I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Franklin Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Tuesday, 27 September 2022

9.30am

The Leslie Comrie Board Room
Level One Franklin: the Centre
12 Massey Ave
Pukekohe

and via Microsoft Teams videoconference

 

Either a transcript or a recording will be published to the Auckland Council Website.

 

 

Franklin Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Andrew Baker

 

Deputy Chairperson

Angela Fulljames

 

Members

Malcolm Bell

 

 

Alan Cole

 

 

Sharlene Druyven

 

 

Amanda Kinzett

 

 

Matthew Murphy

 

 

Logan Soole

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Denise Gunn

Democracy Advisor

 

19 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 021 981 028

Email: denise.gunn@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                   5

2          Apologies                                                                                 5

3          Declaration of Interest                                          5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                         5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                    5

6          Acknowledgements                                              5

7          Petitions                                                                 5

8          Deputations                                                           5

8.1     Deputation - Warriors Community Foundation                                                   5

8.2     Deputation - Abbeyfield Home                   6

8.3     Deputation - Tui Cox, Waiuku footpaths  6

9          Public Forum                                                                            6

10        Extraordinary Business                                       7

11        Options for the future of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field                                                                        9

12        Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022             23

13        Franklin Discretionary Community Grants, Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023                                                             41

14        Auckland Transport - Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                        59

15        Variation to 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme           63

16        Devon Lane, Pukekohe one-way upgrade       77

17        Approval for a new public road name at 141 Collingwood Road, Waiuku                               85

18        Approval for a new private road name at 35 Monument Road Clevedon Auckland               95

19        Approval for a new private road name at 150 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford                  111

20        Approval to extend an existing road name to a new private road, and new private and public road names at 37 McEldownie Road / Maketu Road, Drury South - Hunua Views Development Stage 5-6                                    119

21        Grant of new landowner approval and subsequent Agreement to Lease and Lease to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated at Karioitahi Gap Domain Recreation Reserve 701 and 685 Karioitahi Road, Karioitahi                131

22        Franklin Local Board Council-controlled Organisations Work Programme update Quarter Four 2021-22, and amendments to the Council-controlled Organisations Engagement Plan 2022-2023                                                  145

23        Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management         185

24        Update on the progress and achievements of Ara Kōtui (formerly the Improving Māori input into local board decision-making)                  257

25        Governance Forward Work Calendar September 2022                                                265

26        Franklin Local Board workshop records       269

27        2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations                  277

28        Closing the Franklin Local Board's electoral term and valedictory reflections                     281

29        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chair will open the meeting and welcome everyone present.

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)          confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Tuesday, 23 August 2022 as true and correct.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Franklin Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Deputation - Warriors Community Foundation

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Lincoln Jefferson, the CEO for the Warriors Community Foundation, will be in attendance to address the local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Warriors Community Foundation tackle social issues with programmes and community initiatives that support mental health, anti-bullying, literacy, and other wellbeing skills that support success for our tamariki, rangatahi and whānau.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Lincoln Jefferson, CEO of the Warriors Community Foundation, for his attendance and presentation.

 

 

 

8.2       Deputation - Abbeyfield Home

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Virginia Warren and Mary Crawford will be in attendance to address the board about housing for older people at Abbeyfield in Pukekohe.                     

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Virginia Warren and Mary Crawford will address the board regarding an Abbeyfield Home in Pukekohe.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Virginia Warren and Mary Crawford for their attendance and presentation regarding Abbeyfield Home in Pukekohe.

 

 

 

8.3       Deputation - Tui Cox, Waiuku footpaths

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Tui Cox will be in attendance to address the board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Tui Cox will be addressing the board about some of the footpaths in Waiuku.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      thank Tui Cox for her attendance and presentation on footpaths in Waiuku.

 

 


 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Options for the future of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field

File No.: CP2022/10071

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.     To receive and endorse key findings from the investigation into the facilities and services provided by Ardmore Hall and Bell Field.

2.     To approve giving Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku) the mandate to investigate the possible sale of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field, by way of service property optimisation, and to develop advice on local reinvestment options.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.     An investigation into the facilities and services provided by Ardmore Hall, at 177 Burnside Road and the adjacent land, Bell Field, at 587R Papakura-Clevedon Road in Ardmore was completed, to understand if service property optimisation is a feasible option (Attachment A).

4.     Ardmore Hall is a venue for hire, but a fire in January 2021 resulted in the facility no longer being useable and it has been closed to the public since.

5.     Bell Field is adjacent to Ardmore Hall and has been used as a cricket field in the past and is used occasionally by Ardmore School.

6.     Ardmore Hall was fit for purpose before the fire and if repaired could return to service as a fit for purpose facility.

7.     Bell Field is not fit for purpose as a sports park or cricket field but is fit for purpose as a suburb park.

8.       There is adequate provision of venues for hire, bookable spaces, and sports parks to meet current and future anticipated demand, and service property optimisation is recommended.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)     kohuki / consider the findings from the investigation into the facilities and services provided by Ardmore Hall and Bell Field (Attachment A)

b)     whakaae / approve the proposed disposal of 177 Burnside Road and 587R Papakura-Clevedon Road, Ardmore, (option 6) in accordance with the service property optimisation process with:

i)      proceeds of sale proposed for reinvestment as a contribution to an eligible project in the Ardmore/Clevedon area

ii)     conditions of sale providing protection of historic heritage

iii)      terms and conditions to be approved under the appropriate Eke Panuku Development Auckland board delegation.

 

Horopaki

Context

Our investigation confirms that service property optimisation is a feasible option for both Ardmore Hall and Bell Field

9.     Ardmore Hall, located at 177 Burnside Road, is part of the Franklin Local Board’s network of venues for hire and was predominantly used as a venue for hire by the Orewa Tongan Assembly of God and the Manukau City Veterans Cycle Club.

10.   Ardmore Hall is not scheduled as a heritage building but the hall and the Ardmore First World War memorial, located on the corner of Burnside and Clevedon Roads, are included in Auckland Council’s Cultural Heritage Inventory (CHI).

11.   A fire in January 2021 means the hall is no longer useable and it has been closed to the public since.

The service property optimisation process is a development funding tool

12.   Under the service property optimisation process (adopted by Finance and Performance Committee, March 2015) council owned property assets that are currently used to deliver a council service can be redeveloped or sold with sale proceeds reinvested in eligible projects to improve service delivery in the same local board area.

13.   Eligible reinvestment projects are projects contemplated in current or future years of the Long-term Plan (LTP), noted in the relevant Asset Management Plan (AMP), or are consistent with qualifying business strategies or plans formally adopted to guide council’s future service provision and to inform LTP/AMP processes (for example, Community Facilities Network Plan).

14.   On 28 September 2017, the Governing Body delegated final decision-making authority on local asset disposal and reinvestment, under the service property optimisation process, to local boards, providing all criteria have been met.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Ngā kitenga matua
Key findings

15.   Our investigation identified the following information and insights regarding Ardmore Hall and Bell Field.

·       Ardmore Hall and Bell Field have limited service offerings and low utilisation.

·       There is adequate provision of venues for hire and bookable spaces to accommodate current and future demand.

·       The majority of costs required to repair Ardmore Hall would be covered by insurance, with additional renewals funding required to remedy pre-existing building issues.

·       Ardmore Hall is not scheduled as a heritage building but holds some social heritage value for the local community.

·       Bell Field is not fit for purpose as a sports park or cricket field but is fit for purpose as a suburb park.

·       The population in the study area is expected to increase at a much slower rate than the local board area and Auckland region.

·       Ardmore Hall and Bell Field may be considered for potential disposal, with further due diligence and legal investigations, as part of the service property optimisation process.

16.   The investigation’s findings are reported in Attachment A: Ardmore Hall and Bell Field community service provision findings report.

Te wāhi e mātaihia ana
Study area

17.   Following discussions with the Venue Hire team and after gaining a clear understanding of the users of the hall and field, it was agreed the study area for this assessment should be based on a 10–15-minute drive from Ardmore Hall. This is because there are other nearby facilities that offer viable alternatives, both within and beyond the study area, and a 30-minute drive covers a very large area that was too broad for detailed analysis.

18.   To enable collection of demographic information for the study area, it was adjusted according to Statistical Areas (SA2s)[1], as defined by Statistics New Zealand (see Map 1).

Map 1: Study area

Map

Description automatically generated

19.   The study area includes Ardmore, Clevedon, Papakura Industrial, Papakura North East, Papakura East, Papakura Central, Papakura Massey Park, Papakura Kelvin, Papakura North, Red Hill, Takanini South East, and Takanini South.

Te tipuranga me te hangapori o te wāhi e mātaihia ana
Growth and demographics in the study area

20.   By 2051 the total population of the study area is expected to be 40,320, a 25 per cent increase from 2018. This is much lower than the Franklin Local Board area’s expected population growth of 113 per cent and the Auckland region’s expected growth of 47 per cent[2].

21.   Papakura North and Papakura Central areas are projected to have the highest population growth within the study area, at 313 per cent and 104 per cent. Ardmore is projected to have the lowest population growth at negative 15 per cent.

22.   The investigation identified that, within the study area, the percentage of Māori and Pacific people is more than both the local board and regional average.

23.   Age group distribution in the study area is consistent with the local board area and wider Auckland region.

Ngā ritenga
Provision

24.   It is important to consider available alternatives when looking at future provision.

·    Within 10km of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field there are 12 council-provided venues for hire, two community centres, and multiple bookable spaces run by non-council providers.

·    Franklin Local Board has 21 council-provided sports parks (including Bell Field), 288 local parks, and 10 regional parks.

·    There are 17 council-owned sports parks in the study area.

25.   There is adequate provision of venues for hire and bookable spaces to accommodate current demand. Almost half of the venues for hire have low utilisation rates (below 30 per cent), so it is likely that current provision could also support future demand. 

26.   There is adequate provision of parks to accommodate current demand. The neighbouring Papakura Local Board area holds excess capacity for sports parks. This could likely support both population growth and additional future demand from the Ardmore area.

Ngā kōwhiringa kua tautuhia
Options identified

27.   Following our investigation, the following options were identified and assessed.

1)     Status quo
Ardmore Hall stays closed.
No change to Bell Field.

2)     Repair Ardmore Hall, retain Bell Field
Ardmore Hall is repaired and reopened.
No change to Bell Field.

3)     Repair Ardmore Hall, upgrade Bell Field
Ardmore Hall is repaired and reopened.
Bell Field is upgraded to service-level for daytime sports.

4)     Dispose of Ardmore Hall, retain Bell Field
Ardmore Hall is sold through the service property optimisation process and sale proceeds allocated to a local project.
No change to Bell Field. Retained as a (satellite) support sports field
.

5)     Dispose of Bell Field, repair Ardmore Hall
Bell Field is sold through the service property optimisation process and sale proceeds allocated to a local project.
Ardmore Hall is repaired and reopened.

6)     Dispose of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field
Ardmore Hall and Bell Field are sold through the service property optimisation process and sale proceeds allocated to a local project.

28.   Each option was assessed against critical success factors. These factors are outlined below in Table 1. A summary of the options assessment is shown in Table 2.

Table 1: Critical success factor for options assessment

Strategic fit

 

·   Should we be doing this?

·   Which options align with the council’s strategies, policies, and programmes?

Business need

 

·   Do we need to do this?

·   How well does each option fulfil the needs identified by the organisation?

Potential value for money

 

·   What is the most cost-effective way to do this?

·   Which option has the lowest long-term costs?

Supplier capacity and capability

 

·   Can we get others to do this?

·   How well does each option match with potential suppliers to deliver the required services?

Potential affordability

 

·   Can we afford this?

·   How well does each option align with available funding?

Potential achievability

·   Can we do this?

Enable our communities

·   Do these options enable our communities to make decisions about their lives?

·   Which options brings our communities together?

Focus on communities that need us most

·   How well does each option use our resources to serve our communities that need us most?

Prepare for population growth

 

·   How well does each option support anticipated population growth?

Hall and field made fit-for-purpose

·   Which option ensures the hall and field are fit-for-purpose?

·   How flexible are the spaces?

Retain the heritage value

 

·   How well does each option recognise the current heritage value and support heritage preservation?

Support local board priorities

 

·   Which options support local board priorities?

·   How well does each option meet the needs of the community, now and into the future?

 

 

Table 2: Summary of options assessment

Critical success factors

Option 1

Option 2

Option 3

Option 4

Option 5

Option 6

 

Ardmore Hall stays closed, no change to Bell Field

Repair Ardmore Hall, retain Bell Field

Repair Ardmore Hall, upgrade Bell Field

Dispose of Ardmore Hall, retain Bell Field

Dispose of Bell Field, repair Ardmore Hall

Dispose of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field

Strategic fit

Business need

Potential value for money

Supplier capacity and capability

Potential affordability

Potential achievability

Enable our communities

Focus on communities that need us most

Prepare for population growth

Hall and field made fit-for-purpose

Retain the heritage value

Support local board priorities

Alignment:
weak          moderate    strong

 

29.   The summary of options assessment shows that option 6, the proposed disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field, ranks most favourably against the critical success factors.

·    Option 6 is the only option that has strong alignment with potential value for money and supporting local board priorities.

·    While option 6 only has moderate alignment with retaining the heritage value, where other options do provide strong alignment, this can be manged by adhering to the Strategic Heritage Asset Management Plan 2018.

30.   The final option agreed upon by the local board will need to include consideration for how Ardmore Hall and the Ardmore First World War memorial are managed in the future. The Strategic Heritage Asset Management Plan (SHAMP) sets out advice and protocol for this, including committing to future repairs and maintenance. If the memorial needed to be relocated, the method of removal and relocation would need to be considered and the new location should allow its current community function to continue.

Ngā pānga ā-pūtea i ngā kōwhiringa
Financial implications of options

31.   Table 3 outlines the approximate expected capital and operational expenditure, over the next 30 years, for each of the options.

Table 3: CAPEX and OPEX costs for Ardmore Hall and Bell Field over the next 30 years[3]

Description

Capital expenditure
(CAPEX)

Operational expenditure (OPEX)

Net costs

 

Initial work (expected repair and upgrade costs)[4]

Expected renewal costs over next 30 years

 

Annual costs (expected maintenance, and utilities, minus fees and user charges)

Expected operation costs over next 30 years

 

Option 1:
Ardmore Hall stays closed, no change to Bell Field

$0

$233,000

$12,424

$372,720

$0.7m to $1m

Option 2: Repair Ardmore Hall, retain Bell Field

$160,000

$1,777,000

$67,287

$2,018,610

$4.6m to $6.4m

Option 3:
Repair Ardmore Hall, upgrade Bell Field

$510,000

$2,965,000

 

$67,287

 

 

$2,018,610

 

 

$6.2m to $8.6m

 

Option 4:
Dispose of Ardmore Hall, retain Bell Field

$0

$233,000

$12,424

$372,720

$0.8 to $1.1m
(+ ~$600,000 available for reinvestment)

Option 5:
Dispose of Bell Field, repair Ardmore Hall

$160,000

$1,375.000

$54,863

$1,645,890

$3.9m to $5.4m
(+ ~$730,000 available for reinvestment)

Option 6:
Dispose of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field

$0

$0

$0

$0

$0
(+ ~$1,330,000 available for reinvestment)

 

32.   Options 2, 3, and 5 include any potential offset from insurance, as well as the approximate costs to fix the pre-existing building issues.

33.   The total costs column for options 4, 5, and 6 show an approximate surplus from the sale of the hall and/or field, which must be reinvested in an eligible project, in accordance with the service property optimisation process.

34.   The funds available for reinvestment, in options 4, 5, and 6, are based on Government Valuation. Market valuation will be completed should the local board chose to progress with service property optimisation.

35.   The CAPEX and OPEX costs for Ardmore Hall and Bell Field over the next 30 years show that option 6, the proposed disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field, has the highest potential financial benefits.

Ko te marohitanga o te tukunga o te Hōro o Ardmore me te Papa o Bell Field te kōwhiringa e tika katoa ana
Proposed disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field​ is the strongest option

36.   The options analysis shows that option 6, the proposed disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field, ranks most favourably against the critical success factors and has the highest potential benefits.

·    Option 6 has strong alignment with potential value for money, supplier capacity and capability, potential affordability, potential achievability, and supporting local board priorities.

·    The only critical success factor with weak alignment is regarding the hall and field being made fit-for-purpose. However, the proposed disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field will enable the board to make another space fit for purpose and better able to respond to anticipated future demand and growth of the local board area.

Ngā whakataunga me ngā tūtohunga
Conclusions and recommendations

·    Ardmore Hall and Bell Field have limited service offerings and low utilisation.

·    The financial investment required to ensure the hall and field are fit for purpose is significant for spaces with low utilisation.

·    There are a number of nearby venues for hire, bookable spaces, and parks that have capacity to accommodate current demand. It is also likely they will be able to support population growth and anticipated future demand.

·    The number of people living in the Ardmore Hall study area has increased by 27 per cent since 2013 and is projected to keep increasing. Anticipated growth is much lower than in the Franklin Local Board area and wider Auckland region.

·    Staff recommend option 6, the proposed disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell FieldArdmore Hall and Bell Field are sold through the service property optimisation process and sale proceeds allocated to a local project. Option 6 has the highest potential economic benefits and strongest alignment with critical success factors, including potential value for money, supplier capacity and capability, potential affordability, potential achievability, and supporting local board priorities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

37.   The recommendation in this report has no direct or negative climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.   The findings and recommendations included in this report have been developed with input from members of the following council rōpū: Parks and Community Facilities, Connected Communities, Regional Services and Strategy, Digital and Customer Services, Finance and Business Performance, Heritage, Community Leasing, Local Board Services, and Eke Panuku Development Auckland.

39.   The advice from Park Services is not to dispose of Bell Field because a parcel of land this size would be hard to acquire in the future.

40.   The advice from the Heritage Information Management team is not to dispose of Ardmore Hall because of the social and other potential heritage values of the hall.

41.   The allocation of decision-making on investment in local community facilities has recently transferred to local boards (GB/2021/137 and GB2022/53). Local board decisions will adhere to the budget and minimum service level parameters set by the Governing Body. Significant decisions under this new direction will be implemented in a phased manner through the upcoming local board plans and next Long-term Plan.[5]

42.   Ardmore Hall and Bell Field can be considered for potential divestment using the service property optimisation process with proceeds of sale, less costs of sale, available for reinvestment in an eligible project.

43.   Current eligible projects for reinvestment through the service property optimisation process include the development of the Karaka Sports Park and Community Hub and improving public open space and amenities in Clevedon Village.

44.   The Franklin Local Board have the delegated authority to approve this sale and reinvestment, providing all optimisation process criteria are met.

45.   If the necessary approvals are received to proceed with service property optimisation, the process will be led by Eke Panuku, with support from staff in the Heritage and Land Advisory teams.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

46.   Key findings from a preliminary investigation were presented to the Franklin Local Board in March 2021. The local board gave direction to carry out further investigation.

47.   Investigation findings and options were presented to the Franklin Local Board at a workshop on 10 May 2022. The local board requested the following actions.

·    Include an additional option to dispose of Bell Field and repair Ardmore Hall

The additional option has been included in this report and Ardmore Hall and Bell Field community service provision findings report (refer Attachment A) as option 5.

·    Update population growth projections by suburb

The data could not be determined for all suburbs in the study area. Further detail can be found in Ardmore Hall and Bell Field community service provision findings report (refer Attachment A).

·    Outline renewal and maintenance costs

Costs have been included in this report (see Table 3).

·    Investigate whether any deed obligations would have to be met with a possible sale

No obligations have been found to date and investigation findings are outlined in the findings report (refer Attachment A).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

48.   The Māori population in the study area is 29 per cent, which is higher than both the local board and regional average. This means any decisions that impact Māori will have a higher impact here than in other areas.

49.   Mana whenua and local iwi have not been engaged as part of this investigation. They will be consulted if the necessary approvals are received to proceed with service property optimisation.

50.   Neither site is noted as a site of significance in the Unitary Plan. Both sites are listed as Open Space - Sport and Active Recreation Zone.

51.   Should Te Poari ā-Rohe o Franklin resolve to progress property sales through the service property optimisation process, Eke Panuku will contact mana whenua groups with kaitiaki links to the land, who will be offered first right of refusal. Local mana whenua groups include:

·    Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Pāoa

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

·    Ngāti Tamaterā

·    Ngāti Te Ata

·    Ngāti Whanaunga

·    Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Waikato-Tainui.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

52.   The impact of COVID-19 and the resulting economic upheaval has had a significant impact on council’s revenue and borrowing capacity. The Emergency Budget 2020/2021 highlighted the need to reduce capital expenditure across the council family and prioritisation of projects already being delivered. This message was reiterated in the Annual Budget 2022/2023 and in the Long-term Plan.

53.   Disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field through the service property optimisation process would result in immediate and long-term reductions in maintenance and renewal costs for the local board.

54.   The service property optimisation process offers an alternative funding source that releases value from underperforming service assets for reinvestment in improved service outcomes with no increase in capital expenditure and no impact on rates.

55.   The cost of fire-related repairs would in part be covered by insurance. However, there are pre-existing issues that would need to be remedied at the same time and local renewals funding would be required for this portion of the work. Any additional costs relating to increased labour rates and material costs, and/or further damage to the facility since the initial assessment, would not be covered.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.   Staff have completed a risk assessment. The following table outlines the main risks and mitigations associated with the recommendation in this report.

Table 2: Risk identification and mitigation

Type of risk

Risk

Risk level

Mitigation

Strategic

If the sale of Bell Field creates a gap in green space provision then green space may need to be acquired in the future.

Medium

This risk can be mitigated by retaining the field (options 1, 2, 3, or 4), with the trade-off of continued financial investment for an under-utilised field.

Financial

If the costs to repair Ardmore Hall are higher than the initial estimates then additional budget will need to be sourced.

Low

 

This risk has been mitigated by recommending option 6, the proposed disposal of Ardmore Hall and Bell Field.

Reputational

If the hall is sold without further stakeholder engagement then there may be negative feeling from the local community about losing an asset that contributes to their sense of place

Medium

This risk can be managed by robust stakeholder engagement to gain a better understanding of community sentiment, and to provide more information on the intended reinvestment..

Reputational

If communication is not clear and regular then the local community may feel uninformed and lose trust in council and their local board.

Medium

This risk can be managed by establishing clear lines of communication, developing and implementing an agreed communication and engagement strategy, and

ensuring all project status information is accurate and up to date.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

57.   Subject to approval of the recommended option to progress the service property optimisation process, the following key phases will commence.

·    Eke Panuku will contact iwi groups with kaitiaki links to the whenua, who will be offered first right of refusal.

·    Eke Panuku will bring findings back to the Franklin Local Board, which has the delegated authority to approve this sale and reinvestment, providing all service property optimisation process criteria have been met.

·    Subject to approval, Eke Panuku will develop a go to market strategy which considers the council’s obligations under s40 Public Works Act 1984 and any proposed heritage protection conditions. Final terms and conditions of the agreement will be approved by the Eke Panuku board under the appropriate delegation.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Ardmore Hall and Bell Field Community Service Provision Findings Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ren Kirk - Service and Asset Planning Specialist

Authorisers

Kim Taunga - Head of Community Delivery

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/12414

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2021/2022 Annual Report for the Franklin Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2021/2022 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 September 2022. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2021/2022 Franklin Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the local board chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2021/2022.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2021/2022 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2022

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 September 2022

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 September 2022

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Annual report 2021-2022 Vol 2

27

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Faithe Smith - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisory

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Franklin Discretionary Community Grants, Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023

File No.: CP2022/13092

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.   To fund, part fund or decline grant applications received for Franklin Discretionary Community Grants, Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023.

2.   To approve or decline repurpose of the application QR2203-207.

Whakarāpopotonga matua

Executive summary

3.   This report presents applications received in Franklin Discretionary Community Grants, Round One (refer Attachment A) and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023 (refer Attachment B).

4.   The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022/2023 (Attachment C). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

5.   The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $112,903 which includes Pool Grants ($20,000), Coastal Rescue Grants ($45,000) and Discretionary Community Grants ($47,903) for the 2022/2023 financial year.

6.   The Franklin Local Board received sixteen applications for Discretionary Community Grants, Round One and three Multi-board Grants Round One applications. The total amount requested from the Discretionary Community Grants, Round One is $80,582.74 and the Multi-board Grants Round One is $10,415.00

7.   To repurpose the funds from Pukekohe Business Association grant application QR2203-207 towards Christmas on the Green event Health and Safety measures 2022.


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)       agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Franklin Discretionary Community Grants, Round One and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023 listed in the following table:  

 

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2303-101

Clevedon Sport Incorporation

Towards buying equipment such as flag, Sony speaker, glassware, pie warmer, computer monitor, small drink fridge at 65 Monument Road, Clevedon from 15 October 2022 to 15 December 2022.

$5,204.60

Eligible

QR2303-102

Dream Big Trust

Towards wages, mobile classroom rental, food, equipment to provide "Dream big mobile homework centre" at various location around Franklin (Mobile) from 17 October 2022 to 20 December 2022.

$4,918.48

Eligible

QR2303-103

Bombay Community Group

Towards the hiring of a portable toilets and event medic team for the Bombay Farm Run at 554 Paparata Road, Bombay from 12 March 2023 to 12 March 2023.

$2,081.00

Eligible

QR2303-106

Waiuku Business & Development Association

Towards first aid, banner, photograph printing, sunset coast musical band, graphics for marketing and gazebo and portable toilet hire for Glenbrook Vintage Railway Centennial Celebration at Waiuku Cosmopolitan Club from 16 October 2022 to 16 October 2022.

$2,663.91

Eligible

 

 

 

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

QR2303-107

Youthline Auckland Charitable Trust

Towards the cost to provide triage/clinical support and leadership to volunteer counsellors who staff the Youthline Helpline in support at Youthline House 145 St Georges St Papatoetoe from 1 October 2022 to 30 June 2023.

$6,000.00

Eligible

QR2303-108

The Helping Paws Charitable Trust

Towards kitten food and kitty litter at Franklin from 1 October 2022 to 30 September 2023.

$2,000.00

Eligible

QR2303-109

Franklin Baptist Community Trust

Towards costs of construction of playground and play equipment.

$7,840.31

Eligible

QR2303-110

Blue Light Ventures Incorporated

Towards the printing and production costs of the Street-Smart Handbook between 30th Dec 2022 to 31st March 2023

$2,100.00

Eligible

QR2303-111

Waiuku Business & Development Association Incorporation

Towards the cost for the traffic management, first aid and portable toilets at Waiuku Township from 17th December 2022 to 17th December 2022.

$6,043.00

Eligible

QR2303-114

Tamaoho School

Towards buying planting bed, garden soil, chicken coop, chicken run, plants, 8 chickens, living eggs education and beehive hire and education at Tamaoho School, Pukekohe from 01 January to 29 July 2023.

$8,300.00

Eligible

QR2303-117

Life Education Trust Counties Manukau

Towards marketing promotion expenses at the momentum hub, vector wero Whitewater Park from 1st November 2022 to 30th April 2023.

$3,000.00

Eligible

QR2303-118

Franklin United Football Club Incorporation

Towards buying video camera at Victoria Street, Franklin and Bledisloe Park, Pukekohe from 1st November 2022 to 31st December 2022.

$5,550.00

Eligible

QR2303-119

Rotary Club of Pohutukawa Coast Incorporation

Towards traffic management plan implementation cost at Te Puru Park, Beachlands from 6th November to 6th November 2022.

$5,567.00

Eligible

QR2303-123

Returned & Services Association Franklin Incorporation

Towards purchase of the projector, retractable screen, ceiling mount, cable, and trunking at RSA Franklin from 10th October 2022 to 31st October 2022.

$4,196.94

Eligible

QR2303-124

Bloom Pukekohe

Towards materials (including fencing) cost and installation of a disabled persons toilet at Franklin Road, Pukekohe from 1st October 2022 to 31st October 2022.

$10,000.00

Eligible

QR2303-125

Takutai Charitable Trust

Towards full cost of the traffic management for Christmas parade event at Beachland domain to Sunkist Bay Reserve from 3rd December 2022 to 3rd December 2022.

$5,117.50

Eligible

Total

 

 

$80,582.74

 

 

 

b) agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023 listed in the following table: 

 

 

Application ID

Organisation

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2223-133

Guardians of our Children Charitable Trust

Towards costs to run the Make Them Proud - Parental Disputes workshops at various venues across Auckland (October 2022 - October 2023)

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-111

The Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Towards free or subsidised classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in various locations in Auckland from October 2022 to May 2023.

$5,415.00

Eligible

MB2223-115

African Film Festival New Zealand Trust

Towards film rights, website, and marketing of the African Film Festival online and in Rialto Cinemas Newmarket (September 2022 - December 2022)

$2,000.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

$10,415.00

 

 

 

 

Horopaki

Context

8.   The local board allocates grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

9.   Auckland Council Community Grants Policy supports each local board to adopt a grants programme.

The local board grants programme sets out:

·   local board priorities

·   lower priorities for funding

·   exclusions

·   grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·   any additional accountability requirements.

10. The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grants webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11. The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grants Policy and the local board grant programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

12. The Local Board Grants Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way. Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

13. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

14. The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

15. Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Franklin Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications in accordance with its priorities identified in the local board grant programme.

16. The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grants Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

17. A summary of each application received through Franklin Discretionary Community Grants, Round One 2022/2023 is provided (Attachment A).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

18. The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

19. This report presents applications received in Franklin Discretionary Community Grants, Round One (refer Attachment A) and Multi-board Grant Round One 2022/2023 (refer Attachment B).

20. The Franklin Local Board adopted the Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022/2023 (Attachment C). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

21. The Franklin Local Board has set a total community grants budget of $112,903 which includes Pool Grants ($20,000), Coastal Rescue Grants ($45,000) and Discretionary Community Grants ($47,903) for the 2022/2023 financial year.

22. The Franklin Local Board received sixteen applications for Discretionary Community Grants, Round One and three Multi-board Grants Round One applications. The total amount requested from the Discretionary Community Grants, Round One is $80,582.74 and the Multi-board Grants Round One is $10,415.00

23. To repurpose the funds from Pukekohe Business Association grant application QR2203-207 towards Christmas on the Green event Health and Safety measures 2022.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24. Based on the main focus of an application, a subject matter expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

25. The grants programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

26. Following the Franklin Local Board allocation of funding, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board Discretionary Community Grants Round One 2022-2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Franklin Local Board Multi-board Round One Application Summary 2022-2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Franklin Local Board Community Grants Programme 2022-2023

49

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Asha Malhotra - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport - Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2022/12681

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide confirmation on which activities can be delivered under the reduced Local Board Transport Capital Fund for Franklin Local Board following the Council’s Annual Budget decision on 29 June 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.         On 29 June 2022, Auckland Council adopted the Annual Budget.  Auckland Transport (AT) is facing significant pressure on operational expenditure principally due to slower recovery of public transport (PT) patronage than expected. 

3.         To address these challenges Auckland Transport, in discussion with the Auckland Council finance team, put through a request for a moderate increase in operating funding in financial year 2022/23, whilst at the same time agreeing to defer capital expenditure by $223 million over the next three years.

4.         The impact of these reductions for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for this financial year (2022/23). 

5.         For Franklin Local Board, this means the financial year 2022/23 allocation has reduced from $1,117,179 to  $574,788.68.

6.         AT Board is considering providing an additional $868,671 which would bring budget up to $1,443,459, but the funding is subject to there being underspends in other AT work programmes.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      continue to progress the Jutland Road pedestrian bridge with available funds of $1,443,459 this financial year.

b)      place the following project on hold:

 

·    Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.         The financial implications of the reduction in funding for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for this financial year (2022/23). 

8.         For Franklin Local Board, this means the financial year 22/23 allocation has reduced from $1,117,179 to $574,788.68.

9.         The AT Board is considering providing an additional $868,671, which would bring budget up to $1,443,459, but the funding would be subject to there being underspends in other AT work programmes.

10.       Of this $1,443,459, $168,500 is already committed through contracts.

11.       The below table outlines the current status of the two projects resolved by the Franklin Local Board:

   Project Name

   Project Status

   Budget

   Budget Comments

Jutland Road

 Bridge

Des      Design progressing

$2,040,141

 Design budget committed

Pukekohe Path

Plan delivery

support

Investigation

 

$194,217

 

       No contractual commitments

Total

 

$2,234,358

 

 

12.       The local board does not have enough budget this financial year to deliver both projects above.

13.       It is recommended that the Jutland Road Bridge continue to progress this financial year as design is already progressing and budget is contractually committed. Construction will then start this financial year and be completed next financial year.

14.       It is recommended that the Pukekohe Path Plan delivery support project be put on hold until budget becomes available.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.       The local board was presented with advice in regard to the impact of the reduction in budget on the LBTCF at a workshop on 16 August 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.       Auckland Transport is committed to minimising the negative effects that transport operations have on climate change. This includes encouraging emission neutral modes (walking and cycling) and low emission modes (public transport and ride-sharing).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.       The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT.

18.       The Auckland Transport budget allows for the LBTCF as a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT).

19.       Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their own Local Board Plan but are not part of Auckland Transport’s work programme.

20.       Any LBTCF projects selected must be safe, must not impede network efficiency, and must be located in the road corridor or on land controlled by Auckland Transport, although projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.       AT has workshopped with the local board the impacts of budget reductions on the LBTCF projects in the Franklin Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.       The proposed recommendations in the report have no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.       There will not be enough budget to deliver all projects this financial year as previously planned.

24.       AT are seeking direction on which projects the local board would like to proceed with this financial year, and which projects are to be placed on hold.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.       There will not be enough budget to deliver all projects this financial year as previously planned.

26.       AT are seeking direction on which projects the local board would like to proceed with this financial year, and which projects are to be placed on hold.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.       Once the local board’s resolutions are finalised, AT will work to progress agreed projects as far as possible.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Bruce Thomas, Elected Member Relationship Partner, South

Authorisers

Ioane Afoa - Local Area Manager Auckland Transport

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Variation to 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/13893

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval for variations to the Franklin Local Board 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Franklin Local Board approved the following renewal projects on 30 June 2022 as a part of their 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme (resolution number FR/2022/92). Both approved projects were allocated budget from the Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget as below: 

 

i)    ID 27770 Whitford Community Hall – refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating – approved budget of $365,000

ii)   ID 30270 Clevedon Showgrounds – renew culvert – approved budget of $75,000

3.       As projects progress through the consultation, investigation and design process, the specific work required and the cost of delivery can change, impacting the approved budget. As a result, variations may be required to the work programme to accommodate final costs and updated timeframes for some projects. 

4.       Both the Whitford Community Hall and the Clevedon Showground provide family focused gathering spaces for the Clevedon and Whitford community area. The investigation and design work started for both the project in financial year 2021/2022. Staff have recently received the recommendations and estimates, and the projects require additional budgets.

5.       Staff seek approval of additional budget for Whitford Community Hall refurbishment and Clevedon Showgrounds culvert renewals work as below:

i)    ID 27770 Whitford Community Hall - refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating – at an increase of $283,000 for:

·    delivering the high priority elements within the current design report

·    taking direction to carry out invasive investigation work into the structural elements of the building.

ii)   ID 30270 Clevedon Showgrounds – renew culvert – at an increase of $90,000 for:

·    significant increase in material and labour costs due to the supply chain impacts in our current market from COVID19 pandemic

·    providing professional and technical advice for arboricultural planning, inspections work for the culvert, retaining walls and small section of aggregate footpath during the construction of Section D of the proposed path network.

6.       To fund the additional budgets for the ‘Whitford Community Hall - refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating’ and the ‘Clevedon Showgrounds – renew culvert’ projects, staff have identified the following three projects from the programme that no longer require funding on the current approved 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme (resolution number FR/2022/92).

i)          ‘ID 33242 Waiuku Cemetery - renew carpark’ project on the current approved 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services work programme has been carried out as part of the current burial berm extension regional funded project on site. The budget of $145,000 from the Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget is no longer required for this renewals project.

ii)         ‘ID 30451 Beachlands - refurbish toilet block (Third View Avenue)’ on the current approved 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services work programme is under investigation to confirm whether this asset is still council owned. The budget of $138,000 from the Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget is to be rephased until the investigation is completed to decide next steps for the project.

iii)        ‘ID 27771 Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior’ on the current approved 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services work programme is under further consultation with the stakeholders to understand the strategic view for the future of the asset and identify the priority elements to deliver. The budget of $90,000 from the Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget is to be rephased until the investigation is completed to decide next steps for the project.

7.   The budget reduction for 'Beachlands - refurbish toilet block (Third View Avenue)’ and Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior in the financial years 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 is proposed to be allocated in future years of the work programme. The future of these projects will be determined through a workshop with the Local Board once the next steps are identified for these assets.

8.   The identified realignment of budget as outlined in Attachment A will ensure the delivery of the high priority element and the preliminary further invasive investigation to the structural elements for Whitford Community Hall and complete scope of works are delivered for the Clevedon showgrounds culvert renewals project.

9.   Staff have discussed the proposal and rationale for this change with the local board at the Local Board workshop and in a direction setting meeting in August 2022. The local board provided positive feedback and supported the proposal in principle. 

10. The proposed variations will stay within the budget envelope for the Franklin Local Board’s financial year 2022/2023 and will not substantially impact any other approved projects than those identified in Table 2.

11. Subject to the local board’s decision, staff will update the work programme and project updates will be provided to the local board as part of the quarterly reports.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approve the following variations including budget and timeline changes to its adopted 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme as per Attachment A to this agenda report:

i)       additional budget allocation of $283,000 for project ID 27770 ‘Whitford Community Hall - refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating’ from Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget over financial year 2022/2023, 2023/2024 and 2024/2025.

ii)       additional budget allocation of $90,000 for project ‘ID 27771 Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior’ from Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget over financial year 2022/2023.

iii)      reallocate budget allocation of $145,000 Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget from project ID 33242 ‘Waiuku cemetery - renew carpark’ to project ID 27770 ‘Whitford Community Hall’ – refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating’.

iv)      rephasing of budget allocation by $138,000 to financial year 2025/2026 and 2026/2027 from project ID 30451 ‘Beachlands - refurbish toilet block (Third View Avenue)’ and allocate $138,000 of Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget in financial year 2022/2023 and 2023/2024 to project ID 27770 ‘Whitford Community Hall’ – refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating’.

v)      rephasing of budget allocation by $90,000 to financial year 2023/2024 from project ID 27771 ‘Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior’ and allocate $90,000 of Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget in financial year 2022/2023 to project ID 30270 Clevedon Showgrounds – renew culvert.

 

Horopaki

Context

12. Franklin Local Board approved the 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme on 30 June 2022 (resolution number FR/20222/92). The budget allocated for all projects on the work programme and the anticipated timelines were best estimates and are subject to change as projects progress through the design and delivery process.

13. The local board approved of Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal project at the Whitford Community Hall and Clevedon Showgrounds as part of their 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme.

14. Staff received recommendations and estimates from the design specialist team and the project now requires an additional budget to complete the refurbishment and renewal work at Whitford Community Hall and Clevedon Showgrounds as follows:

i)       ID 27770 Whitford Community Hall - refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating – at an increase of $283,000 for:

·    delivering the high priority elements within the current design report

·    taking direction, to carry out invasive investigation work into the structural elements of the building.

ii)       ID 30270 Clevedon Showgrounds – renew culvert – at an increase of $90,000 for:

·    significant increase in material and labour costs due to the supply chain impacts in our current market from COVID19 pandemic. 

·    providing professional and technical advice for arboricultural planning, inspections work for the culvert, retaining walls and small section of aggregate footpath during the construction of Section D of the proposed path network.

15. Staff have identified three projects,Waiuku cemetery - renew carpark’, ‘Beachlands - refurbish toilet block (Third View Avenue)’ and ‘Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior’ in the current approved 2022–2025 Customer and Community Services work programme where budget allocation can be removed or realigned.

16. It has been identified that the scope of ‘Waiuku cemetery - renew carpark’ (project ID 33242) has been undertaken and carried out as part of the regionally funded current burial berm extension project work. The budget of $145,000 from the Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget is no longer required for renewal of this project.

17. The project ‘Beachlands - refurbish toilet block (Third View Avenue)’ (project ID 30451) is under investigation to confirm whether this asset is still council owned. The budget of $138,000 from the Asset Based Services (ABS): capital expenditure (Capex) – Local Renewal budget is to be rephased until the ownership and responsibilities of this asset are fully understood.

18. The project ‘Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior’ needs further consultation with the stakeholders to understand the strategic view for the future of the asset and identify the priority elements to deliver.  This requires additional time; therefore, less funding is required for financial year 2022/2023. Staff recommend that the budget be rephased over future years for this project.

19. Approved funding allocations for the identified projects are shown in the Table ‘1’ below:

Resolution Number

Project ID

Activity Name

Activity Description

Budget source

Total Budget Allocation

FR/2022/92

27770

Whitford Community Hall - refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating

Renew parts of the roof and refurbish as required. Refurbish drainage and interior.  Install suitable heating in main hall and supper room. (10903-B001 – 1 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford)

FY21/22 - FY22/23 - investigate and design

FY23/24 - physical works

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project.

ABS Local Renewal

$365,000

FR/2022/92

33242

Waiuku cemetery - renew carpark

Waiuku cemetery - renew carpark

FY22/23 - investigation and design

FY23/24 - investigation design and physical works

FY24/25 - physical work

Risk Adjusted Programme (RAP) project.

ABS Local Renewal

$145,000

FR/2022/92

30451

Beachlands - refurbish toilet block (Third View Ave)

Refurbish toilet block.

FY22/23 - investigation and design

FY23/24 - physical works

ABS Local Renewal

$138,000

FR/2022/92

30270

Clevedon Showgrounds – renew culvert

Renew the stream culvert.

FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY22/23 - physical works

ABS Local Renewal

$75,000

FR/2022/92

27771

Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior

Renew roof, undertake structural repairs (including piles), and refurbish the exterior and interior of the Bombay War Memorial Hall.

FY21/22 - investigation and design

FY22/23 - physical works

ABS Local Renewal

$480.000

7.      

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20. Proposed variations and how they will affect the current 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services work programme are shown in Attachment A and noted in Table 2 below: 

Table 2: Description of the proposed variations to the 2023 – 2025 Customer and Community Services work programme

Project ID

Activity Name

Budget variations

 FY2021-2022 

Details 

27770

Whitford Community Hall - refurbish roof, drainage, interior and improve heating

Additional budget of $283,000 is required for the work to:

·   Carry out invasive investigation into the structural elements of the building.

·   Delivery of high priority elements within the current design report

Approved FY21/22 budget $36,984

No change

Approved FY22/23 budget $210,831

Revised FY22/23 budget $223,831

 (Increase of $13,000)

 

Approved FY23/24 budget $117,185

Revised FY23/24 budget $317,185

(Increase of $200,000)

 

Approved FY24/25 budget $0

Revised FY24/25 budget $70,000

(Increase of $70,000)

Increase in budget of $283,000 will ensure that the high priority elements within the current design report are delivered.

 

The budget increase will also allow structural investigation to be completed which will identify any further elements to be added to the project scope.

 

Should this investigation identify further building issues additional budget changes may be required.

 

30270

Clevedon Showgrounds – renew culvert

Additional ABS: Capex Renewals budget of $90,000 is required for the renewals work to renew the culvert at Clevedon Showgrounds.

Approved FY21/22 budget $9,725

No change

 

Approved FY22/23 budget $65,275

Revised FY22/23 budget $155,275

 (Increase of $90,000)

The increase in budget will ensure that the asset is renewed to meet service level requirement, complete scope of the project is delivered and is compliant with the building code.

 

Community aspirations of shared and connecting footpaths, for ease of accessibility to other routes, are met.

 

33242

Waiuku cemetery - renew carpark

The Local Renewals budget is no longer required for this project

Approved FY22/23 budget $10,000

Revised FY22/23 budget

$0

 

Approved FY23/24 budget $65,000

Revised FY23/24 budget

 $0

Approved FY24/25 budget $70,000

Revised FY24/25 budget

$0

The Local Renewals budget of $145,00 is no longer required.

The scope of this project has been delivered as part of the current burial berm extension project on site.

30451

Beachlands - refurbish toilet block (Third View Ave)

The Local Renewals budget is no longer required for this project at this stage

Approved FY22/23 budget $3,000

Revised FY22/23 budget

$0

 

Approved FY23/24 budget $135,000

Revised FY23/24 budget

 $0

Approved FY24/25 budget

$0

No change

 

Approved FY25/26 budget

$0

Revised FY25/26 budget

$3,000

 

Approved FY26/27 budget

$0

Revised FY26/27 budget

$135,000

The toilet block at Third View Beachlands being investigated to confirm if this asset is a council owned asset.

This investigation will require additional time to determine the next steps for this project hence the budget $138,000 will be rephased to outer years.

27771

Bombay War Memorial Hall - renew roof, building exterior and interior

Budget of $106,085 is now required for:

·   Project management costs

·   Stakeholders’ engagement and consultation

Approved FY21/22 prior budget $27,423

No Change

 

Approved FY22/23 budget $452,577

Revised FY22/23 budget $362,577

Request for reduction in funding in financial year 2022/2023 is due to additional time required understand the strategic view for the future of the asset and identify the priority elements to deliver for this asset.

 

21. Staff will ensure that the proposed variations are within the Local Board’s financial year 2022/2023 budget envelope and have no further changes to the current work programme.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22. The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·           to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·           to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

23. This is an administrative report and the budget variations proposed in the report have no direct effect on climate change.  Each project will be considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

24. It is anticipated that there will be an increase in carbon emission from construction, including contractor emissions. Staff will seek to minimise carbon and contractor emissions as far as possible when delivering the projects. Maximising the upcycling and recycling of existing material, aligned with the waste management hierarchy (prevention, reduction, recycle), will also be prioritised to ensure minimum impact.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25. Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services directorate (Community Facilities - operational management and maintenance, Parks, Sport, and Recreation) teams have been consulted and are supportive of the proposed budget changes for the Whitford Community Hall and Clevedon Showgrounds renewals project. These renewals will improve the following for each project:

·    Whitford Community Hall – improve the weather tightness, painting, and cladding renewals, increase the longevity of the asset structure, and create a safe and fit-for-purpose space for the Whitford community.

·    Clevedon Showgrounds – to meet the service level requirements, complete scope of the project is delivered and meets the community aspiration of shared and connecting footpaths, for ease of accessibility to other routes.

26. The overall 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

27. Staff collaboration will be ongoing throughout the life of the projects to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28. Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the Local Board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy, and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

29. The proposed variations to the approved work programme as outlined in this report were discussed with the Local Board at a workshop on 2 August 2022. The Local Board provided positive feedback and indicated support for the proposal in principle.

30. The identified projects in this report are part of approved 2023-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme and align with the following Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives:


 

Table 3: Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes and objectives

 Outcome

Objective / Initiative

Outcome 3: Fit for purpose places and facilities

We will plan for and respond to future growth and the impacts of climate change whilst protecting and celebrating what is special and unique about our communities.

Outcome 6: A sense of belonging and strong community participation

We will support and enable community organisations to deliver local community activities and cultural programmes, to encourage local participation and to respond to local change.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

31. The project proposal discussed in this report will benefit Māori and the wider community through the provision of quality facilities and open spaces that promote good health, the fostering of family and community relationships and connection to the natural environment.

32. Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its broader obligations to Māori. These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents, the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, Whiria Te Muka Tangata Māori Responsiveness Framework, and Local Board plans.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33. The proposed variations are within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will have no further changes to the current work programme.

34. Details of proposed variations are outlined under Table 2 of the Analysis and Advice section of this report and the recommended changes as shown in Attachment A have been agreed with the Local Board’s lead financial advisor. 

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

35. Amendments to the projects as outlined in Table 2 of the Analysis and Advice section of this report are essential for to undertake the structural investigation for the asset and deliver the priority elements as per identified by the current scope of the project. If the local board does not approve the change, there is a risk that the identified projects will remain incomplete and may not meet community expectations.  

36. The shortage of labour and delay in supply of materials could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37. Subject to the local board’s decision on the proposal outlined in this report, the local board’s 2023–2025 Customer and Community Services – Community Facilities work programme will be amended to reflect the decision and works will commence on the projects as per the timing outlined in the approved work programme.

38. Progress and updates on the work programme will be reported to the local board as part of the quarterly reports to the local board. 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Proposed amendment to 2023 - 2025 Customer  Community Services Work Programme September Report

73

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Moushmi Sharan - Work Programme Lead

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Devon Lane, Pukekohe one-way upgrade

File No.: CP2022/14177

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek endorsement from the Franklin Local Board for the design and delivery for the permanent one-way traffic circulation on Devon Lane following a successful trial.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2020 Pukekohe was a location chosen by Eke Panuku to participate in the Innovating Streets for People trial run by Waka Kotahi and Auckland Transport. One of 21 in the Auckland region.

3.       The focus of the trial was to try and introduce change in street layouts and traffic circulation by using tactical urbanism methodology and a do learn do approach that is fostered within Eke Panuku. A process that helps to test out scenarios before investing a large sum of money to find out later it has not worked or not appropriate for that location.

4.       Devon Lane was one of the three trials undertaken in Pukekohe along with nearby market trials and a trial one-way of part of lower King Street. The laneway trial has been in situ since June 2021 with iterations completed to keep the lane functioning.

5.       Eke Panuku in consultation with stakeholders determined that this part of the tactical urbanism trial has worked well helping to reduce the speed, increasing safety and is now more in line with a shared space environment and provides valuable insights into how changes to future laneways may take place.

6.       This most recent design was presented to the local board in May 2022 and the design was also presented to the local businesses that back onto Devon Lane on 14 September 2022.

7.       The design is now refined further and ready to progress to delivery of the permanent solution following the successful trials and recent stakeholder feedback.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      endorse the design agreed with the local businesses for Devon Lane and delivery by Eke Panuku following Auckland Transport approval.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Pukekohe is an established rural centre, in the heart of the Franklin district and on the southern edge of Tāmaki Makaurau. It has a reputation as an important market garden and horticultural hub that services a large catchment extending into Southern Tāmaki Makaurau and Northern Waikato region.

9.       Pukekohe town centre has been identified as a regeneration and intensification opportunity for Auckland. It is one of the ‘Unlock’ priority locations to be delivered by Eke Panuku Development Auckland (Eke Panuku). The town centre occupies strategic locations with good infrastructure, services, and facilities. The programme area has a concentration of council landholdings that are development ready.

10.     In 2020 Pukekohe was a location chosen by Eke Panuku to participate in the Innovating Streets for People trial run by Waka Kotahi and Auckland Transport. The initiative was to trial alternative street layouts and traffic circulation plans for several streets in Pukekohe to prioritise pedestrians and create a more vibrant and attractive town centre focused on people.

11.     Devon Lane became a one-way network entering from Edinburgh Street and exiting onto Queen Street. Road art was installed to help create a defined shared space. Installation of speed humps and planter boxes to help slow the vehicles passing through.

12.     Although the King Street trial was unsuccessful and decommissioned earlier than anticipated, the Devon Lane trial has been retained and deemed successful in achieving its objectives, reducing speed, and increasing safety. Since the one-way for Devon Lane has been in situ it has had multiple iterations to the layout to accommodate proactive suggestions from the business community ensuring the lane stays operational.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     Following feedback received during the trial from the local businesses that backed onto Devon Lane a design was produced to ensure the service was able to operate properly allowing for deliveries, waste collection and customers / clients to access the carparks to the associated businesses. All feedback is listed in the table below:

14.     Consultation table:

Franklin Local Board Feedback

Eke Panuku Response

Explore more lighting to make it pedestrian friendly in the whole lane

Have received the lighting study completed by the Pukekohe Business Association. Contacted Auckland Transport to help fund additional lighting – no budget

Use of colour, planters etc

Initiated conversations again about a mural on the Farmers wall with the property manager.

Community Facilities have stated they do not want planters along Devon Lane as they require more maintenance and cost.

Vibrancy, innovative look, not dull

Understand the want for a vibrant and innovative lane but do not feel this is the section of Devon Lane that would benefit from this. It has also been noted through consultation with the local businesses that they want a simple, functioning service lane.

There is an opportunity to create vibrancy on Devon Lane that is adjacent to the Edinburgh superblock development, and this has received some positive feedback from the recent community consultation on the masterplan.

Need to prohibit right turn out of Farmers carpark

There are currently line markings stating only left turn out of carpark but will note this may need to be made clearer upon review.

Accessible for prams etc.

The lane will not be able to provide a dedicated footpath space for pedestrians as the lane is not wide enough especially with dedicated loading zones. It will not provide a clear pathway and encourage pedestrians to move into the middle of the road to avoid delivery trucks. However, with the reduce in speed, it will allow people to move across safely with a pram if they choose to walk the length of the lane.

Work with Pukekohe Business Association for mural budget

Will work with the business association to understand budget allocation for this financial year if there is approval to install a mural on the Farmers wall.

 

Local Businesses Feedback

Eke Panuku Response

Need to address the issues with the delivery trucks parking wherever they chose and blocking cars in

Dedicated loading zones will be clearly marked out on the lane with clear signage. The loading zones will be placed in locations that will not block any carparks preventing customers or clients to drive.

Cars find it difficult to reverse out of carparks due to the red planters

The planters will be removed and are not part of the proposed design. They were used as a quick and cheap option to help define the space in the lane. Understand they have not helped with cars reversing.

Needs to be a functioning service lane

Agree this is a key purpose of the lane but need to understand pedestrians will also use the lane regardless and need to ensure they can safely use it to transverse.

Devon Lane should be kept a one way as it is working

Agree. Keeping the lane one way is helping to reduce the speed of the vehicles providing a safer environment.

Road art is unsightly and adds no value

The road art will be water blasted along with all the existing line markings and new line markings installed. A cleaner look to the lane which is easy to decipher.

The purpose of a kerb build out by the pedestrian crossing

If there are delivery trucks in the loading zone it prevents line of sight for the pedestrians who wish to use the crossing. Having a kerb build out will allow the pedestrians to safely move forward to gain a line of sight for oncoming vehicles.

 

15.     Following engagement with the local businesses that back onto Devon Lane (at Farmers / Pukekohe Plaza) this portion is best suited to continue as a simple and functional service lane that meets the operational requirements of Auckland Transport and for the local businesses.

16.     It has been identified through the consultation process with the local businesses and during the recent community consultation on the Unlock Pukekohe Masterplan that Devon Lane leading into Roulston Street and the town square is the appropriate area to carry forward the local board feedback on design quality and create more of a vibrant laneway response and explore the idea of colour, artwork, materials etc. A laneway that has a vibe that draws you into the town square supported by the proposed Edinburgh Superblock development. 


 

17.     A final schematic design will be submitted to Auckland Transport’s Design Review Panel (DRP) for review and feedback. Once all feedback has been resolved and the design has been approved. The project will have the mandate to proceed to procure a contractor to undertake the physical works.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     Not applicable for this small upgrade.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     As this is Auckland Transport land, Eke Panuku will ensure the design meets the Transport Design Manual standards and the design is functional and operational to meet all modal requirements.

20.     Auckland Transport are aware of the upgrade as this has fallen out of the Innovating Streets for People trial and they were informed in June 2022 that Eke Panuku would be taking Devon Lane through a pathway to permanence.

21.     Eke Panuku will use the Auckland Transport Design Review Panel (DRP) to submit the final design for review and feedback.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Eke Panuku have worked with the Franklin Local Board since inception of the Unlock Pukekohe programme and have provided regular updates to ensure the views of the local board are considered and consistent with the strategic vision outlined in the High Level Project Plan (HLPP) and Framework Plan.

23.     Eke Panuku worked with the local board during the Innovating Streets for People trial and listened to the feedback when informed aspects of the trial were not working. Collaborating to make sure the local community were being listened to and ensuring the best results for the town centre.

24.     Eke Panuku gained endorsement from the local board to progress to a pathway to permanence for Devon Lane on 12 April 2022. A proposed design was workshopped with the local board on 24 May 2022 with feedback provided (noted above).

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.     As this is a simple lane upgrade that responds primarily to Auckland transport technical requirements and adjoining landowner matters, it does not require mana whenua involvement given the scale and type of transport and safety project.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.     The Devon Lane upgrade is funded by Eke Panuku via the Small T Pukekohe project that sits within the Unlock Pukekohe programme.

27.     The funds have been forecasted and will be submitted to the Eke Panuku governance forum for approval.

28.     The annual maintenance and operational costs will be funded using existing council budgets assigned to Auckland Transport and Community Facilities through the 10-year Budget 2021-2031.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.     The following risk for the project has been identified and a mitigation has been proposed to respond throughout the project lifecycle:

i)    Risk: Asset acceptance may not be agreed with Auckland Transport

Mitigation: Eke Panuku will work closely with Auckland Transport to ensure the design meets the Transport Design Manual standards and goes through the appropriate process to gain approval.

ii)   Risk: Physical works may cause disruption to the local businesses

Mitigation: Eke Panuku will work closely with the local businesses throughput the design process and keep them informed as the upgrade progresses. Eke Panuku would look to undertake physical works at night to minimise disruption as much as possible.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Eke Panuku will continue to work with the local businesses to make final refinements to the design ready for delivery.

31.     Eke Panuku will take the schematic design via the Design Review Panel (DRP) at Auckland Transport to get approval.

32.     Eke Panuku will provide the approved design to the affected local businesses for final feedback.

33.     Eke Panuku to procure a contractor to undertake the works with an intended target of completing the project by June 2023.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Devon Lane scheme

83

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katie Walton – Project Manager

Authorisers

Richard Davison - Senior Project Planning Leader, Panuku Development Auckland

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Approval for a new public road name at 141 Collingwood Road, Waiuku  

File No.: CP2022/12206

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name a new public road, being a road to be vested, created by way of a subdivision development at 141 Collingwood Road, Waiuku.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Graham Windross, agent Rob Kimber of Maven Associates has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new public road at 141 Collingwood Road are:

·    Waimarire Road (Applicant Preferred)

·    Vitex Road (Alternative 1)

·    Podocarpus Road (Alternative 2)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name Waimarire Road (applicant’s preferred name) for the new public road created by way of subdivision at 141 Collingwood Road, Waiuku, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (Road naming reference RDN90101548, resource consent references BUN60339255 and SUB60339258).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60339255 (subdivision reference number SUB60339258) was issued in July 2020 for the creation of 33 light industrial lots and one public road to be vested in Auckland Council.

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       In this development, the new public road requires a road name because it serves more than five lots.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The proposed names reflect elements of nature / ecological features that exist within the local area and within the site. The applicant’s preferred name proposed is gifted by Ngāti Te Ata, the Mana Whenua of Waiuku. This name reflects the cultural and ancestral link Ngāti Te Ata have to the local area.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Waimarire Road

(Applicant preferred)

Suggestion by Ngaati Te Ata, which is a Māori word which means Tranquil Waters. This name is in reference to the Mangatoitoi, and the waters used for ceremonial purposes. Mangatoitoi Road was investigated and is the name of the catchment that runs through this area to the back of Knight and Dickeys transportation yard and under the road along Collingwood. It was a waterway used by local iwi people for harvesting to ceremonial purposes. Unfortunately, the Manga toi toi Road is in use already. Waimariri Road provides connection with local Iwi and local significance. The connection and the name in Te Reo, both encouraged within the AT road naming policy.

Vitex Road

(Alternative 1)

Vitex lucens is the botanical name for the tree more commonly referred to as Puriri, being a large tree with an uneven knobbly trunk. These trees are found throughout the site and are located in the Significant Ecological Areas on the Fernleigh Project and will be planted in the industrial development as part of the Road interface with the industrial areas.

Podocarpus Road

(Alternative 2)

Podocarpus totara is the botanic name for Tōtara a species of podocarp tree endemic to New Zealand. It grows throughout the North Island and northeastern South Island and is commonly found in lowland areas where the soil is fertile and well drained. Tōtara will be prominent features of the Fernleigh development and established Tōtara stands are located throughout the industrial development and are located within the Significant Ecological Areas on the Fernleigh Project.

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Road’ is an acceptable road type for the new public road, suiting the form and layout of the road.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 8 July 2022, Ngāti Te Ata were contacted by Rob Kimber of Maven Associates, who sought prior consultation with the iwi group for a name to be gifted.

22.     On 11 July 2022, Karl Flavell on behalf of Ngāti Te Ata gifted the name ‘Waimaariri’.

23.     On 14 July 2022 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

24.     By the close of the consultation period Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngāti Te Ata were the only two iwi groups to provide a response.

25.     Ngāti Tamaoho provided the following feedback:

·    With regards to below, the name for the proposed road should be "Waimaarire" and not 'Waimaariri.'  Please make this change asap.

26.     Ngāti Te Ata provided the following feedback:

·    Kia ora, when Ngati Te Ata were asked to submit a name it was not for an alternative. It was for first choice. That was the agreement with the developers. Ngati Te Ata reject Vitex and put forward Waimaariri as the first preference. Vitex as the alternative.

27.     Following the response from iwi groups Ngāti Tamaoho and Ngāti Te Ata, the spelling of the proposed name has been changed to ‘Waimarire Road’ in consultation with Karl Flavell on behalf of Ngāti Te Ata, and he has provided confirmation that they are satisfied with the proposed spelling.

28.     In addition, the applicant has made ‘Waimarire Road’ their preferred road name option.

29.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

31.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

33.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database.  LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

91

b

Attachment B - Location Map

93

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 35 Monument Road Clevedon Auckland 

File No.: CP2022/13567

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL), created by way of a subdivision development at 35 Monument Road Clevedon.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

3.       The developer and applicant, Roger and Brenda Pyke have proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 35 Monument Road Clevedon are:

·    Hampton Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Reuben Way (Alternative 1)

·    Le Gallais Lane (Alternative 2)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name Hampton Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 35 Monument Road, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90099611, resource consent references BUN60365306).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60365306 was approved for the creation of ten fee simple residential allotments and one commonly owned access lot (COAL).

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new COAL requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment B, where the COAL that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The proposed road names reflect the history of the area and are to commemorate people who used to live in the area.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Hampton Lane

(Applicant preferred)

Named after "Hampton Thorp", son of Joshua Thorp, who sailed up the Wairoa and settled beside the river 1854

Reuben Way (Alternative 1)

Named after Reupene (Reuben) Hetaraka.  Waitarata was home of Wiremu Waitene Reupene Hetaraka of Ngati Tai & Ngati Kohua.  Wiremu was Wi Reuben to his pakeha neighbours.  One of their sons Patariki Teupene or Pat Reuben was killed in Italy in World War II.

Le Gallais Lane (Alternative 2)

In 1866 Te Wairoa was changed to the name Clevedon by C.W. Stephens, a settler from Channel Islands and the Schoolmaster Le Gallais, a native of Clevedon Somerset in England.

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ and ‘Way’ are acceptable road types for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows. The applicant also sought approval of these names from the Clevedon Historical Society, who has indicated that their preference would be ‘Le Gallias Lane’ However they do not see any opposition to any of these names. Correspondence from the Clevedon Historical Society can be found in Attachment C. It is also noted that the Clevedon Historical Society has endeavoured to look for any relatives or links to these names still alive and have not found anyone that would be able to be contacted to approve the use of the name.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 20 May 2022, mana whenua was contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·    Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Tamaterā

·    Waikato-Tainui

·    Ngāti Whanaunga

22.     By the close of the consultation period, no responses, comments, or feedback were received. Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

23.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

25.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Report attachment A - Site Plan

99

b

Report attachment B - Location Map

101

c

Report attachment C - Letter from Clevedon Historical Society

103

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Approval for a new private road name at 150 Whitford-Maraetai Road, Whitford

File No.: CP2022/13571

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name a new private road, created by way of a subdivision development at 150 Whitford-Maraetai Road.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Whitford Road Limited, agent Neil Crispe of The Survey Company has proposed the names presented below for the board’s consideration.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private road at 150 Whitford-Maraetai Road are:

·    Puawaiwhero Lane (Applicant Preferred)

·    Mahana Way (Alternative 1)

·    Shawai Lane (Alternative 2)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name Puawaiwhero Lane (applicant’s preferred name) for a new private road created by way of subdivision at 150 Whitford-Maraetai Road, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90099449, resource consent references BUN60336233 and SUB60336234).

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60336233 (subdivision reference number SUB60336234) was issued on 13 September 2019 for creation of six lots, establishment of esplanade reserve and a new right of way

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B.

8.       In accordance with the Standards, every public and any private way, COAL, or right of way, that serves more than five lots generally requires a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new right of way requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the road that requires a name is highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road names for the local board’s approval

11.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme:  The proposed road names reflect the natural landscape environment of the area as well as the history of the site.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Puawaiwhero Lane

(Applicant Preferred)

‘Puawaiwhero’- meaning red flower

There are a total 28 Māori Princess Pohutukawa trees being planted along each side of the ROW which will have red flowers hence the connection of the proposed name and physical feature on the ROW.

Mahana Way (Alternative 1)

‘Mahana’- meaning warm/warmth

Shawai Lane (Alternative 2)

Herbert William Shaw purchased the property in 1888 and it remained in the Shaw family ownership until 1957 as evidenced on the attached title NA43-90. There is a stream located on the northern side of the property, the Māori word for water is Wai.

 

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ and ‘Way’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the road.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.     On 20 May 2022, mana whenua were contacted via the Council Consultation Facilitation Service, as set out in the Guidelines. By the close of the consultation period, no feedback was received.

22.     On 08 August 2022, due to a change in the proposed names, mana whenua were contacted again via the Council Consultation Facilitation Service, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·        Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·        Te Ākitai Waiohua

·        Te Ahiwaru Waiohua

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·        Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·        Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·        Ngāti Maru

·        Ngāti Tamaterā

·        Waikato-Tainui

·        Ngāti Whanaunga

23.     By the close of the consultation period, no feedback was received. Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua.

24.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

26.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Site Plan

115

b

Attachment B - Location Map

117

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Approval to extend an existing road name to a new private road, and new private and public road names at 37 McEldownie Road / Maketu Road, Drury South - Hunua Views Development Stage 5-6

File No.: CP2022/14107

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Franklin Local Board to name new public and private roads, being a commonly owned access lot (COAL) and roads to be vested in the council, created by way of a subdivision development at 37 McEldownie Road / Maketu Road, Drury South.

2.       Approval to extend an existing road name to a new public road is also requested from the local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the Guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval.

4.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, Drury Property Group LP, agent Josh Allan of Classic Developments has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the Local Board.

5.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the Guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the Standards). The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana Whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the Guidelines.

6.       The proposed names for the new private road at 37 McEldownie Road / Maketu Road are:

COAL 1 (referred to JOAL 1 in the Scheme Plan/Attachment A)

·    Kaihaukai Lane (applicant preferred)

·    Taapapa Lane (alternative)

·    Kuriipango Lane (alternative)

7.       The proposed names for the new public roads at 37 McEldownie Road / Maketu Road are:

ROAD 1

·    John Main Drive is proposed to be extended to this road

ROAD 2

·    Lignite Street (applicant Preferred)

·    Shale Drive (alternative)

·    Puku Drive (alternative)

ROAD 3

·    Shepherds Bush Road (applicant preferred)

·    Hummock Street (alternative)

·    Uruaute Drive (alternative)

ROAD 4

·    Stratum Drive (applicant preferred)

·    Pookere Drive (alternative)

·    Kaamehameha Street (alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      approves the name ‘Kaihaukai Lane’ (COAL 1) for the new private road created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90101922, resource consent references BUN60383209 and SUB60383231).

b)      approves the extension of the existing name ‘John Main Drive’ to the new public road (Road 1) created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90101922, resource consent references BUN60383209 and SUB60383231).

c)       approves the names ‘Lignite Street’ (Road 2), ‘Shepherds Bush Road’ (Road 3) and ‘Stratum Drive’ (Road 4) for the new public roads created by way of subdivision at 37 McEldownie Road, Drury South, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (road naming reference RDN90101922, resource consent references BUN60383209 and SUB60383231).

Horopaki

Context

8.       Resource consent reference BUN60383209 (subdivision reference number SUB60383231) was issued in March 2022 for the creation of 62 new vacant residential lots within Stage 5 of the development and 7 super lots within Stage 6 as part of the Block B area. The creation of several public roads to vest and one COAL was also approved as part of Stage 5 and 6 of the Hunua Views Development.

9.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B.

10.     In accordance with the Standards, any road including private ways, COALs, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

11.     The new roads therefore require a road name because they serve more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the roads that require a name are highlighted in yellow.

12.     LINZ have confirmed that the new COAL does not require naming and could be a continuation of Road 3. However, the applicant wishes to name this road.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

13.     The Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The Guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the Local Board’s approval

14.     The Guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

15.     Theme: The proposed names reflect the historical and ancestral links Ngāti Whanaunga iwi have to the area. The proposed names also reflect an existing geological theme and historical references to the area.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

COAL 1

Kaihaukai Lane

(applicant preferred)

This is a reciprocal feast shared by Iwi leaders which was a positive relationship between hapuu/sub tribal leadership. There were many associated hui events in reference to Hunua and these locations that were practiced.

Taapapa Lane

(alternative)

Ngāti Whanaunga planted kuumara, for various products of trading and kuumara seedling boxes, the translation is 'sweet potatoes seedling boxes'.

Kuriipango Lane

(alternative)

This is named after an ancestor of Ngāti Whanaunga associated to this area. The translation is the most prized of Dog furs and black colour being a highly prized and paramount cloak that adorns the royal garment worn and passed through as an heirloom to high born lineage and the name as a taonga kaamehameha.

ROAD 1

John Main Drive

Continuation of road name from Hunua Views - Block A Stage 1, 2, & 3 previously approved. John Main was the farmer who owned the land that the development is on. He farmed it from the 1980s until it was sold in 2010. He passed in 2008. He was a local identity and was involved in many aspects of Ramarama life. His family were supportive of this proposal.

ROAD 2

Lignite Street

(applicant preferred)

This name continues the geological theme previously used at Block A. Lignite is often referred to as brown coal. It is a soft, brown, combustible, sedimentary rock formed from naturally compressed peat - Coal was mined in in surrounding Drury and Ramarama area in the mid-1800s and this name represents that past history.

Shale Drive

(alternative)

This name continues the geological theme previously used at Block A. Shale rocks are those that are made of clay-sized particles and have a laminated appearance. They are a type of sedimentary rock. Shale is an abundant rock usually found in areas where gentle waters have deposited sediments that become compacted together.

Puku Drive

(alternative)

This is named after an ancestor of Ngāti Whanaunga associated to this area. There are many associated sites in reference to Hunua and these locations.

ROAD 3

Shepherds Bush Road

(applicant preferred)

Ramarama back in the 1800s was once called Shepherds Bush. This name reflects on the past history of the area.

Hummock Street

(alternative)

This name continues the Geological theme previously used at Block A. A Hummock is a Geographic feature characterised by ‘an elevated track of land rising above the general level of a marshy region'. It is noted that this proposed road is elevated above the park edge and dry stream to the east.

Uruaute Drive

(alternative)

Ngāti Whanaunga planted various groves of mulberry tree, for various products of trading. This commodity was traded and established, well-known as metaphor in main context. The translation is 'groves of mulberry tree'.

ROAD 4

Stratum Drive

(applicant preferred)

This name continues the Geological theme previously used at Block A. Stratum is a sheetlike mass of sedimentary rock or earth of one kind lying between beds of other kinds.

Pookere Drive

(alternative)

This is named after an ancestor of Ngāti Whanaunga associated to this area. This ancestor made a famous quote that is referred to this area location.

Kaamehameha Street

(alternative)

This is the highest heaven of such prestige held by such esteem that mankind is unable to enter this realm but have tried to aspire to it. The duck like or web feet that are associated with the carving depicting the feet are the associated puuraakau of our tuupuna when climbing to this realm the rains from the heaven made their feet being turned to web therefore slipping back to lower levels.

 

16.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Guidelines and the Standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

17.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

18.     Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private road, suiting its form and layout. ‘Road’, ‘Drive’ and ‘Street’ are acceptable road types for the new public roads, suiting their form and layout.

19.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     To aid local board decision making, the Guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The Guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

24.     On 10 March 2022 the applicant’s agent contacted a representative of Ngāti Whanaunga, seeking input into the road naming for this stage of the development.

25.     On 17 June 2022 Ngāti Whanaunga gifted the names in the table below and provided a description, definition and some comments.

Road

Name

Description

Translation

Comment

1

Puku

This is named after ancestor of Ngāti Whanaunga associated to this area

Stomach

There are many associated sites in reference to Hunua and these locations

4

Pookere

This is named after ancestor of Ngāti Whanaunga associated to this area

Dense darkness, the creation of time, the underworld of night.

This ancestor made a famous quote that is referred to this area location

5

Kuriipango

This is named after ancestor of Ngāti Whanaunga associated to this area

The most prized of Dog furs and black colour being a highly prized and paramount cloak that adorns the royal garment worn and passed through as an heirloom to high born linage and the name as a taonga kaamehameha

This ancestor made a famous quote that is referred to this area location

6

Kaamehameha

This is the highest heaven of such prestige held by such esteem that mankind is unable to enter this realm but have tried to aspire to. The duck like or web feet that are associated with the carving depicting the feet are the associated puuraakau of our tuupuna when climbing to this realm the rains from the heaven made their feet being turned to web therefore slipping back to lower levels.

Invaluable, priceless, crown jewels, beyond reach

Not to be used frivolous but in a context

7

Uruaute

Ngāti Whanaunga planted various groves of mulberry tree, for various products of trading

groves of mulberry tree

This commodity traded and established, well-known as metaphor in main context

10

taapapa

Ngāti Whanaunga planted kuumara, for various products of trading and kuumara seedling boxes

Sweet potatoes seedling boxes

This commodity traded and established, well-known as metaphor in main context

 

The rich soils of this area are famous

 

26.     On 20 June 2022 the applicant’s agent followed up with a request for input into the road naming of COAL 1.

27.     On 20 June 2022 Ngāti Whanaunga gifted the name below.

Name

Description

Translation

Comment

Coal 1

Kaihaukai

This is a reciprocal feast shared by Iwi leaders which was a positive relationship between hapuu/sub tribal leadership

Reciprocal feast

There were many associated hui events in reference to Hunua and these locations that were practiced

 

28.     The applicant has included all of these gifted names in their application.

29.     On 23 August 2022 mana whenua were also contacted by council on behalf of the applicant, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the Guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki Tribal Trust)

·    Ngāti Maru (Ngāti Maru Rūnanga Trust)

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Whanaunga (Ngāti Whanaunga Incorporated)

·    Te Ahiwaru – Waiohua (Makaurau Marae Māori Trust)

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua (Te Ākitai Waiohua Iwi Authority)

·    Waikato – Tainui (Te Whakakitenga o Waikato Incorporated)

·    Ngāti Tamaoho

30.     By the close of the consultation period, no additional responses, comments, or feedback were received. Dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance, not all road naming applications receive comments from mana whenua, however in this instance it is anticipated that the gifting of names by Ngāti Whanaunga can provide comfort that mana whenua have been suitably consulted in this instance.

31.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

32.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

33.     The applicant has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.     There are no significant risks to Council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.     Approved road names are notified to LINZ which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database.  LINZ provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Attachment A - Scheme Plan

127

b

Attachment B - Location Map

129

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Amy Cao - Subdivision Advisor

Authorisers

David Snowdon - Team Leader Subdivision

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 



Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Diagram

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Grant of new landowner approval and subsequent Agreement to Lease and Lease to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated at Karioitahi Gap Domain Recreation Reserve 701 and 685 Karioitahi Road, Karioitahi

File No.: CP2022/13951

 

  

 

Te take te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Grant to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated, at Karioitahi Gap Domain Recreation Reserve, 701 and 685 Karioitahi Road, Karioitahi:

i)    landowner approval for the construction of new clubrooms and associated wastewater infrastructure

ii)   an Agreement to Lease for the development of the clubrooms and associated infrastructure

2.       Grant, subject to satisfactory engagement with interested iwi in respect of the proposed easements, a new Agreement to Lease to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The legal name of the surf club is spelt Kariaotahi, while the legal name of the reserve, entry road and local community is spelt Karioitahi.  Each has been used in this report in its specific context.

4.       Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated was founded in 1969 to provide lifeguard services and education to ensure safety in and around the aquatic environment of Karioitahi beach.

5.       At its business meeting on 22 March 2016 the Franklin Local Board approved an Agreement to Lease to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi for two years, with one renewal for a term of one year, to construct a new surf life-saving and community facility to replace its present building at Karioitahi Beach (Resolution number FR/2016/38). The Agreement to Lease expired on 31 May 2019.

6.       In 2018, the club was granted landowner approval to conduct the work and were sent a landowner approval agreement.  The agreement was not signed and returned to Auckland Council.

7.       On 19 September 2019, the local board further resolved to grant, from 1 October 2019, another Agreement to Lease for an additional two years, with one right of renewal for a further term of one year (Resolution number FR/2019/15). The final expiry date of the second Agreement to Lease is 30 September 2022.

8.       Due to the scale of the project, Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi had been unable to secure all necessary funding and complete plans to finalise the project within the stipulated timeframes.

9.       A further Agreement to Lease has been requested by the club. The club has secured funding and is now in a position to call for tenders and start construction. The club has separately secured funding of $1.88m from the dedicated Surf 10:20 fund, which was administered by Active Communities (formerly Parks, Sports and Recreation) and authorised by Auckland Council towards the clubhouse replacement project. The proposed construction period is expected to be two years.

10.     On 2 May 2022, the club reapplied for landowner approval for the construction of new clubrooms and associated wastewater infrastructure. The new application for landowner approval also includes access to and use of an Auckland Council water bore and the construction of a secondary wastewater disposal field. Staff have reviewed the proposal and note the proposed drinking water system could be improved through including a secondary source, such as rainwater detention tanks.  Otherwise, staff recommend the granting of landowner approval, subject to conditions.

11.     The landowner approval and agreement to lease do not replace any regulatory requirements for the proposed building and construction works.

12.     A community outcomes plan was discussed with the club and agreed to in 2019, this plan will be included as the Third Schedule to the draft lease agreement (Attachment B).

13.     During the term of the expired agreements, plans and required funding for the new building has continued and progress is ongoing.  This report recommends the Franklin Local Board grant a new landowner approval, an Agreement to Lease and subsequent community ground lease including easements for the fresh water and wastewater pipelines and wastewater disposal fields, to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated.

14.     At the successful completion of the physical works, the issuance of a Certificate of Code Compliance and fulfilment of all other conditions under the Agreement to Lease, the community ground lease will be formalised.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      grant landowner approval to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated occupying 2,134 square metres (more or less) of Karioitahi Gap Domain Recreation Reserve, 701 and 685 Karioitahi Road, Karioitahi as indicated on the lease site plan (Attachment A) for:

i)         the construction of a new clubhouse

ii)        development of wastewater disposal fields

iii)       establishing access and sharing arrangement with the council for use of the existing bore water supply

iv)       easements over existing and proposed underground services.

b)      subject to satisfactory engagement with interested iwi in respect of the proposed easements, grant a new Agreement to Lease to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated for 2,134 square metres (more or less) of land at Karioitahi Gap Domain Recreation Reserve, 701 and 685 Karioitahi Road, Karioitahi, described as Sections 1 and 2 Survey Office 506161, as outlined on the lease site plan (Attachment A).

c)       grant, on fulfilment of all the conditions of the Agreement to Lease, a community ground lease, under section 61(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated for 2,134 square metres (more or less) of land at Karioitahi Gap Domain Recreation Reserve, 701 and 685 Karioitahi Road, Karioitahi, described as Section 1 Survey Office 506161, as outlined on the site plan (Attachment A) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)       term – the difference in time between the signing of the Agreement to Lease and completion of the development, being no more than 11 years from signing of the Agreement to Lease, with two rights of renewal for a further term of 11 years each (total of 33 years)

ii)       the commencement date of the lease being no later than five years from the signing of the agreement to lease

iii)      rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded, to be reviewed on renewal

iv)      community outcomes plan – to be attached to the agreement as the Third Schedule (Attachment B).

d)      grant under the community ground lease above, and in accordance with section 48 of the Reserves Act 1977, easements on land described as Section 3 Survey Office 506161 (Attachment A) for the:

i)       water supply pipeline, being 45 square metres (more or less) outlined in red and marked as ‘existing path of water supply’.  A condition of the easement will be that the club share the costs of maintenance of the existing bore, and their use cannot affect the water supply to the public toilets. The club will be responsible for finding an alternative water source at their own cost if the bore water is no longer available to them

ii)       wastewater pipeline, being 12 square metres (more or less), and outlined in red and marked as ‘wastewater pipe to proposed disposal field’

iii)      wastewater disposal field, being 302.5 square metres (more or less), and outlined in light teal and marked as ‘proposed disposal field’

iv)      reserve wastewater disposal field, being 300 square meters (more or less), and outlined in dark blue and marked as ‘proposed reserve disposal field’.

e)      all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 and the Reserves Act 1977.

 

Horopaki

Context

The land

15.     The land at Karioitahi Gap Domain Recreation Reserve is legally described as Sections 1, 2 and 3 Survey Office 506161.  Section 1 and 2 are a classified Local Purpose (Surf Life Saving, Surf Education, Accommodation, Kiosk and Community Buildings) Reserve; Section 3 is a classified recreation reserve.  The land is held by the Crown, vested in council and subject to the Reserves Act 1977.

16.     In 2016, with the support of the Franklin Local Board (Resolution number FR/2016/38), two parcels of land covering 1,822 square metres (more or less) was reclassified by the Parks, Recreation and Sport Committee of Auckland Council from Recreation Reserve to Local Purpose (Surf Life Saving, Surf Education, Accommodation, Kiosk and Community Buildings) Reserve (now described as Sections 1 and 2 Survey Office 506161).  This was to accommodate the surf club building and their future development plans for the site (Resolution number PAR/2016/82 refers).  The proposed lease to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi accords with the revised classification of the land.

17.     Section 3 Survey Office 506161, held as a classified recreation reserve, contains the water bore, freshwater pipe to the clubhouse; and is proposed to contain the wastewater pipe to the disposal fields and the proposed reserve disposal field.  This land was not contemplated to be used under the original proposal and has not been the subject of iwi engagement.

Proposal

18.     Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated propose to demolish their existing facility and construct a new surf life-saving and community facility at Karioitahi Beach. The replacement has been proposed due to the deterioration of the existing building and the potential to provide better services to the local community.

19.     The proposal would see the construction of a new facility consisting of three levels. The basement level will house a first aid and administration room, toilet and wash facilities, a workshop, general purpose areas and dry storage. The ground floor of the clubhouse would comprise a lounge, dining area, kitchen, three separate training rooms, storage, toilets and wash facilities and guest/member accommodation. The upper most level of the clubhouse will comprise a storage area and a watchtower. The facility will be made available to local iwi, as a space to hold meetings.

20.     To the south of the facility, a wastewater disposal field and secondary disposal field would be established.  These are required by the Auckland Unitary Plan to allow the club to safely dispose of their wastewater. The primary disposal field will be established to the south of the carpark and a short bollard and rope fence would separate these.

21.     The nearby water bore, owned by Auckland Council will continue to serve as the club’s water source.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Landowner Approvals

22.     In February 2018, the club was granted landowner approval for the proposed extension to the lease area to enable new clubrooms to be built.  The approval was for five years and expires in February 2023.  This approval was not signed by the club and returned by them to council and is therefore not valid. This proposal did not include access to, and use of, the fresh water bore, or the creation of a secondary wastewater disposal field.

23.     On 2 May 2022, the club applied for a new landowner approval for the construction of the new clubrooms and surrounds. 

24.     Staff have identified that the updated proposal includes access to, and use of, the existing Auckland Council water bore. An easement would need to be granted over the underground pipe, which connects the water bore and surf club. The applicant would need to ensure their use of the bore complies with regulatory standards. Otherwise, they would need to obtain appropriate resource consents. In the event the water source is no longer available the applicant shall be responsible for gaining a new water source and shall do so at their own cost and with appropriate approvals.

25.     The area proposed as the secondary/reserve disposal field is located adjacent to the primary field and is unlikely to see frequent public use due to the slope and nature of the surrounding land. The reserve wastewater disposal field would need to be included in any new approval and formalised via an easement.

26.     The landowner approval, if granted by the board, would include conditions relating to:

i)    health and safety

ii)   obtaining regulatory approvals

iii)  damage avoidance and public safety during construction

iv)  maintenance responsibilities

v)   reinstatement of Auckland Council land and assets.

Agreements to Lease

27.     The Franklin Local Board meeting of 22 March 2016 approved an Agreement to Lease to Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated for a period of two years, commencing 1 June 2016 with one renewal for a term of one year if required (Resolution number FR/2016/38).

28.     Following the expiry of the original agreement a further Agreement to Lease was granted from 1 October 2019 under Resolution number FR/2019/140 (17 September 2019 local board meeting).

29.     The agreements to lease enabled the club to construct a new surf life saving and community facility to replace its present building

30.     The 2019 Agreement to Lease period expires on 30 September 2022.  Although the club has made some progress, this is a large-scale project and Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi has been unable to secure all the necessary funding and complete the plans within the original time frame.  Therefore, a further Agreement to Lease is required, to enable the project to proceed.

Lease

31.     Once the conditions within the Agreement to Lease are satisfied, the new community lease will come into effect.  Under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 the standard lease term for a group-owned building is 10 years, with a single 10-year right of renewal.  The board may vary this with a maximum term of 33 years (plus renewals) available under the Reserves Act 1977.

32.     The previous decision of 17 September 2019 was for a term of 11 years, plus two further 11 year terms.  The first term of the lease and easements will commence once the development is completed - but for no longer than 11 years from the signing of the Agreement to Lease.  This term is followed by two renewal terms of 11 years each.

33.     Annual rental for community leases is set at one dollar ($1.00) plus GST, if demanded.  A rent review will take place at each renewal.

34.     The lease will include easements to cover the bore and water supply pipeline, wastewater pipeline and the two proposed disposal fields.  An easement is a right to use land owned by another, in this case council, without having the right to possession of that land.  Common easements include the right to convey utilities through pipes or lines through the owner’s land.

35.     A Community Outcomes Plan is also included as a standard schedule within new community leases granted.  This is an annual report that includes information on the group’s activities, membership and revenue; measured against agreed performance measures and targets.  A Community Outcomes Plan had been agreed with the club in 2019 (Attachment B) and the same plan will be attached to the new draft lease agreement.

Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi project works to date

36.     Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi has:

i)    obtained a resource consent for the site (in 2015), this had a lifespan of five years and expired in 2020.  The club lodged a new resource consent application on 25 July 2022.  This is being processed by council’s regulatory department

ii)        obtained an initial building consent for the development; this was renewed (in 2022) and a variation to the building consent was lodged on 19 August 2022 to address the proposed new wastewater disposal system for the site.  This consent is currently being processed

iii)       appointed an independent project manager for the development

iv)       entered into a tri-partite Development Funding Agreement with Auckland Council and Surf Life Saving Northern Region Incorporated for funding of $1,880,235 as part of the Surf 10:20 Project

v)        secured funding from external funders, including Surf Life Saving New Zealand

vi)       issued a request for tenders (August 2022) to undertake the construction of the new surf club facility

37.     indicated their intention to commence the building phase of the project in late 2022.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Greenhouse gas emissions

38.     There is expected to be an impact on greenhouse gas emissions during the build.

39.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lease holder:

·    use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·    use eco labelled products and services

·    seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

40.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

Coastal inundation and flooding

41.     The site is not expected to be impacted by coastal inundation:

Map

Description automatically generated

Coastal Inundation: 701 Karioitahi Road, Waiuku

42.     Note:  The coastal inundation map shows the extent of flooding expected around coastal areas of the Auckland region during storm events.  There are three layers:

Present day

i.        5 year average return interval coastal inundation:  The level of flooding predicted in the 1-in-5 year coastal storm inundation event. This 1-in-5 probability statistic means there is a 20% chance of this happening in any year.

ii.       100 year average return interval coastal inundation:  The level of flooding predicted during the 1-in-100 year coastal storm inundation. This event has a 1% chance of being equalled or exceeded each year.


 

Climate change

iii.      100 year coastal inundation with 1m sea level rise:  This layer represents the level of flooding predicted in the 1-in-100 year coastal storm inundation event, with the addition of a further 1m flood height to represent the effects of sea level rise.

43.      Coastal inundation is more likely when waves, storms, wind and tides combine (storm surge). The areas that experience inundation are expected to increase and flood more frequently because of climate change.

44.     Climate change has little potential to impact the lease as the new site does not sit within a flood plain area:

A picture containing text, nature

Description automatically generated

Flood Plains: 701 Karioitahi Road, Waiuku

Note:  The flood map shows the extent of flooding expected during severe rainfall events.  Areas that are not highlighted may also experience flooding in some circumstances.  There are two layers:

i.        Flood plains show areas predicted to be covered by flood water as a result of a one-in-100-year rainstorm event by river or surface flooding.

ii.       Flood prone areas are low points in the ground that may flood.  They are often associated with roads or railway embankments, or places where water can become trapped and pool if their outlet is blocked.  These areas are also associated with one-‑in-100-year rainfall events.

A flood happens when heavy rainfall overwhelms the capacity of natural or designed drainage systems.  Floods become dangerous if the water is very deep or travelling very fast or if the flood waters have risen very quickly, or if they contain debris like tree branches and sheets of iron.

45.     The proposed building and associated infrastructure are outside of the inundation and flood plain zones. However, there is still a low risk that the site could be affected.

Water

46.     The applicant suggests that the Auckland Council water bore would be the surf club’s sole source of drinking water.  Staff note that a secondary water source, such as rainwater retention tanks would be beneficial. This would reduce the need to take from the bore and would ensure the club retain a source of water should there be saltwater intrusion into bore.

47.     Staff anticipate water take will be increased by the new activities proposed by the club.  As the club intends to continue taking its freshwater supply from the council bore, staff will install meters at the bore and public toilet to establish how much the newly developed building uses.  The meters will monitor salination levels, flow, take, and whether the public toilet block is affected by the club’s water take.  This will be monitored by Auckland Council’s Healthy Waters department.

48.     The Community Lease will include a provision whereby the club shares equitably in the maintenance costs of the bore based on usage and will not be allowed to affect council’s own water requirements.  In the event of contamination or other negative freshwater results, the club will need to establish their own alternative water source.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     Auckland Council has separately approved funding of $1.88m towards the Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi development.  Staff across a number of departments are working closely with the club and Surf Life Saving Northern Region to deliver this project.  The advice contained in this report has been informed by Parks & Community Facilities and Healthy Waters.  Staff support the application for new landowner approval and agreements to enable the project to proceed.

50.     Staff note that public toilets will not be included in the new development.  While the inclusion of public toilets would benefit the wider community, requiring this may delay the construction process and will have funding implications for the club. In addition, the existing public toilets meet current service demands.

51.     Staff also note that the granting of the easements and creation of the wastewater disposal fields, may limit Auckland Council’s ability to develop the site in future.

52.     The proposed work aligns with the land classification and any alteration of the proposal may delay the construction process and have funding implications for the club.

53.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

54.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s allocated authority relating to local recreation, sports and community facilities.

55.     Franklin Local Board has contributed funding for the project, which has assisted the club with procuring engineering reports and supporting with consent costs.

56.     The activities of the surf life saving club align with the following Franklin Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

·        Outcome 3: Fit for purpose places and facilities
We will plan for and respond to future growth and the impacts of climate change while protecting and celebrating what is special and unique about our communities.

·        Outcome 4: Kaitiakitanga and protection of our environment
We will work with mana whenua, local communities, and others to lead and inform environmental conservation, restoration, and regeneration projects and to recover and regenerate waste.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

57.     Eleven iwi groups were contacted during the initial consultation periods for the 2016 Agreement to Lease, landowner approval and reserve reclassification processes covering the development of the surf club and included the original wastewater disposal fields. There were no objections during the initial consultation.  Ngati te Ata in particular attended site visits and met with the club regarding the ongoing plans.  No further engagement regarding the lease area is required.

58.     Iwi have not been engaged to comment on the proposed easements covering the intake of fresh water from the council bore and disposal of wastewater to the proposed reserve disposal field.  This engagement is now underway.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

59.     There is no direct cost to council involved in the granting of new property agreements relating to the proposed development.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

Water supply and wastewater storage and treatment

60.     There is concern that the new clubhouse, with the increased number of up to 30 overnight guests, will result in an increase in the amount of water to be drawn from the bore.  The club have confirmed that the 22,500-litre water tank will take water only from the bore and not from the roof of the building.  Recent mana whenua engagements have highlighted that it is becoming clear that use of roof-water supplies is favoured as the alternative to any increased use or development of bore supplies.  There is a risk that should the bore be unavailable to the club they will have no alternative source of water.

61.     If the club’s usage takes the volumes over the Permitted Activity limit, being in excess of 20m3 per day, all aspects of the processing of the then required Water Take Consent would need to be met by the club.  The club will be fully responsible as the owner and operator of the water supply storage and treatment system and would be required to manage the system as a private supplier meeting the new water quality regulations and reporting to Taumata Arowai.

62.     In regard to the wastewater system development, the club will be fully responsible as the owner and operator of the wastewater storage and treatment system, thus they will be required to manage the system as required by the Resource Consent and reporting to council’s compliance team.

Occupancy agreements

63.     The granting of new agreements allows Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi to continue its plans for a new purpose-built surf life-saving clubhouse so it can better provide its essential services in the area.  If new agreements are not granted the club’s ability to finalise its building plans will be inhibited, affecting its ability to deliver its services including providing quality life-saving services.

64.     The risks to council associated with the granting of the community lease are minimised, as the maintenance and renewal of the building and wastewater pipeline will be the responsibility of the club. The freshwater draw will be metered at the bore and public toilets so usage can be monitored, and the club will pay its share of the freshwater maintenance costs.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

65.     Subject to the Franklin Local Board granting the new landowner approval, Agreement to Lease and Community Lease, including easements for water use and disposal, the relevant council staff will prepare the necessary documents.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan - 701 and 685 Karioitahi Road

141

b

Community Outcomes Plan - Surf Life Saving Kariaotahi Incorporated

143

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jenny Young - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board Council-controlled Organisations Work Programme update Quarter Four 2021-22, and amendments to the Council-controlled Organisations Engagement Plan 2022-2023

File No.: CP2022/13270

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Franklin Local Board with updates on Council-controlled Organisation (CCO) work programme 2021/2022 items in its area, along with amendments to the Franklin Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2022.  

3.       The plan will be reported on each quarter to show both amendments to the plan itself, and to provide an update on each CCO work programme.

4.       An amended version of the engagement plan is provided as Appendix A.  

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Appendix B-E.   

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)   receive the Council-controlled Organisations (CCO) quarter four update for 2021/2022. 

b)   approve amendments to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan for the 2022/2023 financial year.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2022/2023 local work programme. 

7.       The local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year.

8.       The CCO engagement plan is a live document and CCOs are required to update their plan quarterly.  Quarter four updates are included in Appendix B-E.

9.       Amendments can also be proposed by local boards, when an improvement can be made to all 21 local board engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

10.     Amendments may include:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Amendements from Local Board Services

11.     Amendments have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.     The Watercare contact is now Elizabeth Stewart (replacing Ben Halliwell).

13.     These amendments are reflected in Appendix A – Franklin Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023.

 

Auckland Transport Q4 updates to work programme

14.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Appendix B.

Amendments to the Auckland Transport work programme

Deferred, completed or removed activities

15.     No amendments have been made.

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited Q4 updates to work programme

16.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Appendix C.

Updates to the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme

Deferred, completed or removed activities

17.     No amendments have been made.   

 

Eke Panuku Development Auckland Q4 updates to work programme

18.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Appendix D.

Amendments to the Eke Panuku work programme

Deferred, completed or removed activities

19.     No amendments have been made.

 

Watercare Q4 updates to work programme

20.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Appendix E.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

Additional activities

21.     This activity has been added since the last update, and is provided along with the suggested engagement approach:

Beachlands Servicing Strategy – engagement approach is ‘consult’.

Deferred, completed or removed activities

22.     This activity included in the engagement plan has been removed:

Clevedon Water and Wastewater Servicing – project is complete.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

23.     Amending the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to may.

24.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.     Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

26.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

28.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

30.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

31.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021/2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

32.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

33.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter One in late 2022.

35.     A workshop will be held in early 2023 to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2023/2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2022-2023 Franklin Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

149

b

Auckland Transport Quarter Four update 2021-2-22

159

c

Tātakai Unlimited Quarter Four update 2021-2022

165

d

Eke Panuku Quarter Four update 2021-2022

177

e

Watercare Quarter Four update 2021-2022

183

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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27 September 2022

 

 

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Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

File No.: CP2022/13871

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek high-level input from local boards on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020. This includes:

·    long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

2.       This report also provides an overview of the feedback received through the first stage of the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement that ran from 13 June to 17 July.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 provides national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991. The fundamental concept of the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

4.       Auckland Council is required to change the Auckland Unitary Plan to give full effect to Te Mana o te Wai, which must be reflected in all decisions made under the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020.  Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must be notified by December 2024. Action plans must also be prepared and published as soon as practicable to achieve environmental outcomes and freshwater management objectives.

5.       The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 sets the National Objectives Framework and steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow when implementing the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020. Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland.

6.       The first stage of National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value and use freshwater bodies and the environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

7.       Feedback from the first stage engagement will be used, along with existing information and further research and analysis, to develop freshwater management options that will be brought back for a second stage of engagement in the second half of 2023.

8.       There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the engagement period.

9.       Local boards are now invited to provide input to the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020. Local boards can view the feedback form provided during consultation to assist in preparation of a feedback form at Attachment A.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the feedback received from communities through the first stage of public engagement with the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020, in Attachment D, Attachment E and Attachment F

b)      provide feedback on the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 values including the:

i)       long-term visions for freshwater management

ii)       proposed Freshwater Management Units

iii)      values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) is a mandatory national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).  The Policy Statement applies to all freshwater (including groundwater) and, to the extent they are affected by freshwater, to receiving environments (which may include estuaries and the wider coastal marine area).

11.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing

12.     Regional councils and unitary authorities are required to change regional policy statements and regional plans to give effect to the requirements of the NPS-FM, including Te Mana o te Wai.

13.     Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland. A plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is required for the NPS-FM implementation. The AUP plan change must be notified by December 2024.  The NPS-FM also requires the preparation of action plans to manage the effects of the use and development of land, freshwater and on receiving environments. Action plans must be prepared and published as soon as practicable.

14.     Every council must develop long-term visions for freshwater in its region and include those long-term visions as objectives in its regional policy statement. Long-term visions:

a)   may be set by Freshwater Management Units (FMU), be part of a FMU, or at a catchment level; and

b)   must set goals that are ambitious but reasonable (that is, difficult to achieve but not impossible); and

c)   identify a timeframe to achieve those goals that is ambitious and reasonable (for example, 30 years after the commencement date).

15.     The National Objectives Framework (NOF) is a core part of the NPS-FM, and includes a series of steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow on implementation, including to:

·    identify FMU in the region

·    identify values for each FMU

·    set environmental outcomes for each value and include them as objectives in regional plans

·    identify attributes for each value and set a baseline for those attributes

·    set target attribute states, environmental flows and levels, and other criteria to support the achievement of environmental outcomes

·    set limits as rules and prepare action plans (as appropriate) to achieve environmental outcomes.

16.     FMUs are essentially the spatial arrangements adopted by council for the management of freshwater.  All fresh waterbodies and their related catchments must be within an FMU.  While the NPS-FM is primarily concerned with the management of freshwater, it does also require an integrated management approach – ki uta ki tai – including consideration of the relationship of freshwater and its management to the coastal receiving environment. 

17.     A public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022 through AK Have Your Say and other engagement activities including library events and online webinars. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value freshwater in FMUs and environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for these values.

18.     The public engagement on AK Have Your Say comprised the following:

·    the NPS-FM 2020

·    an overview of the NPS-FM implementation programme

·    NPS-FM implementation timeline

·    the proposed Auckland FMU map

·    the map of the Pukekohe specified vegetable growing area (when implementing the NPS-FM, the council must have regard to the importance of this area for domestic vegetables and food security, and may temporarily have a less stringent approach to water quality issues to ensure this is appropriately recognised)

·    an online feedback form with consultation questions and opportunity to provide comments on the proposed FMUs (also translated into numerous languages)

·    a social pinpoint map allowing people to provide feedback to a water body or within an area

·    Ministry for the Environment factsheets, infographics, and videos on freshwater management

·    access to freshwater planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

19.     Two online webinars and six library drop-in events were undertaken through the engagement period. These engagement activities introduced Auckland Council’s NPS-FM implementation programme and provided opportunities to the public to ask questions and to provide feedback directly.

20.     There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the consultation period, including:

·    128 online feedback forms

·    343 site-specific comments (from 84 submitters) via the Social Pinpoint mapping tool

·    12 hard copy feedback forms

·    23 emails

·    120 comments via library displays where feedback could be provided on post-it notes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The NPS-FM has a focus on the identification and management of freshwater values.  It includes four compulsory values (ecosystem health, human contact, threatened species, and mahinga kai) that must be applied and managed in each FMU. There are also other values that must be considered in managing freshwater if they are relevant to Auckland. The list of compulsory values and other values are provided in Attachment C to this report (and are identified as Appendices 1A and 1B of the NPS-FM).  Additionally, the council must identify any other relevant values (i.e. additional to those specifically identified in the NPS-FM) including any additional Māori Freshwater Values as identified by mana whenua.

22.     Overall, submitters raised over 200 individual sites of value to them, while many talked more generally about particular types of, or all, freshwater bodies. The sites named were most commonly located in the Franklin, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Waitematā local board areas.

23.     The values most commonly raised in relation to how submitters use, and would like to use, those freshwater bodies related to:

·    ecosystem health – including water quality and habitat (both generally and for threatened species) in particular

·    natural form and character

·    drinking water supply

·    human contact (that is, for recreational purposes such as swimming, boating, or fishing).

24.     Given the importance of the coastal environment in Auckland, and the impacts from key freshwater issues, such as sediment and E. coli, three FMUs have been proposed for freshwater management based on the three coastal receiving environments for catchments: the Kaipara Harbour, the Manukau Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf (map provided in Attachment B).  This proposed approach provides the opportunity to both address the management of freshwater for its own sake, while also explicitly considering its relationship to the coastal environment.

25.     While submitters were not asked directly whether they supported the Freshwater Management Units or not, comments were provided on a range of matters, including suggestions around amending the proposed boundaries, or rationale behind the boundaries, having more or less FMUs, more location specific detail, and having the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area as a separate FMU.

26.     Other submitters commented on non-FMU specific matters including wetlands, the need for more transparency and action, concern about water quality, the need to prioritise ecosystem health, farming/vegetable growing, and flooding.

27.     The NPS-FM provides for a specified vegetable growing area in Pukekohe that sits within the Manukau FMU. Some comments related to the provision for horticultural land use in Pukekohe.

·        3 supported the provision for continued horticultural use, including irrigation.

·        3 expressed concerns about the impact of horticultural activities on water quality (streams, and aquifers) particularly from fertiliser and nitrates.

28.     Demographic information from those submitters who provided it is detailed in Attachment D.

29.     Data tables naming sites, and their number of mentions by local board area is provided in Attachment E. A full Summary of Feedback report is provided in Attachment F.

30.     Staff are currently undertaking data analysis and a summary report of feedback will be published on AK Have Your Say.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM Te Mana o te Wai is about restoring and preserving the balance between the water, the wider environment, and the community. This concept is in line with the natural environment priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which sets the goal:

Oranga taiao, oranga tāngata: a healthy and connected natural environment supports healthy and connected Aucklanders. The mauri (life essence) of Tāmaki Makaurau is restored”.

32.     The NPS-FM includes the following policy direction in response to climate change:

Policy 4: Freshwater is managed as part of New Zealand’s integrated response to climate change.

33.     Every council must have regard to the foreseeable impact of climate change in following areas:

·    when setting limits on resource use, every regional council must:

3.14(2)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when setting environmental flows and levels, every regional council must:

3.16(4)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when assessing and reporting, as part of each review required by section 35(2A) of the RMA, every regional council must prepare and publish:

3.30(2)(g) predictions of changes, including the foreseeable effects of climate change, that are likely to affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in the region.

34.     The implementation of the NPS-FM will help to promote the resilience of freshwater ecosystems to the effects of climate change.  The development of freshwater action plans will require sustainable land and water management practices to enhance the mauri and health of waterways, which is in line with actions prioritised in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The NPS-FM is relevant to all of the council’s functions. All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) are involved in the NPS-FM implementation, including participation in aa Steering Committee overseeing the development and implementation of the programme. This includes having an ongoing role in supporting the NPS-FM engagement, and providing input and review of responses developed to give effect to the NPS-FM.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, local boards are responsible for identifying and communicating to Auckland Council the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards have a detailed understanding of their areas including freshwater values and issues and are in a position to provide important input to the development of NPS-FM responses, including in relation to the matters covered by this round of public engagement. 

37.     Prior to the public engagement a memo titled “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland” was provided to all local boards on 26 May 2022. The memo advised the key principles, consultation and timeframe requirements of implementing the NPS-FM, and the opportunities for local board input through the process (attached in Attachment G).

38.     A webinar presentation titled “National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020” was also presented to local boards in the meeting on 3 June 2022.  In response to feedback from elected members, the period for providing input had been extended for local boards to September 2022 to allow local boards time to provide feedback following the close of public engagement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The NPS-FM says the council must “actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in freshwater management” including in identifying Māori values and decision-making processes relating to Māori freshwater values.

40.     Engagement with mana whenua in Auckland is being undertaken through an on-going process, directly with mana whenua entities throughout the preparation of a plan change and development of action plans.

41.     Engagement with the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau about the NPS-FM has also been undertaken in the broader context of Three Waters Reform and the development and implementation of the council’s Water Strategy, to enable mana whenua to provide a more holistic consideration of the management of water.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The first stage of the NPS-FM engagement was undertaken within the business-as-usual planning budget. This budget covers primarily staff time and the public engagement.

43.     The budget required for NPS-FM engagement in 2023, and for implementation of the project through to 2026 is presently under discussion.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The government has set a deadline of December 2024 for the council to publicly notify the AUP plan change in response to the provisions of the NPS-UD. Given the scale and complexity of the work, and limited resources, there is a risk that the council may not receive sufficient quality feedback from a wide range of interests. There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-FM and how the NPS-FM engagement links to previous water related engagements, for example the Auckland Water Strategy engagement and the Three Waters Reform engagement.

45.     These risks have been mitigated to date by communicating communications with communities and stakeholders during the engagement period, through meetings, emails, and online Question & Answer sessions. There will be further and ongoing communication to obtain quality engagement results to progress the NPS-FM implementation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The feedback received from the first stage engagement on the values and the environmental outcomes sought, together with the NPS-FM requirements, will inform the development of objectives and proposed management options to achieve the objectives.

47.     A second phase of public engagement will be undertaken to seek feedback on the proposed objectives and management approaches for FMUs and water bodies. This will be undertaken in the second half of 2023 to provide opportunity for communities and stakeholders, and local boards for further involvement.  

48.     The feedback received from the second phase of engagement will further inform the development of a proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan and the development of action plans.

49.     Elected representatives will have opportunities to review the proposed plan change and action plans as they evolve, and before the plan change is approved for public notification in the second half of 2024 to meet the NPS-FM deadline of notification before December 2024.

50.     Submissions to the plan change will be heard by an independent Freshwater Hearing Panel who will make recommendations back to council by 2026.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback Form

193

b

Map of Proposed Freshwater Management Units

201

c

NPS-FM freshwater values

203

d

Who we heard from

205

e

Local Board breakdowns

209

f

Summary of Feedback Report

219

g

Memo to local boards on 26 May 2022: Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland

249

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Xu - Senior Policy Planner, Regional Planning, Plans and Places

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager - Planning, Regional, North, West & Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Lesley Jenkins – Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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27 September 2022

 

 

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27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Update on the progress and achievements of Ara Kōtui (formerly the Improving Māori input into local board decision-making)

File No.: CP2022/13825

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To report progress and achievements for the Ara Kōtui programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Ara Kōtui is a joint mana whenua iwi and southern local boards initiative, established in 2015 to explore and support opportunities for improving iwi Māori involvement in local board decision-making.

3.       The initiative receives funding from the five participating southern local boards and is supported by Auckland Council staff and Ōtara Health to progress its work programme and delivery plan.

4.       In September, a 0.5 permanent part-time staff role in the Local Board Services department was established to further support the initiative and share experience and learnings more widely across Auckland Council and local boards.

5.       Key recent achievements include a number of hui with mana whenua iwi and local boards to provide input to the development of local board work programmes, the establishment of a co-design process to explore formal shared decision-making, and successful advocacy to Auckland Council for a council-wide Mātauranga Māori policy and practice (currently in development).

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

(a)  receive the report on progress and achievements of the Ara Kōtui programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

6.       Ara Kōtui (formerly known as the Improving Māori input into local board decision-making programme - IMI) was established in 2015 as a joint initiative between mana whenua iwi and, initially, the Manurewa, Māngere-Otāhuhu, and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards. Papakura and Franklin Local Boards joined the project group subsequently.

At inception, the aim of the programme was to explore and support opportunities to enable mana whenua iwi to effectively participate in local board decision-making.

7.       Ara Kōtui contributes to the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau mana outcome, effective Māori participation – Kia ora te hononga, and the objective that mana whenua and iwi Māori are active partners and participants at all levels of the council group’s decision-making.

8.       The programme is funded through local board work programmes.  In the current 2022/2023 financial year, local boards contribute as follows:

Local Board

Budget Allocation

Māngere-Otāhuhu

$10,000.00

Ōtara-Papatoetoe

$6,000.00

Manurewa

$10,000.00

Papakura

$11,000.00

Franklin

$5,000.00

Total Budget

$42,000.00

 

9.       Reporting on these budgets is provided at the completion of each financial year. The funding goes towards a contract with Ōtara Health (for facilitation including establishing hui appointments, agendas and minutes; catering for hui; administering mana whenua attendance and travel fees; organising regular collective mana whenua / southern local boards hui), and towards deliverables related to the Ara Kōtui delivery plan (examples include additional wānanga between mana whenua iwi and local boards and other deliverables in the joint work plan).

10.     In August 2022, work programme and budget responsibility for Ara Kōtui was transferred from Connected Communities to the Local Board Services department.

11.     Local Board Services will now take responsibility for quarterly reporting against this budget.

12.     In July 2021, a part-time Lead Advisor was contracted to support the progress of Ara Kōtui and co-ordinate advice to deliver work programme priorities. From 1st September 2022, a permanent 0.5 position will be established, replacing the Lead Advisor role.

13.     The purpose of this permanent 0.5 role is to support Ara Kōtui, help to strengthen southern local board-iwi partnerships and advance Kia ora te hononga (effective Māori participation), one of the Māori Outcomes identified in Kia Ora Tamaki Makarau. 

14.     The 0.5 role will also focus on the learnings and experience from Ara Kōtui being shared with other local boards across Tāmaki Makaurau.

15.     Ara Kōtui is also supported by the southern Local Area Managers and staff supporting the southern local boards.

16.     Staff from other council departments that have responsibility for various priorities in the current work programme also participate on an ‘as needed’ basis.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

 

17.     In July 2021, an Auckland Council Research and Evaluation Unit (RIMU) evaluation of the programme made four key recommendations:

a)   Local Board Services to ensure a forum is provided for mana whenua and local boards to discuss whether IMI is fit for purpose and is generating outcomes consistent with their strategies and plans.

b)   The Project Reference Group (PRG) refresh the relationships and thinking informing IMI

c)   That the Project Reference Group generate mechanisms for ensuring oversight and accountability for IMI initiatives

d)   The PRG and Local Board Services discuss how IMI should be adequately resourced and managed.

18.     In response to the recommendations in the RIMU evaluation:

a)   the Project Delivery Group and Project Reference Group were combined into one rōpū and have been meeting monthly, supported by Ōtara Health and council staff from Local Board Services, Connected Communities and others to implement work programme priorities.

b)   new Terms of Reference were adopted, including roles and responsibilities for facilitation of meetings, Ara Kōtui support, advice and implementation of the delivery plan.

c)   a refreshed and updated delivery plan was agreed with a number new of projects included

d)   improved oversight of the programme to local boards and mana whenua entities through regular reporting to local boards via a business meeting report, with the same information tailored for a newsletter for distribution to mana whenua iwi.

Ara Kōtui Work Programme Delivery Plan

Elections

19.     In September 2021, Auckland Council’s election team held a workshop with Ara Kōtui seeking input to the design of a programme of initiatives that council could deliver in partnership with Ara Kōtui (and any other stakeholders) to improve Māori participation in elections 2022. 

20.     Insights and suggestions were offered by Ara Kōtui at both the September and October hui. The elections team held a workshop with mana whenua seeking further feedback in November. In February 2022, details of community partnerships to promote candidacy and voting participation were presented to Ara Kōtui.

Inauguration and induction

21.     Interest has been sought from iwi Maori to host incoming local boards’ pōwhiri and inauguration ceremonies following the 2022 elections. Planning for these ceremonies is currently under way.

22.     Work is also progressing for mana whenua participation in the induction of local board members, following the 2022 local government elections.

23.     Expressions of interest have been sought from mana whenua iwi to:

·        provide updates for inclusion in revised Local Board Induction Handbooks

·        present on their priorities to a joint local boards/mana whenua hui in December 2022

·        facilitate their own iwi-led induction with the new local boards, perhaps by way of a tour of the rohe, a marae visit or in some other form as determined by mana whenua iwi

24.     Auckland Council has offered to provide resource to support this mahi. Six iwi have so far indicated their interest.

Mana Whenua / Local Board Member Hui

25.     The 6-monthly hui for southern local boards and mana whenua was scheduled to be held in March/April of 2022. However, owing to COVID-19 and consequent meeting restrictions at that time, it was decided to defer the hui until late 2022, or early 2023.

26.     With local government elections in October, the hui was rescheduled for early December, to be part of the induction process for incoming local boards. It will be an opportunity to introduce the new local boards and for mana whenua to shared priorities and aspirations ahead of development of the next local board plans.

27.     The joint hui will also be an opportunity for existing local board members who are re-elected to continue to build on existing relationships, and for new elected members to begin those relationships.

28.     For all elected members, the joint hui offers an introduction and/or familiarisation with tikanga in a marae setting.

Mana whenua input into local board decision-making

 

29.     In April this year, staff asked participating local boards for direction on the establishment of a formal council joint committee with representation from mana whenua and local boards. The proposal was to establish a pilot to trial shared mana whenua iwi/local board decision-making for road naming.

30.     Participating iwi and local boards chairs gave mixed feedback on this proposal, with general support for a trial of some form of shared decision-making, however limited support for road naming as the allocated decision-making to be shared.

31.     Ara Kōtui gave direction to proceed with a co-design process to explore possibilities for shared decision-making, decide on the most suitable mechanism (which may not be a joint committee) and draft a terms of reference.

32.     The co-design process was started in July using an online process, however iwi engagement was limited and a preference for in person engagement indicated.

33.     Given the pending local government elections, the co-design process has paused, and will be revisited in the new electoral term.

Annual local board work programme development

34.     In late 2021 mana whenua iwi were invited to join a pilot initiative with local boards in the development of the 2022/23 local board work programmes.

35.     The purpose of the pilot initiative was to allow iwi to:

·        increase understanding of the role of local boards through oversight and input into the work programme process

·        ask questions about specific work programmes items

·        influence existing work programme initiatives

·        indicate projects of particular interest

·        identify potential partnership projects

 

36.     Seven iwi attended a number of hui across the five southern local boards.

37.     A variety of formats were trialed:

·        Iwi participating in scheduled work programme workshops (Māngere-Otāhuhu and Ōtara-Papatoetoe Local Boards)

·        A series of hui between one local board and one iwi (Manurewa Local Board)

·        A joint hui between multiple iwi and one local board (Franklin and Papakura Local Boards)

 

38.     Feedback and insights from the hui helped to inform the development of local board work programmes for 2022/23 and will help with the design of future iwi/local board shared decision-making and iwi input to local board decision-making in the future.

39.     The recommendation from this trial is for Local Board Services to amend the work programme process for the southern local boards to invite iwi participation in the work programme process as business as usual. 

Governance Forward Work Programme

40.     The Governance Forward Work Calendars for the five southern local boards are collated and provided each month to mana whenua. This gives mana whenua oversight of local board work programme initiatives being discussed at workshops, and upcoming decisions that local boards are considering.

41.     There is a standing invitation for mana whenua to arrange, through liaison with local board chairs, their attendance at workshops or business meetings for items they have an interest in.

Advocacy

The Future for Local Government Review

42.     The Future for Local Government Review Panel has accepted an invitation to attend the September 2022 hui of Ara Kōtui. The Panel will update the group on the progress of the review, with discussion about strengthening the Treaty partnership through effective Māori representation in local government. 

43.     This will be an opportunity for Ara Kōtui to share experiences and challenges of working together as local boards and iwi, within the governance structure of Auckland Council.

Mātauranga Māori

44.     In May 2021, Ngā Mātārae presented a project plan and scope to develop a council-wide approach for the management, storage and use of iwi intellectual property, including kōrero, waiata, karakia, kupu, imagery, artwork and proverbs.

45.     This was in response to a request from Ara Kōtui to the Chief Executive of Auckland Council that a consistent, careful and non-commercial approach be developed and agreed with mana whenua.

46.     A draft policy will be presented to Ara Kōtui in November 2022, before being finalised and approved by Council.

Future Focus

47.     In addition to the mahi mentioned above, there will be a focus in the new electoral term on:

·        bringing local boards up to date with Ara Kōtui, with the likelihood of new local board members being elected with little or no knowledge of the kaupapa

·        development of the new three-year local board plans that identify how local boards can support Māori Outcomes, and partner with iwi to deliver projects of mutual interest

·        refreshing the Ara Kōtui delivery plan to ensure continued support for delivering on shared iwi and local board aspirations through work programmes

·        continuing to build relationships, at governance and operational/delivery levels, between iwi and local boards

·        continuing the co-design process.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

48.     This project does not have any immediate impact on climate.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

49.     Departmental staff delivering local board work programmes will need to be prepared to experience mana whenua attending local board workshops and being involved in local board work programming.

50.     Ara Kōtui is developing ‘new’ ways of working with mana whenua.  This may create expectations that other boards also implement these ways of working.

51.     The work of Ara Kōtui complements the role of the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB) and responds to the Schedule of Issues of Significance to Māori in Tamaki Mākaurau produced by the IMSB, with specific mention of the issue that “Māori are recognised as playing an important role in the development of local communities through the inclusion of Māori in local board decision-making”.

52.     Ara Kōtui contributes to the Kia Ora Tāmaki Makaurau mana outcome, effective Māori participation – Kia ora te hononga - the objective that mana whenua and iwi Māori are active partners and participants at all levels of the council group’s decision-making.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

53.     Five southern local boards are represented as part of the Ara Kōtui governance structure and their views contribute to the direction and decision-making of the group. They have committed to exploring and supporting opportunities to work with and enable mana whenua participation in local board decision-making.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

54.     Mana whenua across the rohe are invited to send representatives to participate in the direction and decision-making of Ara Kōtui.

55.     Work programme priorities and projects are co-designed with local boards for delivery by mana whenua and Auckland Council kaimahi.

56.     Over time, it is expected that representation at various levels and processes for implementation of the Ara Kōtui delivery plan will continue to be refined, so that Māori views and aspirations are better reflected in local decision-making in Tāmaki Makaurau

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

57.     This report is an update only to the local board and there are no direct financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

58.     Not all mana whenua regularly attend Ara Kōtui, at either the governance or operational level.  Some mana whenua may prefer to (and do) engage directly with individual local boards.

59.     While Ara Kōtui is a governance to governance forum that sets direction, it is important that as actions are operationalised, all mana whenua iwi are given the same opportunity to take part, regardless of their attendance at Ara Kōtui.

60.     Not all new local board members at the beginning of the new term will be familiar with the existence and role of Ara Kōtui. Local Board induction will need to include information on and familiarisation with the initiative.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

61.     Reporting on progress of the Ara Kōtui delivery plan be included with the quarterly reporting cycle.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Lucy Stallworthy - Local Board Engagement Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar September 2022

File No.: CP2022/05638

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Franklin Local Board with a governance forward work calendar.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Franklin Local Board at business meetings and workshops over the coming months. The governance forward work calendar for the local board is included in Attachment A.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·   ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·   clarifying what advice is required and when

·   clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings and distributed to relevant council staff. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed. Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar dated May 2022 (Attachment A).

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Franklin Local Board governance forward work calendar for September 2022

267

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Franklin Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/05644

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for workshops held on 2, 16 and 23 August 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Franklin Local Board holds weekly workshops to facilitate oversight of projects in their work programme or on matters that have significant local implications.

3.       The local board does not make decisions at these workshops. Workshops are not open to the public, but a record of what was discussed and presented at the workshop are reported retrospectively.

4.       Workshop records for the Franklin Local Board are attached for 2,16 and 23 August 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      receive the Franklin Local Board workshop records for 2, 16 and 23 August 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

2 August 2022 Franklin Local Board workshop record

271

b

16 August 2022 Franklin Local Board workshop record

273

c

23 August 2022 Franklin Local Board workshop record

275

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

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Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations

File No.: CP2022/12607

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide for appropriate arrangements for decision-making between the final local board meeting of the current electoral term and the inaugural meeting of the new local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The last meeting of the Franklin Local Board in this current term is scheduled for 27 September 2022. Between that meeting and the first meeting of the local board in the new term, decisions may be needed from the local board. As for each of the previous terms, temporary arrangements for making these decisions need to be confirmed.

3.       The term of office of the current local board members ends the day following the official declaration of election results. Following the declaration, which is expected to be Friday 14 October 2022, the term of office for members elected to the local board will commence.

4.       For the period from the commencement of their term of office until their inaugural meeting where members are sworn in (interregnum), decisions may be made by the Auckland Council Chief Executive under existing delegations.

5.       The existing local boards delegation to the Chief Executive requires, amongst other things, that staff consult with the allocated local board portfolio holder/lead on certain decisions. As a temporary measure, this report seeks to allow staff to make decisions without complying with the requirement for consultation during the interregnum. 

6.       Staff also seek confirmation of arrangements for making decisions at the local board level in the period between the final local board meeting and the official end of term. The urgent decision delegations and process that is already in place adequately caters for this scenario.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      confirm that the local board’s existing urgent decisions delegations process will be utilised where decisions are required from the local board between the final local board business meeting (27 September 2022) and the end of term (15 October 2022).

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board (interregnum), all decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under current delegations.

c)       note that the Chief Executive will not be required to comply with consultation requirements in the local boards’ delegation protocols when making decisions during the interregnum.

d)      request that the Chief Executive exercise restraint when making decisions during the interregnum and to consider referring significant decisions to the first meeting of the incoming local board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results (Sections 115 and 116, Local Electoral Act 2001). The declaration will be publicly notified on 14 October 2022, with the term of office of current members ending and the term of office of new members commencing on 15 October 2022.

8.       The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting (Clause 14, Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

9.       Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, decisions may be needed on urgent matters or routine business as usual that cannot wait until the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

10.     As with each of the previous electoral terms, temporary arrangements need to be made and/or confirmed for:

·    making urgent decisions before the end of term

·    making decisions that require consultation with local board/local board members during the interregnum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent decisions – arrangement for remainder of the term

11.     Between the last business meeting and the declaration of results expected around 14 October 2022, current local board members are still in office and can use their existing urgent decisions delegations to make decisions that are required from the local board during this time.

12.     The urgent decisions process includes a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson that enables them to make decisions on behalf of the local board where it is not practical to call the full board together.

13.     All requests for an urgent decision will need to be supported by adequate staff advice and information and clear recommendations.

Decision-making during the interregnum

14.     All local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive. During the interregnum, any decisions that will be required from the local board, and which cannot wait until a local board meeting, will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under his existing delegations.

15.     The delegation to the Chief Executive is subject to a requirement to comply with the delegation protocols, which require consulting with the local board on some decisions that are made by staff under delegated authority. Consultation is often done through a local board lead (referred to as a portfolio holder in the delegation protocols). The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland.

16.     During the current term, while the elected members remain in office, staff will continue to consult with leads/portfolio holders as required by the delegation protocols (or chairperson where there is no portfolio holder). However, during the interregnum, staff will be unable to comply with this requirement due to the absence of appointed portfolio holders/lead/chairpersons to consult with.

17.     As a temporary measure, it is recommended that staff continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until the local board’s first business meeting without consultation. Following the election of chairpersons at the inaugural meetings, staff will consult with the chairperson when and if required and can resume consultation with appointed representatives once new arrangements for leads/portfolio holders are in place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     This report relates to procedural matters and has no quantifiable climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The arrangements proposed in this report enable the council to proceed with necessary business during the election period. During the interregnum, staff will exercise restraint and ensure that any significant decisions are deferred to the incoming local board.

20.     These arrangements apply only to local boards. The reduced political decision-making will be communicated to the wider council group.

21.     The governing body has made its own arrangements to cover the election period, including delegating the power to make urgent decisions between the last governing body meeting of the term and the day the current term ends, to any two of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and a chairperson of a committee of the whole. From the commencement of the term of office of the new local board members until the governing body’s inaugural meeting, the Chief Executive will carry out decision-making under his current delegations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This is a report to all local boards that proposes arrangements to enable the council to process routine local matters during the election period. This will enable the council to meet timeframes and provide good customer service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report and decision being sought relates to a procedural matter and does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that unforeseen decisions will arise during this period, such as a decision that is politically significant or a decision that exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegations.

26.     This risk has been mitigated by scheduling meetings as late as possible in the current term and communicating to reporting staff that significant decisions should not be made during October 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The decision of the local board will be communicated to senior staff so that they are aware of the arrangements for the month of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 

 


Franklin Local Board

27 September 2022

 

 

Closing the Franklin Local Board's electoral term and valedictory reflections

File No.: CP2022/12453

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity to acknowledge the closing of the Franklin Local Board’s electoral term with a whakawātea (closing karakia, address and waiata).

2.       To provide an opportunity to share valedictory reflections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       This is an opportunity to mark the closure of the Franklin Local Board’s electoral term, to acknowledge and celebrate the achievements of Franklin Local Board and all local board members.

4.       This item also enables a retiring member to share valedictory reflections or an end of term address, prior to the 2022 local board elections.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Franklin Local Board:

a)      temporarily suspend Standing Orders to undertake a programme of whakawātea led by iwi Māori and inclusive of staff to acknowledge the local board and to close the electoral term

b)      receive, as part of the programme, valedictory reflections.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Denise Gunn - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Carol McKenzie-Rex - Local Area Manager Franklin Manurewa Papakura

 



[1] SA2s were introduced as part of the Statistical Standard for Geographic Areas 2018 (SSGA2018) which replaced the New Zealand Standard Areas Classification (NZSAC1992). The SA2 geography replaces the (NZSAC1992) area unit geography. (Source: https://datafinder.stats.govt.nz/layer/104271-statistical-area-2-2020-generalised/)

[2] Data is based on the 2020 land use scenario modelling (i11v6).

[3] Figures do not include escalation (rise in price due to factors such as inflation, and supply and demand).

[4] Figures include compensation from insurance claim.

[5] Additional information can be found can be found in Auckland Council Annual Budget 2022/2023. Volume 2. Pages 208-219