-a- Rakataura, an exemplar WF7 Pūriri ngāhere[2] will be created as a representation of the forest that once stood on and near the maunga:

a)      Approximately 13,000 native plants will be planted (of which approximately 5,180 have already been planted and are maturing well).

b)      Habitats for mokomoko and other native fauna will be restored.

c)      Approximately 345 exotic trees will be removed, including weed species identified in the RPMP.

Pukewīwī/ Puketāpapa / Mt Roskill

23.     To achieve the cultural, spiritual and ecological restoration of Pukewīwī/ Puketāpapa / Mount Roskill, a range of native species will be planted as a representation of the forest and ecosystems that once stood on and near the maunga:

a)      Approximately 7,400 native plants will be planted (of which 4,800 have already been planted and are maturing well).

b)      A pā harakeke will be established on the maunga.

c)      A mara kai will also be established on the maunga, which will include amenity native tree plantings and traditional Māori kai.

d)      Several large native specimen trees will also be planted. Further planting sites will be identified in the future.

e)      Approximately 160 non-native trees (not all) will be removed, including weed species identified in the RPMP.

Ōtāhuhu/ Mt Richmond

24.     To achieve the cultural, spiritual and ecological restoration of Ōtāhuhu/ Mt Richmond, a WF7 Pūriri ngāhere forest type will be planted as a representation of the forests that stood on or near the maunga:

a)      39,000 native plants will be planted on the maunga (of which 12,000 have already been planted and are maturing well).

b)      Habitats for mokomoko and other native fauna will be restored.

c)      Approximately 443 non-native trees and shrubs (not all) will be removed, including weed species identified in the RPMP.

Te tātua a riukiuta / Big King

25.     To achieve the cultural, spiritual and ecological restoration of Te Tātua-a- Riukiuta/ Big King, a WF7 Pūriri ngāhere forest type will be planted as a representation of the forests that stood on or near the maunga:

a)      9000 native plants will be planted on the maunga.

b)      Habitats for mokomoko and other native fauna will be restored.

c)      Approximately 197 non-native trees and shrubs (not all) will be removed, including weed species identified in the RPMP.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     This report informs the local board’s decision on whether to submit on a consultation. The decision to submit on the proposed amendment will not adversely impact climate emissions or efforts to adapt to the impacts of climate change.

27.     The climate impact of the IMP proposed ecological restoration actions is an issue that will need to be considered by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

28.     The consultation is open to the public and feedback from relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations on the draft submission will be sought. The council group was involved in establishing existing council positions.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

29.     Staff anticipate that some local communities will welcome the consultation, particularly groups and communities who were involved in the judicial review challenge.

30.     Local board views on this matter are not known and this report provides the opportunity for the local board to provide feedback on this item. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31.     The Tūpuna Maunga are among the most significant cultural, historical and geological (volcanic) landscapes in the region and are iconic taonga. They are sacred to mana whenua as taonga tuku iho (treasures handed down through the generations). Local communities also have a strong connection with, and draw a sense of identity from, the Tūpuna Maunga.

32.     The Tūpuna Maunga are interwoven in mana whenua history and whakapapa. They also hold significance during important cultural events, such as Matariki and Waitangi Day. The Tūpuna Maunga strive to manage these sites in accordance with tikanga and seek to enable activities and behaviour which are consistent with the values and mana of the Tūpuna Maunga.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.     There are no financial implications from receiving this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     This report informs the local board about a public consultation. There is no obligation to submit. In that regard, staff consider that there are no risks associated with the local board decision.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     If the local board resolves on this item, staff will send written feedback directly to the Tūpuna Maunga Authority via email to MaungaAuthority@aklc.govt.nz. Submissions must be received by 5pm, Saturday 8 October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed amendments to the Integrated Management Plan (IMP)

335

b

Tupuna Maunga Integrated Management Strategies (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Carol Hayward - Team Leader Operations and Policy

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations

File No.: CP2022/13705

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide for appropriate arrangements for decision-making between the final local board meeting of the current electoral term and the inaugural meeting of the new local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The last meeting of the Albert-Eden Local Board in this current term is scheduled for 20 September 2022. Between that meeting and the first meeting of the local board in the new term, decisions may be needed from the local board. As for each of the previous terms, temporary arrangements for making these decisions need to be confirmed.

3.       The term of office of the current local board members ends the day following the official declaration of election results. Following the declaration, which is expected to be Friday 14 October 2022, the term of office for members elected to the local board will commence.

4.       For the period from the commencement of their term of office until their inaugural meeting where members are sworn in (interregnum), decisions may be made by the Auckland Council Chief Executive under existing delegations.

5.       The existing local boards delegation to the Chief Executive requires, amongst other things, that staff consult with the allocated local board portfolio holder/lead on certain decisions. As a temporary measure, this report seeks to allow staff to make decisions without complying with the requirement for consultation during the interregnum. 

6.       Staff also seek confirmation of arrangements for making decisions at the local board level in the period between the final local board meeting and the official end of term. The urgent decision delegations and process that is already in place adequately caters for this scenario.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      confirm that the local board’s existing urgent decisions delegations process will be utilised where decisions are required from the local board between the final local board business meeting on 20 September 2022 and the end of term (15 October 2022)

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board (interregnum), all decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under current delegations

c)      note that the Chief Executive will not be required to comply with consultation requirements in the local boards’ delegation protocols when making decisions during the interregnum

d)      request that the Chief Executive exercise restraint when making decisions during the interregnum and to consider referring significant decisions to the first meeting of the incoming local board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results (Sections 115 and 116, Local Electoral Act 2001). The declaration will be publicly notified on 14 October 2022, with the term of office of current members ending and the term of office of new members commencing on 15 October 2022.

8.       The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting (Clause 14, Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

9.       Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, decisions may be needed on urgent matters or routine business as usual that cannot wait until the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

10.     As with each of the previous electoral terms, temporary arrangements need to be made and/or confirmed for:

·       making urgent decisions before the end of term

·       making decisions that require consultation with local board/local board members during the interregnum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent decisions – arrangement for remainder of the term

11.     Between the last business meeting and the declaration of results expected around 14 October 2022, current local board members are still in office and can use their existing urgent decisions delegations to make decisions that are required from the local board during this time.

12.     The urgent decisions process includes a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson that enables them to make decisions on behalf of the local board where it is not practical to call the full board together.

13.     All requests for an urgent decision will need to be supported by adequate staff advice and information and clear recommendations.

Decision-making during the interregnum

14.     All local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive. During the interregnum, any decisions that will be required from the local board, and which cannot wait until a local board meeting, will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under his existing delegations.

15.     The delegation to the Chief Executive is subject to a requirement to comply with the delegation protocols, which require consulting with the local board on some decisions that are made by staff under delegated authority. Consultation is often done through a local board lead (referred to as a portfolio holder in the delegation protocols). The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland.

16.     During the current term, while the elected members remain in office, staff will continue to consult with leads/portfolio holders as required by the delegation protocols (or chairperson where there is no portfolio holder). However, during the interregnum, staff will be unable to comply with this requirement due to the absence of appointed portfolio holders/lead/chairpersons to consult with.

17.     As a temporary measure, it is recommended that staff continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until the local board’s first business meeting without consultation. Following the election of chairpersons at the inaugural meetings, staff will consult with the chairperson when and if required and can resume consultation with appointed representatives once new arrangements for leads/portfolio holders are in place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     This report relates to procedural matters and has no quantifiable climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The arrangements proposed in this report enable the council to proceed with necessary business during the election period. During the interregnum, staff will exercise restraint and ensure that any significant decisions are deferred to the incoming local board.

20.     These arrangements apply only to local boards. The reduced political decision-making will be communicated to the wider council group.

21.     The governing body has made its own arrangements to cover the election period, including delegating the power to make urgent decisions between the last governing body meeting of the term and the day the current term ends, to any two of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and a chairperson of a committee of the whole. From the commencement of the term of office of the new local board members until the governing body’s inaugural meeting, the Chief Executive will carry out decision-making under his current delegations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This is a report to all local boards that proposes arrangements to enable the council to process routine local matters during the election period. This will enable the council to meet timeframes and provide good customer service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report and decision being sought relates to a procedural matter and does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that unforeseen decisions will arise during this period, such as a decision that is politically significant or a decision that exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegations.

26.     This risk has been mitigated by scheduling meetings as late as possible in the current term and communicating to reporting staff that significant decisions should not be made during October 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The decision of the local board will be communicated to senior staff so that they are aware of the arrangements for the month of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors' Updates

File No.: CP2022/13670

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors to update the local board on Governing Body issues they have been involved with since the previous local board meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Standing Orders 5.1.1 and 5.1.2 provides provision in the local board meeting for Governing Body members to update their local board counterparts on regional matters of interest to the local board.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Albert-Eden-Puketāpapa Ward Councillors Christine Fletcher and Cathy Casey’s verbal updates.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2022/13671

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for the local board chairperson to provide a written and/or verbal update on projects, meetings and other initiatives relevant to the local board’s interests.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 2.4.7, the chairperson will update board members by way of a report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive Chairperson Margi Watson’s September 2022 report.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Chairperson Margi Watson - September 2022 Report

349

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Board Members' Reports

File No.: CP2022/13672

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To facilitate an opportunity for local board members to provide a written update on projects and events attended since the previous month’s local board meeting and to discuss other matters of interest to the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an information item and it is optional for board members to provide a written board member report for inclusion in the agenda.

3.       Local board members are recommended to use a Notice of Motion, rather than a Board Member Report, should a member wish to propose a recommendation or request action to be undertaken by staff.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Board Member Reports for September 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Christina Robertson - September 2022 Board Report

357

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/13673

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for the local board to receive the records of its recent workshops held following the previous month’s local board business meeting.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In accordance with Standing Order 12.1.4, the local board shall receive a record of the general proceedings of each of its workshops held since the previous month’s local board business meeting.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive the Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Records for the workshops held on the 23 and 30 August 2022 and 6 and 13 September 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 23 August 2022

361

b

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 30 August 2022

365

c

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 6 September 2022

369

d

Albert-Eden Local Board Workshop Record - 13 September 2022

373

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 

 


Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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20 September 2022

 

 

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Albert-Eden Local Board

20 September 2022

 

 

Valedictory reflections: end of term address

File No.: CP2022/13706

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide retiring Albert-Eden Local Board member/s the opportunity to comment on their time in local government and share valedictory reflections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an opportunity for retiring Albert-Eden Local Board members to share valedictory reflections or an end of term address, prior to the 2022 Local Board Elections.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Albert-Eden Local Board:

a)      receive valedictory reflections from Members Lee Corrick, Graeme Easte and Rachel Langton.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Michael Mendoza - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Nina Siers - Local Area Manager

 



[1] Pg 34 section 6 of the Biosecurity Strategy states: Removal of exotic trees will occur when there is a health and safety risk, they are identified as a weed species, there is a risk to archaeological features, or they impact on the cultural landscape and view shafts. Any other tree removals will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

[2] A WF7 Pūriri ngāhere forest type is a broadleaf forest that occurs in warm frost-free areas on fertile soils of alluvial and volcanic origin.