I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Thursday, 15 September 2022

2.00pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre
50 Centreway Road
Orewa

And Virtually via MS Teams

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Gary Brown

 

Deputy Chairperson

Victoria Short

 

Members

Andy Dunn

 

 

Janet Fitzgerald, JP

 

 

Gary Holmes

 

 

Julia Parfitt, JP

 

 

Alexis Poppelbaum

 

 

Leanne Willis

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Charlie Inggs

Democracy Advisor

 

9 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: 027  208 5284

Email: charlie.inggs@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  6

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                6

11        Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 7

12        Proposed new community lease to Orewa Tennis Club Incorporated at Victor Eaves Park, Orewa                                                                                                                            15

13        Classification of a reserve at 6-10 Highgate Parkway, Silverdale                          27

14        Hibiscus and Bay - Additional local parks reclassifications                                  31

15        Auckland Transport Update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund – August 2022       43

16        Hibiscus and Bays Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023 grant allocations 47

17        Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022                                                                      51

18        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme reallocation and Film Income allocation                                              67

19        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021-2022   73

20        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council's submission on the Ministry of Transports Reshaping Streets regulatory package                       77

21        2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations                                                                             81

22        Approval for two new private road names at  31 Cochrane Avenue Arkles Bay 85

23        Approval for a new public road name at 1-5 Chenery Road, Red Beach              93

24        Governance Forward Work Calendar Hōtaka Kaupapa                                        103

25        Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Workshop Records                                            107

26        Members' Reports                                                                                                      113

27        Valedictory reflection: end of term address                                                           117

28        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome

 

The Chairperson will open the meeting and nominate a Member or staff member to say the karakia.

 

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Thursday, 18 August 2022, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days’ notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is

ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 


 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda, one requests for public forum, from Sheryl Whale, had been received.

 

 

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

File No.: CP2022/13477

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek high-level input from local boards on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020. This includes:

·    long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

2.       This report also provides an overview of the feedback received through the first stage of the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement that ran from 13 June to 17 July 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 provides national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991. The fundamental concept of the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

4.       Auckland Council is required to change the Auckland Unitary Plan to give full effect to Te Mana o te Wai, which must be reflected in all decisions made under the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020.  Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must be notified by December 2024. Action plans must also be prepared and published as soon as practicable to achieve environmental outcomes and freshwater management objectives.

5.       The National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 sets the National Objectives Framework and steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow when implementing the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland.

6.       The first stage of National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value and use freshwater bodies and the environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

7.       Feedback from the first stage engagement will be used, along with existing information and further research and analysis, to develop freshwater management options that will be brought back for a second stage of engagement in the second half of 2023.

8.       There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the engagement period.

9.       Local boards are now invited to provide input to the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Local boards can view the feedback form provided during consultation to assist in preparation of feedback at Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the feedback received from communities through the first stage of public engagement with the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020, in Attachments D, E and F to the agenda report

b)      provide feedback on the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 values including the:

i)        long-term visions for freshwater management

ii)       proposed Freshwater Management Units

iii)      values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) is a mandatory national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).  The Policy Statement applies to all freshwater (including groundwater) and, to the extent they are affected by freshwater, to receiving environments (which may include estuaries and the wider coastal marine area).

11.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

12.     Regional councils and unitary authorities are required to change regional policy statements and regional plans to give effect to the requirements of the NPS-FM, including Te Mana o te Wai.

13.     Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland. A plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is required for the NPS-FM implementation. The AUP plan change must be notified by December 2024.  The NPS-FM also requires the preparation of action plans to manage the effects of the use and development of land, freshwater and on receiving environments. Action plans must be prepared and published as soon as practicable.

 

14.     Every council must develop long-term visions for freshwater in its region and include those long-term visions as objectives in its regional policy statement. Long-term visions:

a)   may be set by Freshwater management Units (FMU), be part of a FMU, or at a catchment level; and

b)   must set goals that are ambitious but reasonable (that is, difficult to achieve but not impossible); and

c)   identify a timeframe to achieve those goals that is ambitious and reasonable (for example, 30 years after the commencement date).

15.     The National Objectives Framework (NOF) is a core part of the NPS-FM, and includes a series of steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow on implementation, including to:

·    identify FMU in the region

·    identify values for each FMU

·    set environmental outcomes for each value and include them as objectives in regional plans

·    identify attributes for each value and set a baseline for those attributes

·    set target attribute states, environmental flows and levels, and other criteria to support the achievement of environmental outcomes

·    set limits as rules and prepare action plans (as appropriate) to achieve environmental outcomes.

16.     FMUs are essentially the spatial arrangements adopted by council for the management of freshwater.  All fresh waterbodies and their related catchments must be within an FMU.  While the NPS-FM is primarily concerned with the management of freshwater, it does also require an integrated management approach – ki uta ki tai – including consideration of the relationship of freshwater and its management to the coastal receiving environment. 

17.     A public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022 through AK Have Your Say and other engagement activities including library events and online webinars. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value freshwater in FMUs and environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for these values.

18.     The public engagement on AK Have Your Say comprised the following:

·    the NPS-FM 2020

·    an overview of the NPS-FM implementation programme

·    NPS-FM implementation timeline

·    the proposed Auckland FMU map

·    the map of the Pukekohe specified vegetable growing area (when implementing the NPS-FM, the council must have regard to the importance of this area for domestic vegetables and food security, and may temporarily have a less stringent approach to water quality issues to ensure this is appropriately recognised)

·    an online feedback form with consultation questions and opportunity to provide comments on the proposed FMUs (also translated into numerous languages)

·    a social pinpoint map allowing people to provide feedback to a water body or within an area

·    Ministry for the Environment factsheets, infographics, and videos on freshwater management

·    access to freshwater planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

19.     Two online webinars and six library drop-in events were undertaken through the engagement period. These engagement activities introduced Auckland Council’s NPS-FM implementation programme and provided opportunities to the public to ask questions and to provide feedback directly.

20.     There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the consultation period, including:

·    128 online feedback forms

·    343 site-specific comments (from 84 submitters) via the Social Pinpoint mapping tool

·    12 hard copy feedback forms

·    23 emails

·    120 comments via library displays where feedback could be provided on post-it notes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The NPS-FM has a focus on the identification and management of freshwater values.  It includes four compulsory values (ecosystem health, human contact, threatened species, and mahinga kai) that must be applied and managed in each FMU. There are also other values that must be considered in managing freshwater if they are relevant to Auckland. The list of compulsory values and other values are provided in Attachment C to this agenda report (and are identified as Appendices 1A and 1B of the NPS-FM).  Additionally, the council must identify any other relevant values (i.e., additional to those specifically identified in the NPS-FM) including any additional Māori Freshwater Values as identified by mana whenua.

22.     Overall, submitters raised over 200 individual sites of value to them, while many talked more generally about particular types of, or all, freshwater bodies. The sites named were most commonly located in the Franklin, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Waitematā local board areas.

23.     The values most commonly raised in relation to how submitters use, and would like to use, those freshwater bodies related to:

·    ecosystem health – including water quality and habitat (both generally and for threatened species) in particular

·    natural form and character

·    drinking water supply

·    human contact (that is, for recreational purposes such as swimming, boating, or fishing).

24.     Given the importance of the coastal environment in Auckland, and the impacts from key freshwater issues, such as sediment and E. coli, three FMUs have been proposed for freshwater management based on the three coastal receiving environments for catchments: the Kaipara Harbour, the Manukau Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf (map provided in Attachment B to the agenda report).  This proposed approach provides the opportunity to both address the management of freshwater for its own sake, while also explicitly considering its relationship to the coastal environment.

 

 

25.     While submitters were not asked directly whether they supported the Freshwater Management Units or not, comments were provided on a range of matters, including suggestions around amending the proposed boundaries, or rationale behind the boundaries, having more or less FMUs, more location specific detail, and having the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area as a separate FMU.

26.     Other submitters commented on non-FMU specific matters including wetlands, the need for more transparency and action, concern about water quality, the need to prioritise ecosystem health, farming/vegetable growing, and flooding.

27.     The NPS-FM provides for a specified vegetable growing area in Pukekohe that sits within the Manukau FMU. Some comments related to the provision for horticultural land use in Pukekohe.

·        3 supported the provision for continued horticultural use, including irrigation.

·        3 expressed concerns about the impact of horticultural activities on water quality (streams, and aquifers) particularly from fertiliser and nitrates.

28.     Demographic information from those submitters who provided it is detailed in Attachment D.

29.     Data tables naming sites, and their number of mentions by local board area is provided in Attachment E to the agenda report. A full Summary of Feedback report is provided in Attachment F to the agenda report.

30.     Staff are currently undertaking data analysis and a summary report of feedback will be published on AK Have Your Say.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM Te Mana o te Wai is about restoring and preserving the balance between the water, the wider environment, and the community. This concept is in line with the natural environment priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which sets the goal:

Oranga taiao, oranga tāngata: a healthy and connected natural environment supports healthy and connected Aucklanders. The mauri (life essence) of Tāmaki Makaurau is restored”.

32.     The NPS-FM includes the following policy direction in response to climate change:

Policy 4: Freshwater is managed as part of New Zealand’s integrated response to climate change.

33.     Every council must have regard to the foreseeable impact of climate change in following areas:

·    when setting limits on resource use, every regional council must:

3.14(2)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when setting environmental flows and levels, every regional council must:

3.16(4)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when assessing and reporting, as part of each review required by section 35(2A) of the RMA, every regional council must prepare and publish:

3.30(2)(g) predictions of changes, including the foreseeable effects of climate change, that are likely to affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in the region.

34.     The implementation of the NPS-FM will help to promote the resilience of freshwater ecosystems to the effects of climate change.  The development of freshwater action plans will require sustainable land and water management practices to enhance the mauri and health of waterways, which is in line with actions prioritised in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The NPS-FM is relevant to all of the council’s functions. All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) are involved in the NPS-FM implementation, including participation in aa Steering Committee overseeing the development and implementation of the programme. This includes having an ongoing role in supporting the NPS-FM engagement, and providing input and review of responses developed to give effect to the NPS-FM.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, local boards are responsible for identifying and communicating to Auckland Council the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards have a detailed understanding of their areas including freshwater values and issues and are in a position to provide important input to the development of NPS-FM responses, including in relation to the matters covered by this round of public engagement. 

37.     Prior to the public engagement a memo titled “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland” was provided to all local boards on 26 May 2022. The memo advised the key principles, consultation and timeframe requirements of implementing the NPS-FM, and the opportunities for local board input through the process (attached in Attachment G to the agenda).

38.     A webinar presentation titled “National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020” was also presented to local boards in the meeting on 3 June 2022.  In response to feedback from elected members, the period for providing input had been extended for local boards to September 2022 to allow local boards time to provide feedback following the close of public engagement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The NPS-FM says the council must “actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in freshwater management” including in identifying Māori values and decision-making processes relating to Māori freshwater values.

40.     Engagement with mana whenua in Auckland is being undertaken through an on-going process, directly with mana whenua entities throughout the preparation of a plan change and development of action plans.

41.     Engagement with the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau about the NPS-FM has also been undertaken in the broader context of Three Waters Reform and the development and implementation of the council’s Water Strategy, to enable mana whenua to provide a more holistic consideration of the management of water.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The first stage of the NPS-FM engagement was undertaken within the business-as-usual planning budget. This budget covers primarily staff time and the public engagement.

43.     The budget required for NPS-FM engagement in 2023, and for implementation of the project through to 2026 is presently under discussion.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The government has set a deadline of December 2024 for the council to publicly notify the AUP plan change in response to the provisions of the NPS-UD. Given the scale and complexity of the work, and limited resources, there is a risk that the council may not receive sufficient quality feedback from a wide range of interests. There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-FM and how the NPS-FM engagement links to previous water related engagements, for example the Auckland Water Strategy engagement and the Three Waters Reform engagement.

45.     These risks have been mitigated to date by communicating communications with communities and stakeholders during the engagement period, through meetings, emails, and online Question and Answer sessions. There will be further and ongoing communication to obtain quality engagement results to progress the NPS-FM implementation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The feedback received from the first stage engagement on the values and the environmental outcomes sought, together with the NPS-FM requirements, will inform the development of objectives and proposed management options to achieve the objectives.

47.     A second phase of public engagement will be undertaken to seek feedback on the proposed objectives and management approaches for FMUs and water bodies. This will be undertaken in the second half of 2023 to provide opportunity for communities and stakeholders, and local boards for further involvement.  

48.     The feedback received from the second phase of engagement will further inform the development of a proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan and the development of action plans.

49.     Elected representatives will have opportunities to review the proposed plan change and action plans as they evolve, and before the plan change is approved for public notification in the second half of 2024 to meet the NPS-FM deadline of notification before December 2024.

50.     Submissions to the plan change will be heard by an independent Freshwater Hearing Panel who will make recommendations back to council by 2026.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback Form (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Map of Proposed Freshwater Management Units (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

NPS-FM freshwater values (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Who we heard from (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Local Board breakdowns (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Summary of Feedback Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Memo to local boards on 26 May 2022: Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland (Under Separate Cover)

 

      

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning

Monica Xu - Senior Policy Planner, Regional planning team, Plans and Places

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager - Planning, Regional, North, West & Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Lesley Jenkins - Acting General Manager, Local Board Services

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Proposed new community lease to Orewa Tennis Club Incorporated at Victor Eaves Park, Orewa

File No.: CP2022/11936

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To grant a new community lease to the Orewa Tennis Club Incorporated for land located at Victor Eaves Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Orewa Tennis Club seeks a new community ground lease to continue occupation and operation from their group-owned building at Victor Eaves Park, 87 Florence Avenue, Orewa.

3.       The club currently holds a community ground lease which has reached final expiry on 8 November 2021. The lease will continue to roll over on a month-by month basis on existing terms and conditions until the lease is terminated or a new lease is granted.

4.       The Orewa Tennis Club aims to provide Orewa residents and the wider community an opportunity to enjoy tennis in a safe environment, as well as to network and socialise through the sport.

5.       Other council staff were consulted for the lease application and no other objections were received other than maintenance of the tennis volley board on this site. The Orewa Tennis Club and staff propose changing the new leased area, so the tennis volley board and surrounding grounds revert to council for ongoing maintenance.

6.       Staff have assessed the club’s comprehensive lease application including financials, insurance, and maintenance of the club grounds and building.

7.       This report recommends that a new community lease be granted to the Orewa Tennis Club for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 October 2022 with one 10-year right of renewal.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      grant a new community lease to the Orewa Tennis Club Incorporated for an area comprising approximately 4384m2 located at 87 Florence Avenue, Orewa on the land legally described as Lot 1 DP 89502 (Attachment A to the agenda report) subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term –10 years, commencing 1 September 2022, with one 10-year right of renewal.

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded.

iii)      Community Outcomes Plan - to be appended to the lease as a schedule of the lease agreement (as per Attachment B to the agenda report – Community Outcomes Plan).

b)      approve all other terms and conditions in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

9.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved the Community Facilities: Community Leases Work Programme 2021-2022 at their local board meeting on 17 June 2021 (resolution HB/2021/64).

10.     A new lease to the Orewa Tennis Club (the club) was part of the approved work programme for the local board.

Land, building/s and lease

11.     The area proposed to be leased to the Orewa Tennis Club at Victor Eaves is approximately 4384m2 and is outlined in Attachment A to the agenda report. The land is legally described as Lot 1 DP 89502 and classified as a recreation reserve.

12.     The club holds a community ground lease for the council owned land situated at Victor Eaves Park.

13.     The particular site (on site plan as Attachment A to the agenda report) contains the club’s courts and building.

14.     The club improvements and building were built by the club’s members and their families back in 1980.

15.     The club’s building is primarily used for connecting tennis players and provides a space for hire to the community.

16.     The club covers all maintenance and operational costs for its building and tennis grounds.

17.     The club intends to undertake maintenance of its courts such as resurfacing, improving lighting and access to its courts when appropriate funds are secured.

18.     The club’s current lease with the council commenced on 9 November 2000 and has expired on 8 November 2021. The lease to the group is holding over on a month-by-month basis on the same terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is formalised.

19.     During the lease application process, the club and staff have discussed changing the leased area for council to take over the tennis volley board and surrounding land (Attachment A- marked red).

20.     The tennis volley board sits outside the club’s fenced area and has been subject to maintenance issues as it is being used by members of the public like skateboarders and exposed to vandalism from graffiti taggers.

21.     The proposal between the club and staff is to amend the original footprint of the current lease to the proposed new leased area outlined in blue in Attachment A to the agenda report, leaving the tennis volley board and surrounding area to revert to council for maintenance.

22.     Staff from Area Operations, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the local board Strategic Broker were consulted, and feedback sought from the club in our recommendation for changing the leased area.


 

Orewa Tennis Club Incorporated

23.     The Orewa Tennis Club was established in 1948 and its primary purpose/ objective is to:

·    provide Orewa residents and the wider community an opportunity to enjoy tennis in a safe environment.

·    promote active participation in interclub competitions.

·    provide an opportunity to network and socialise for tennis players in the community.

24.     The club is a recreational sports group with over 200 registered members based at Victor Eaves Park.

25.     The club records notable membership growth in the last couple of years and has won several awards in the past including an award for Tennis Club Growth.

26.     The club is open for approximately 44 hours a week and is open to the public for people to use their tennis courts through an online booking system.

27.     The club also provides valuable service to the community by hiring its facilities to other community groups. A music group and a mah jong group use their facilities during the week for their activities.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

28.     Under the Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their own buildings have an automatic right to reapply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club is exercising this right by applying for a new lease.

29.     The local board has discretion to vary the term of the lease if it wishes. However, the guidelines suggest that where the term is varied, it aligns to one of the recommended terms.

Public notification and iwi engagement 

30.     Public notification or iwi engagement will not be required as the club’s activities are contemplated under the approved Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan.

Assessment of the application

31.     The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting the new lease request.

32.     A site visit has been undertaken by staff and the facility is well managed and maintained.

33.     The club has provided all required information including financials, showing that it has sufficient funds and that it is being managed appropriately. The club has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance in place. 

34.     The club is able to demonstrate its ability to deliver on the local board outcomes and a community outcomes plan has been agreed on with the club and attached as Attachment B to the agenda report as part of the lease agreement. 

35.     Staff recommend that a new community lease be granted to Orewa Tennis Club Incorporated for a term of 10 years commencing from 1 October 2022 as per recommendations with one 10-year right of renewal. 


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.     To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·       use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·       use eco labelled products and services

·       seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·       include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

37.     All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

38.     Climate change has some potential to impact the lease, as part of the leased area is in a coastal inundation zone. Please refer to Attachment C to the agenda report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

39.     Staff have engaged with various internal council stakeholders including Area Operations, Parks, Sport and Recreation and the locals Strategic Broker to obtain feedback on the proposed lease to the club. They were all supportive of the new lease. 

40.     There have been ongoing discussions between Community Facilities and the tennis club that the tennis volley board will now revert to council ownership. There is a project for this asset to be renewed in the work programme in the coming years.

41.     The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of this report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

42.     This item is on the community facilities work programme for 2021/2022.

43.     This item was discussed with the local board through a memorandum circulated to all elected members to comment and provide feedback. No concerns were raised on the proposed new lease.

44.     The proposed lease activities align with the local board plan 2020 in supporting:

·    a connected community (outcome one).

·    open spaces to enjoy (outcome four).

45.     The recommendations within this report fall within the local board’s delegated authority relating to local, recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.     Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi and its statutory obligations and relationship commitments to Māori. The council recognises these responsibilities are distinct from the Crown’s Treaty obligations and fall within local government Tāmaki Makaurau context. 

47.     These commitments are articulated in the council’s key strategic planning documents the Auckland Plan, the Long-term Plan 2021-2031, the Auckland Unitary Plan, individual local board plans and in Whiria Te Muka Tangata, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. 

48.     Support for Māori initiatives and outcomes are detailed in Te Toa Takitini, Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Framework. An aim of community leasing is to increase targeted support for Māori community development projects.

49.     The club supports the Maōri community by providing access to racquets for free during junior coaching sessions.

50.     As previously explained under 30-31 above, iwi engagement was not required for consideration of this lease application.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

51.     The financial implications have been accounted for on the tennis volley board and surrounding grounds reverting back to council’s responsibility. The volley board and associated hard surfaces will be varied into council’s Full Facilities maintenance contract.  The total cost that will be added to the Full Facilities contract is $358.00 per annum on additional maintenance for this asset. These costs have been approved by the Area Operations team and are considered minimal to ensure appropriate upkeep.

52.     There are no other direct costs to council associated with the grant of a new lease to the Orewa Tennis Club. The club will continue to take responsibility for all operational maintenance costs involved with its building located in their leased area on Victor Eaves Park.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

53.     Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to the club this will affect the club’s ability to undertake its core activities which will have a negative impact on the local board outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

54.     Subject to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s approval, staff will work with the Orewa Tennis Club to finalise the lease agreement.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Site Plan - Victor Eaves Park, 87 Florence Avenue, Orewa

21

b

Community Outcomes Plan - Orewa Tennis Club

23

c

Coastal Inundation Indicative Plan - Orewa Tennis Club

25

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Chan Park - Community Lease Specialist

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Table

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Application

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Classification of a reserve at 6-10 Highgate Parkway, Silverdale

File No.: CP2022/13257

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To classify a reserve situated at 6-10 Highgate Parkway, Silverdale as local purpose (drainage) reserve pursuant to Section 16(2A) of the Reserves Act 1977. 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The land located at 6-10 Highgate Parkway, Silverdale is legally described as Lot 100 Deposited Plan 501398 contained in ROT 755693 (Reserve).  

3.       The reserve is currently held by Auckland Council as an unclassified local purpose (drainage) reserve subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977. 

4.       Local boards hold delegated authority under Section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 to classify council held reserves.  

5.       North/West mana whenua representatives were advised of the proposed classification via email and were invited to submit their feedback by Wednesday 7 September 2022. The local board will be informed of any objections to the proposal raised by iwi that cannot be resolved. 

6.       The proposed classification was not publicly notified because it is substantially the same as the purpose for which the reserve has been held.  

7.       Auckland Council staff recommend that the local board classify the reserve as local purpose (drainage) reserve.  

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      classify, pursuant to Section 16 (2A) of the Reserves Act 1977, Lot 100 Deposited Plan 501398, comprised in Record of Title 755693, as local purpose (drainage) reserve, subject to iwi engagement with no objection.

 

Horopaki

Context

Classification of reserves under the Reserves Act 1977 and the local board’s role 

8.       Auckland Council is statutorily required to classify all unclassified reserves. This is undertaken under section 16 of the Reserves Act 1977 (RA) and if not done would mean that Auckland Council is not meeting its statutory obligations. 

9.       Classification of reserves under the RA identifies the principal or primary purpose of a reserve. The classification helps direct the reserve’s management, usage and development. It is necessary to enable the administering body to grant third parties rights over reserves such as leases, licenses, easements. 

10.     The local board holds delegated authority under Section 16(2A) of the RA to approve classification of reserves held by Auckland Council within the local board area, subject to all statutory processes having been satisfied.   

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Classification Denotes Primary Purpose of Reserve 

 

11.     As the reserve is held by council under the RA, it is a statutory requirement to classify it according to its primary or principal purpose.  

12.     The reserve was vested in Auckland Council on subdivision of privately owned land as a local purpose (drainage) reserve subject to the RA.  

13.     Classification under section 16 of the RA involves assigning a reserve (or parts of a reserve) to the appropriate class. The class determines the principal or primary purpose of the reserve. The present values of the reserve are considered as well as the future “potential” values and the possible future uses and activities on the reserve.  

14.     This reserve, shown in Image 1 (below), is currently used for drainage purposes, which is the purpose that was intended when it was vested in Council on subdivision. 

15.     The reserve is zoned “Open Space – Informal recreation zone” under Auckland Unitary Plan (Operative in Part). 

Image 1.     Reserve - Lot 100 DP 501398 

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Proposed classification – Local purpose (drainage) reserve 

16.     Staff consider that classification of the reserve as local purpose (drainage) reserve is most appropriate as: 

·           the reserve vested in Auckland Council for the purpose of drainage reserve  

·           it aligns with current and intended future use of the reserve .

 

Consultation 

17.     Engagement with iwi is required for the proposed classification in terms of Section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987. 

18.     On 10 August 2022, an email was circulated to all iwi groups identified as having an interest in land within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area inviting feedback by 7 September 2022. The local board will be advised on the outcome of iwi engagement at its business meeting on 15 September 2022. 

19.     As the proposed classification is substantially the same as the purpose for which the reserve is held and administered, public notification of the council’s intention to classify the reserve is not required.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The proposal outlined in this report does not include any change in the current use of or activity on the reserve and does not introduce any new source of greenhouse gas emission. 

21.     The proposed classification is a formalisation of the statutory requirement under the RA, which is an administrative process, and therefore will have no impact on climate change. 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.     Healthy Waters staff support the proposed classification of the reserve. 

23.     The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

24.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board holds the delegated authority under Section 16(2A) of the RA to resolve to classify the reserve.  

25.     The views and preferences of the local board in relation to the proposal are sought via this report. 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     There is no express requirement to consult Mana Whenua under the RA. However, section 4 of the Conservation Act 1987 states: 

Act to give effect to the Treaty of Waitangi 

This Act shall be so interpreted and administered as to give effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi. 

 

27.     The proposal to classify the reserve was presented to the mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in the land via email dated 10 August 2022.   

28.     deadline for mana whenua feedback on the proposed classification closes on 7 September 2022. The local board will be informed of any objections to the proposed classification raised by iwi. 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

29.         The proposed classification is an administrative exercise and will not result in any costs to the local board. All costs (if any) relating to publication of a notice of classification in the New Zealand Gazette will be met by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Department.  

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.          The proposed classification will fulfil the council’s statutory requirement under the RA to classify all unclassified reserves which are either held or managed by the council. 

31.          If the local board does not classify the reserve, Auckland Council will be in breach of this statutory requirement. 

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.         If approved, the resolution will take immediate effect and no further action is required.  

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Katerina Marinkovich - Specialist Technical Statutory Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Hibiscus and Bay - Additional local parks reclassifications

File No.: CP2022/13429

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve public notification of proposals to reclassify 14 land parcels covered by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       A local board may change the classification or primary purpose of an entire reserve, or parts of a reserve, if it considers this appropriate at any time.

3.       Fourteen land parcels within five local parks in the local board area are proposed for reclassification. The reason for proposed reclassifications is that some submitters to the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan requested greater recognition and protection of the ecological values of these five parks.

4.       Criteria used to assess the classification of each parcel, included consideration of the local park’s values, current and likely future use of the local park, and workshop feedback from the local board.

5.       The fourteen land parcels are valued for their range of ecosystems and are recognised as sites of ecological significance.

6.       The status and recommendations for parcels of land included in this report is as follows:

Land status

Recommended actions

Fourteen classified parcels held under the Reserves Act 1977

·    Publicly notify proposals to reclassify six parcels from recreation reserve to scenic reserve 19(1)(b): Poplar Road Esplanade Reserve (1 parcel), Blue Heron Rise Esplanade (2 parcels), Moreton Drive Bush Reserve (1 parcel), and Karaka Cove (2 parcels)

 

·    Publicly notify proposals to reclassify eight parcels contained in Torbay Heights from scenic reserve 19(1)(b) to scenic reserve 19(1)(a)

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve public notification of the proposal to reclassify one parcel (Lot 4 DP 62591) at Poplar Road Esplanade Reserve from Recreation Reserve to Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b), pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977

b)      approve public notification of the proposal to reclassify two parcels (Lot 126 DP 181158, Section 1 SO 396648) at Blue Heron Rise Esplanade Reserve from Recreation Reserve to Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b), pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977

c)      approve public notification of the proposal to reclassify one parcel (Lot 279 DP 40296) at Moreton Drive Bush Reserve from Recreation Reserve to Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b), pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977

d)      approve public notification of the proposal to reclassify two parcels (Lot 185 DP 155649, Lot 32 DP 357819) at Karaka Cove from Recreation Reserve to Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b), pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977

e)      approve public notification of the proposal to reclassify Torbay Heights from Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b) to Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a), pursuant to section 24(2)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977.

Horopaki

Context

7.       Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has decision-making responsibility for all local parks in the local board area.

8.       The Hearing Panel’s report on the draft Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan  identified the potential reclassification of 14 land parcels in response to requests by some submitters for greater recognition and protection of ecological values.

9.       The report suggested that the proposed reclassifications should follow their own process separate from approval of the final Hibiscus and Bays Local Parks Management Plan.

10.     The final plan was approved by the local board in July 2022 (HB/2022/90).

11.     A local board may change the classification or primary purpose of an entire reserve, or parts of a reserve, if it considers this appropriate at any time.

12.     Reclassification involves assigning a different class to a reserve (or part of a reserve), as defined in s.17 to 23 of the Reserves Act 1977 (RA), to better cater for its primary purpose and present values. Consideration is also given to potential future values and activities and uses.

13.     Any change of classification, purpose or revocation of the reservation of any reserve needs to follow the process set out in either section 24 of the RA, or if applicable under section 24A which includes the need for public notification (unless statutory exceptions apply).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Proposed reclassification of RA land

14.     The parcels of classified reserve land identified as candidates for reclassification comprise six parcels across four reserves that are currently classified recreation reserve and eight parcels forming one reserve classified scenic reserve under section 19(1)(b) of the RA (see Table 1 and Attachment A to the agenda report for maps).

15.     All of the proposed reclassifications are for either scenic reserve 19(1)(a) or 19(1)(b) which seek to protect and preserve areas of scenic interest or natural features or landscapes.

16.     Section 19 of the RA provides the following definitions for scenic reserves:

19(1)(a): “for the purpose of protecting and preserving in perpetuity for their intrinsic worth and for the benefit, enjoyment, and use of the public, suitable areas possessing such qualities of scenic interest, beauty, or natural features or landscape that their protection and preservation are desirable in the public interest”

19(1)(b): “for the purpose of providing, in appropriate circumstances, suitable areas which by development and the introduction of flora, whether indigenous or exotic, will become of such scenic interest or beauty that their development, protection, and preservation are desirable in the public interest.”

17.     The 14 land parcels are recognised as sites of ecological significance and are valued for their range of ecosystems and native vegetation. 

 

18.     Torbay Heights is a large area of ecologically significant native vegetation that contains a range of ecosystems including Kānuka and Mānuka scrub, Kahikatea and Pukatea forest, and flaxland. These ecosystems have an important role in Auckland’s biodiversity. These features meet the standards of a scenic reserve 19(1)(a) classification.

19.     Section 24(2)(b) of the RA requires all proposals to reclassify reserves to be publicly notified together with the reasons for the proposed change in classification.

Table 1

Park name

Physical address

Appellation

Survey area (m2)

Current classification

Proposed reclassification

Poplar Road Esplanade Reserve

Poplar Road, Stanmore Bay

Lot 4 DP 62591

1,305

Recreation

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Blue Heron Rise Esplanade

R38 Blue Heron Rise, Stanmore Bay

Lot 126 DP 181158

182

Recreation

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

R38 Blue Heron Rise, Stanmore Bay

Section 1 SO 396648

2,885

Recreation

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Moreton Drive Bush Reserve

6 Moreton Drive, Manly

Lot 279 DP 40296

2,263

Recreation

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Karaka Cove

269 Whangaparaoa Road, Red Beach

Lot 31 DP 342131

4,025

Recreation

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

269 Whangaparaoa Road, Red Beach

Lot 32 DP 357819

54,439

Recreation

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Torbay Heights

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 1 DP 150396

34,471

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 185 DP 155649

9,069

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 185 DP 151462

6,899

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 106 DP 162778

1,654

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 185 DP 168959

10,900

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 112 DP 190880

13,040

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 110 DP 190883

3,334

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

Glenvar Road, Awaruku

Lot 185 DP 168960

2,690

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(b)

Scenic Reserve 19(1)(a)

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

Potential impact of proposed decisions on greenhouse gas emissions

20.     The decisions in this report are largely administrative and we anticipate that they will have no direct impact on greenhouse gas emissions.

21.     However future management and potential development of park land, which is determined by its purpose, could have a potential positive or negative impact on greenhouse gas emissions. The degree and nature of the impact is dependent on the specific management and development of each park. An example of potential impacts is:

·   a potential reduction of emissions by classifying land as scenic reserve. The purpose of a scenic reserve is largely to protect and restore the natural environment; ecological restoration of a site could result in a reduction of emissions and increase in carbon sequestration.

Effect of climate change over the lifetime of the proposed decisions

22.     Classification recommendations in this report consider the potential impacts of climate change in the context of current and future use and values of a park. An example of this is the consideration of whether a park could be affected by coastal inundation or sea level rises in the future. This can influence a recommendation on how to classify or reclassify the land.

23.     The lifetime of classification decisions is indefinite, except where the local board chooses and has the discretion under RA to change the classification in the future.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

24.     The land classification investigations that have formed the recommendations in this report have been discussed with the council biodiversity unit.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     A workshop was held with the current local board on 11 August 2022 to present the land classification recommendations detailed in this report. Local board members expressed their support for the proposed reclassifications.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

26.     We engaged with mana whenua to seek their feedback on the proposals to reclassify in July/August 2022. However, we did not receive any feedback. Ngāti Whanaunga provided a written response in support of the proposals to reclassify.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.     This report has no financial implications for the local board. The cost for public notices will be covered through existing departmental budgets.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations.

Risk

Mitigation

RA classifications constrain the range of uses that land can be used for

Recommendations reflect current land use and do not add additional restrictions.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.     The next steps following this decision are:

·   publish notice in local newspapers Hibiscus Coast and East Coast Bays for at least one calendar month.

·   report to the local board in December 2022 or February 2023 to address any submissions and confirm classification proposals that were publicly notified.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays - Local parks reclassification maps

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sheryne Lok - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport Update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund – August 2022

File No.: CP2022/13682

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide confirmation on which activities can be delivered under the reduced Local Board Transport Capital Fund for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board following the approval of the  Annual Budget 2022/2023 by the Governing Body on 29 June 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 29 June 2022, the Governing Body  adopted the Annual Budget 2022/2023. 

3.       Auckland Transport is facing significant pressure on operational expenditure principally due to slower recovery of Public Transport patronage than expected. 

4.       To address these challenges Auckland Transport, in discussion with the Auckland Council Finance team, put through a request for a moderate increase in operating funding in financial year 2022/2023, whilst at the same time agreeing to defer capital expenditure by $223 million over the next three years.

5.       The impact of these reductions for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a total reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for the 2022/2023 financial year . 

6.       For the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, this means the current financial year 2022/2023 allocation has reduced from $1,257,373 to $646,918.  Hibiscus and Bays Local Board have $1,493,907 in current commitments.

7.       The Auckland Transport Board are considering providing an additional $778,305 which would bring the budget up to $1,317,337.74, subject to underspends in other Auckland Transport Work Programmes.

8.       The table below outlines the current status of projects  proposed or underway by the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Local Board Capital Transport Fund budget

Table

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9.       Due to budget reductions, some of these projects will need to be deferred until budget becomes available. This is indicated by the project status “Investigation on hold”.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the continuation of the following projects :

i)        Orewa Boulevard Stage Three project (Resolution HB/2021/96)

ii)       Programmed delivery of Phase Two of the Wayfinding Programme (Resolution HB/2021/138

iii)      Hibiscus Coast Highway pedestrian crossing (Resolution HB/2021/138)

iv)      Progress design for the Aitken Reserve lighting project (Resolution HB/2021/138)

b)      approve the deferral of the investigation, design and construction of the following projects until the financial year 2023/2024

i)        East Coast Bays school safety improvements (Resolution HB/2021/138)

ii)       Browns Bay pedestrian crossings (Resolution HB/2021/138)

iii)      Torbay Bollards projects. (Resolution HB/2021/138).

 

Horopaki

Context

10.     The financial implications of the reduction in funding for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) for all local boards, is a reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for this financial year 2022/2023. 

11.     For Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (Hibiscus and Bays), this means the allocation in financial year 2022/2023  has reduced from $1,257,373 to $646,918. Previously these were resolved upon in 2021 (Resolutions HB 2021/96 and HB/2021/138). At present Hibiscus and Bays have $1,493,907 in current commitments.

12.     It is recommended the following projects continue to be delivered as they have contractual commitments, and some are currently under construction:

·     Orewa Boulevard Stage Three project

·     Phase Two of the Wayfinding Programme

·     Progress design for Aitken Reserve lighting project.

 

13.     It is recommended that investigation for each of these projects is deferred until the following financial year (Financial Year 2023/2024), as none have any impediments to deferral:

·     East Coast Bays school safety improvements

·     Browns Bay pedestrian crossings

·     Torbay Bollards.

Strategic alignment

14.     The Auckland Transport Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) budget allows for the LBTCF as a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT).

15.     Local Boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their own Local Board Plan but are not part of AT’s work programme.

16.     Any LBTCF projects selected must be safe, must not impede network efficiency, and must be located in the road corridor or on land controlled by AT (though projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.     The local board were presented with advice in regard to the impact of the reduction in budget on the LBTCF at a workshop on Thursday, 28 July 2022.

18.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board gave a direction to continue to progress those projects under construction and sought a report to enable a deferral of those projects currently in the investigation stage until the  financial year 2023/2024.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.     Auckland Transport is committed to minimising the negative effects that transport operations have on climate change. This includes encouraging emission neutral modes (walking and cycling) and low emission modes (public transport (PT) and ride sharing).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

20.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT.

21.     Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities Group, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     AT have workshopped with the local board the impacts of budget reductions on the LBTCF projects in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The proposed recommendations in the report have no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There will not be enough budget to deliver all projects this financial year as previously planned.

25.     AT are seeking direction on which projects the local board would like to proceed with this financial year and which projects are to be deferred.

26.     AT recommended that the following projects continue:

·     Orewa Boulevard Stage 3 project (construction contract signed and construction almost complete)

·     Phase Two of the wayfinding programme

·     Progress design for Aitken Reserve lighting.

 

 

27.     The following projects be deferred:

·    East Coast Bays school safety improvements

·    Browns Bay pedestrian crossings

·    Torbay bollards.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.     The financial impact on the construction industry from COVID-19 related disruption, and reduced AT income from the drop in PT use has had a domino effect on the delivery of all AT projects including projects within the LBTCF.

29.     This report explains those projects recommended to the local board to progress within the reduced funding envelope.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.     Once the local board resolutions are finalised, AT will work to contract out the projects as soon as possible.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Emma Petrenas, Auckland Transport Elected Member Relationship Partner - North

Authorisers

Paul Thompson, Auckland Transport Head of Community Engagement - North

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023 grant allocations

File No.: CP2022/13082

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with information on applications received in the Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023, to enable a decision to fund, part fund or decline each application.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents applications received in Hibiscus and Bays Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023 (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report)

3.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023 and the Local Economic and Business Development Grants round on 19th May 2022 (Attachment B to the agenda report). The document sets application guidelines for these contestable grants.

4.       The local board has set a total community grants budget of $401,968 for the 2022/2023 financial year with $50,000 set for the Local Economic and Business Development Grants and $150,000 of this set for the Facilities grants.

5.       The Local Board allocated $100,489.39 to the Local Grants Round One leaving $101,478.61 remaining to be allocated to two Multiboard Grant Rounds and a Local Grant Round Two.

6.       Eight applications were received for the Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023, requesting a total of $47,240.00.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      agree to fund, part-fund, or decline each application in Hibiscus and Bays Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023, listed in Table One:

Application ID

Organisation

Main focus

Requesting funding for

Amount requested

Eligibility

MB2223-102

Badminton North Harbour

Sport and recreation

Towards the upgrade of CCTV equipment at Badminton North Harbour (October 2022 - November 2022)

$5,500.00

Eligible

MB2223-107

Kaipātiki Project Incorporated

Events

Towards costs to run EcoFest North 2023 in North Auckland local board areas (November 2022 - June 2023)

$4,500.00

Eligible

MB2223-111

The Re-Creators Charitable Trust

Community

Towards free or subsidised classes of Community Upcycling DIY Workshops in various locations in Auckland from October 2022 to May 2023

$3,740.00

Eligible

MB2223-113

Harbour Sport

Events

Towards traffic management, transport costs, temporary fencing, and sound hire at the Shore to Shore Fun Run in Takapuna Beach and Milford Beach and Reserve (March 2023)

$3,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-114

Auckland Events Company T/A Food Truck Collective

Events

Towards live music, face painting, and waste collection for the Food Truck Collective - Street Food Summer Series all over Auckland (October 2022 - May 2023)

$13,240.00

Eligible

MB2223-115

African Film Festival New Zealand Trust

Arts and culture

Towards film rights, website, and marketing of the African Film Festival online and in Rialto Cinemas Newmarket (September 2022 - December 2022)

$2,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-134

North Shore CMA

Community

Towards operational costs to run eight Companionship and Morning Activities for Seniors in various venues in the north local boards (January 2023 - December 2023)

$10,000.00

Eligible

MB2223-135

The Helping Paws Charitable Trust

Environment

Towards installation of isolation cages in new Little Blue Penguin Wing at Pebblebrooke Road Mangawhai (October 2022 - September 2024)

$5,260.00

Eligible

Total

 

 

 

$47,240.00

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocate grants to groups and organisations delivering projects, activities and services that benefit Aucklanders and contribute to the vision of being a world class city.

8.       Auckland Council Community Grant Policy supports each local board to adopt a grant programme.

9.       The local board grant programme sets out:

·      local board priorities

·      lower priorities for funding

·      exclusions

·      grant types, the number of grant rounds and when these will open and close

·      any additional accountability requirements.

10.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted its grant programme for 2022/2023 on 19 May 2022 (see Attachment B to the agenda report). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grant.

11.     The community grant programmes have been extensively advertised through the council grant webpage, local board webpages, local board e-newsletters, Facebook pages, council publications and community networks.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

12.     The aim of the local board grant programme is to deliver projects and activities which align with the outcomes identified in the local board plan. All applications have been assessed utilising the Community Grant Policy and the Local Board Grant Programme criteria. The eligibility of each application is identified in the report recommendations.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

13.     The Local Board Grant Programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to address climate change by providing grants to individuals and groups for projects that support and enable community climate action. Community climate action involves reducing or responding to climate change by local residents in a locally relevant way.

14.     Local board grants can contribute to expanding climate action by supporting projects that reduce carbon emissions and increase community resilience to climate impacts. Examples of projects include local food production and food waste reduction; increasing access to single-occupancy transport options; home energy efficiency and community renewable energy generation; local tree planting and streamside revegetation; and educating about sustainable lifestyle choices that reduce carbon footprints.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

15.     Based on the main focus of an application, a Subject Matter Expert from the relevant department will provide input and advice. The main focus of an application is identified as arts, community, events, sport and recreation, environment or heritage.

16.     The grant programme has no identified impacts on council-controlled organisations and therefore their views are not required.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

17.     Local boards are responsible for the decision-making and allocation of local board community grants. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board is required to fund, part-fund or decline these grant applications against the local board priorities identified in the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Community Grant Programme 2022-2023.

18.     The local board is requested to note that section 48 of the Community Grant Policy states “We will also provide feedback to unsuccessful grant applicants about why they have been declined, so they will know what they can do to increase their chances of success next time”.

19.     A summary of each application received through Hibiscus and Bays Multiboard Grant Round One (Attachment A to the agenda report) is provided.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     The local board grants programme aims to respond to Auckland Council’s commitment to improving Māori wellbeing by providing grants to individuals and groups who deliver positive outcomes for Māori. Auckland Council’s Māori Responsiveness Unit has provided input and support towards the development of the community grant processes.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

21.     The allocation of grants to community groups is within the adopted Long-term Plan 2021-2031 and local board agreements

22.     This report presents applications received in Hibiscus and Bays Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023 (refer to Attachment A to the agenda report).

23.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board adopted the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Grants Programme 2022/2023 on 19 May 2022 (Attachment B to the agenda report). The document sets application guidelines for contestable grants.

24.     The local board has set a total community grants budget of $401,968 for the 2022/2023 financial year with $50,000 set for the Local Economic and Business Development Grants and $150,000 of this set for the Facilities grants.

25.     The local board allocated $100,489.39 to the Local Grants Round One leaving $101,478.61 remaining to be allocated to two Multiboard Grant Rounds and a Local Grant Round Two.

26.     Eight applications were received for the Multiboard Grants Round One 2022/2023, requesting a total of $47,240.00

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     The allocation of grants occurs within the guidelines and criteria of the Community Grant Policy and the local board grant programme. The assessment process has identified a low risk associated with funding the applications in this round.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Following the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board allocation of funding for Multiboard Grants 2022/2023, the grants staff will notify the applicants of the local board’s decision.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Multi-board Round One Applications Summary 2022-2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Hibiscus and Bays Community Grants Programme 2022/2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Ann Kuruvilla - Grants Advisor

Authorisers

Pierre Fourie - Grants & Incentives Manager

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/12469

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2021/2022 Annual Report for the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2021/2022 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 September 2022. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2021/2022 Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A to the agenda report

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the local board chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2021/2022.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2021/2022 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2022

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 September 2022

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 September 2022

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays
Local Board
Annual Report 2021/2022

55

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Purdie - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie - Manager Local Board Financial Advisory

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme reallocation and Film Income allocation

File No.: CP2022/13611

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To approve the re-allocation of funding within the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

2.       To approve the allocation of Film Income funding to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved its 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services Work Programme on 23 June 2022 (resolution HB/2022/80).

4.       Since the adoption, Auckland Council Event staff have identified an error in line 189: Event Partnership fund Hibiscus and Bays, which details the part-allocation of $5,000 towards Event Delivery Capacity Building for the Community, as part of the total work programme line budget of $120,800.

5.       Event Delivery Capacity Building for the Community was never mooted with local board members during the development process for the 2022/2023 work programme, and as a result, staff are seeking re-allocation of the $5,000 to another work programme line 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays.

6.       Additionally, the local board has received Film Income of $1,095 from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited which requires allocation within the 2022/2023 financial year.

7.       Staff recommend allocating Film Income to 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme line 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the reallocation of $5,000 from work programme line 189: Event Partnership fund Hibiscus and Bays, to work programme line 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays

b)      request the removal of wording “from 2022/2023 onwards it is proposed to add $5,000 for Event Delivery Capacity Building for community partners” from the activity benefits column under work programme line 189: Event Partnership Fund Hibiscus and Bays

c)      approve the allocation of $1,095 Film Income from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to work programme line 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays, in the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services Work Programme.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.       The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board approved the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services Work Programme (attachment A to the agenda report) on 23 June 2022.

Event delivery Capacity reallocation

9.       Staff have identified an error within the Customer and Community Services Work Programme line 189: Event Partnership Fund Hibiscus and Bays, which details a portion of the lines budget going towards the delivery of Event Delivery Capacity Building (workshops) for the Community.

10.     After investigation, it was noted that Event Delivery Capacity Building was proposed as a new work programme item in the 2021/2022 work programme development process. At that time, the local board did not support the inclusion of this work programme item as it was low priority due to the economic climate (that is, COVID-19 and emergency budget). It was noted that it could be considered for future work programmes. Staff noted the local board feedback under the Event Partnership Fund activity benefits column, as something to consider in 2022/2023.

11.     Event Delivery Capacity Building for the Community was never mooted with the local board during the development process of the 2022/2023 work programme. The previous local board feedback noted under the Event Partnership Fund activity benefits column (shown in attachment A of the agenda report) was not raised during workshop discussions and was inadvertently left in the 2022/2023 work programme.

12.     Staff are now seeking to correct this error by reallocating the $5,000 to work programme line 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays.

Film income allocation

13. Annually the local board receives Film Income from filming permit fees charged by Tātaki Auckland Unlimited. All local boards receive a portion of this income to allocate within their annual work programmes.

14. The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board has received Film Income of $1,095 from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, which requires allocation within the 2022/2023 work programme. Staff recommend allocating this income to work programme line 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     Staff have identified an error within the Customer and Community Services work programme, line 189: Event Partnership Fund Hibiscus and Bays, and are seeking to correct this error by way of re-allocation.

16.     Event staff considered the option of delivering the Event Capacity Building workshops in 2022/2023, should the local board show its support to do so. However, staff have noted regional workshops for event organisers to build their capacity are underway and therefore see little benefit in delivering duplicate local Event Capacity Building workshops with the $5,000 funding. Furthermore, the Events team do not have the capacity to deliver local workshops in the 2022/2023 financial year.

17.     As in previous years, staff recommend allocating Film Income received from Tātaki Auckland Unlimited to work programme line 177: Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays.

18.     The following table provides a breakdown of the re-allocation against each activity.

ID

Department

Activity Name

Reason for re/allocation

Re/allocation amount

189

Customer and Community Services

Event Partnership Fund Hibiscus and Bays

An error has been identified in line 189: Event Partnership Fund Hibiscus and Bays, which details the part-allocation of $5,000 towards Event Delivery Capacity Building for the Community, as part of the total work programme line budget of $120,800.

 

This was not discussed or supported by the local board during the 2022/2023 work programme development.

$5,000

NA

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

Film Income

Local boards receive a portion of Film Income annually to allocate to a line within the work programme.

$1,095

 

 

 

TOTAL

$6,095

Table 1: Budget to re-allocation by the local board

19.     Staff have identified the following activity to re-allocate budget.

ID

Work Programme Name

Activity Name

Activity description / how budget will be spent

Re/allocation total

177

Customer and Community Services

Local Contestable Grants, Economic Development Fund, and Facilities Grant Hibiscus and Bays

To be spent in Round Two of the Local Contestable Grants Programme including the Facilities Grant.

$6,095

Table 2: Activity line to re-allocate to

20.     Staff have presented the re-allocation proposal to the local board on the 15 September and noted a report will be included on the next local board business meeting agenda to make a formal decision.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     The proposed work programme re-allocation does not impact on the increase of greenhouse gas emissions.  

22.     The proposed re-allocation work programme line partly contributes towards community group delivery on outcome three “A enhanced environment” of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020 as community groups deliver environmental projects funded by the local boards contestable grants programme.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. There are no further impacts to be considered with this re-allocation of funding.

24.     Relevant departments within Auckland Council have been consulted regarding the re-allocations and no objections or concerns have been raised by delivery staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     The re-allocation of funding within the local board’s work programme supports strong delivery and optimisation of the local board’s available budget for 2022/2023.

26.     The nature of the re-allocation aligns with the local board’s work programme and the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Plan 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activities of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.     Re-allocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise the locally driven initiatives (LDI) opex budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

29.     Should the local board choose not to support the re-allocation of the funding, additional conversations will take place in the new term and re-allocation included in the quarter one performance report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

30.     There is a low risk that this budget will remain unspent at the end of the financial year. Should the local board choose not to reallocate the Event Delivery budget, there is a risk that these funds will remain unspent given the lack of capacity within the Events team to carry out this work.

31.     COVID-19 may interrupt the ability for community groups to spend their contestable grant funding, however staff will seek local board support should groups require time extensions or if re-purposing of funding is required.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The funding will be re-allocated according to the local board’s resolution, and the relevant department will progress with the delivery of the next steps.

33.     The Hibiscus and Bays Local Board 2022/2023 work programme will be updated to reflect the board’s formal decisions and any variations will be reflected from the quarter one performance report onwards.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022/2023 - Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Saskia Coley – Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Matthew Kerr – Senior Local Board Advisor

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update: Quarter Four, 2021-2022

File No.: CP2022/13757

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with an update on Council-controlled Organisations’ work programme items in its area.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022-2023 Council-controlled Organisations Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2022.

3.       Updates on the work programme items are included in the attachments to the plan.

4.       The engagement plan is provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B to E to the agenda report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter Four 2021-2022.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four Council-controlled Organisations (CCOs) for the 2022-2023 local work programme. 

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This update may include the following types of changes:

·    Additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·    Proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·    Proposed changes to the extent of community engagement

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Updates from Local Board Services

11.     Updates have been made where there have been staff changes within Local Board Services or CCOs.

12.     These changes are reflected in Attachment A to the Agenda Report – Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022-2023.

Auckland Transport

13.     Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment B to the agenda report.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

Deferred, completed or removed activities

14.     These activities in the engagement plan have had major changes:

·        214 Hibiscus Coast Highway Signalised Crossing (Local Board Transport Capital Fund - LBTCF) – Completed

·        Glenvar Road Corridor Renewal – Completed

·        Dairy Flat Highway (between Pine Valley Road and Green Road) (Road Safety) – Completed

·        Maire Road – No 48 to 60, Orewa (Active Modes) – Completed

·        Hibiscus Coast Highway footpath between Noel Ave and Puriri Ave– Completed

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

15.     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment C to the agenda report.

Updates to the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme

16.     No updates have been made.   

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

17.     Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment D to the agenda report.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

18.     No updates have been made.   

Watercare

19.     Watercare’s work programme updates for Quarter Four are provided as Attachment E to the agenda report.

Updates to the Watercare work programme

Additional activities

20.     These activities have been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

·        Hibiscus Coast Boost Pumpstation - Inform

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

21.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

22.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

23.     Approving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 is likely to have a positive impact on other parts of the council as well as between the respective CCOs within each local board area.

24.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

25.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

26.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

27.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

28.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2021-2022 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

30.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for Quarter One in late 2022.

33.     A workshop will be held in early 2023 to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2023-24.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022-2023 - Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Auckland Transport: Quarter Four 2021-2022 Report – Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited Quarter Four 2021-2022 Report – Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Eke Panuku Quarter Four 2021-2022 Report – Hibiscus and Bays Local Boar (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Watercare Quarter Four 2021-2022 Report – Hibiscus and Bays Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Matthew Kerr -Senior Local Board Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council's submission on the Ministry of Transports Reshaping Streets regulatory package

File No.: CP2022/13519

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the Hibiscus Local Board’s feedback for inclusion in the Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry of Transports Reshaping Streets regulatory package.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Ministry of Transport is proposing a package of technical rule changes known as Reshaping Streets, which are intended to make it easier for local authorities to make street changes that support public transport, active travel and placemaking.

3.       The package includes the introduction of a new “Street Layout” rule, as well as amendments to existing rules that enable Road Controlling Authorities to make street changes more efficiently.

4.       While these regulatory changes will make it easier for Auckland Council to implement existing strategies, there is no legal requirement for local councils to make street changes and Council can continue to undertake additional consultation even when it is not required.

5.       Public consultation on Reshaping Streets opened on 9 August 2022, with a closing date for submissions on 19 September 2022.

6.       Local board feedback to be appended to Auckland Council’s submission was due 7 September 2022, therefore the feedback could not be considered and approved at the September business meeting.

7.       At its meeting of 19 August 2021, the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board resolved (resolution number) HB/2021/92 to delegate authority to the chairperson to approve and submit the local board’s input into Auckland Council submissions on formal consultation from government departments, parliament, select committees and other councils.

8.       A copy of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board formal feedback, submitted on 7 September 2022, is available under Attachment A of this agenda report.

 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board’s feedback for inclusion in Auckland Council’s submission on the Ministry of Transports Reshaping Streets regulatory package, as set out in Attachment A.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

HBLB Feedback on Reshaping Streets consultation

79

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Matthew Kerr -Senior Local Board Advisor

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Text, letter

Description automatically generated

Graphical user interface

Description automatically generated with medium confidence


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations

File No.: CP2022/12588

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide for appropriate arrangements for decision-making between the final local board meeting of the current electoral term and the inaugural meeting of the new local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The last meeting of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board in this current term is scheduled for 15 September 2022. Between that meeting and the first meeting of the local board in the new term, decisions may be needed from the local board. As for each of the previous terms, temporary arrangements for making these decisions need to be confirmed.

3.       The term of office of the current local board members ends the day following the official declaration of election results. Following the declaration, which is expected to be Friday 14 October 2022, the term of office for members elected to the local board will commence.

4.       For the period from the commencement of their term of office until their inaugural meeting where members are sworn in (interregnum), decisions may be made by the Auckland Council Chief Executive under existing delegations.

5.       allocated local board/lead and alternate on certain decisions. As a temporary measure, this report seeks to allow staff to make decisions without complying with the requirement for consultation during the interregnum. 

6.       Staff also seek confirmation of arrangements for making decisions at the local board level in the period between the final local board meeting and the official end of term. The urgent decision delegations and process that is already in place adequately caters for this scenario.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      confirm that the local board’s existing urgent decisions delegations process will be utilised where decisions are required from the local board between the final local board business meeting (15 September 2022) and the end of term (15 October 2022)

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new local board members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board (interregnum), all decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under current delegations

c)      note that the Chief Executive will not be required to comply with consultation requirements in the local boards’ delegation protocols when making decisions during the interregnum

d)      request that the Chief Executive exercise restraint when making decisions during the interregnum and to consider referring significant decisions to the first meeting of the incoming local board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results (Sections 115 and 116, Local Electoral Act 2001). The declaration will be publicly notified on 14 October 2022, with the term of office of current members ending and the term of office of new members commencing on 15 October 2022.

8.       The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting (Clause 14, Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

9.       Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, decisions may be needed on urgent matters or routine business as usual that cannot wait until the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

10.     As with each of the previous electoral terms, temporary arrangements need to be made and/or confirmed for:

·    making urgent decisions before the end of term

·    making decisions that require consultation with local board/local board members during the interregnum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent decisions – arrangement for remainder of the term

11.     Between the last business meeting on 15 September 2022 and the declaration of results expected around 14 October 2022, current local board members are still in office and can use their existing urgent decisions delegations to make decisions that are required from the local board during this time

12.     The urgent decisions process includes a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson that enables them to make decisions on behalf of the local board where it is not practical to call the full board together.

13.     All requests for an urgent decision will need to be supported by adequate staff advice and information and clear recommendations.

Decision-making during the interregnum

14.     All local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive. During the interregnum, any decisions that will be required from the local board, and which cannot wait until a local board meeting, will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under his existing delegations.

15.     The delegation to the Chief Executive is subject to a requirement to comply with the delegation protocols, which require consulting with the local board on some decisions that are made by staff under delegated authority. Consultation is often done through a local board lead (referred to as the lead and alternate in the delegation protocols). The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland.

16.     During the current term, while the elected members remain in office, staff will continue to consult with leads as required by the delegation protocols (or chairperson where there is no lead or alternate). However, during the interregnum, staff will be unable to comply with this requirement due to the absence of appointed lead/alternate/chairpersons to consult with.

17.     As a temporary measure, it is recommended that staff continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until the local board’s first business meeting without consultation. Following the election of chairpersons at the inaugural meetings, staff will consult with the chairperson when and if required and can resume consultation with appointed representatives once new arrangements for leads or alternates  are in place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     This report relates to procedural matters and has no quantifiable climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The arrangements proposed in this report enable the council to proceed with necessary business during the election period. During the interregnum, staff will exercise restraint and ensure that any significant decisions are deferred to the incoming local board.

20.     These arrangements apply only to local boards. The reduced political decision-making will be communicated to the wider council group.

21.     The governing body has made its own arrangements to cover the election period, including delegating the power to make urgent decisions between the last governing body meeting of the term and the day the current term ends, to any two of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and a chairperson of a committee of the whole. From the commencement of the term of office of the new local board members until the governing body’s inaugural meeting, the Chief Executive will carry out decision-making under his current delegations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This is a report to all local boards that proposes arrangements to enable the council to process routine local matters during the election period. This will enable the council to meet timeframes and provide good customer service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report and decision being sought relates to a procedural matter and does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that unforeseen decisions will arise during this period, such as a decision that is politically significant or a decision that exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegations.

26.     This risk has been mitigated by scheduling meetings as late as possible in the current term and communicating to reporting staff that significant decisions should not be made during October 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The decision of the local board will be communicated to senior staff so that they are aware of the arrangements for the month of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Approval for two new private road names at  31 Cochrane Avenue Arkles Bay

File No.: CP2022/12934

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to name two new private roads, being commonly owned access lots (, created by way of a subdivision development at 31 Cochrane Avenue, Arkles Bay.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       The developer and applicant, Body Corporate 12098 has proposed the names presented below for the local board’s consideration.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian and New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new private roads at 31 Cochrane Avenue Arkles Bay are:

Road one

·    Ataahua Grove (Body Corporate 12098’s preference)

·    Tawhiri Grove (alternative)

·    Tohoraha Lane (alternative)

Road Two

·    Waiata Manu Rise (Body Corporate 12098’s preference)

·    Waraki Rise (alternative)

·    Kihikihi Rise (alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the following names for the two new private roads, created by way of subdivision, undertaken by Body Corporate 12098 at 31 Cochrane Avenue, Arkles Bay, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references SUB60318979-2 and SUB60318979-A): 

i)        ‘Ataahua Grove’ for road one

ii)       ‘Waiata Manu Rise’ for Road two.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference SUB60318979-2 and SUB60318979-A were approved for the creation of twelve fee simple residential allotments and four commonly owned access lots.

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

8.       In accordance with the Australian and New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 (the standards), every public road and any private way, commonly owned access lots or right of way, that serves more than five lots generally requires a new road name to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

9.       Therefore, in this development, the new commonly owned access lots require a road name because they each serve more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment B to the agenda report, where the commonly owned access lots that require a name are highlighted in yellow.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The proposed road names are chosen to reflect the landscape features and environmental theme of the area.

Road Reference

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Road one 

Ataahua Grove

(applicant’s preference)

‘Ataahua’ – meaning beautiful. We are in a grove of beautiful mature Kanukas

Tawhiri Grove

(alternative)

‘Tawhiri’ – meaning "welcome - to beckon or wave"

Tohoraha Lane

(alternative)

‘Tohoraha’  – meaning "Baleen whales, also known as whalebone whales which use keratinaceous baleen plates in their mouths to sieve planktonic creatures from the water"

Road 2

Waiata Manu Rise

(applicant’s preference)

‘Waiata Manu’ – meaning birdsong

Waraki Rise

(alternative)

‘Waraki’ - meaning "morning bird song, dawn chorus (from birds)"

Kihikihi Rise

(alternative)

Kihikihi – meaning "cicada" - as we are surrounded by the bush and sounds of the cicada at certain times of the year

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming.  The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     Road Type: ‘Rise’, ‘Lane’ and ‘Grove’ are acceptable road types for the new private roads, suiting the form and layout of the commonly owned access lots.

16.     Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines.  Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

17.     This report was prepared and written by Align Planning.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change.  Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group.  The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

20.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

21.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

22.     On 27 May 2022, mana whenua groups were contacted by council on behalf of Body Corporate 12098, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·    Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Whanaunga

·    Te Patukirikiri

·    Ngāti Manuhiri

·    Ngāti Wai

23.     By the close of the consultation period, feedback was received from Ngāti Manuhiri. Ngāti Manuhiri has recommended ‘Tohoraha’ for Road one and ‘Waraki’ for Road two which have been proposed as alternative names for the new private roads

24.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

25.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for council.

26.     Body Corporate 12098 has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

27.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

28.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. Land Information New Zealand provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

31 Cochrane Avenue Arkles Bay - Location Map

89

b

31 Cochrane Avenue Arkles Bay - Site Plan

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jan Asplet - Business Coordinator

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Diagram, engineering drawing

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Approval for a new public road name at 1-5 Chenery Road, Red Beach 

File No.: CP2022/12951

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval from the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to name one new public road, created by way of a subdivision development at 1- 5 Chenery Road Red Beach.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names.  The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.       On behalf of the developer and applicant, HND RB Limited, agent, David Partington of Cato Bolam Consultants Limited has proposed the names presented below in point four of this report for consideration by the local board.

4.       The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian and New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

5.       The proposed names for the new public road at 1- 5 Chenery Road, Red Beach are:

·        Awanui Road (HND RB Limited’s preference)

·        Kahiwi Road (alternative)

·        Kokopu Road (alternative)

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Awanui Road’ for the new public road created by way of subdivision undertaken HND RB Limited by at 1- 5 Chenery Road Red Beach, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Resource consent reference BUN60365834 (subdivision reference number SUB60365836) was granted for a subdivision to create 32 residential fee simple allotments, three commonly owned access lots and one public road.

7.       Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachments A and B to the agenda report.

 

8.       In accordance with the Australian and New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245 (the standards), every public road and any private way, commonly owned access lot or  right of way, that serves more than five lots generally requires a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

9.       Within this development, Lot 200 is a public road and therefore requires a name. While Lots 201 and 203 are both commonly owned access lots that serve more than 5 lots, Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has advised that in this instance sub-addressing off the existing adjoining road can be used and therefore they do not require a name.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.     The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (the guidelines)  set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.  The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

11.     The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area; or

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature; or

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.     Theme: The proposed names reflect the landscape, environmental or biodiversity feature of the area.

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Awanui Road

(applicant’s preference)

referring to the Weiti Awa

Kahiwi Road (alternative)

meaning ridge of hill, trunk, or heart of tree

Kokopu Road (alternative)

meaning whitebait/fish – relevant to the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Inanga spawning project

13.     Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.     Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.     With respect to the name ‘Kahiwi Road’, LINZ notes that there is a Kahiwi Lane in Whenuapai (approximately 21 kms distance, 35kms driving). The distance and different road type mean ‘Kahiwi Road’ is acceptable to use in this location.

16.     With respect to the name ‘Kokopu Road’, LINZ notes that there is a Kokopu Lane in Waterview (approximately. 30kms distance/40kms driving). The distance and different road type mean ‘Kokopu Road’ is acceptable to use in this location.

17.     Road Type: ‘Road’ is an acceptable road type for the new public road, suiting the form and layout of the public road.

18.     Consultation: Both LINZ and mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

19.     This report was prepared and written by Align Planning.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

20.     The naming of roads has no effect on climate change.  Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.     The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the Council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

24.     On 08 July 2022, mana whenua groups were contacted by council on behalf of HND RB Limited, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·    Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·    Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·    Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·    Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·    Te Kawerau ā Maki

·    Te Ākitai Waiohua

·    Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·    Ngāti Paoa

·    Ngāti Maru

·    Ngāti Whanaunga

·    Te Patukirikiri

·    Ngāti Manuhiri

·    Ngāti Wai

25.     It should be noted that the names originally presented to mana whenua for comment included ‘Kawerau Road’ but not ‘Awanui Road,’ as clarified in item 32 below.

26.     By the close of the consultation period, responses were received from Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngāti Paoa.

27.     Ngāti Manuhiri provided the following comment on the names that were previously proposed:

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Kahiwi Road (applicant’s preference)

meaning ridge of hill, trunk, or heart of tree - Already been used in Hibiscus and Bays Local Board area

Kokopu Road (alternative)

meaning whitebait/fish - already been used in Hibiscus and Bays area

Kawerau Road (alternative)

First iwi to settle in the area – Kawerau

Kawerau confederation represents: Ngati Manuhiri, Ngati Rongo/Rango and Te Kawerua a Maki.

This cannot be used.

28.     Although Ngāti Manuhiri advises that ‘Kahiwi’ and ‘Kokopu’ have previously been used for road names, as above Land Information New Zealand advises that due to the relative location of the duplicates, the names are acceptable for this location.

29.     Ngāti Manuhiri also recommended two names being ‘Awanui’, referring to the Weiti Awa and ‘Waitai’ referring to the sea water.

30.     Ngāti Paoa has indicated that they will support the choice of Ngāti Manuhiri.

31.     No other responses were received.  The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance

32.     Following the mana whenua consultation, HND RB Limited has decided to propose ‘Awanui Road’ as their preference as per Ngāti Manuhiri’s recommendation and propose ‘Kahiwi Road’ and ‘Kokopu Road’ as alternative names. ‘Kawerau Road’ has consequently been discarded as an alternative.

33.     This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua. Te Reo Māori names are proposed, and the applicant has proposed ‘Awanui Road’, recommended by Ngāti Manuhiri, as the preferred name.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

34.     The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the Council.

35.     HND RB Limited has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

36.     There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

37.     Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database.  Land Information New Zealand provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

1-5 Chenery Road, Red Beach - Location Map

99

b

1-5 Chenery Road, Red Beach - Site Plan

101

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jan Asplet - Business Coordinator

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Governance Forward Work Calendar Hōtaka Kaupapa

File No.: CP2022/13042

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To present the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board with a governance forward work calendar hōtaka kaupapa.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report contains the governance forward work calendar, a schedule of items that will come before the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board over the coming months until the end of the electoral term. The governance forward work calendar hōtaka kaupapa for the local board is included in Attachment A to the agenda report.

3.       The calendar aims to support local boards’ governance role by:

·    ensuring advice on agendas and workshop material is driven by local board priorities

·    clarifying what advice is required

·    clarifying the rationale for reports.

4.       The calendar will be updated every month. Each update will be reported back to business meetings. It is recognised that at times items will arise that are not programmed.  Local board members are welcome to discuss changes to the calendar.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the governance forward work calendar hōtaka kaupapa.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

HBLB GFWC Hōtaka Kaupapa -October 2022

105

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Table

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Workshop Records

File No.: CP2022/13046

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       Attached are the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board workshop records for August and September 2022.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for August and September 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Workshop Record 11 August 2022

109

b

Hibiscus and Bays Local Board Workshop Record 8 September 2022

111

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Table

Description automatically generated


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Table

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Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2022/13052

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide an opportunity for members to update the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board on matters they have been involved in over the last month.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       An opportunity for members of the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board to provide a report on their activities for the month.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive the report from Member A Dunn.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Member Report A Dunn August - September 2022

115

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Text

Description automatically generated


Hibiscus and Bays Local Board

15 September 2022

 

 

Valedictory reflection: end of term address

File No.: CP2022/12589

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide retiring Hibiscus and Bays Local Board member/s the opportunity to comment on their time in local government and share valedictory reflections.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This is an opportunity for retiring Hibiscus and Bays Local Board member/s to share valedictory reflections or an end of term address, prior to the 2022 Local Board Elections.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board:

a)      receive valedictory reflections from Member J Fitzgerald

b)      invite Member G Holmes to share reflections on his service with the Hibiscus and Bays Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Charlie Inggs - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager