I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 21 September 2022

10.00am

Kaipātiki Local Board Office
90 Bentley Avenue
Glenfield and via Microsoft Teams

 

Kaipātiki Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

John Gillon

 

Deputy Chairperson

Danielle Grant, JP

 

Members

Paula Gillon

 

 

Ann Hartley, QSO

(Leave of absence)

 

Melanie Kenrick

 

 

Cindy Schmidt

 

 

Andrew Shaw

 

 

Adrian Tyler

 

 

(Quorum 4 members)

 

 

 

Jacinda Gweshe

Democracy Advisor

 

15 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: (09) 484 6236

Email: jacinda.gweshe@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS                                                                                         PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                                         5

2          Apologies                                                                                                                        5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                               5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                                          5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                                                       6

6.1     Member Ann Hartley, QSO                                                                                  6

6.2     Member Cindy Schmidt                                                                                       6

7          Petitions                                                                                                                          7

8          Deputations                                                                                                                    7

8.1     Onepoto Domain Pond Flooding - Shane Brannigan and Barry Quinn         7

8.2     Birkenhead Village Association - Kae Condon                                                 8

8.3     Birkenhead Skate Park / Marlborough Skate Park                                           8

8.4     Northern Rovers Football Club                                                                           8

9          Public Forum                                                                                                                  9

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                                                9

11        Auckland Transport Update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund – September 2022                                                                                                           11

12        Changes to the Kaipātiki Local Board 2022-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme                                                                                          17

13        Wairau Valley Business Needs                                                                                  77

14        Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan                                                                          99

15        Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022                                                                    171

16        Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Kaipātaki Local Board: Quarter Four, 2021/2022                                                                                            189

17        Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 211

18        2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations                                                                283

19        Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report                                                          287

20        Members' Reports                                                                                                      299

21        Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board Members' Update    301

22        Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - August and September 2022       303

23        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

 


1          Welcome / Karakia

 

            Text

Description automatically generated

 

2          Apologies

 

At the close of the agenda no apologies had been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

The Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members (the Code) requires elected members to fully acquaint themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions of Auckland Council’s Conflicts of Interest Policy.  The policy covers two classes of conflict of interest:

i)       A financial conflict of interest, which is one where a decision or act of the local board could reasonably give rise to an expectation of financial gain or loss to an elected member; and

ii)      A non-financial conflict of interest, which does not have a direct personal financial component.  It may arise, for example, from a personal relationship, or involvement with a non-profit organisation, or from conduct that indicates prejudice or predetermination.

The Office of the Auditor General has produced guidelines to help elected members understand the requirements of the Local Authority (Member’s Interest) Act 1968.  The guidelines discuss both types of conflicts in more detail, and provide elected members with practical examples and advice around when they may (or may not) have a conflict of interest.

Copies of both the Auckland Council Code of Conduct for Elected Members and the Office of the Auditor General guidelines are available for inspection by members upon request. 

Any questions relating to the Code or the guidelines may be directed to the Local Area Manager in the first instance.

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)         confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 August 2022, as true and correct.

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.


 

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

6.1       Member Ann Hartley, QSO

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To acknowledge Member Ann Hartley’s retirement from the Kaipātiki Local Board and thank her for her commitment and leadership to the local board and the wider community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Member Ann Hartley has been involved with the Birkdale, Birkenhead and North Shore communities for more than 50 years.

3.       Member Ann Hartley was awarded a Companion of the Queen’s Service Order in the New Year Honours List 2022 for her services to local government and the community.

4.       Ann was coordinator of the Birkdale community house in the 1970s and played a significant role in the establishment of the creche at St Philip’s Church in Birkdale. She was first elected to Birkenhead City Council in 1980, becoming Mayor in 1986 and was elected Mayor of North Shore City upon its inception in 1989. As Mayor, she worked with other councils to secure funding for the establishment of the only Marae in the North Shore area, Awataha Marae.

5.       Ann was elected to Parliament for the Northcote electorate in 1999, was Deputy Speaker of the House from 2002 to 2005, and a list member and Assistant Speaker from 2005 until her retirement from Parliament in 2008. From 2008 to 2012 she was a Trustee of the ASB Community Trust and served as Chairperson. She was Councillor for the North Shore Ward from 2010 to 2013 and she also served as chairperson of council’s Regional Development and Operations Committee during this time. She has been influential in establishing and maintaining the North Shore’s rich array of parks and facilities including North Shore Events Centre, Kauri Point Centennial Park and the Bruce Mason Centre, and improved public beach access at Takapuna. Ann Hartley was elected to Kaipātiki Local Board of Auckland Council in 2013, and served as Deputy Chairperson of the board for the 2013-2016 political term.

6.       The Kaipātiki Local Board wishes to acknowledge and congratulate Member Hartley on being the driving force behind many key initiatives providing positive outcomes.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      thank Member Ann Hartley for her time and commitment she has given as a Kaipātiki Local Board Member and wish her well for the future.

 

 

6.2       Member Cindy Schmidt

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To acknowledge Member Cindy Schmidt’s retirement from the Kaipātiki Local Board and thank her for her commitment and leadership to the local board and the wider community.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Member Cindy Schmidt was a member of the Kaipātiki Local Board for the 2019-22 political term. 

3.       During Member Schmidt’s time on the local board, she was appointed as a local board liaison to Bayview Community Centre, Hearts and Minds NZ and Kaipātiki Youth Development Trust.

4.       Member Schmidt was formally appointed as an Auckland Council representative on the Local Government New Zealand Policy Advisory Group. She was also appointed to attend the 2020 and 2021 Local Government New Zealand Conference and Annual General Meeting.

5.       In addition to her role as elected member of the Kaipātiki Local Board, Member Cindy Schmidt is a registered nurse who works hard to improve health in the community.

6.       The Kaipātiki Local Board wishes to acknowledge and thank Member Cindy Schmidt for the time and commitment she has given to the Kaipātiki Local Board as a member this term and wish her well for the future. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      thank Member Cindy Schmidt for the time and commitment she has given to the Kaipātiki Local Board this term and wish her well for the future.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Kaipātiki Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

8.1       Onepoto Domain Pond Flooding - Shane Brannigan and Barry Quinn

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Onepoto Domain Pond Flooding.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Shane Brannigan and Barry Quinn will be in attendance to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation.

b)      thank Shane Brannigan and Barry Quinn for their presentation.

Attachments

a          21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Onepoto Domain Pond Flooding presentation............................................. 317

 

 

8.2       Birkenhead Village Association - Kae Condon

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Birkenhead Village Association.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Kae Condon, Manager of Birkenhead Town Centre Village Association, will be in attendance to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation.

b)      thank Kae Condon for her attendance and presentation.

 

 

8.3       Birkenhead Skate Park / Marlborough Skate Park

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding an update on Birkenhead Skate Park and Stafford Park Skate Park.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Poul Evans, local parent and skateboarder, will be in attendance to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation.

b)      thank Poul Evans for his presentation.

Attachments

a          21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Skate presentation.................................................................................................. 329

 

 

8.4       Northern Rovers Football Club

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this deputation is to update the Kaipātiki Local Board regarding Northern Rovers Football Club.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       Mike Pirovich, President, and Dean Dodds, Chairperson, will be in attendance to address the board on this item.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the deputation from Northern Rovers Football Club.

b)      thank Mike Pirovich and Dean Dodds for their presentation.

Attachments

a          21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Northern Rovers Artificial Turf Presentation................................................................ 335

 

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport Update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund – September 2022

File No.: CP2022/13239

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide confirmation on which activities can be delivered for the Kaipātiki Local Board under the reduced Auckland Transport Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) programme following the council’s Annual Budget 2022/23 decision on 29 June 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       On 29 June 2022, Auckland Council adopted the Annual Budget 2022/23. Auckland Transport (AT) is facing significant pressure on operational expenditure principally due to slower recovery of Public Transport (PT) patronage than expected. 

3.       To address these challenges Auckland Transport, in discussion with the Auckland Council finance team, requested a moderate increase in operating funding in the 2022/23 financial year. AT agreed to defer capital expenditure by $223 million over the next three years.

4.       The impact of these reductions for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for the 2022/23 financial year.

5.       For Kaipātiki Local Board, this means the financial year 2022/23 allocation has reduced from $1,047,683 to $539,032.

6.       The Auckland Transport Board is considering providing an additional $778,305 which would increase the budget to $1,317,337. The funding would, however, be subject to there being underspend in other AT work programmes.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      continue to progress the following projects this financial year:

i)     Birkenhead War Memorial Park Walking/Cycling Track (budget already committed)

ii)    Pavers in Birkenhead Avenue, Highbury

iii)    Paragon Avenue/Beach Haven Road intersection

iv)   Beach Haven Road pedestrian crossing

v)    Beach Haven Road bus shelter stop 4202

vi)   Street-to-street walkway signage.

b)      place the following projects on hold until budget becomes available:

i)     Pupuke Road/Ocean Road Intersection

i)     Birkdale Road pedestrian safety

ii)    Jean Sampson Reserve vehicle crossing

iii)    Cresta Avenue angle parking

iv)   Onewa Road shared path

v)    Highbury globe lights.

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       The financial implications of the reduction in funding for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for this financial year (FY2022/23). 

8.       For Kaipātiki Local Board, this means the current financial year’s allocation has reduced from $1,047,683 to $539,032.

9.       AT Board is considering providing an additional $778,305 which would increase the budget to $1,317,337. The funding would, however, be subject to there being underspend in other AT work programmes.

10.     Of this $1,317,337, $622,736 is already committed through various contracts.

11.     The below table outlines the status of projects previously resolved by the Kaipātiki Local Board:

Project Name

Project Status

Remaining Budget

Budget Comments

Birkenhead War Memorial Park walking/cycling track

Design Progressing

$609,000

The full $609,000 budget is committed through contract with Auckland Council for construction

Pupuke/Ocean roads intersection

Investigation

$491,350

Budget not currently committed

Pavers in Birkenhead Avenue, Highbury

Investigation

$364,620

Budget not currently committed

Beach Haven Road pedestrian crossing and Paragon Avenue/Beach Haven Road intersection

Investigation

$253,420

Budget not currently committed

Birkdale Road pedestrian safety

Investigation

$149,540

Budget not currently committed

Street-to-street walkway signage

Design

$60,000

$6,120 of budget committed as design contract in place.

Onewa Road shared path

Investigation

$50,000

Budget not currently committed

Highbury globe lights

Investigation

$50,000

Budget not currently committed

Beach Haven Road bus shelter stop 4202

Design

$37,237

$7,616 of budget committed as design contract in place

Jean Sampson Reserve vehicle crossing

Investigation

$21,000

Budget not currently committed

Cresta Avenue angle parking

Investigation

$9,500

Budget not currently committed

Total

 

$2,097,667

 

 

12.     The local board does not have enough budget this financial year to deliver all the projects above.

13.     Below are the projects recommended to progress this financial year, along with justification of the recommendation:

·     Birkenhead War Memorial Park walking/cycling track. This project has been on hold due to budget constraints. The designs are completed and construction budgets are committed. It is recommended that the local board prioritise this project given the investment to date and contractual commitments.

·     Pavers in Birkenhead Avenue, Highbury. This project should progress based on the health and safety concerns with uneven pavers along Birkenhead Avenue.

·     Beach Haven Road pedestrian crossing and Paragon Avenue/Beach Haven Road intersection. These projects have been combined due to their proximity and the risk that the Paragon Avenue/Beach Haven Road intersection proposal will not be supported by internal AT stakeholders in isolation (this is based on previous feedback from the traffic operations team). The combined projects enhance safety for multiple road users and can be delivered within the reduced budget.

·     Beach Haven Road bus shelter. This project is well advanced and design is almost complete. Based on this and the fact there is budget contractually committed, it is recommended this project progress.

·     Street-to-street walkway signage. This project is well advanced, and design is progressing. Based on this and contractual commitments, it is recommended this project progress.

14.     It is recommended that the following projects be placed on hold until budget becomes available.

·     Pupuke/Ocean roads intersection. There is insufficient budget to progress this project. It is recommended this project be placed on hold till budget becomes available. This project may meet funding requirements for the Climate Emergency Response Fund (CERF) and, if so, will be put forward for consideration.

·     Birkdale Road pedestrian safety. Additional budget is required to deliver these improvements due to internal stakeholder feedback on concept designs. These requirements will likely push this project outside the available budget this financial year. This project may meet funding requirements for the Climate Emergency Response Fund (CERF) and, if so, will be put forward for consideration.

·     Jean Sampson Reserve vehicle crossing. When compared to other projects, this proposal has limited benefits.

·     Cresta Avenue angle parking. When compared to other projects, this proposal has limited benefits.

·     Onewa Road shared path. This budget was identified for investigation only. Initial consultation with internal stakeholders indicated that a shared path along Onewa Road would not meet current design standards and would likely not be supported. Due to the complexity of this transport corridor and the limited available budget, it is recommended this project be deferred.

·     Highbury globe lights. As indicated to the local board in previous workshops, this budget is not sufficient to replace the globe lights in Highbury. It is recommended that this project be placed on hold till budget becomes available.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The local board was presented with advice regarding the impact of the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) budget reduction at a workshop on 24 August 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

16.     Auckland Transport is committed to minimising the negative effects that transport operations have on climate change. This includes encouraging emission neutral modes (walking and cycling) and low emission modes (public transport and ride sharing).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

17.     The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to Auckland Transport (AT).

18.     Where Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities unit, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the Council group will be carried out on an individual basis.

19.     Auckland Transport’s Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) budget allows for the LBTCF as a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by AT.

20.     Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe deliver outcomes highlighted by their local board plans but are not part of AT’s work programme.

21.     Any LBTCF projects selected must be safe, must not impede network efficiency, and must be located in the road corridor or on land controlled by Auckland Transport (though projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     Auckland Transport has workshopped with the Kaipātiki Local Board the impacts of budget reductions on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund programme in the local board rohe.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     The proposed recommendations in the report have no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     There will not be enough budget to deliver all projects this financial year as previously planned.

25.     Auckland Transport is seeking direction on which projects the Kaipātiki Local Board wish to proceed with this financial year and which projects are to be placed on hold.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

26.     The cost escalations affecting the construction industry and reduced Auckland Transport income from the drop in public transport use have significantly impacted the delivery of all Auckland Transport projects, including those from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     Following the local board’s decision, Auckland Transport will contract out the selected projects as soon as possible.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Marilyn Nicholls, Elected Member Relationship Partner, North, Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Paul Thompson – Head of Community Engagement, North, Auckland Transport

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Changes to the Kaipātiki Local Board 2022-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme

File No.: CP2022/14068

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek approval of changes to the Kaipātiki Local Board 2022-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme, following the Governing Body adoption of the Annual budget 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the 2022-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme on 22 June 2022 (resolution number KT/2022/128).

3.       Changes to the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme are required due to the decisions made by the Governing Body when adopting the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

4.       These changes require us to re-balance the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services Capital Work Programme.

5.       There have been changes in the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI), One Local Initiative (OLI), Network Connections Plan and Long-Term Plan budget lines. Some of these have been re-phased and some have been pushed out into future years.

6.       Our over-arching principle is to continue as many projects as possible. To achieve this, we have re-phased most of the project budgets and increased the number of projects approved for the risk adjusted programme (RAP) by eight.

7.       The budget allocated for all projects in the work programme are best estimates and are subject to change and refinements. As a project progresses, the specific work required, and the costs of delivery could either exceed the original estimated budget or the anticipated delivery cost could be less than the approved budget. As a result, variations maybe required to the work programme to accommodate final project costs.

8.       Staff have identified changes required to the approved work programme to ensure delivery of approved projects.

9.       A breakdown of the individual projects that have been affected is detailed in Attachment A to this agenda report.  

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      approve the changes to the 2022-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme as detailed in Attachment A to this agenda report.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services work programme for financial year 2022/2023 on 22 June 2022. The local board also approved the financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025 work programmes in principle (resolution number KT/2022/128).

11.     The budget allocated for all projects in the work programme are best estimates and are subject to change and refinements. As a project progresses, the specific work required, and the costs of delivery could either exceed the original estimated budget or the anticipated delivery cost could be less than the approved budget. As a result, variations maybe required to the work programme to accommodate final project costs.

12.     To build the 2022/2023 work programme and meet the reporting timelines, project forecasts from May 2022 were used. These were the best estimates of required budget at that time.

13.     Changes to the 2022/2023 Customer and Community Services work programme are required due to the decisions made by the Governing Body when adopting the Annual Budget 2022/2023.

14.     Changes are required in financial years 2022/2023 to 2024/2025. We have also included some indicative changes to financial year 2025/2026.

15.     In July 2022, the budget requirements were reviewed to identify the under or overspends and what the impact would be on the financial year 2022/2023 budget. This is called the deferrals process.

16.     After the deferral process, the local renewals programme was over-allocated in 2022/2023 by $1,887,325. The majority of this has come from delays to projects in the construction phase.

17.     For example, the Glenfield Leisure Centre hydro-slide has had significant delays.  This meant construction was not completed in financial year 2021/2022. Therefore, the remains of the approved budget need to be available in financial year 2022/2023. Some of the financial year 2022/2023 budget requirement was built into the new work programme, but not all.

18.     There have been changes in the Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI), One Local Initiative (OLI), Network Connections Plan and Long-Term Plan budget lines. Some of these have been re-phased and some have been pushed out into future years.

19.     The renewals budget for financial year 2022/2023 has remained at the same amount but the under-spend from financial year 2021/2022 has had to be accounted for in financial year 2022/2023. In previous years, prior to the recovery budget, this amount would have been brought forward to the next financial year.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

20.     A breakdown of the individual projects that have been affected is detailed in Attachment A, along with the work programme approved on 22 June 2022 (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report).

21.     Our over-arching principle was to continue as many projects as possible. We recognise that although we have some large construction projects happening in financial year 2022/2023, we need to progress the planning of the next round of construction, to be ready for financial years 2023/2024 and 2024/2025.

22.     To continue as many projects as possible we have:

a)      Spread budget over two or three financial years for many of the projects.

b)      Increased the number of projects that are RAP by eight, so that spending can be brought forward if necessary. These projects are:

i)     ActivZone – replace main hall ceiling panels and investigate ventilation (ID18436)

ii)    Glenfield Library – renew guttering (ID30149)

iii)    Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre – refurbish roof (ID18042)

iv)   Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre – structural assessment and works on hydro slide and dive platform (ID18043)

v)    Kaipātiki – minor sports field asset renewals 2022 -2025 (ID30671)

vi)   Kaipātiki – renew play equipment (ID27962)

vii)  Northcote War Memorial Hall – renew heritage facility (ID20596)

viii)  Onewa Domain – renew sports field one (ID30156)

c)      On some projects, we have pushed most of the investigation and design budget out to financial year 2023/2024 but kept a small amount in financial year 2022/2023 to allow work to start.

d)      Two playground renewal projects have been pushed out to later financial years.

e)      Two projects will potentially have construction pushed out to later financial years.

23.     Between the development of the final work programme in 2021/2022 and this work, cost increases for several projects have been identified. We have therefore included the required extra funds in this round of budget review, to ensure the projects can be completed.

24.     We will review progress regularly to check forecast over or under-spend and will discuss this with the new local board once convened.

25.     We will also need to discuss and confirm the priorities for tracks, buildings, and Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI) with the new local board.

26.     Staff recommend variations to the 2022/2025 Customer and Community Services work programme for financial year 2022/2023 as detailed in Attachment A of the agenda report.

27.     The proposed variations are within the local board’s financial year 2022/2023 budget envelope and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

28.     Staff recommend that the Kaipātiki Local Board approve the proposed variations to the 2022-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

29.     In June 2019, council declared a climate emergency and in response to this, council adopted the Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan in July 2020.

30.     Each activity in the work programme is assessed to identify whether it will have a positive, negative, or neutral impact on greenhouse gas emissions and impact on resilience to climate change.

31.     The proposed budget variations have no direct effect on climate change. Each project will be considered individually to assess the impacts of climate change and the appropriate approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  The sorts of impacts to be considered include:

·     Maximum upcycling and recycling of old material.

·     Installation of energy efficiency measures.

·     Building design to ensure the maximum lifetime and efficiency of the building is obtained.

·     Lifecycle impacts of construction materials (embodied emissions).

·     Exposure of building location to climate change hazards (sea level rise, flooding (floodplains), drought, heat island effect).

·     Anticipated increase in carbon emissions from construction, including contractor emissions.

·     Lifecycle impacts of construction materials.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

32.     The decision sought for this report has no direct impact on other parts of the council group. The overall 2022-2025 Customer and Community services work programme was developed through a collaborative approach by operational council departments, with each department represented in an integrated team.

33.     Collaboration with staff will be ongoing throughout the life of the projects to ensure integration into the operational maintenance and asset management systems.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

34.     Community facilities and open spaces provide important community services to the people of the local board area. They contribute to building strong, healthy and vibrant communities by providing spaces where Aucklanders can participate in a wide range of social, cultural, art and recreational activities. These activities improve lifestyles and a sense of belonging and pride amongst residents.

35.     The activities in the work programme align with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020

Outcome

Objective

Outcome 3: Places and spaces

Our built environment is high quality, vibrant, well-maintained, reflects the culture and heritage of Kaipātiki, and meets our people’s needs.

Outcome 4: Transport and connections

Our people have many transport options and can easily and safely move around and find their way.

 

36.     All of the proposed variations as detailed in this report were provided for the local board’s consideration in a memorandum and discussed at a workshop in September 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.     Consideration is given to how the provision of services, facilities and open spaces can support the aspirations of Māori, promote community relationships, connect to the natural environment, and foster holistic wellbeing of whānau, hapu and iwi Māori.

38.     The approved work programme includes activities that will have an impact on a service, facility, location of significance to Māori. In these situations, appropriate and meaningful engagement and consultation will be undertaken, including to meet our obligations under Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

39.     The proposed variations are within the local board’s budget envelopes for each year and will not substantially impact the approved projects or the overall work programme.

40.     The recommended changes in this report have been agreed with the local board’s Lead Financial Advisor.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.     The COVID-19 pandemic could have a further negative impact on the delivery of the work programme with delays of construction supplies and the availability of contractors.

42.     If the proposed variations to the work programme are not approved, there is a risk that projects identified may not be delivered within the expected time frames.

43.     If assets are not renewed in a timely way, they may deteriorate further and need to be closed or removed.  Staff will continue to monitor the condition of the assets and consider action to be taken in the future.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.     Subject to local board’s decision, the Kaipātiki Local Board 2022-2025 Customer and Community Services work programme will be amended to reflect the decision.

45.     Progress and updates on the work programme will be reported as part of the quarterly reports to the local board.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - CCS 2022-2025 Work Programme changes detail

23

b

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board CCS Work Programme APPROVED

37

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Judy Waugh – Work Programme Lead, Parks and Community Facilities

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe – General Manager, Parks and Community Facilities

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Wairau Valley Business Needs

File No.: CP2022/13663

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To receive the report and recommendations from the Wairau Valley Business Needs research undertaken in 2021/22 and to approve the recommended follow-on activities to be supported by funding allocated to Wairau Valley Business Engagement and Communications project (SharePoint project ID#3042).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       In 2021/22, the Kaipātiki Local Board funded a piece of work with businesses in the Wairau Valley to understand in better detail the issues they face and to understand how the local board could establish and maintain better communication channels between the businesses and the local board.

3.       A stratified sample of businesses was created to be representative of the types of businesses present in the Wairau Valley. The work engaged with 42 businesses in the Wairau Valley either in person, by telephone or e-mail. Interviews lasted 45-60 minutes.

4.       Businesses were asked about:

·     their understanding of the role of the local board;

·     the main issues they face;

·     the business support that is available for them; and

·     how they communicate or engage with other businesses locally.

5.       The findings from this work were workshopped with the local board on 8 June 2022 and a report ‘Connecting with Wairau Valley Businesses’ (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report) was finalised shortly after.

6.       The General Manager of Business North Harbour (BNH), a large Business Improvement District (BID) just north of Wairau Valley, attended that workshop to provide insight into engagement and communication activities they undertake with their membership that could be expanded to Wairau Valley businesses that are interested. A role for Business North Harbour offering support to Wairau Valley businesses on an associate member basis was outlined at that workshop.

7.       The report contains a number of findings and make several recommendations for how the Kaipātiki Local Board can better engage with and support the Wairau Valley business community.

8.       The local board has allocated $15,000 in 2022/23 for a further project to implement recommendations from the ‘Connecting with Wairau Valley Businesses’ report to continue the development of a communications channel with businesses with a view to ensuring businesses are aware of, and able to put forward their views, on parts of council activity that have an impact on them. 

9.       Business North Harbour have provided an outline proposal of how they could employ a resource to engage with business in the Wairau Valley, communicate with the businesses on behalf of Kaipātiki Local Board and provide the option of associate membership of Business North Harbour which would confer businesses the benefits of BID membership.

10.     It is recommended the Kaipātiki Local Board proceed with the Business North Harbour proposal and instruct staff to arrange an initial meeting between the local board and Business North Harbour General Manager to agree desired outcomes and a process for how they will work together.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Connecting with Wairau Valley Businesses report (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

b)      support the allocation of funding approved as part of the ‘Wairau Valley Business Engagement and Communications’ (SharePoint project ID#3042) via the local board’s Tātaki Auckland Unlimited 2022/2023 work programme towards the Business North Harbour proposal as outlined within Attachment B to the agenda report.

c)      request staff to arrange an initial meeting between the local board and Business North Harbour to agree arrangements for how the collaboration between Business North Harbour and the local board will be operationalised.

Horopaki

Context

11.     The Kaipātiki Local Board funded a piece of work with businesses in the Wairau Valley to understand in better detail the issues they face and to understand how the local board could establish and maintain better communication channels between the businesses and the local board.

12.     Forty-two business were engaged. The key findings were:

·        Businesses have issues with traffic congestion, a lack of notification of events or activities that will negatively impact them, a lack of on-street parking, illegal parking, environmental amenity (overhead cables, maintenance of green space), inadequate rubbish and recycling services.

·        Business understanding of the role of the local board is very limited and most have had no communication from the local board. The information businesses would like to see from the local board at this point are events and activities that negatively impact their business.

·        Businesses tend to operate in silos with little communication between them.

·        Businesses appear to have an appetite for some form of business support service but do not know what that could look like. The business association concept is something few were familiar with.

13.     Key recommendations from the report focus on some activities that the local board can implement with existing resources (council staff capacity permitting) and activities that would require a specialist third party provider.

14.     The recommendations cover:

·        Creating awareness

·        Improving communications

·        Breaking down silos

·        Providing access to business support.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

15.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has indicated strong interest in improved communications with its business base, particularly ahead of the consultation phase for the next Local Board Plan in order to ensure any economic development outcomes and activities within the Local Board Plan reflect local business needs.

16.     Activities recommended in the report are outlined in the table below.  Some, such as the communications audit can be progressed internally, while others would benefit from an external agency with business and communications expertise.

Theme

Activity

Activity

Creating Awareness

Broad local media campaign

Direct communications (using a business database or flyer drop). Host an event for invited local businesses to meet the local board.

Improving Communications

Audit current business facing communication channels

Assess audit findings and identify areas for improvement.

Breaking Down Silos

Networking events

Utilise existing funded programmes (e.g., pollution prevention).

Business Support

Learn from neighbouring business associations

Establish points of contact within infrastructure and service providers who can alert the local board to planned activities that may adversely impact businesses.

 

17.     A proposed approach provided by Business North Harbour (refer to Attachment B of the agenda report) could be implemented to achieve many of the desired outcomes outlined in the proposed framework alongside work the local board leads in improving its own business facing communications.

18.     Stage one of the proposed BNH approach involves employing a business ambassador to visit Wairau Valley businesses to provide them with any information the local board would like to communicate with them (i.e., who they are, what they do, outline to Local Board Plan development work), outline the services BNH can offer associate members.

19.     Effectively this proposes a more direct awareness raising campaign than a local media campaign or flier drop recommended in the research report.

20.     The ambassador would also invite them to an in-person meeting with Kaipātiki Local Board members and Business North Harbour businesses can meet each other and hear directly from the local board and BNH.

21.     Actions recommended in the research report would be delivered as follows.

Objective

Business North Harbour (BNH) lead workstream

Kaipātiki Local Board Led workstream

Creating Awareness

Employment of BNH Business Ambassador to meet local businesses and disseminate information about what Kaipātiki Local Board and BNH do.

Consider how existing local board funded initiatives can be used to engage with the business community.

Improving Communications

Provision of collateral / resource packs.

Associate member access to regular BNH newsletter which the local board can use to communicate key messages to the business community.

Business event provides opportunity for BNH and KLB meet business owners in person.

Audit current business facing communication channels and implement findings.

Consider what information and messaging the local board wish to communicate to businesses.

Breaking Down Silos

BNH and KLB hosted event provides an opportunity for business owners to meet each other.

 

Business Support

Associate membership of BNH provides access to the information and support services.

 

 

22.     Business North Harbour indicate an estimated cost $11,330 to employ the ambassador for five months with additional resources required for the production of collateral and hosting of an event.

23.     This initiative would achieve many of the desired outcomes identified in the Connecting with Wairau Valley Businesses report in terms of creating awareness, improving communications and enabling access to business support.

24.     It is recommended that the local board pursue this approach after further discussion with the Business North Harbour General Manager while also instigating its own review of its business facing communications.

25.     Discussion with Business North Harbour should clarify expectations around anticipated number if associate members, any Business North Harbour activity or events that will be targeted or developed with Wairau Valley based associate members in mind, and arrangements for how the collaboration between Business North Harbour and the Local Board will be operationalized.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

26.     The proposed allocation of funds does not significantly impact on greenhouse gas emissions or contribute towards adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

27.     The proposed project for the current financial year may require departments of Auckland Council and its council-controlled organisations to provide some information that can be passed on to local businesses. It is not envisaged this would be additional to business-as-usual activity.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

28.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has an opportunity to proactively engage with its local business base. In doing so it can open a communication channel that improves the flow of information relevant to local businesses as well as provide for a stronger business voice to be heard at the next Local Board Plan consultation stage.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.     There are no specific impacts on Māori businesses.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

30.     A total of $15,000 is available for the next phase of work to better engage with business in the Wairau Valley (SharePoint project ID#3042).

31.     There is likely to be a need for Kaipātiki Local Board to continue the proposed collaboration with Business North Harbour in the next financial year. This this will have an additional financial cost in the next financial year similar to the current allocation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

32.     The main risk is that Wairau Valley Businesses are unwilling or unable to engage. Using a well-established local Business Association with much experience of engaging with and understanding what services businesses value should ensure the initial engagement is a positive one.

33.     Experience shows that business association and BID establishment can be difficult and costly. By offering associate membership to business that are interested provides a lower risk way of demonstrating the value of business association membership and gauging business interest in developing something specific for Wairau Valley in the longer term.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.     Subject to local board approval Tātaki Auckland Unlimited arrange a meeting with Kaipātiki Local Board and Business North Harbour to agree expected outcomes and how the collaboration with work in practice. 

35.     Following that Tātaki Auckland Unlimited will draw up a service agreement with Business North Harbour specifying expected milestones and deliverables.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Connecting Te Poari ā-rohe o Kaipātiki - Kaipātiki Local Board with Wairau Valley businesses

83

b

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Business Support Collaboration With Kaipātiki Local Board (KLB).

97

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jonathan Sudworth – Senior Local Economic Knowledge Advisor, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

Authorisers

John Norman – Head of Economic Places, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan

File No.: CP2022/13437

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To adopt the Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       This report presents the ‘Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan’ (referred to as the ‘action plan’) for the board’s consideration and adoption (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

3.       The local board allocated $20,000 of its locally driven initiatives operational budget towards the development of a local climate action plan in 2021/2022 (resolution number KT/2021/84). This was supplemented with $15,000 of Environmental Service’s regional budget in May 2022 to support completion of the plan.

4.       The action plan was developed to align with The Auckland Plan 2050 and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These two plans lay the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a resilient, zero carbon community which is actively adapting to the impacts of climate change. Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri sets a target to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050.

5.       The action plan was developed in alignment with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020. In particular, the action plan supports the Local Board Plan outcome to keep ‘our environment protected and restored for future generations to enjoy’ and the objectives that ‘our people are environmentally aware and work together to live sustainably’ and to ‘support coastal communities to be prepared for the impacts of a changing climate’.

6.       A draft action plan was developed during 2021/2022 based on a stocktake of existing low carbon projects and feedback from a virtual meeting held with more than 26 community stakeholders. Additional meetings with Auckland Council staff, and council-controlled organisations, and workshops with local board members were held during plan development.

7.       Several hui were also held with mana whenua representatives on the local climate action plans. These identified the need for further work by staff and local board members to build relationships with mana whenua and identify opportunities for Māori-led climate initiatives.

8.       The action plan builds on existing initiatives of the council, local board, council-controlled organisations and key community-based organisations including Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust, Kaipātiki Project, Pest Free Kaipātiki Restoration Trust and other community and environment restoration initiatives.

9.       The action plan identifies a number of opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through extending existing initiatives or starting new projects. It also highlights the council departments or community groups that will have a leading role in the implementation of these.

10.     Once adopted, staff will support implementation of the action plan where possible. This will be achieved using a combination of support by the local board and advocacy for new and existing projects, direct local and regional funding, and partnerships with businesses and community organisations to leverage investment and grant funding from external sources.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the ‘Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan’ as per Attachment A of the agenda report. 

b)      note that staff will continue to work with mana whenua to identify more opportunities to partner with them on climate/te taiao projects in the Kaipātiki Local Board area.

c)      delegate to the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson the ability to approve minor amendments of the action plan document ahead of publication.

Horopaki

Context

11.     In 2019, Auckland Council declared a Climate Emergency and in 2020 Auckland Council launched ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’.

12.     The Auckland Plan and Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan lay the foundation for Auckland’s transformation to a resilient, zero carbon community which is actively adapting to the impacts of climate change.

13.     Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan sets out a decarbonisation pathway and two core goals:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per cent by 2030 and achieve net zero emissions by 2050; and

·        to adapt to the impacts of climate change by ensuring we plan for the changes we face under our current emissions pathway.

14.     The opportunity to examine the connection between the Auckland-wide plan and local action was identified by the Kaipātiki Local Board in its 2021/2022 local board work programme. The local board allocated $20,000 to this project through the 2021/2022 work programme, and staff subsequently supplemented this by an investment of $15,000 from regional climate budgets to ensure completion of the plan.

15.     Using these funds, staff have worked with the community to develop a local climate action plan. The plan defines focus areas at a local level that align with ‘Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan’ and will contribute to Auckland’s overall greenhouse gas emission reduction target.

16.     The action plan was developed in alignment with the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan 2020. In particular, the action plan supports the Local Board Plan (outcome to keep ‘our environment protected and restored for future generations to enjoy’ and the objectives that ‘our people are environmentally aware and work together to live sustainably’ and to ‘support coastal communities to be prepared for the impacts of a changing climate.  

17.     Over 26 stakeholders including representatives from key community organisations and businesses, Auckland Council staff, and council-controlled organisations, contributed to developing a draft action plan. The community contributors are identified in the appendix to the action plan document (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

18.     Due to impacts of COVID-19 face-to-face community engagement was limited. Instead, an online hui to develop the draft action plan was held with community engagement on 24 March 2022, facilitated by the Kaipātiki Project. This was followed by interviews with key stakeholders and subject matter experts for additional input. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

19.     The action plan focuses on promoting actions by individuals, households and businesses which will lead to a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. It also includes consideration of how the local board can seek to reduce emissions from infrastructure and buildings in the board area. It gives effect to both local board and regional outcomes which relate to sustainability, carbon reduction and caring for the environment.

20.     The action plan aligns with council’s regional Live Lightly programme launched in October 2017. The Live Lightly programme involves collaboration between community groups, Auckland Council, and partners to engage with Aucklanders about how they can take impactful action to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and live a low carbon lifestyle.

21.     Feedback from community during the development of the Live Lightly programme indicated a need to focus on low or no-cost solutions and initiatives enabling behaviour change, and this feedback has been considered through the development of the action plan.

Structure of the climate plan – Eight priority areas for action

22.     The action plan builds on the Kaipātiki Local Board’s existing environmental and sustainability initiatives and focuses on the eight action priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. These action areas are listed below and are further detailed in Attachment A to this report:

·    Natural Environment

·    Built Environment

·    Transport

·    Economy

·    Community and Coast

·    Food

·    Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai

·    Energy and Industry.

23.     For each of these action areas, the action plan includes:

·    goals based on achieving regional, national, and global greenhouse gas emission reduction targets;

·    opportunities to amplify existing regional and local initiatives; and

·    actions suggested through consultation with community stakeholders, including:

flagship climate action projects for which seed funding should be prioritised by the board where needed and as funding allows over the next three years

a monitoring framework for measuring progress against these targets.

24.     The action plan includes quantitative detail on specific targets, as well as a proposed programme to measure progress against these (refer to Attachment A of the agenda report).

25.     The draft action plan was discussed with the local board at a workshop held on 3 August 2022. Local board members were provided with a full draft plan on 15 August 2022 and feedback received has been incorporated into the final version.

Mechanisms for implementing the plan

26.     The intention of the action plan is for implementation and ownership by the whole community. The Kaipātiki Local Board will support the implementation of the action plan where possible through a variety of mechanisms, including:

·    advocacy

·    funding to enable local project delivery

·    further investigation of potential climate initiatives

·    leadership (delivering projects directly as well as enabling and encouraging others)

·    partnerships

·    promotion

·    monitoring and recognition.


 

Key areas for action in the board area – top priorities and flagship projects

27.     The plan identifies priority areas for the local board to support emissions reductions (particularly in relation to the built environment, active transport, energy and the economy) and key areas to promote climate resilience (particularly, in relation to food and the natural environment).

28.     Within the action plan six flagship projects have been identified. Flagship projects are activities identified as being particularly impactful in reducing carbon emissions and/or empowering community resilience within key priority areas. Flagship projects are detailed in Table One below:

Table One: Kaipātiki Climate Action Plan Flagship projects

Priority areas

Project

Natural Environment

Develop a programme of funded tree plantings from the planting opportunities set out in the Kaipātiki Urban Ngahere Action Plan 2020.

Build Environment

Investigate installing solar power assets on facilities with significant solar potential including:

·    Birkenhead Pool and Leisure Centre

·    Kaipātiki Local Board Office

·    Glenfield Pool and Leisure Centre.

Transport

Identify opportunities to improve active travel infrastructure within forthcoming Connections Network Plan update.

Economy

Host new programme with Sustainable Business Network, Business Improvement Districts and town centre associations to help businesses measure and reduce climate emissions.

Community and Coast

Fund establishment of community climate activator to support community activities to implement plan.

Food

Support community-led low carbon food initiatives such as community gardens, markets, cooking lessons, plant-based meal choices, community fridges and garden projects, such as those set out in the Kaipātiki Naturalisation of Parks Assessment.

Te puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai

Build relationships between local board and interested mana whenua as a foundation for future co-delivery of te taiao projects.

 

Implementation of the plan – appointment of a local climate activator

29.     The Kaipātiki Local Board approved in principle a three-year climate action programme.  In Year One (2021/2022) progress was made towards developing a local climate action plan.

30.     In 2022/2023, once the plan has been adopted, staff will recruit a local climate activator to drive community implementation of the Climate Action Plan. The activator will work with the community to try and identify initial potential sources of investment to support collaboration and amplify community climate action. In 2023/2024, the board will be asked to provide ongoing support for the activator and investment to amplify community climate action as in 2022/2023.

31.     The Kaipātiki Local Board has approved $20,000 to support the plan’s implementation in the 2022/2023 financial year through the activator role (resolution number KT/2022/127). Staff will seek approval of budgets for this project through the respective work programme approval processes each financial year.


 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.     The council’s climate goals as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan are:

·    to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050; and

·    to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

33.     The ‘Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan’ provides a roadmap for Kaipātiki to become a low carbon community and deliver on the goals of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan.

34.     The plan covers all eight priority areas from Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan. Key priorities for the local board area include amplifying current work protecting the natural environment including increased funded tree plantings, reduction of emissions from community facilities, reducing transport emissions through investment in active travel infrastructure, educating and engaging communities and local businesses.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.      Staff from across the council group contributed to the development of the action plan, including representatives from the Chief Sustainability Office, Community Facilities, Auckland Emergency Management, Resilient Land and Coasts, Environmental Services, Parks Services, Local Board Services, Auckland Transport and Tātaki / Auckland Unlimited.

36.      Goals in the action plan relating specifically to the council group are those outlined in existing council group plans and strategies.

37.      Input from key staff from across the council group will continue throughout the implementation of the action plan and will also contribute to periodic review and update of the action plan.  

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.     The action plan supports the Kaipātiki Local Board Plan (2020) outcome to keep ‘our environment protected and restored for future generations to enjoy’ and the objectives that ‘our people are environmentally aware and work together to live sustainably’ and to ‘support coastal communities to be prepared for the impacts of a changing climate.

39.     Kaipātiki Local Board members considered draft versions of the action plan at a workshop held on 3 August 2022. Local board members were provided with a full draft plan on 15 August and staff have incorporated members’ feedback into the final version.

40.     The intention of the action plan is for implementation and ownership by the whole community. The Kaipātiki Local Board will support the implementation of the action plan including through establishing a climate activator position.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

41.     A Te Ao Māori lens was used for the development of the action plan to help frame thinking about and approaches to climate change. This helped ensure that taiao (nature), whenua (land) and tangata (people) remain the focal point for all climate related decisions. Key values and principles of the Te Ora ō Tāmaki Makaurau Wellbeing Framework developed by the Mana Whenua Kaitiaki Forum in response to Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan will be applied as the action plan is developed and implemented.

42.     Staff also presented to the Infrastructure and Environmental Services Mana Whenua Hui, which includes operational kaitiaki representatives of Ngā Iwi Mana Whenua o Tāmaki Makaurau to seek their feedback on development of five local climate action plans, including the Kaipātiki plan in November 2021 and April 2022. Staff also asked mana whenua for feedback on how they would like to be engaged on this project in more depth.

43.     Informal feedback from mana whenua representatives at this hui covered topics such as:

·     the need for local boards to work in partnership with mana whenua to develop climate projects and to support mana whenua as kaitiaki of Auckland’s natural environment

·     desire to be engaged in projects that respond to climate change through a partnership approach

·     the urgent need for more support for mana whenua to respond to climate impacts, particularly in relation to sea level rise and coastal change

·     the need for regional support to be offered to mana whenua to support them with drafting their own climate response plans.

44.     Mana whenua also asked that staff hold one-on-one hui with any iwi that would like to be engaged further. Staff subsequently sent an invitation to representatives of all iwi with an interest in the Kaipātiki area to participate in a one-on-one hui. At the time of writing, only one iwi representative from Waikato-Tainui requested a one-on-one hui.

45.     The rohe of Waikato-Tainui does not include the local board area, but their feedback was still useful to staff in drafting the plan. Some points that were raised at this hui included:

·     need for local boards to reduce their own operational carbon footprint and ‘walk the talk’ by leading efforts to reduce emissions

·     local boards should invest in educating communities about the risks of climate change and supporting them to reduce emissions as quickly as possible

·     more support for Māori-led and rangatahi led climate initiatives, including innovative responses to the climate challenge that draw on mātauranga Māori and indigenous knowledge systems.

46.     Feedback from mana whenua to the Kaipātiki Local Board as part of Auckland Council 10-year Budget 2021-2031 also informed development of the plan. Five iwi (Ngāti Tamaterā, Ngāti Paoa, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Te Kawerau ā Maki) provided feedback. Feedback was received on coastal issues, food, housing, the natural environment, transport, water, waste and Māori engagement.

47.     In response to this feedback, practical ways of supporting kaitiakitanga outcomes have been identified and included in the Te Puāwaitanga ō Te Tātai section of the action plan including supporting rangatahi Māori leadership on climate change, the protection and restoration of our natural environment, strengthening awareness of tikanga, taonga species, and continuing to identify and protect sites of cultural heritage which may be impacted by climate change.

48.     The plan proposes that ongoing engagement with mana whenua be carried out to guide implementation of the action plan and future reviews and updates of the plan.

49.     Staff will also work with the local climate activator to try and identify additional opportunities for the local board to support Māori-led climate or te taiao projects in the future.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

50.     The Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan is aspirational, and as such many of the proposed actions are not currently funded within regional or local board budgets.

51.     The Kaipātiki Local Board currently provides funding for some of the climate actions identified in the Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan through its locally driven initiatives budget and environment grants programme. For example, the local board funds Kaipātiki Project, Pest Free Kaipātiki and Zero Waste Northcote.  The local board has also allocated $20,000 (resolution number KT/2022/127) in 2022/2023 to employ a local climate activator to amplify and support community initiatives in the local climate action plan.

52.     The Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan is aspirational, and as such many of the proposed actions are not currently funded within regional or local board budgets.

53.     Implementing the plan is not solely reliant on investment derived from Auckland Council-related funding. Central government incentives and programmes, philanthropic funding entities, as well as investment decisions of local businesses all have a part to play. The community climate activator will work to identify opportunities for partnerships with businesses and community organisations to leverage funding from external sources to deliver on the aspirations of the action plan.

54.     Auckland Council is also establishing a new Auckland Climate Grant. This will expand the pool of contestable funding that Kaipātiki community groups can apply for to deliver community led actions in this plan.

55.     The intention of the action plan is implementation and ownership by the whole community. As such, flagship projects outlined in the action plan may be subject to change, due to community interest and changes in central government policies and legislation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

56.     There is a risk that some actions within the plan may not be implemented due to budgetary constraints from council and non-council sources. To minimise the risk, it has been communicated in the action plan that the intention of the plan is implementation and ownership by the whole community.

57.     Flagship projects outlined in the action plan may be subject to change, due to factors such as community interest, funding, and legislative changes. The action plan is designed as an evolving plan with regular updates in anticipation of a rapidly changing environment as Auckland and Aotearoa’s climate response accelerates.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

58.     Following the local board’s approval of the Kaipātiki Local Climate Action Plan, recruitment for the climate activator position will commence. This position will support and amplify community initiatives to implement the board’s local climate action plan. A work programme will be developed and agreed with the Kaipātiki Local Board.

59.     The local board has allocated $20,000 to support recruitment of the local climate activator in 2022/2023 (resolution number KT/2022/127). Approval of budgets for this project will be sought through the respective work programme approval processes each financial year.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Kaipātiki Climate Action Plan

107

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Brandii Stephano - Relationship Advisor

Authorisers

Barry Potter - Director Infrastructure and Environmental Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/12456

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To seek local board adoption of the 2021/2022 Annual Report for the Kaipātiki Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The Auckland Council Annual Report 2021/2022 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 September 2022. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2021/2022 Kaipātiki Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report.

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the Chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Horopaki

Context

3.       In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.       In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.       The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.       The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.       Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.       Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the local board chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.       The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.     The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2021/2022.

11.     There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.     The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.     The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.     The next steps for the draft 2021/2022 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2022

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 September 2022

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 September 2022

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Draft 2021/2022 Kaipātiki Local Board Annual Report

175

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Sugenthy Thomson - Lead Financial Advisor

Authorisers

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisory

Louise Mason – General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Kaipātaki Local Board: Quarter Four, 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/13767

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide the Kaipātaki Local Board with an update on Council-Controlled Organisation (CCO) work programme items in its area during quarter four 2021/2022, along with updates to the Kaipātaki Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2022. However, this quarter four update is for the 2021/2022 CCO Engagement Plan.

3.       Updates will be provided to local boards each quarter to show both changes to the plan itself, and to provide updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

4.       A copy of the Kaipātaki Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 is provided as Attachment A to this report.

5.       Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments B-E. 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      receive the Council-Controlled Organisations Quarterly Update for Quarter Four 2021/2022.

b)      note the following amendment to the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023:

i)        removal of the activity entitled ‘Northcote upgrades’ within the Watercare work programme due to this not being a Watercare activity.

Horopaki

Context

6.       Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four CCOs for the 2022-2023 local work programme.  

7.       While the local board approves the Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date. 

8.       Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

9.       This update may include the following types of changes: 

·        additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·        proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·        proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

10.     In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan. 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Quarter four updates on the 2021/2022 CCO Engagement Plan

11.     The CCO updates for quarter four of 2021/2022 are provided as Attachments B-E as follows:

·        Attachment B - Auckland Transport’s updates for Q4 2021/2022

·        Attachment C - Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s updates for Q4 2021/2022

·        Attachment D - Eke Panuku’s updates for Q4 2021/2022

·        Attachment E - Watercare’s updates for Q4 2021/2022.

Amendments to the 2022/2023 CCO Engagement Plan

12.     A copy of the Kaipātaki Local Board Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 is provided as Attachment A to this report.

13.     Watercare provided clarification through the 2021/2022 Q4 update that the water network upgrades that are happening in Northcote are being delivered by Piritahi, Kāinga Ora’s urban development arm, rather than Watercare. While these developments are typically vested over to Watercare upon completion and commissioning, Watercare are unable to provide ongoing project updates on these. As such, the activity entitled ‘Northcote upgrades’ will be removed from the 2022/2023 CCO Local Board Joint Engagement Plan.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

14.     Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

15.     Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

16.     Receiving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 addresses key elements of recommendations made by the CCO Review, including ensuring the communication of clear, up to date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

17.     These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

18.     Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

19.     Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.     Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

21.     While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

22.     The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

23.     Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

24.     It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the local board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

25.     The local board will receive the next quarterly update for quarter one 2022/2023 in late 2022.

26.     A workshop will be held in early 2023 to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2023/2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting -  2022/2023 Kaipātiki Local Board - Joint CCO Engagement Plan

193

b

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Auckland Transport Q4 2021/2022 report - Kāipatiki Local Board

199

c

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting  - Tātaki Auckland Unlimited Q4 2021/2022 report - Kāipatiki Local Board

201

d

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting  - Eke Panuku Q4 2021/2022 report - Kāipatiki Local Board

207

e

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting  - Watercare Q4 2021/2022 report - Kāipatiki Local Board

209

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Paul Edwards - Senior Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

File No.: CP2022/14143

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to seek high-level input from local boards on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020. This includes:

·    long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

2.       This report also provides an overview of the feedback received through the first stage of the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement that ran from 13 June to 17 July 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.       The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 provides national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991. The fundamental concept of the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs of people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

4.       Auckland Council is required to change the Auckland Unitary Plan to give full effect to Te Mana o te Wai, which must be reflected in all decisions made under the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020.  Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must be notified by December 2024. Action plans must also be prepared and published as soon as practicable to achieve environmental outcomes and freshwater management objectives.

5.       The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 sets the National Objectives Framework and steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow when implementing the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020. Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland.

6.       The first stage of National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value and use freshwater bodies and the environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

7.       Feedback from the first stage engagement will be used, along with existing information and further research and analysis, to develop freshwater management options that will be brought back for a second stage of engagement in the second half of 2023.

8.       There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the engagement period.

9.       Local boards are now invited to provide input to the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020. Local boards can view the feedback form provided during consultation to assist in preparation of feedback at Attachment A to the agenda report.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the feedback received from communities through the first stage of public engagement with the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020, in Attachments D, E, and F to the agenda report

b)      provide feedback on the National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 values including the:

i)        long-term visions for freshwater management

ii)       proposed Freshwater Management Units

iii)      values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

Horopaki

Context

10.     The National Policy Statement - Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) is a mandatory national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA).  The Policy Statement applies to all freshwater (including groundwater) and, to the extent they are affected by freshwater, to receiving environments (which may include estuaries and the wider coastal marine area).

11.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs of people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for social, economic and cultural wellbeing

12.     Regional councils and unitary authorities are required to change regional policy statements and regional plans to give effect to the requirements of the NPS-FM, including Te Mana o te Wai.

13.     Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland. A plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is required for the NPS-FM implementation. The AUP plan change must be notified by December 2024.  The NPS-FM also requires the preparation of action plans to manage the effects of the use and development of land, freshwater and on receiving environments. Action plans must be prepared and published as soon as practicable.

14.     Every council must develop long-term visions for freshwater in its region and include those long-term visions as objectives in its regional policy statement. Long-term visions:

a)   may be set by Freshwater Management Units (FMU), be part of a FMU, or at a catchment level; and

b)   must set goals that are ambitious but reasonable (that is, difficult to achieve but not impossible); and

c)   identify a timeframe to achieve those goals that is ambitious and reasonable (for example, 30 years after the commencement date).

15.     The National Objectives Framework (NOF) is a core part of the NPS-FM, and includes a series of steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow on implementation, including to:

·    identify FMU in the region

·    identify values for each FMU

·    set environmental outcomes for each value and include them as objectives in regional plans

·    identify attributes for each value and set a baseline for those attributes

·    set target attribute states, environmental flows and levels, and other criteria to support the achievement of environmental outcomes

·    set limits as rules and prepare action plans (as appropriate) to achieve environmental outcomes.

16.     FMUs are essentially the spatial arrangements adopted by council for the management of freshwater.  All fresh waterbodies and their related catchments must be within an FMU.  While the NPS-FM is primarily concerned with the management of freshwater, it does also require an integrated management approach – ki uta ki tai – including consideration of the relationship of freshwater and its management to the coastal receiving environment. 

17.     A public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022 through AK Have Your Say and other engagement activities including library events and online webinars. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value freshwater in FMUs and environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for these values.

18.     The public engagement on AK Have Your Say comprised the following:

·    the NPS-FM 2020

·    an overview of the NPS-FM implementation programme

·    NPS-FM implementation timeline

·    the proposed Auckland FMU map

·    the map of the Pukekohe specified vegetable growing area (when implementing the NPS-FM, the council must have regard to the importance of this area for domestic vegetables and food security, and may temporarily have a less stringent approach to water quality issues to ensure this is appropriately recognised)

·    an online feedback form with consultation questions and opportunity to provide comments on the proposed FMUs (also translated into numerous languages)

·    a social pinpoint map allowing people to provide feedback to a water body or within an area

·    Ministry for the Environment factsheets, infographics, and videos on freshwater management

·    access to freshwater planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

19.     Two online webinars and six library drop-in events were undertaken through the engagement period. These engagement activities introduced Auckland Council’s NPS-FM implementation programme and provided opportunities to the public to ask questions and to provide feedback directly.

20.     There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the consultation period, including:

·    128 online feedback forms

·    343 site-specific comments (from 84 submitters) via the Social Pinpoint mapping tool

·    12 hard copy feedback forms

·    23 emails

·    120 comments via library displays where feedback could be provided on post-it notes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.     The NPS-FM has a focus on the identification and management of freshwater values.  It includes four compulsory values (ecosystem health, human contact, threatened species, and mahinga kai) that must be applied and managed in each FMU. There are also other values that must be considered in managing freshwater if they are relevant to Auckland. The list of compulsory values and other values are provided in Attachment C to this report (and are identified as Appendices 1A and 1B of the NPS-FM).  Additionally, the council must identify any other relevant values (i.e. additional to those specifically identified in the NPS-FM) including any additional Māori Freshwater Values as identified by mana whenua.

22.     Overall, submitters raised over 200 individual sites of value to them, while many talked more generally about particular types of, or all, freshwater bodies. The sites named were most commonly located in the Franklin, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Waitematā local board areas.

23.     The values most commonly raised in relation to how submitters use, and would like to use, those freshwater bodies related to:

·    ecosystem health – including water quality and habitat (both generally and for threatened species) in particular

·    natural form and character

·    drinking water supply

·    human contact (that is, for recreational purposes such as swimming, boating, or fishing).

24.     Given the importance of the coastal environment in Auckland, and the impacts from key freshwater issues, such as sediment and E. coli, three FMUs have been proposed for freshwater management based on the three coastal receiving environments for catchments: the Kaipara Harbour, the Manukau Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf (map provided in Attachment B to the agenda report).  This proposed approach provides the opportunity to both address the management of freshwater for its own sake, while also explicitly considering its relationship to the coastal environment.

25.     While submitters were not asked directly whether they supported the Freshwater Management Units or not, comments were provided on a range of matters, including suggestions around amending the proposed boundaries, or rationale behind the boundaries, having more or less FMUs, more location specific detail, and having the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area as a separate FMU.

26.     Other submitters commented on non-FMU specific matters including wetlands, the need for more transparency and action, concern about water quality, the need to prioritise ecosystem health, farming/vegetable growing, and flooding.

27.     The NPS-FM provides for a specified vegetable growing area in Pukekohe that sits within the Manukau FMU. Some comments related to the provision for horticultural land use in Pukekohe.

·        3 supported the provision for continued horticultural use, including irrigation.

·        3 expressed concerns about the impact of horticultural activities on water quality (streams, and aquifers) particularly from fertiliser and nitrates.

28.     Demographic information from those submitters who provided it is detailed in Attachment D to the agenda report.

29.     Data tables naming sites, and their number of mentions by local board area is provided in Attachment E to the agenda report. A full Summary of Feedback report is provided in Attachment F to the agenda report.

30.     Staff are currently undertaking data analysis and a summary report of feedback will be published on AK Have Your Say.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.     The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM Te Mana o te Wai is about restoring and preserving the balance between the water, the wider environment, and the community. This concept is in line with the natural environment priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which sets the goal:

“Oranga taiao, oranga tāngata: a healthy and connected natural environment supports healthy and connected Aucklanders. The mauri (life essence) of Tāmaki Makaurau is restored”.

32.     The NPS-FM includes the following policy direction in response to climate change:

Policy 4: Freshwater is managed as part of New Zealand’s integrated response to climate change.

33.     Every council must have regard to the foreseeable impact of climate change in following areas:

·    when setting limits on resource use, every regional council must:

3.14(2)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when setting environmental flows and levels, every regional council must:

3.16(4)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when assessing and reporting, as part of each review required by section 35(2A) of the RMA, every regional council must prepare and publish:

3.30(2)(g) predictions of changes, including the foreseeable effects of climate change, that are likely to affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in the region.

34.     The implementation of the NPS-FM will help to promote the resilience of freshwater ecosystems to the effects of climate change.  The development of freshwater action plans will require sustainable land and water management practices to enhance the mauri and health of waterways, which is in line with actions prioritised in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.     The NPS-FM is relevant to all of the council’s functions. All relevant council departments and Council Controlled Organisations (CCOs) are involved in the NPS-FM implementation, including participation in a Steering Committee overseeing the development and implementation of the programme. This includes having an ongoing role in supporting the NPS-FM engagement, and providing input and review of responses developed to give effect to the NPS-FM.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.     Under the Local Government Act 2002, local boards are responsible for identifying and communicating to Auckland Council the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards have a detailed understanding of their areas including freshwater values and issues and are in a position to provide important input to the development of NPS-FM responses, including in relation to the matters covered by this round of public engagement. 

37.     Prior to the public engagement a memo titled “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland” was provided to all local boards on 26 May 2022. The memo advised the key principles, consultation and timeframe requirements of implementing the NPS-FM, and the opportunities for local board input through the process This memo is included as Attachment G to the agenda report.

38.     A webinar presentation titled “National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020” was also presented to local boards on 3 June 2022.  In response to feedback from elected members, the period for providing input had been extended for local boards to September 2022 to allow local boards time to provide feedback following the close of public engagement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.     The NPS-FM says the council must “actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in freshwater management” including in identifying Māori values and decision-making processes relating to Māori freshwater values.

40.     Engagement with mana whenua in Auckland is being undertaken through an on-going process, directly with mana whenua entities throughout the preparation of a plan change and development of action plans.

41.     Engagement with the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau about the NPS-FM has also been undertaken in the broader context of Three Waters Reform and the development and implementation of the council’s Water Strategy, to enable mana whenua to provide a more holistic consideration of the management of water.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.     The first stage of the NPS-FM engagement was undertaken within the business-as-usual planning budget. This budget covers primarily staff time and the public engagement.

43.     The budget required for NPS-FM engagement in 2023, and for implementation of the project through to 2026 is presently under discussion.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.     The government has set a deadline of December 2024 for the council to publicly notify the AUP plan change in response to the provisions of the NPS-UD. Given the scale and complexity of the work, and limited resources, there is a risk that the council may not receive sufficient quality feedback from a wide range of interests. There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-FM and how the NPS-FM engagement links to previous water related engagements, for example the Auckland Water Strategy engagement and the Three Waters Reform engagement.

45.     These risks have been mitigated to date by communicating with communities and stakeholders during the engagement period, through meetings, emails, and online Question & Answer sessions. There will be further and ongoing communication to obtain quality engagement results to progress the NPS-FM implementation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.     The feedback received from the first stage engagement on the values and the environmental outcomes sought, together with the NPS-FM requirements, will inform the development of objectives and proposed management options to achieve the objectives.

47.     A second phase of public engagement will be undertaken to seek feedback on the proposed objectives and management approaches for FMUs and water bodies. This will be undertaken in the second half of 2023 to provide opportunity for communities and stakeholders, and local boards for further involvement.  

48.     The feedback received from the second phase of engagement will further inform the development of a proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan and the development of action plans.

49.     Elected representatives will have opportunities to review the proposed plan change and action plans as they evolve, and before the plan change is approved for public notification in the second half of 2024 to meet the NPS-FM deadline of notification before December 2024.

50.     Submissions to the plan change will be heard by an independent Freshwater Hearing Panel who will make recommendations back to council by 2026.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback Form

219

b

Map of Proposed Freshwater Management Units

227

c

NPS-FM freshwater values

229

d

Who we heard from

231

e

Local Board breakdowns

235

f

Summary of Feedback Report

245

g

Memo to local boards on 26 May 2022: Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland

275

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Xu, Senior Policy Planner, Regional planning team, Plans and Places

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager - Planning, Regional, North, West & Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations

File No.: CP2022/14144

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       To provide for appropriate arrangements for decision-making between the final local board meeting of the current electoral term and the inaugural meeting of the new local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       The last meeting of the Kaipātiki Local Board in this current term is scheduled for 20 September 2022. Between that meeting and the first meeting of the local board in the new term, decisions may be needed from the local board. As for each of the previous terms, temporary arrangements for making these decisions need to be confirmed.

3.       The term of office of the current local board members ends the day following the official declaration of election results. Following the declaration, which is expected to be Friday 14 October 2022, the term of office for members elected to the local board will commence.

4.       For the period from the commencement of their term of office until their inaugural meeting where members are sworn in (interregnum), decisions may be made by the Auckland Council Chief Executive under existing delegations.

5.       The existing local boards delegation to the Chief Executive requires, amongst other things, that staff consult with the allocated local board portfolio holder/lead on certain decisions. As a temporary measure, this report seeks to allow staff to make decisions without complying with the requirement for consultation during the interregnum. 

6.       Staff also seek confirmation of arrangements for making decisions at the local board level in the period between the final local board meeting and the official end of term. The urgent decision delegations and process that is already in place adequately caters for this scenario.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      confirm that the local board’s existing urgent decisions delegations process will be utilised where decisions are required from the local board between the final local board business meeting (20 September 2022) and the end of term (15 October 2022).

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board (interregnum), all decision-making will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under current delegations.

c)      note that the Chief Executive will not be required to comply with consultation requirements in the local boards’ delegation protocols when making decisions during the interregnum.

d)      request that the Chief Executive exercise restraint when making decisions during the interregnum and to consider referring significant decisions to the first meeting of the incoming local board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.       Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results (Sections 115 and 116, Local Electoral Act 2001). The declaration will be publicly notified on 14 October 2022, with the term of office of current members ending and the term of office of new members commencing on 15 October 2022.

8.       The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting (Clause 14, Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

9.       Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, decisions may be needed on urgent matters or routine business as usual that cannot wait until the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

10.     As with each of the previous electoral terms, temporary arrangements need to be made and/or confirmed for:

·    making urgent decisions before the end of term

·    making decisions that require consultation with local board/local board members during the interregnum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent decisions – arrangement for remainder of the term

11.     Between the last business meeting and the declaration of results expected around 14 October 2022, current local board members are still in office and can use their existing urgent decisions delegations to make decisions that are required from the local board during this time.

12.     The urgent decisions process includes a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson that enables them to make decisions on behalf of the local board where it is not practical to call the full board together.

13.     All requests for an urgent decision will need to be supported by adequate staff advice and information and clear recommendations.

Decision-making during the interregnum

14.     All local boards have made a general delegation to the Chief Executive. During the interregnum, any decisions that will be required from the local board, and which cannot wait until a local board meeting, will be undertaken by the Chief Executive under his existing delegations.

15.     The delegation to the Chief Executive is subject to a requirement to comply with the delegation protocols, which require consulting with the local board on some decisions that are made by staff under delegated authority. Consultation is often done through a local board lead (referred to as a portfolio holder in the delegation protocols). The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland.

16.     During the current term, while the elected members remain in office, staff will continue to consult with leads/portfolio holders as required by the delegation protocols (or chairperson where there is no portfolio holder). However, during the interregnum, staff will be unable to comply with this requirement due to the absence of appointed portfolio holders/lead/chairpersons to consult with.

17.     As a temporary measure, it is recommended that staff continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until the local board’s first business meeting without consultation. Following the election of chairpersons at the inaugural meetings, staff will consult with the chairperson when and if required and can resume consultation with appointed representatives once new arrangements for leads/portfolio holders are in place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.     This report relates to procedural matters and has no quantifiable climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.     The arrangements proposed in this report enable the council to proceed with necessary business during the election period. During the interregnum, staff will exercise restraint and ensure that any significant decisions are deferred to the incoming local board.

20.     These arrangements apply only to local boards. The reduced political decision-making will be communicated to the wider council group.

21.     The governing body has made its own arrangements to cover the election period, including delegating the power to make urgent decisions between the last governing body meeting of the term and the day the current term ends, to any two of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor and a chairperson of a committee of the whole. From the commencement of the term of office of the new local board members until the governing body’s inaugural meeting, the Chief Executive will carry out decision-making under his current delegations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.     This is a report to all local boards that proposes arrangements to enable the council to process routine local matters during the election period. This will enable the council to meet timeframes and provide good customer service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.     A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.     This report and decision being sought relates to a procedural matter and does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.     There is a risk that unforeseen decisions will arise during this period, such as a decision that is politically significant or a decision that exceeds the Chief Executive’s financial delegations.

26.     This risk has been mitigated by scheduling meetings as late as possible in the current term and communicating to reporting staff that significant decisions should not be made during October 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.     The decision of the local board will be communicated to senior staff so that they are aware of the arrangements for the month of October 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report

File No.: CP2022/00239

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       An opportunity is provided for the Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson to update members on recent activities, projects and issues since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the chairperson’s report.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Kaipātiki Local Board Chairperson's Report John Gillon September 2022

289

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Members' Reports

File No.: CP2022/00247

 

  

 

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for members to update the Kaipātiki Local Board on the projects and issues they have been involved with since the last meeting.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note any verbal reports of members.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board Members' Update

File No.: CP2022/00255

 

  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

1.       An opportunity is provided for Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board members to update the board on Governing Body or Independent Māori Statutory Board issues, or issues relating to the Kaipātiki Local Board.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the Governing Body and Independent Māori Statutory Board members’ verbal updates.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Workshop Records - Kaipātiki Local Board - August and September 2022

File No.: CP2022/12554

 

  

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.       The purpose of this report is to record the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 3 August 2022, Wednesday 24 August 2022, Wednesday 7 September 2022 and Wednesday 14 September 2022.  

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 3 August 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Kaipātiki Local Grant Round One 2022/2023

·     Infrastructure and Environmental Services

-     Kaipātiki Local Board Climate Action Plan

·     Business Improvement Districts (BIDS) – Birkenhead and Northcote

-     Birkenhead Town Centre Business Association

-     Northcote Town Centre Business Association

·     Healthy Waters Regionwide Network Discharge Consent Feedback

3.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 24 August 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Auckland Transport

-     Local Board Transport Capital Fund projects and update on budget impact

·     Northcote development update

-     Northcote, Kāinga ora, Eke Panuku, Te Ara Awataha

·     Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

-     Eventfinda Stadium update

4.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 7 September 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Community Facilities

-     Work programme changes

·     Auckland Transport

-     Community Bike Hubs - Te Poka Pū Paihikara i tēnei Hapori

5.       At the workshop held on Wednesday 14 September 2022, the workshop session was on:

·     Kāinga ora regional update

·     Steps to Success – Kaipātiki Community Facilities Trust

·     Birkenhead Heritage Trail

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Kaipātiki Local Board:

a)      note the record for the Kaipātiki Local Board workshop held on Wednesday 3 August 2022, Wednesday 24 August 2022, Wednesday 7 September 2022 and Wednesday 14 September 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 3 August 2022 workshop record

305

b

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 24 August 2022 workshop record

307

c

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 7 September 2022 workshop record

309

d

21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - 14 September 2022 workshop record

311

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Jacinda Gweshe - Democracy Advisor

Authorisers

Eric Perry - Local Area Manager

 

 


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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21 September 2022

 

 

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Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ATTACHMENTS

 

Item 8.1      Attachment a    21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Onepoto Domain Pond Flooding presentation                                                   Page 317

Item 8.3      Attachment a    21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board Business Meeting - Skate presentation                        Page 329

Item 8.4      Attachment a    21 September 2022 - Kaipātiki Local Board business meeting - Northern Rovers Artificial Turf Presentation                                                   Page 335


Kaipātiki Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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21 September 2022

 

 

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21 September 2022

 

 

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