I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 6 September 2022

10.00am

Reception Lounge, Auckland Town Hall 301-305 Queen Street Auckland

 

Kōmiti Aromātai Whakahaere Kaupapa Kei Raro I

Te Maru O te Kaunihera / Council Controlled

Organisation Oversight Committee

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Deputy Mayor Cr Bill Cashmore

 

Deputy Chairperson

Cr Angela Dalton

 

Members

Cr Josephine Bartley

Cr Richard Hills

 

Cr Dr Cathy Casey

Cr Tracy Mulholland

 

Cr Fa’anana Efeso Collins

Cr Daniel Newman, JP

 

Cr Pippa Coom

Cr Greg Sayers

 

Cr Linda Cooper, JP

Cr Desley Simpson, JP

 

Cr Chris Darby

Cr Sharon Stewart, QSM

 

Cr Alf Filipaina, MNZM

IMSB Chair David Taipari

 

Cr Christine Fletcher, QSO

Cr Wayne Walker

 

Mayor Hon Phil Goff, CNZM, JP

Cr John Watson

 

IMSB Member Hon Tau Henare

Cr Paul Young

 

Cr Shane Henderson

 

 

(Quorum 11 members)

 

 

 

Duncan Glasgow

Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere /

Governance Advisor

 

1 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 890 2656

Email: duncan.glasgow@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 


Terms of Reference

 

Responsibilities

 

The purpose of the committee is to:

 

·         have a general overview and insight into the strategy, direction and priorities of all Council Controlled Organisations (CCO)

·         set policy relating to CCO governance

·         approve CCO Statements of Intent

·         monitor performance of CCOs and other entities in which the council has an equity interest (such as CRLL, Tāmaki Regeneration Company and Haumaru Housing).

 

Key responsibilities include:

 

·         monitoring the financial and non-financial performance targets, key performance indicators, and other measures of each CCO and the performance of each organisation

·         advising the mayor on the content of the annual Letters of Expectations (LoE) to CCOs and Ports of Auckland Limited

·         exercising relevant powers under Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act 2002, which relate to the Statements of Intent of CCOs

·         exercising relevant powers under Part 1 of the Port Companies Act 1988, which relate to the Statements of Corporate Intent for port companies

·         exercising Auckland Council’s powers as a shareholder or given under a trust deed, including but not limited to modification of constitutions and/or trust deeds, granting shareholder approval of major transactions where required, exempting CCOs, and approving policies relating to CCO and CO governance

·         approval of a work programme which includes a schedule of quarterly reporting of each CCO to balance reporting across the meetings.

 

Powers

 

(i)         All powers necessary to perform the committee’s responsibilities.

Except:

(a)          powers that the Governing Body cannot delegate or has retained to itself (section 2)

(b)          where the committee’s responsibility is limited to making a recommendation only

(ii)        Power to establish subcommittees.

 

 

Code of conduct

 

For information relating to Auckland Council’s elected members code of conduct, please refer to this link on the Auckland Council website - https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/about-auckland-council/how-auckland-council-works/elected-members-remuneration-declarations-interest/Pages/elected-members-code-conduct.aspx

 

 


 

Auckland Plan Values

 

The Auckland Plan 2050 outlines a future that all Aucklanders can aspire to. The values of the Auckland Plan 2050 help us to understand what is important in that future:

 

 


 

Exclusion of the public – who needs to leave the meeting

 

Members of the public

 

All members of the public must leave the meeting when the public are excluded unless a resolution is passed permitting a person to remain because their knowledge will assist the meeting.

 

Those who are not members of the public

 

General principles

 

·           Access to confidential information is managed on a “need to know” basis where access to the information is required in order for a person to perform their role.

·           Those who are not members of the meeting (see list below) must leave unless it is necessary for them to remain and hear the debate in order to perform their role.

·           Those who need to be present for one confidential item can remain only for that item and must leave the room for any other confidential items.

·           In any case of doubt, the ruling of the chairperson is final.

 

Members of the meeting

 

·           The members of the meeting remain (all Governing Body members if the meeting is a Governing Body meeting; all members of the committee if the meeting is a committee meeting).

·           However, standing orders require that a councillor who has a pecuniary conflict of interest leave the room.

·           All councillors have the right to attend any meeting of a committee and councillors who are not members of a committee may remain, subject to any limitations in standing orders.

 

Independent Māori Statutory Board

 

·           Members of the Independent Māori Statutory Board who are appointed members of the committee remain.

·           Independent Māori Statutory Board members and staff remain if this is necessary in order for them to perform their role.

 

Staff

 

·           All staff supporting the meeting (administrative, senior management) remain.

·           Other staff who need to because of their role may remain.

 

Local Board members

 

·           Local Board members who need to hear the matter being discussed in order to perform their role may remain.  This will usually be if the matter affects, or is relevant to, a particular Local Board area.

 

Council Controlled Organisations

 

·           Representatives of a Council Controlled Organisation can remain only if required to for discussion of a matter relevant to the Council Controlled Organisation.

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Apologies                                                                                                                        7

2          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   7

3          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               7

4          Petitions                                                                                                                          7  

5          Public Input                                                                                                                    7

6          Local Board Input                                                                                                          7

7          Extraordinary Business                                                                                                8

8          Update on the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines                                       9

9          Council Controlled Organisations - Approval of statements of intent for 2022-2025                                                                                                                                       69

10        Auckland Council Comments on Ports of Auckland Limited's Draft Statement of Corporate Intent                                                                                                         345

11        Liaison councillors' updates                                                                                    363

12        Summary of Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 6 September 2022                                                                                                                             365

13        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

14        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                               385

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Review of Strategic Options                                                       385


1          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

2          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

3          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 26 April 2022, and extraordinary minutes of its meeting on Friday 10 June, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

 

4          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

5          Public Input

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for Public Input.  Applications to speak must be made to the Governance Advisor, in writing, no later than one (1) clear working day prior to the meeting and must include the subject matter.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.  A maximum of thirty (30) minutes is allocated to the period for public input with five (5) minutes speaking time for each speaker.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public input had been received.

 

 

6          Local Board Input

 

Standing Order 6.2 provides for Local Board Input.  The Chairperson (or nominee of that Chairperson) is entitled to speak for up to five (5) minutes during this time.  The Chairperson of the Local Board (or nominee of that Chairperson) shall wherever practical, give one (1) day’s notice of their wish to speak.  The meeting Chairperson has the discretion to decline any application that does not meet the requirements of Standing Orders.

 

This right is in addition to the right under Standing Order 6.1 to speak to matters on the agenda.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for local board input had been received.

 


 

 

7          Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local  authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

Update on the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines

File No.: CP2022/12468

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an update on the implementation of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines across the council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The July 2020 Review of Auckland Council’s council-controlled organisations - Report of the Independent Panel (CCO Review), recommended that:

·     the council updates its brand guidelines to ensure the pōhutukawa logo is used in a clear, consistent, and flexible way on all council-funded services, activities and facilities, including when used alongside CCO operational brands (recommendation 57)

·     the council monitors CCO compliance with its brand guidelines (recommendation 58).

3.       These recommendations were agreed in principle by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020 (resolution GB/2020/89).

4.       The updated Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines were developed jointly by Auckland Council and CCO representatives and were adopted by the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee on 24 August 2021 (resolution CCO/2021/32). The updated guidelines have been included as Attachment A.

5.       The guidelines were developed to ensure the pōhutukawa logo is used in a clear, consistent and flexible way by CCOs. This will help to increase awareness among Aucklanders of the full range of services and facilities provided or funded by the council.

6.       Compliance with these guidelines will be monitored on an ongoing basis and reported to this committee (or equivalent following the election) annually. This report provides the first annual update on progress for the committee’s information.

7.       Since the guidelines were adopted, Watercare, Eke Panuku and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited have substantially implemented them, and Auckland Transport are currently applying the guidelines across their communications, and will be working to implement across their full range of products and services in the coming months.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      receive the annual update on the implementation of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines across the council-controlled organisation

b)      note that the next update on the Auckland Council whanau logo guidelines will be provided to the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee (or equivalent following the election) in August 2023.


 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       In 2011, the CCO Strategy Review Subcommittee agreed that all CCOs should incorporate the Auckland Council pōhutukawa logo in all communications, marketing, advertising, and when promoting any activity, service or facility receiving council funding (CCOS/2011/26).

9.       Increased visibility of the pōhutukawa logo is considered an important tool for improving Aucklanders’ understanding of the value and benefits the council provides.

10.     Prior to the 2021 Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines update, guidelines had last been provided to CCOs in 2013. While there were good examples of the 2013 guidelines being followed, in many cases they had proven difficult and impractical to implement, and had not worked well overall for CCOs or council.

11.     As a result, visibility and prominence of the pōhutukawa logo continued to be low overall, in particular with endorsed branding across Auckland Transport and Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s suite of brands.

12.     Research carried out in 2018 by Auckland Council’s Communications Department found Aucklanders had a low attribution to the council for many of the services and facilities provided through the CCOs, particularly those they value most highly (for example, Auckland Zoo and Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki).

13.     Further research in 2020 found that most Aucklanders recognised the pōhutukawa brandmark, identified it with the council and approved of it being used more widely to make it clear which services the council provides.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

14.     The implementation of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines has been planned as cost neutral, requiring a phased approach over time. Logo changes on marketing materials have been adopted as new campaigns are planned and launched, digital assets have been updated within existing development cycles, new products and services have incorporated the guidelines as they are developed, and fixed assets are being updated within existing cycles of renewal and replacement.

15.     The guidelines provide for three approaches to implementation of the pōhutukawa (see Figure 1 below):

·     an updated organisation logo made up of the organisation name and a resized larger pōhutukawa brandmark

·     the pōhutukawa brandmark and the words ‘part of the Auckland Council whānau’, for application on endorsed brands which have their own distinct branding (for example, Auckland Zoo). These words provide more context for the appearance of the pōhutukawa where the connection to council is not currently well understood by Aucklanders

·     a pōhutukawa brandmark in a white tab design, for application where the relationship to council is better understood by Aucklanders.

 

Graphical user interface, text, application

Description automatically generated

Figure 1. Implementation approaches for Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines

Watercare

16.     Watercare have successfully implemented the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines, applying an updated organisation logo made up of the organisation name and a resized larger pōhutukawa brandmark.

17.     Watercare have recently completed an update of the organisation’s brand guidelines, incorporating the updated organisation logo, with staff being engaged on the changes. The updated logo has been applied to all new customer collateral, digital apps, signage, bills and the website.

18.     Due to technical issues the updated logo has yet to be applied to the waterforlife.org.nz website, which will be resolved when the website is updated.

19.     Watercare will continue to update any other assets to meet the requirements of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines as they are renewed or replaced.

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

20.     Eke Panuku Development Auckland have successfully implemented the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines, applying an updated organisation logo.

21.     The Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines have been included in a wider refresh of branding post the organisation’s name change to Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

22.     The first branding update since being established in 2015, Eke Panuku Development Auckland’s refreshed brand vision is to ‘create amazing places’. The updated and modernised brand aligns with council branding beyond the logo, also incorporating the Auckland Council brand’s font and colour palette.

23.     The refreshed branding has been implemented across all communications, digital assets, hoardings and collateral.

24.     Eke Panuku will continue to update any other assets to meet the requirements of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines as they are renewed or replaced.

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

25.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited have successfully implemented the Auckland Council Whānau logo guidelines, applying as appropriate either the updated organisation logo or the pōhutukawa brandmark with the words ‘part of the Auckland Council Whānau’.

26.     Where communications are predominantly business to business, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited has applied an updated organisation logo made up of the organisation name and a resized larger pōhutukawa brandmark

27.     Where communications are intended for out of Auckland audiences, the Auckland ‘A’ destination mark is used rather than the organisation logo, as prescribed in the exceptions section of the guidelines.

28.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s endorsed brands (Auckland Live, Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland Zoo, New Zealand Maritime Museum Hui Te Ananui A Tangaroa, and Auckland Stadiums) have implemented the guidelines through either the updated organisation logo or the pōhutukawa brandmark with the words ‘part of the Auckland Council Whānau’.

29.     The ‘part of the Auckland Council Whānau’ logo has been applied through a baseline banner graphic on website home pages and advertising and marketing collateral, including print advertising, brochures, billboards, digital signage, visitor guides, brochures, online advertising, websites, and event schedules.

30.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited will continue to update any other assets (including signage) to meet the requirements of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines as they are renewed or replaced.

Auckland Transport

31.     Auckland Transport has successfully implemented the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines regarding the use of the organisation logo, which is now being used in preference to the previous AT-endorsed brand logo in a wider number of communications.

32.     A wider review of branding for the Auckland Transport endorsed brand (AT) has recently been completed, which looked at refreshing brand elements such as colours, using the name gifted by mana whenua, and the inclusion of the pōhutukawa tab.  

33.     The review confirmed how the pōhutukawa will be incorporated within the brand refresh and with a new gifted name when confirmed.

34.     The pōhutukawa has been included on all new Auckland Transport endorsed brand communications and assets since 1 August 2022, and all other assets will be updated to meet the requirements of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines as they are renewed or replaced.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan was adopted in July 2020 (ECC/2020/29). The plan commits to halving greenhouse gas emissions (against a 2016 baseline) by 2030 and reaching net zero emissions by 2050.

36.     When applying the logo guidelines discussed in this report, Auckland Council and CCOs aim to contribute towards the waste minimisation goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri by focusing first on renewals and replacements. This helps to reduce waste, and minimise the emissions arising from landfill gases (three per cent of Auckland’s current emissions profile).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

37.     Auckland Council sought input from the CCOs on how to implement CCO Review recommendations 57 and 58. The guidelines reflect this consultation and supporting research, and were endorsed by the CCO chief executives before being approved by the CCO Oversight Committee in 2021. 

38.     The Auckland Council Group will continue to measure the effectiveness of logo guidelines, focused on raising awareness of council investment in the community through the services provided by CCOs.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.     Where branding on communication activities and facilities falls under the decision-making jurisdiction of local boards, the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines provide technical details on how local boards are acknowledged alongside the use of the pōhutukawa logo and the relevant CCO branding.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.     While CCOs names, represented in organisation logos, are not within the remit of the brand guidelines it should be noted that:

·     On 1 July 2021 the Eke Panuku Development Auckland board endorsed Eke Panuku Development Auckland as the organisation name, after a period being named Panuku Development Auckland. The Eke Panuku name was gifted in 2015 after Development Auckland engaged with its 19 mana whenua partners and asked them to gift a name for the new organisation. The updated organisation logo representing the new name has been incorporated in the rollout of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines.

·     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited has recently updated its bilingual name to reflect the organisation’s kaupapa and commitment to Māori outcomes as documented in Te Mahere Aronga 2021 – 2024, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s Māori outcomes plan.

·     Auckland Transport are in the early stages of engaging with mana whenua on a gifted name for Auckland Transport which represents the idea of movement and connection.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.     Implementing guidelines will be cost neutral or minimal and will be accommodated within existing Auckland Council and CCO marketing and brand budgets. Logo changes on marketing materials will be adopted as future campaigns are launched, digital assets will be updated within existing development cycles, new products and services will incorporate the guidelines as they are developed, and fixed assets will be updated within existing cycles of renewal and replacement.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.     There is a risk that increased use of the council brand dilutes or degrades the positive view of some of the existing CCO brands. This risk is mitigated by the work that has been done as part of developing the guidelines, to test public reaction to increased use of the pōhutukawa. This is not considered to be a major risk at this time.

43.     In addition, research will provide visibility of the impact of the changes and identify any unanticipated negative impacts. The first round of research will be evaluated in late 2022 when the logo changes have had sufficient time to embed.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Auckland Council and CCO brand representatives will continue to review the implementation of the guidelines and look for further opportunities to communicate with Aucklanders as a council group.

45.     Auckland Transport will continue to implement the guidelines across updated branding across digital products and collateral materials. All CCOs will continue to apply the guidelines to products and fixed assets as they are launched, replaced and renewed.

46.     The next annual update on the implementation of the Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines will be provided to the Council Controlled Organisations Oversight Committee (or equivalent following the elections) in August 2023.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Council whānau logo guidelines

15

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dan Lambert – General Manager Communications

Authorisers

Richard Jarrett - Director Group Services

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

Council Controlled Organisations - Approval of statements of intent for 2022-2025

File No.: CP2022/10695

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the 2022-2025 statements of intent (SOIs) for Auckland Council’s four substantive council-controlled organisations, and three legacy council-controlled organisations (CCOs).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       SOIs set out the objectives and activities of each CCO for the next three years. They serve as a basis for accountability to the council, as the shareholder, and provide an opportunity for the council to influence each organisation’s direction. SOIs should reflect agreed council plans and strategies, 10-year budget (long-term plan) decisions and a CCO view of the strategic outlook and organisational priorities.

3.       Staff consider that no major modifications are required and that the CCO Oversight Committee should approve the 2022- 2025 SOIs for council’s substantive CCOs – Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited and Watercare Services Limited.

4.       The council has also received final SOIs from three legacy CCOs. Staff recommend that the 2022-2025 SOIs for Community Education Trust Auckland, Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust and Contemporary Art Foundation are approved.

5.       There are two areas concerning the SOIs where it is recommended that the Chair of the committee writes to:

·     Watercare, to reflect that the government reform of the water sector is continuing to evolve and seek that Watercare be part of the process at executive level to ensure the group is operating within the legislative and council policy mandate and there is a cohesive approach to the reform across the group. 

·     Auckland Transport, to thank it for their commitment to the Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway, and invite the Board to report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee (or its equivalent) on how it is embedding the Pathway into its work programme and organisational processes.  Additionally, the letter can indicate that council would welcome a discussion as part of the upcoming letter of expectation process about how implementation will be reflected in the work programme for the 2023-2026 Statement of Intent. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendations

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      approve the 2022-2025 statements of intent for Auckland Transport, Eke Panuku, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited and Watercare

b)      approve the 2022-2025 statements of intent for Community Education Trust Auckland, Contemporary Art Foundation and Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust


 

 

 

c)      agree that the Chair of the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee will send a letter to Watercare outlining the council’s expectation of Watercare being part of the council group’s executive process for managing the three waters transition to ensure the group has a cohesive approach and is operating within the legislative and council policy mandate

d)      agree that the Chair of the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee will send a letter to Auckland Transport thanking it for its endorsement of the Transport Emission Reduction Pathway and inviting it to report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee (or its equivalent) on how the Transport Emission Reduction Pathway is being embedded into Auckland Transport’s future work programme and organisational processes.

Horopaki

Context

6.       The requirements for SOIs are set out in Schedule 8 of the Local Government Act 2002 (LGA). SOIs set out the objectives and activities of each CCO for the next three years. They serve as a basis for accountability to the council, as the shareholder, and provide an opportunity for the council to influence each organisation’s direction.

7.       Under the LGA the council has the ability to modify a SOI to ensure it adequately reflects the council’s strategic priorities if it considers that is necessary.

8.       A letter of expectation was provided to each substantive CCO in December 2021. The content of the letters was approved by this committee in December 2021 (CCO/2021/62).

9.       Each SOI follows a template, as recommended by the CCO review, which has the following sections:

·     Part 1: Strategic Overview – which focuses on the three-year horizon and sets out strategic objectives, nature and scope, how it will deliver on council’s outcomes and the 10-year budget (LTP) performance measures. It is intended that this will be produced triennially, aligning with the adoption of the 10-year budget.

·     Part 2: Statement of performance expectations. It provides an annual work programme, financial information and responses to specific requests by the shareholder. It is updated and submitted annually.

10.     Given the impact of COVID-19, the CCO Oversight Committee agreed to approve a one-month extension of statutory deadlines for the 2022-2025 SOIs (CCO/2021/62).  Key steps in the process were:

·     CCOs provided their draft SOI to council by the deadline of 1 April 2022

·     CCO Oversight Committee approved shareholder comments on 26 April 2022 (CCO/2022/15)

·     CCOs considered the shareholder comments at a public board meeting (as required)

·     Final SOIs were received by 31 July 2022.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.     Staff have reconciled shareholder comments against the final SOIs.  This reconciliation is provided in Attachment A of the report.

12.     Staff consider that no major modifications are required for the SOIs.


 

 

13.     The SOIs are provided in attachments B-H as follows:

·     Auckland Transport (Attachment B)

·     Eke Panuku Development Auckland Limited (Attachment C)

·     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited (Attachment D)

·     Watercare Services Limited (Attachment E)

·     COMET Auckland (Attachment F)

·     Contemporary Art Foundation (Attachment G)

·     Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust (Attachment H).

Auckland Transport (AT)

14.     The Auckland Transport final SOI addresses all the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no issues for modification.

15.     A welcome element of this year’s SOI is the ‘What success looks like’ section (pages 17-19).  This isolates a small set of the key performance indicators that speak to AT’s progress in the most important strategic areas:  safety, travel choices, emissions (a new measure), people and freight movement on the road network, and supporting Māori outcomes. 

16.     Another key element of the Letter of Expectation for Auckland Transport was to reflect the outcomes of the Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway (TERP). On 18 August 2022, the Environment and Climate Change Committee adopted the TERP, and instructed Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to embed implementation of the TERP through all of their activities and planning and funding processes.  It also noted that the Auckland Transport Board had endorsed the TERP in August 2022 (ECC/2022/74).

17.     It would be open to the Committee to request that elements of the SOI are modified to reflect the resolutions of the Environment and Climate Change Committee.  For example, the work programme could be modified to include actions in response to the instruction to “immediately commence implementation of actions earmarked for delivery in the first two years of the Transport Emissions Reduction Pathway” (resolution k). 

18.     A modification is not recommended.  The modification powers in the Local Government Act (Schedule 8, section 6) involve a process of written notice, drafting of changes, Board consideration and shareholder approval.  Given this, any modification would likely run into the period when the next letter of expectation and statement of intent is being discussed.  There is therefore typically a high threshold applied before modifications are considered necessary, relating to major changes of programme or financial context. 

19.     In this case, Auckland Transport has ensured that the SOI is consistent with the TERP, to the degree possible given that the SOI was prepared and submitted well in advance of final decision-making on the TERP.  This consistency is reflected both in the strategic discussion sections and also in the commitments made in the document to ensuring that the TERP is delivered through future planning documents and planning decisions (see in particular pages 24-26 and 40).  Furthermore, the Auckland Transport Board has only recently demonstrated its strong commitment to the TERP, which will have a governance and monitoring framework put in place to oversee implementation (resolution i). 

20.     We therefore recommend that the Chair of the Committee instead writes to the Auckland Transport Board to thank it for their commitment to the TERP, and invite the Board to report to the Environment and Climate Change Committee (or its equivalent) on how it is embedding the Pathway into its work programme and organizational processes. Additionally, the letter can indicate that Council would welcome a discussion as part of the upcoming letter of expectation process about how implementation will be reflected in the work programme for the 2023-2026 Statement of Intent. 


 

 

Eke Panuku

21.     The Eke Panuku final SOI addresses or responds to all the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no issues for modification. 

22.     Eke Panuku have made significant efforts to respond to the shareholder feedback and have recrafted the SOI considerably. The SOI is now clearer, less repetitive and provides a better description of what Eke Panuku does and their key areas of work.

23.     Changes to the final SOI of note include:

·     Contribution to Auckland Council’s strategic direction has been expanded and now covers Eke Panuku contribution to key council strategies.

·     The nature and scope of activities ‘what we do’ covers and describes their three strategic outcomes and functions in more detail. This includes defining urban regeneration and the role of Eke Panuku, improved description of property functions and an outline of their contribution to sector leadership.

·     Eke Panuku have added details of the new investment partnership between the NZ Super Fund and Eke Panuku. This partnership will initially focus on development opportunities in town centres such as Northcote and Panmure (which are already priority locations). Control and approval of urban development outcomes will remain with Eke Panuku, with Auckland Council and local boards, mana whenua and communities fully engaged on the projects.

·     Eke Panuku has been appointed as the lead agency for the city centre, which has also been added to the SOI. This leadership role will involve close co-ordination between council, CCOs and City Rail Link Limited for the next phase of city centre redevelopment.

·     Part 2 of the SOI has an improved overview of the three-year programme. It summarises the purpose or vision for each location, and outlines delivery in the next year, and then the following two years. The description of projects and programmes are significantly clearer.

24.     Final budgets have been included to reflect the final Auckland Council 2022/23 annual budget decisions

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

25.     The Tātaki Auckland Unlimited final SOI addresses or responds to all the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no issues for modification. 

26.     Changes to the final SOI of note include:

·     Commentary regarding Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s work in partnership with Māori has been elevated and refined following feedback from Tāmaki Makaurau mana whenua forum members.

·     Final targets for the performance measure “Number of businesses that have been through a Tātaki Auckland Unlimited programme or benefitted from a Tātaki Auckland Unlimited intervention” (LTP measure) have been set at 1,200 for each of the next three years. This is a significant decrease from the previous target of 3,000. This reflects Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s decision to step away from the delivery of the Regional Business Partner programme and loss of the APTR funding.

 


 

 

 

·     Final targets have been increased for the following two performance measures:

“Net promoter score for Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s audiences and participants” (LTP measure).  This was 20 and is now 40 for 2022/23, 45 for 2023/24 and 50 for 2024/25.

“The number of programmes contributing to the visibility and presence of Māori in Tāmaki Makaurau” (LTP measure). This was 20 and is now 40 for the next three years.

·     Final targets are now included for 2024/25 for the following two performance measures:

“The contribution to regional GDP from major events and business events attracted or supported” ($28m).

“The number of people who are issued tickets to attend Auckland Live, Auckland Zoo, Auckland Art Gallery, NZ Maritime Museum and Auckland Stadiums venues and events” (2.10m).

·     Final targets have been revised for the “Percentage of operating expenses funded through non-rates revenue” performance measure, to align with the ratio of rates to non-rates revenue as set out in the financial tables in the final SOI. The targets are 47 per cent (2022/23), 58 per cent (2023/24) and 60 per cent (2024/25).

·     Final budgets have been included to reflect the final Auckland Council 2022/23 annual budget decisions.

27.     Other changes to the final SOI over and above the matters raised in shareholder feedback include:

·     In the Introduction (and SOI covering letter) Tātaki Auckland Unlimited highlight the loss of APTR funding from the 2022/23 annual budget. Tātaki Auckland Unlimited state that this means that they have no budget available to attract and bid for major events for Tāmaki Makaurau that will occur from 2024 onwards.

·     The opportunities that being a key venue for the FIFA Women’s World Cup 2023 will bring for Tāmaki Makaurau are also highlighted in the Introduction section of the final SOI.

·     A refinement has been made to the wording of the performance measure “carbon emissions reductions year-on-year percentage change”.  This now reads “percentage change in carbon emissions against 2018/19 baseline”. This is based on the same dataset (annual inventory of carbon emissions) and is intended to clarify Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s three-year goal of achieving a 20 per cent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions from the 2018/19 baseline, by 2024/25.  The refined targets in the final SOI are -5 per cent (2022/23), -17 per cent (2023/24) and -20 per cent (2024/25).

Watercare Services Limited

28.     The Watercare final SOI largely addresses or responds to all the matters raised in the shareholder feedback and there are no issues that are recommended for modification.

 


 

 

29.     An area where shareholder feedback was not addressed is to back cast the measure of the economic level of leakage (ELL). Council asked that a back calculation be provided for three years’ ELL as a comparison to the old measure of leakage which was based on percentage of water loss from Watercare’s networked reticulation system. Watercare have explained why this number has not been calculated in the covering letter to the SOI, citing that the ELL is a complex model with a range of inputs including the costs of water, leak detection, pressure management and renewals. The model goes to a catchment level and requires a significant amount of data. As a result, Watercare advised their focus is on updating the ELL annually as opposed to providing historic measure of ELL. For periods prior to 2021, Watercare will continue to report using the historical methodology of percentage of water loss.

30.     The SOI includes a commitment for implementation of actions identified in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. The final SOI includes targets for a new performance measure for greenhouse gas emissions. Watercare has kept council informed during the development of this measure and it is also highlighted in the covering letter. Watercare states its commitment to the goal of 50 per cent reduction in emissions by 2030 but the targets over the next three years reflect a slight increase in emissions before expected decrease from 2025.  

31.     Watercare worked closely with the council on the development of the Water Strategy and has agreed to specific actions that it will lead or contribute to. For each action, Watercare will work with the council to agree scope and resources, collaborate on delivery and communicate regularly and appropriately to ensure alignment. Watercare is committed to the prioritisation of the life-sustaining capacity (mauri) of water in decision-making and commits to strengthening its partnership with mana whenua to do so.

32.     As requested in the shareholder feedback, more information is included on the work within Watercare on three waters reform. The SOI identifies the following workstreams to be supported: iwi engagement; legal support; commercial; financial and technical advice (including asset management, operations and customer) and people and culture. The reform work is developing and there is uncertainty as to the potential costs, timelines, and supporting funding available for Watercare for transition activities, pending legislation and direction from Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) and the National Transition Unit.

33.     The SOI states Watercare’s commitment to work collaboratively with the government and council to respond to the requirements of the reform.

34.     As the government reform of the water sector is continuing to evolve, there are further comments on the SOI that we recommend be included in a letter from the Chair of the committee to Watercare. This would reflect that as the council group awaits the reform legislation a process has been established at executive level to ensure the group is operating within the legislative and council policy mandate and to ensure there is a cohesive approach to the reform across the group. We expect that Watercare will be part of this group.

35.     Other changes in the final SOI include:

·     Commitment to quarterly reporting on progress implementing the Achieving Māori Outcomes plan.

·     Inclusion of the governance arrangements that will be established to promote the vision and strategy for the Waikato River as part of the consent conditions. The function of the new committee or board will be to investigate options for the reduction in reliance on the awa for the supply of water to Auckland.


 

 

·     Commitment to ensure operations are set up to comply with the new Drinking Water Standards, Drinking Water Aesthetic Values and Drinking Water Quality Assurance Rules that come into effect on 14 November 2022.

·     Reinstatement of the Economic Development Action Plan action 5.2.1 to investigate water-use precincts co-located alongside wastewater reuse opportunities at Rosedale and Māngere Wastewater Treatment Plants.

36.     Final budgets have been included to reflect the final Auckland Council 2022/23 annual budget decisions.

Legacy council-controlled organisations

37.     Through the shareholder comment report in April 2022, the Manager, CCO Governance and External Partnerships was delegated the authority to finalise shareholder feedback to the COMET Auckland, Contemporary Art Foundation and Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust.  All the matters in the shareholder feedback for these entities have been addressed. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

38.     The general shareholder feedback to all substantive CCOs was that Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri is a critical council strategy and was well-reflected in the draft SOIs. The final SOIs support the implementation of actions identified in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri. The aim is to ensure that climate change considerations are embedded within organisational decision-making and culture, and to deliver on the two core goals:

·     to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050 and

·     to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway.

39.     The transport system has a major role to play in reducing Auckland’s emissions and Auckland Transport has ensured that the SOI is consistent with the pathway in the new Transport Emissions Reduction Plan.

40.     The Watercare SOI includes commitment to the goal of 50 per cent reduction in emissions by 2030. The final SOI includes a new performance measure for greenhouse gas emissions. The targets over the next three years reflect a slight increase in emissions before expected decrease from 2025. However, backloading emission reduction towards 2030 will increase the risk that the target will be missed, and it is an area that the council should continue to monitor closely.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

41.     Council staff have advised CCOs of the content of this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     The reconciliation exercise between the final SOIs and the shareholder comments ensured that issues relating to local boards were addressed as required in the shareholder comments.

 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

43.     The final SOIs contain each CCO’s contribution to achieving outcomes. The performance of each substantive CCO on these issues is reported on each quarter. The final SOIs address issues raised by the Independent Māori Statutory Board and Ngā Mātārae in shareholder feedback.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.     Financial information in each CCO’s final SOI has been reviewed by Financial Strategy and Planning and the budgets are consistent with final Auckland Council 2022/23 annual budget decisions.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.     There are no major risks associated with approving the CCOs’ SOIs.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     If the committee approves the SOIs, each substantive CCO will report on performance every quarter. Legacy CCOs will report on their performance half-yearly.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Reconciliation of shareholder comments

77

b

Auckland Transport Statement of Intent 2022-2025

85

c

Eke Panuku Statement of Intent 2022-2025

169

d

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited cover letter and Statement of Intent 2022-2025

211

e

Watercare Services Limited cover letter and Statement of Intent 2022-2025

243

f

COMET Auckland Statement of Intent 2022-2025

289

g

Contemporary Art Foundation Statement of Intent 2022-2025

315

h

Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust Statement of Intent 2022-2025

331

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Trudi Fava - CCO Programme Lead

Edward Siddle - Principal Advisor

Rachel Wilson - Principal Advisor

Sarah Johnstone-Smith - Principal Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

Auckland Council Comments on Ports of Auckland Limited's Draft Statement of Corporate Intent

File No.: CP2022/12214

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To agree shareholder comments on Ports of Auckland Limited’s (POAL) 2022-2025 draft Statement of Corporate Intent (SCI).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In June, the Mayor sent a letter of expectation (LOE) setting out the council’s priorities and expectations (as shareholder) to inform POAL’s drafting of their SCI.

3.       POAL has provided the council with a draft SCI for the period 2022–2025 (Attachment A).

4.       As the sole shareholder, the council can provide comments on the draft SCI and POAL must consider those comments before finalising the SCI in early October.

5.       The draft SCI represents a reset in POAL’s strategic direction and a focus on core business and delivery. POAL’s new strategy “Regaining our Mana” and the key pillars that support it are designed to lift performance significantly, deliver a reasonable return to the council, and rebuild trust with customers and stakeholders.

6.       Staff have reviewed the draft SCI and recommend that shareholder comments be provided to POAL as set out in this report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      approve the shareholder comments on the draft Statement of Corporate Intent 2022–2025 for Ports of Auckland Limited as set out in this report

b)      delegate authority to the Mayor and Deputy Mayor to:

i)        finalise a letter to Ports of Auckland Limited setting out the shareholder comments on the draft Statement of Corporate Intent 2022–2025 in line with the direction set by the committee

ii)       approve any minor amendments to the shareholder comments, if required.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Under the Port Companies Act 1988 (the Act), POAL is required to provide the council (as shareholder) a draft SCI one month after the commencement of each financial year of POAL.

8.       The SCI instrument is comparable to a Statement of Intent for a council-controlled organisation in that the SCI is the principal mechanism for establishing the strategic objectives of POAL.


 

9.       The purpose of the SCI is to:

a)      publicly state the activities and intentions of POAL and the objectives to which those activities will contribute; and

b)      provide a basis for the accountability of the Board of Directors of POAL to the council as shareholder for the performance of the company and its subsidiaries.

10.     Under the Act, the council may provide comments on the draft SCI and POAL must consider those comments before finalising the SCI.

11.     Council can modify POAL’s SCI in accordance with the Act at any time.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     Below are the key elements of the SCI and suggested comments to be provided to POAL before they finalise the SCI.

Objectives of POAL

13.     POAL’s overarching strategy is titled ‘Regaining our Mana’. For the period covered by the SCI, POAL are focused on rebuilding the business to deliver a port that is “sustainably profitable, delivering a fair return to Auckland Council, whilst remaining the preferred port of our customers and our people.”

14.     The objectives reflect the overall focus on rebuilding the business and lifting performance significantly from previous year’s results. Specifically, the container operations have been identified as an area of performance improvement. POAL note that their objectives are largely informed by the needs of the customers. They aim to focus on core business and do it well. This approach seeks to regain the trust of customers and deliver them more certainty.

15.     Staff suggest that POAL’s objectives focused on rebuilding the business and lifting performance are appropriate. The expectation from the council is that this improvement will in turn provide the council and Aucklanders, with a suitable return on investment. The council expects to see improvements over the coming financial year and reported through POAL’s quarterly updates to the council.

Health and Safety

16.     In the letter of expectation, the council asked POAL to maintain a proactive focus on continuous improvement in health, safety and wellbeing (HS&W), retain the target of zero fatalities and serious work-related illnesses or injuries and to consult with the council’s HS&W staff to develop suitable targets for inclusion in the SCI.

17.     POAL has confirmed in the SCI that operating safely is their bottom line. As requested, the target of zero fatalities and serious work-related illnesses or injuries has been retained. POAL also consulted with council staff and included the following new HS&W indicators:

a)      95% of critical risk control verifications completed versus scheduled

b)      95% of safety and wellbeing interactions completed versus scheduled

18.     Council HS&W staff consider that these indicators are a good improvement but would ask POAL to provide additional reporting on the effectiveness of control verifications rather than simply completing the verifications.

19.     Council staff also recommend asking that POAL’s HS&W General Manager provide the committee with a general update on the status of HS&W alongside one of their quarterly updates.


 

Key Productivity Targets

Summary of Targets

20.     The draft SCI includes new productivity targets including:

a)      Percentage of ships turned on time.

b)      TEU throughput - This is a measure of container handling activity. TEU means twenty-foot equivalent unit and is the standard container used worldwide. A TEU is 20 feet (6.06 metres) long and eight feet (2.44 metres) wide and tall. A 20-foot container represents one TEU; a 40-foot container represents two TEUs.

c)      Multi-cargo breakbulk tonnage - Breakbulk means goods that are loaded individually and not in containers.

d)      Multi-cargo car units processed.

These new targets are consistent with industry productivity measures and will assist to monitor the productivity of POAL.

21.     The main productivity targets for the SCI period are mostly above the actual results for 2022 and continue to increase over the outer years to 2025. This reflects POAL’s objective of rebuilding the business and significantly improving performance. A key focus for POAL is improving the core container business which makes up the majority of POAL’s revenue and activity. Improvement in this area requires doing the basics well and rebuilding their reputation and trust with customers including providing greater certainty for example around berthing windows.

22.     In key productivity performance targets such as crane rate and ship rate, in particular ship rate, POAL proposes a drop of 25% for financial year 2023/2024 (See commentary on the reason for this below at paragraph 29).

23.     The productivity targets in the draft SCI are set out in the table below with comparison to the previous SCI targets and actual results for 2022.

 

2022 Targets

(2022 SCI)

2022 Actual Results

2023 Targets

(Draft SCI)

2024 Targets

(Draft SCI)

2025 Targets

(Draft SCI)

Customer satisfaction survey

No target

N/A

6/10

6.5/10

7/10

Percentage of ships turned on time

No target

N/A

75%

77%

80%

Crane rate (as measured by MOT)

25

24.1

25

26

27

Ship rate (as measured by MOT)

62.5

43.3

50

55

60

Container Terminal – Truck turn around time

80% at <60 min

75.8% at <30 min

75% at <30 min

77% at <30 min

80% at <30 min

Multi-cargo average car dwell time (days)

2.85

2.07

2.1

2.0

1.9

Percentage of land-side moves on rail

14%

14%

14%

16%

18%

TEU throughput (000’s)

No target

812

942

1,022

1,050

Multi-cargo breakbulk tonnage (000’s)

No target

4,599

4,288

3,815

3,846

Multi-cargo car units processed (000’s)

No target

241

256

260

264

 

24.     The council will be able to monitor the progress that POAL is making towards the targets through the quarterly updates to the relevant committee. The council will be particularly interested in the improvements in the productivity targets relating to the container business. 

Financial Projections

25.     As requested in the LOE, Return on Investment (ROI) has been added as one of the key financial metrics which will be reported on alongside other measures in POAL’s quarterly reports to the council. The measure excludes non-performance related decisions such as financing or distributions and presents a purer view of the underlying performance.

26.     The financial targets in the draft SCI are set out in the table below with comparison to targets in the previous year’s SCI and actual results for 2022.

 

2022 Targets

(2022 SCI)

2022 Actual Results

2023 Targets (Draft SCI)

2024 Targets (Draft SCI)

2025 Targets (Draft SCI)

Return on Equity

(NPAT / average Equity)

No target

-1.0%

3.5%

4.0%

4.7%

Return on Investment

(Operating Profit / total assets)

No target

1.6%

2.2%

2.6%

3.1%

Net Profit after Tax (NPAT)

$21m

-$10.3m

$35.0m

$42.0m

$50.2m

Dividend declared

$2.1m

$14.2m

$17.0m

$21.0m

$25.0m

Interest coverage ratio

2.4

2.54

2.91

3.09

3.63

Ratio of consolidated shareholders’ funds to total assets

60.7%

62.5%

63.7%

65.4%

67.3%

 

27.     The proposed financial return targets shown by ROI and Return on Equity (ROE) are improving for the next three years, driven by the underlying net profit after tax (NPAT) which is projected to increase by 20% year on year for this SCI period.

28.     However, POAL’s projected NPAT for financial year 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 are lower than the targets set in the previous SCI for these outer years. Comparing the updated financials against the recent annual budget 2022/2023 updates, which are largely unchanged from the 10-year Budget 2021-2031, net profit projections are approximately $20 million worse for financial year 2023/2024 and 2024/2025.

29.     POAL advised that the unfavorable movement in profitability projections reflect the impact of shifting from the previously expected automation to manual operation where higher staff costs are required. Global supply chain congestions and shortages in labour are also negatively impacting the productivity level of the company and therefore the overall profitability. The proposed reductions are in line with the downward trend seen to the key productivity performance targets such as crane rate and ship rate, in particular ship rate, the target of which has dropped by 25% for financial year 2023/2024.

30.     Without other offsetting improvements from elsewhere in the council group, the lower profits will widen the council group’s existing operating budget gap by a further $20 million for financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025.


 

 

31.     Staff therefore recommend asking POAL to look for increased revenue and cost reduction opportunities where possible to mitigate the impact on the group budget position. The revised financial projections will be incorporated into the group budgets as part of the 2023/2024 annual budget process.

32.     Council also asked POAL to consider benchmarking against other New Zealand and Asia-Pacific ports. POAL do not consider the SCI is the correct place to include such benchmarking. Staff acknowledge that the SCI document may not be the most appropriate channel to include benchmarking against other ports but consider it as an important step for gaining a comprehensive picture of business performance and identifying areas for improvement. Therefore, staff recommend that consideration should be given by POAL to use benchmarking for processes including target setting and evaluation of performance and share such information with council through appropriate channels.

Sustainability Goals

33.     POAL have reconsidered their sustainability goals which has resulted in dropping the carbon neutral by 2025 goal and moving the target date for the emission free goal from 2040 to 2050. This brings their emissions goal in line with the council’s goal to achieve net zero emissions by 2050. However, the council’s goal also includes a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030 (against a 2016 baseline).

34.     POAL have confirmed that a 50% reduction by 2030 is not possible to achieve. This is because over 60% of Scope 1 and 2 emissions are generated by their straddle carrier fleet. At this stage there are no reasonable options to significantly reduce the straddle carrier emissions. The electrification developments emerging in the sector are promising and POAL will examine all opportunities to transition to zero emissions equipment as current in-service equipment comes to end of life.

35.     Staff acknowledge there are difficulties in reducing emissions given the existing straddle carrier fleet, but suggest the following comments should be made requesting POAL to:

a)       explore ways to halve emissions by 2030 in line with the council’s goal. If this comes at a higher operational cost, or requires significant capital investment, then this information should be provided so an informed discussion can be had with the council;

b)       if a 50% reduction of emissions by 2030 is not possible, adopt a suitable emission reduction target for 2030;

c)       focus on reducing the approximately 40% of non-straddle carrier emissions; and

d)       continue to monitor long term technology and alternative fuel options for their major emission emitting equipment.

36.     Staff also suggest that POAL sustainability staff meet with council’s sustainability staff to consider ways to share understanding and expertise in this area.

Harbour Health Initiatives

37.     POAL’s new sustainability strategy includes a specific stream of work on harbour health. The draft SCI includes a target of implementing at least one new ‘Health of the Harbour’ initiative per year. These initiatives are of a large scale and likely to require consents. An example of the type and scale of initiative is the recent mussel reseeding operation in which POAL supplied dredged shell material to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, who, in collaboration with Revive our Gulf, are working to restore Ōkahu Bay by re-seeding the kūtai (mussel) beds.

38.     POAL will undertake this initiative in conjunction with iwi and are currently in discussions with mana whenua to determine the series of initiatives that will have long term benefit to the harbour.

Utilisation of Port Land

39.     In the LOE the council asked to work with POAL on an appropriate strategy for the ongoing use of the land that the port occupies. Council’s expectation is that POAL will use the existing land footprint in the most efficient way possible to achieve appropriate performance results without further reclamation. POAL have confirmed that they also want to use the land efficiently and are developing a 10-year precinct plan to deliver this. POAL have agreed to work with the council on a long-term strategy for the ongoing use of the land. Staff will work with POAL to progress this work in the next financial year.

Māori Outcomes Framework

40.     In the LOE the council asked for an update on the progress of POAL’s Māori Outcomes Framework. POAL confirmed that their Māori Outcomes Framework has been drafted and will be presented for approval at the August Board meeting. It includes priorities that have been incorporated as a key performance target.

41.     Staff suggest asking POAL to provide a copy of the Māori Outcomes Framework once it has been approved and provide the council an update on the Framework at the next quarterly update.

Information to be provided to the shareholder

42.     Under the Act the SCI must include the kind of information to be provided to the shareholder by the port company. Staff have some suggested amendments to section 7 of the draft SCI including:

a)       the need to inform the Group CFO immediately of any issues that may require disclosure to the NZX;

b)       POAL reporting twice a year to the council’s Audit and Risk Committee; and

c)       the requirement to engage on compliance with Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) under the financial reporting requirement heading.

Summary of Proposed Comments

Key aspect of draft SCI

Suggested comments

Objectives

·    Note POAL’s focus on core business delivery and objective to lift performance significantly, deliver a reasonable return to the council, and rebuild trust with customers.

·    Reiterate that the council’s primary expectation is that POAL provide the council with a suitable return on investment.

Productivity

·    The council will monitor the progress that POAL is making towards the key productivity targets through the quarterly updates. The council will be particularly interested in the improvements in the targets relating to the container business.

Benchmarking financial performance

·    Recommend that consideration be given by POAL to use benchmarking for processes including target setting and evaluation of performance and share such information with council through appropriate channels.

Financial projections

·    Ask POAL to look for increased revenue and cost reduction opportunities where possible to mitigate the impact on the group budget position.

Health, Safety and Wellbeing

·    Approve POAL’s focus on HS&W and the key performance targets.

·    Request additional reporting on the effectiveness of control verifications rather than simply completing the verifications.

·    Request that POAL’s HS&W General Manager provide an update on HS&W to the relevant committee alongside one of POAL’s regular quarterly reports. 

Sustainability

·    Ask POAL to explore ways to halve emissions by 2030 in line with the council’s goal. If this comes at a higher operational cost, or requires significant capital investment, then this information should be provided so an informed discussion can be had with the council.

·    If a 50% reduction of emissions by 2030 is not possible, adopt a suitable emission reduction target for 2030.

·    Focus on reducing the approximately 40% of non-straddle carrier emissions.

·    Continue to monitor long term technology and alternative fuel options for their major emission emitting equipment.

·    Suggest that POAL sustainability staff meet with council’s sustainability staff to consider ways to share understanding and expertise in this area.

Harbour Health Initiatives

·    Acknowledge POAL for including harbour health initiative and look forward to quarterly updates on the progress of the first initiative. 

Māori Outcomes Framework

·    Ask POAL to provide a copy of the Māori Outcomes Framework once it has been approved and provide the council an update on the Framework at the next quarterly update.

Information to be provided to shareholder 

·    Amend section 7 (Information to be provided to shareholder) of the draft SCI to include:

the need to inform the Group CFO immediately of any issues that may require disclosure to the NZX;

reporting twice a year to the council’s Audit and Risk Committee in section 7 of the SCI; and

the requirement to engage on compliance with TCFD under the financial reporting requirement heading in section 7 of the SCI.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

43.     Staff from the council’s sustainability team have reviewed the draft SCI and assisted with the preparation of this report. This report features a review and comments on POAL’s sustainability goals and targets under the Sustainability Goals heading. Staff suggest that asking POAL to explore ways to halve emissions by 2030 in line with the council’s goal. If this comes at a higher operational cost, or requires significant capital investment, then this information should be provided so an informed discussion can be had with the council

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

44.     As noted above, without other offsetting improvements from elsewhere in the council group POAL’s lower projected profits will widen the council group’s existing operating budget gap by a further of $20 million for financial year 2023/2024 and 2024/2025.

45.     POAL should be asked to look for increased revenue and cost reduction opportunities where possible to mitigate the impact on the group budget position. The revised financial projections will be incorporated into the group budgets as part of the 2023/2024 annual budget process.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.     The governance of POAL is a Governing Body responsibility, and therefore we have not consulted with local boards.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

47.     In the LOE the council asked for an update on POAL’s Māori Outcomes Framework. POAL confirmed that their Māori Outcomes Framework has been drafted and will be presented for approval at the August Board meeting. It includes priorities that have been incorporated as a key performance target.

48.     Staff suggest asking POAL to provide a copy of the Māori Outcomes Framework once it has been approved and provide the council an update on the Framework at the next quarterly update.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.     Council’s Finance staff have reviewed the draft SCI and assisted with the drafting of this report. Financial implications are discussed under the Financial Projections heading in this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

50.     The SCI is the principal mechanism for establishing the strategic objectives of POAL. Under the Act the council (as shareholder) can provide comments on the draft SCI. If the council does not engage with the SCI process and provide comments, there is a risk that the strategic objectives of POAL will not be in line with the strategic direction and expectations of the council. To mitigate this risk, staff will work with elected members to fully engage with the process and provide comments as an engaged shareholder.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

51.     If the CCO Oversight Committee agrees to the recommendations, staff will prepare a letter to the chair of the POAL board summarising the contents. Staff recommend that the Committee delegates approving the letter to the Mayor and Deputy Mayor.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ports of Auckland Limited Draft Statement of Corporate Intent 2022-2025

355

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chris Levet - Principal Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

Liaison councillors' updates

File No.: CP2022/06003

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To whiwhi / receive an update from liaison councillors to the boards of Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In February 2020, the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee resolved to establish the role of a CCO liaison councillor (Resolution number CCO/2020/3).

3.       The key purpose of the liaison councillor role is to develop trusting relationships with the CCOs, to allow a better exchange of information. Liaison councillors can act as a key point of contact when specific issues arise, and provide advice when issues are likely to be of high public interest. They can provide the CCO with Governing Body perspectives which may help board decision-making, while at the same time being able to provide Governing Body colleagues with information about the rationale and detail of board decisions.

4.       Liaison councillors are required to regularly report verbally to the CCO Oversight Committee, or in writing if unavailable to attend in person, about activities undertaken in the role and issues arising.

5.       Liaison councillors are allocated to each CCO as follows:

·        Auckland Transport: Deputy Mayor Bill Cashmore and Cr Chris Darby

·        Auckland Unlimited: Cr Richard Hills and Cr John Watson

·        Eke Panuku Development Auckland: Cr Efeso Collins

·        Watercare: Cr Linda Cooper.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      whiwhi / receive the updates from liaison councillors to the Council Controlled Organisations.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

Summary of Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee information memoranda and briefings (including the forward work programme) - 6 September 2022

File No.: CP2022/05997

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A.

2.       To receive a summary and provide a public record of memoranda or briefing papers that may have been held or been distributed to Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee members.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is a regular information-only report which aims to provide greater visibility of information circulated to Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee members via memoranda/briefings or other means, where no decisions are required.

4.       The following workshops/briefings have taken place:

Date

Subject

8/6/2022

Confidential Workshop: Review of Strategic Options

10/6/2022

Site Visit – Watercare

17/6/2022

Site Visit – Auckland Transport

4/7/2022

Site Visit – Ports of Auckland

5/7/2022

Site Visit – Eke Panuku

17/8/2022

Confidential Workshop: FIFA Women’s World Cup Australia & New Zealand 2023

31/8/2022

Confidential Workshop: Review of Strategic Options

 

5.       The following memoranda and information items have been distributed:

Date

Subject

7/6/2022

Auckland Transport Memo: Briefing on public transport patronage recovery in Auckland

24/8/202w2

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited Confidential Memo: CCO Review panel recommendation 3b

 

6.       Note that, unlike an agenda report, staff will not be present to answer questions about the items referred to in this summary.  Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee members should direct any questions to the authors.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee:

a)      tuhi ā-taipitopito / note the progress on the forward work programme appended as Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      whiwhi / receive the Summary of Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee information memoranda and briefings – 6 September 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Forward Work Programme

367

b

Auckland Transport Memo: Briefing on public transport patronage recovery in Auckland

373

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Duncan Glasgow - Kaitohutohu Mana Whakahaere / Governance Advisor

Authoriser

Alastair Cameron - Manager - CCO Governance & External Partnerships

 

 


Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

 

Kōmiti Aromātai Whakahaere Kaupapa Kei Raro I Te Maru O te Kaunihera / CCO Oversight Committee
Forward Work Programme 2022

This committee deals with the performance monitoring of CCOs and other entities in which the council has an equity interest. The committee are to have a general overview and insight into the strategy, direction and priorities of all CCOs, set policy relating to CCO governance and approve the CCO statements of intent.

The full terms of reference can be found here: Terms of Reference - Agreed 12 November 2019

 

Area of work and Lead Department

Reason for work

Committee role

(decision and/or direction)

Expected timeframes

Highlight the month(s) this is expected to come to committee in 2022

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

Quarterly, Half-Year and Annual Reports

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Under the LGA and LGACA the council must regularly undertake performance monitoring of the CCO to evaluate its contribution to meeting its objectives, and the desired results identified in the SOI.

Receive quarterly reports, receive, and adopt half yearly and annual reports.  The CCOs will present to the CCO Oversight committee twice a year on their performance.

 

Progress to date:

Quarter Two reports received March 2022

Quarter Three reports received June 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liaison Councillor Updates

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Mayor Phil Goff has appointed a list of six CCO liaison councillors to attend the board meetings of the CCOs allocated to them, and report back to this committee. 

To receive updates from the CCO Liaison Councillors.

 

Progress to date:

Updates received March 2022, April 2022, June 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ports of Auckland - Statement of Corporate Intent

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Under legislation Ports of Auckland Limited must deliver annually a statement of corporate intent not later than 1 month after the commencement of each financial year.

Seeking committee feedback of draft 2022/25 Ports of Auckland Limited Statement of Corporate intent in August.

Seeking committee approval of final 2022/25 Ports of Auckland Limited Statement of Corporate intent in September.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joint operating model for Auckland stadiums

Auckland Unlimited

The recommendations from the CCO Review report were received by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020 (Resolution number: GB/2020/89).

 

Recommendation 2 was that “the merged entity explores, at the council’s direction, the critical need for joint management and operation of the city’s four stadiums with the Eden Park Trust.”

It is expected a confidential report will be provided in May 2022 for committee approval of the first of a series of decision-making gates.

Progress to date:

Confidential workshops held 7 July, 22 September and 15 December 2021.

Confidential workshop held 4 May 2022.

Confidential report provided on 10 June 2022.

Next steps to be brought to new council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Draft and Final SOIs

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

Under legislation CCOs must deliver annually a draft statement of intent to its shareholders by 1 March 2022

Under legislation CCOs must deliver annually a final statement of intent to its shareholders by 30 June 2022.

These dates can be extended one month by resolution of council under section 4, schedule 8 of the LGA 2002.  This is a recommendation of the LOE report on 14 December 2021 to the Committee and a similar recommendation may be made in 2022. 

Covers: AT, Watercare, Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku

Manukau Beautification Charitable Trust, COMET Auckland and Contemporary Art Foundation

Seeking committee approval of final 2022/25 Statements of Intent from its substantive and non-substantive CCOs.

 

Progress to date:

Committee approval of draft shareholder comments for 2022/25 Statements of Intent from its substantive and non-substantive CCOs – April 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of non-substantive Council controlled organisations

CCO Governance and External Partnerships

 

To ensure that the governance model for Council's non-substantive CCOs is appropriate. CCO/2020/21 approved the council undertaking a review of the status of non-substantive council-controlled organisations and the framework for undertaking the review. 

To make decisions about the future governance of non-substantive CCOs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


Completed

Area of Work

Committee Role

(decision and/or direction)

Decision

Quarterly, Half-Year and Annual Reports

Receive quarterly reports, receive and adopt half yearly and annual reports.  The CCOs will present to the CCO Oversight committee twice a year on their performance.

First quarter reports were received for substantive council-controlled organisations in December 2019, December 2020, and November 2021.

Second quarter reports received for substantive council-controlled organisations in March 2020, and March 2021.

Third quarter reports were scheduled for June 2020; however this meeting was cancelled due to COVID-19; received in May 2021.

Fourth quarter reports were received for substantive council-controlled organisations September 2020, and September 2021.

The Ports of Auckland Limited Interim Report for the six months ending 31 December 2020 were received in March 2021, annual report received in October 2021.

Annual reports for non-substantive CCOs received in October 2021.

Letters of Expectation

Seeking committee approval of the content of draft 2020/21 letters of expectation.

Decision to approve content of 2020/2021 letters of expectation, authority delegated to mayor to finalise and issue the letters, 12 December 2019.

(Link to decision CCO/2019/2)

CCO AGM Resolutions

To delegate the authority to Auckland Council’s chief executive to act as Auckland Council’s shareholder representative to execute a written resolution in lieu of an annual meeting. 

Decision to delegate authority to council’s chief executive to act as council’s shareholder representation to the substantive council-controlled organisations and also Tāmaki Regeneration Company and City Rail Link Limited and sign written resolutions
(Link to decision
CCO/2019/3)

Final SOIs

Seeking committee approval of final 2020/21 Statements of Intent from its substantive and non-substantive CCOs.

Decision to approve the 2020-2023 statements of intent, 22 September 2020.
(Link to decision
CCO/2020/10)

Haumaru Housing – End of year results

Haumaru Housing will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

City Rail Link Limited (CRLL) – end of year results

CRLL reports quarterly as part of the group report to the Finance and Performance Committee. CRLL will present to the CCO Oversight Committee twice a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

Tamaki Regeneration Company (TRC) - End of year results

TRC will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Results presented in a workshop, 21 October 2020.

Merged Entity – new name

To approve the new name for the merged entity resulting from the amalgamation of RFAL and ATEED.

Decision to approve name of merged entity, 27 October 2020.
(Link to decision
CCO/2020/17)

Legacy CCO Review

To agree a set of criteria that will guide a review of Auckland Council’s legacy CCOs and the sequence of their review.

Decision to approve a review of the status of non-substantive CCOs and framework, 27 October 2020.
(Link to decision
CCO/2020/21)

Auckland Unlimited Final SOI

To approve a statement of intent for the new merged entity, Auckland Unlimited, resulting from the amalgamation covering the period 1 December 2020 to 30 June 2021.

Decision to approve a statement of intent for the new merged entity, Auckland Unlimited, 24 November 2020.
(Link to decision CCO/2020/27)

Ports of Auckland statement of corporate intent

To consider POAL’s final statement of corporate intent.

Draft statement of corporate intent received by the Governing Body, 27 August 2020.

Decision to approve POAL’s final statement of corporate intent 2020-2023, 8 December 2020. (Link to decision CCO/2020/33)

Te Puru Community Charitable Trust Organisation – extension of exemption

To approve Te Puru’s extension to the exemption from council-controlled organisation requirements under the Local Government Act 2002.

Decision to extend the Trust’s exemption, 23 February 2021.
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/5)

Draft SOIs

To approve proposed shareholder comments on substantive and non-substantive CCO draft 2021/2024 Statements of Intent.

Decision to note recommended comments, focus of the feedback and feedback received at committee, and agree the process of providing feedback to substantive and non-substantive CCOs, 21 May 2021.
(Link to decision CCO/2021/18)

Highbrook Park Trust - Review of Trust Deed and Management Contract

To disestablish the trust

Decision to disestablish the trust, 18 May 2021.
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/19)

Statement of Expectation

Approve the statement of expectations content and process.

Decision to approve the Statement of Expectations for substantive Council-controlled Organisations, agreed that the CCO Governance Manual is no longer required, 22 June 2021.
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/26)

Auckland Council Branding Guidelines

Approve new Auckland Council branding guidelines.

Decision to approve the updated Auckland Council group brand guidelines, require CCOs to comply with the updated guidelines, and note updates on compliance will be reported annually, 24 August 2021.
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/32)

Final SOIs

Approval of final 2020/24 Statements of Intent for substantive and non-substantive CCOs.

Decision to approve the 2021-2024 statements of intent for substantive and non-substantive CCOs
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/34)

Ports of Auckland statement of corporate intent

To consider POAL’s final statement of corporate intent.

Decision to receive Ports of Auckland Limited’s final Statement of Corporate Intent 2021-2024
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/46)

Haumaru Housing – End of year results

Haumaru Housing will report to CCO Oversight Committee once a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Decision to receive annual reports in October 2021
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/47)

City Rail Link Limited (CRLL) – end of year results

CRLL reports quarterly as part of the group report to the Finance and Performance Committee. CRLL will present to the CCO Oversight Committee twice a year to discuss performance and end of year results.

Decision to receive annual reports in October 2021
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/47)

CCO ‘Scan the Horizon’ Workshops

The topics and sequencing of these workshops is being developed and will be agreed early in 2020.

Future of these workshops being considered as part of CCO Review.

Workshops were held as follows:

ATEED - February 2020, Auckland Transport - March 2020

Watercare - July 2020 (Governing Body workshop)

CCO site visits 2021

To implement CCO Review recommendation 27 - The governing body spends half a day each year visiting each CCO to better understand its business and culture and to informally build relationships.

Watercare site visit – 10 August 2021

Auckland Transport briefing in lieu of site visit due to Covid – 19 October 2021

Auckland Unlimited briefing in lieu of site visit due to Covid – 8 November 2021

Eke Panuku briefing in lieu of site visit due to Covid – 16 November 2021

CCO Review Updates 2021

To receive updates on the implementation and progression of the 64 summary recommendations of the CCO Review

A programme update was received in February 2020

The CCO Review was received by the Governing Body on 27 August 2020.

An update by way of memorandum was provided in November 2020.

An update was received in February 2021.

An update by way of memorandum was provided in March 2021.

Updates were received in May 2021, June 2021, August 2021, September 2021, October 2021 and November 2021

Liaison councillor updates 2021

To receive updates from the CCO Liaison Councillors.

Principals and draft protocols for the liaison councillor role were agreed in February 2020

Updates were provided in September, October and November 2020.

Updates were provided in May, June, August , September, October , November and December 2021.

Letters of Expectation

Seeking committee approval of the content of draft 2021/22 letters of expectation.

Decision to approve content of 2021/2022 letters of expectation, authority delegated to mayor and deputy mayor to finalise and issue the letters, 14 December 2021.
(Link to decision
CCO/2021/62)

CCO Review Updates 2022

To receive updates on the implementation and progression of the 64 summary recommendations of the CCO Review.

Committee received an overview of the implementation programme and noted that the Group Chief Executives Forum will continue to monitor implementation of outstanding review recommendations.

(Link to decision CCO/2022/14)

CCO site visits 2022

To implement CCO Review recommendation 27 - The governing body spends half a day each year visiting each CCO to better understand its business and culture and to informally build relationships.

Site visits took place on the following dates:

Auckland Unlimited – 10 May 2022.

Watercare – 10 June 2022.

Auckland Transport – 17 June 2022.

Ports of Auckland – 4 July 2022.

Eke Panuku – 5 July 2022.

 



Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

 

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Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

06 September 2022

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Exclusion of the Public: Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987

That the Council Controlled Organisation Oversight Committee

a)      exclude the public from the following part(s) of the proceedings of this meeting.

The general subject of each matter to be considered while the public is excluded, the reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter, and the specific grounds under section 48(1) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 for the passing of this resolution follows.

This resolution is made in reliance on section 48(1)(a) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 and the particular interest or interests protected by section 6 or section 7 of that Act which would be prejudiced by the holding of the whole or relevant part of the proceedings of the meeting in public, as follows:

 

C1       CONFIDENTIAL: Review of Strategic Options

Reason for passing this resolution in relation to each matter

Particular interest(s) protected (where applicable)

Ground(s) under section 48(1) for the passing of this resolution

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.

s7(2)(h) - The withholding of the information is necessary to enable the local authority to carry out, without prejudice or disadvantage, commercial activities.

In particular, the report contains information that could prejudice Auckland Council and Ports of Auckland Limited's commercial activties.

s48(1)(a)

The public conduct of the part of the meeting would be likely to result in the disclosure of information for which good reason for withholding exists under section 7.