I hereby give notice that an ordinary meeting of the Rodney Local Board will be held on:

 

Date:

Time:

Meeting Room:

Venue:

 

Wednesday, 21 September 2022

3.00pm

Council Chamber
Orewa Service Centre and via Microsoft Teams (Hybrid meeting)

 

Rodney Local Board

 

OPEN AGENDA

 

 

 

 

MEMBERSHIP

 

Chairperson

Phelan Pirrie

 

Deputy Chairperson

Beth Houlbrooke

 

Members

Brent Bailey

 

 

Steve Garner

 

 

Danielle Hancock

 

 

Tim Holdgate

 

 

Louise Johnston

 

 

Colin Smith

 

 

(Quorum 5 members)

 

 

 

Natasha Yapp

Democracy Advisor

 

19 September 2022

 

Contact Telephone: +64 274245648

Email: natasha.yapp@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

Website: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

 

 


 

Local Board Member

Organisation

Position

Brent Bailey

Central Shooters Inc

Auckland Shooting Club

Royal NZ Yacht Squadron

President

Member

Member

Steven Garner

Warkworth Tennis and Squash Club

Sandspit Yacht Club

Warkworth Gamefish Club

President

Member

Member

Louise Johnston

Blackbridge Environmental Protection Society

Treasurer

Vicki Kenny

International Working Holidays Ltd

Nannies Abroad Ltd

Director/Owner/CEO

Director/Owner/CEO

Danielle Hancock

Kaukapakapa Residents and Ratepayers Association

Pest Free Kaukapakapa

New Zealand Biosecurity Services Limited

Member

 

Pest Free Coordinator

Operations Manager

Tim Holdgate

Landowners Contractors Protection Association

Agricultural & Pastoral Society - Warkworth

Vice Chairman

 

Committee member

Beth Houlbrooke

Kawau Boating Club

Springboard Advisory Board

Committee Member

Member

Phelan Pirrie

Muriwai Volunteer Fire Brigade

Grow West Ltd

North West Country Incorporated

Officer in Charge

Director

Manager

Colin Smith

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

ITEM   TABLE OF CONTENTS            PAGE

1          Welcome                                                                                                             5

2          Apologies                                                                                                           5

3          Declaration of Interest                                                                   5

4          Confirmation of Minutes                                                                                   5

5          Leave of Absence                                                                                             5

6          Acknowledgements                                                                       5

7          Petitions                                                                                          5

8          Deputations                                                                                     5

9          Public Forum                                                                                                     5

10        Extraordinary Business                                                                 5

11        Grant a community lease to Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated for land at Shoesmith Recreation Reserve, Shoesmith Street, Warkworth                  7

12        Grant a community lease to West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, 2 Tapu Road, Huapai                                                   19

13        Grant a licence to occupy to Omaha Beach Community Incorporated (on behalf of The Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board) for land at Omaha Spit, Omaha North, for the location of a storage shed                                              31

14        Grant landowner approval and a licence to occupy to Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated (on behalf of Mahurangi West Community Response Group) for land at Mahurangi West Reserve, for the location of a storage shed 45

15        Wellsford Centennial Park - approval of draft masterplan for public consultation                                                                      59

16        Development of Reserve within Stage 4, Milldale subdivision                                                                                                        85

17        Auckland Transport update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund                                                                                109

18        Auckland Transport update on the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate - September 2022                            115

19        Auckland Transport update on the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate Bus Services - September 2022    131

20        Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022                                    173

21        Reallocation of 2022/2023 Rodney Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme - Civic Events          189

22        New private road name at 289 Sharp Road, Sandspit           193

23        New private road names and a road name extension at 217 Matua Road and 46 Gilbransen Road, Huapai                        203

24        Council-controlled Organisations quarterly update: quarter four 2021-2022                                                                            213

25        Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management                                                           217

26        2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations                                                                                225

27        Project Leads update                                                                 229

28        Rodney Ward Councillor update                                              241

29        Rodney Local Board workshop records                                 247

30        Valedictory reflections: end of term address                         255

31        Consideration of Extraordinary Items

PUBLIC EXCLUDED

32        Procedural Motion to Exclude the Public                                                  259

C1       Sandspit Carpark - options to provide an improved parking service                                                                                         259


1          Welcome

 

 

 

2          Apologies

 

            An apologiey from Member V Kenny has been received.

 

3          Declaration of Interest

 

Members are reminded of the need to be vigilant to stand aside from decision making when a conflict arises between their role as a member and any private or other external interest they might have.

 

4          Confirmation of Minutes

 

That the Rodney Local Board:

confirm the ordinary minutes of its meeting, held on Wednesday, 17 August 2022, including the confidential section, as a true and correct record.

 

 

5          Leave of Absence

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for leave of absence had been received.

 

6          Acknowledgements

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for acknowledgements had been received.

 

7          Petitions

 

At the close of the agenda no requests to present petitions had been received.

 

8          Deputations

 

Standing Order 7.7 provides for deputations. Those applying for deputations are required to give seven working days notice of subject matter and applications are approved by the Chairperson of the Rodney Local Board. This means that details relating to deputations can be included in the published agenda. Total speaking time per deputation is ten minutes or as resolved by the meeting.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for deputations had been received.

 

9          Public Forum

 

A period of time (approximately 30 minutes) is set aside for members of the public to address the meeting on matters within its delegated authority. A maximum of 3 minutes per item is allowed, following which there may be questions from members.

 

At the close of the agenda no requests for public forum had been received.

 

10        Extraordinary Business

 

Section 46A(7) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“An item that is not on the agenda for a meeting may be dealt with at that meeting if-

 

(a)        The local authority by resolution so decides; and

 

(b)        The presiding member explains at the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public,-

 

(i)         The reason why the item is not on the agenda; and

 

(ii)        The reason why the discussion of the item cannot be delayed until a subsequent meeting.”

 

Section 46A(7A) of the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 (as amended) states:

 

“Where an item is not on the agenda for a meeting,-

 

(a)        That item may be discussed at that meeting if-

 

(i)         That item is a minor matter relating to the general business of the local authority; and

 

(ii)        the presiding member explains at the beginning of the meeting, at a time when it is open to the public, that the item will be discussed at the meeting; but

 

(b)        no resolution, decision or recommendation may be made in respect of that item except to refer that item to a subsequent meeting of the local authority for further discussion.”


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Grant a community lease to Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated for land at Shoesmith Recreation Reserve, Shoesmith Street, Warkworth

File No.: CP2022/11299

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval for a new community lease to Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated for land at Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve, Shoesmith Street, Warkworth.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated holds a lease for land on which its clubrooms and associated improvements are located at Shoesmtih Domain Recreation Reserve. The lease commenced 1 May 1992 for a term of 19 years and expired 30 April 2011. The lease agreement is holding over on a month-by-month basis on its existing terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is granted.

3.      This lease project was originally approved as item 1822 in the Community Facilities 2016/2017 work programme (resolution number RODPC/2016/36) and subsequently deferred in the absence of an application by the Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated for a new lease.

4.      The Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated have formally applied for a new community lease to continue its occupation and operations at Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve, Shoesmith Street, Warkworth.

5.      The Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated facilities support the activities that are involved in the game of football. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome five “our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community”.

6.      The Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds, and it is being managed appropriately. The Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

7.      In recent years, the Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated has tabled the potential to co-locate with Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated on Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve.

8.      To allow for any future co-location, a new lease agreement needs to include:

·   an early termination clause for the benefit of the club to provide for this eventuality

·   a clause to require the Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated on 12 months written notice by council as landlord to remove its existing clubroom and remediate the subject land.

9.      This report recommends the local board grant Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated a new community lease for land at Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve, terms and conditions to include as follows:

·   a term of 10 years commencing from 22 September 2022 with one 10 year right of renewal

·   an early termination clause to provide for any future shared facility and to require the club to remove its existing clubroom and associated improvements and remediate the subject land.

10.    If the local board resolves to grant the lease, staff will work with the Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated, under section 54(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease for land comprising 260 square metres (more or less) located at Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve, Shoesmith Street, legally described as described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 205450 (Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – 10 years, commencing 21 September 2022, with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      an early termination clause for the benefit of the Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated to provide council as landlord with 12 months written notice to allow for any future co-location to a multi-sports facility on Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve

iv)      a community outcomes plan will be appended as a schedule to the lease agreement.

b)      approve Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan (Attachment B to the agenda report).

c)      note that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

11.    Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

12.    This item was originally approved as item 1822 in the Community Facilities 2016/2017 work programme (resolution number RODPC/2016/36) and subsequently deferred in the absence of an application by the Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated (the club) for a new lease.

13.    The club now has a strong committee and in August 2021, the club president furnished council with a completed application form for a new lease. This report recommends the grant of a new community lease to the club for its area occupied at Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve.

Land, building and lease

14.    Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve is located at Shoesmith Street, Warkworth. The reserve comprises six land parcels totalling 5.2780 hectares. The land parcel occupied by the club is owned in fee simple by Auckland Council and legally described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 205450. The land is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is classified as recreation reserve.

15.    Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated has occupied an area on Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve since 1992 by way of a community lease originally entered into with the former Rodney District Council. The lease provided for the club to construct its building and associated improvements on the reserve.

16.    Contained within the club’s lease area is the building and associated improvements, a shipping container (for storage) and a concreted area on which the club places its heavy football equipment. On 22 April 2022, staff undertook a site visit at which time the club’s building and associated improvements were found to be well managed and maintained.

17.    The lease commenced 1 May 1992 for one term of 19 years. The lease has now expired, and the agreement is currently holding over on a month-by-month basis on its existing terms and conditions.

18.    The club has formally applied to council for a new lease term. Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 informs staff recommendations, including standard terms and conditions. For groups that own their improvements, council staff typically recommend an initial term of 10 years with one right of renewal for 10 years.

19.    The reserve is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is classified as recreation reserve. The classification legally supports a lease. The club’s activities are consistent with the operative Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve Management Plan adopted on 7 May 2009 by the former Rodney District Council.

20.    The club has tabled the potential to co-locate with the Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective Incorporated on Warkworth Showgrounds Reserve. As such, staff has recommended an initial term of 10 years with one right of renewal for 10 years with the inclusion of a 12-month early termination clause. The clause would provide for any future co-location and to require the club to remove its existing clubroom and associated improvements and remediate the subject land.

Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated

21.    Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club was duly incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 21 September 1990.

22.    The club has a membership of 230 and a strong and active committee who are passionate about driving the club forward. The club intends to upgrade its clubrooms, subject to the local board grant of a new community lease.

23.    The club is affiliated to Northern Regional Football and New Zealand Football.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

24.    Under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club has exercised this right by applying for a new lease.

25.    As the lease to the club is contemplated and in conformity with the operative reserve management plan for Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve, public notification was not required. Engagement with mana whenua has been undertaken as Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities to build relationships with Māori.

Assessment of the lease application

26.    The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting its request for a new lease and is able to demonstrate its ability to manage and maintain its facility.

27.    The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet its liabilities. The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

28.    A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with the club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community (Attachment B). Subject to local board approval, the plan will be appended as a schedule to the new lease agreement.

29.    Staff recommend that the local board grant Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated a new lease for a term of 10 years commencing from 21 September 2022 with one 10 year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

30.    To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·   use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·   use eco labelled products and services

·   seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·   include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

31.    All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

32.    Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone (Attachment C to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

33.    Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted on the proposed new lease. The table below contains detailed feedback:

Relevant team

Feedback

Sport and Recreation Lead, Parks Sports and Recreation

No issues from my perspective.”

Sport and Recreation Lead, Sport and Recreation Team

“Support from Sport and Recreation perspective. Club is an important part of the Warkworth community and an active participant in Mahurangi Community Sport and Recreation Collective. Future development of “clubrooms” at Warkworth Showgrounds are still a few years off, so continuing at Shoesmith as proposed makes sense to me.”

Senior Sports Park Maintenance Coordinator, Area Operations, Community Facilities

“All good, no objections.”

Service and Asset Planning Specialist, Service Investment and Programming

The new community lease to the football club sounds good. The draft intentions for this park align with continuing this current state.”

34.    The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.    The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

a)      Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need (outcome four).

b)      Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community (outcome five).

36.    The leasing staff provided a memorandum on progressing the proposed new community lease to Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated which was circulated to the local board on 9 May 2022. The local board did not raise any concerns.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

37.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are outlined in council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

38.    For the purposes of seeking feedback from mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in land in the local board geographical area, staff prepared a PowerPoint document containing detail on the proposed new lease.

39.    On 27 May 2022, staff emailed the document to key representatives for mana whenua as follows; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Maru, Ngati Pāoa, Ngāti Te Ata, Ngātiwai, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Patu Kirikiri and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua.

40.    The table below contains feedback received:

Iwi group

Feedback

Action taken

Te Ākitai Waiohua

 

“Further to the above, I have no feedback to offer, other than to say that I'll defer to those Iwi Mana Whenua, with a more focused interest in the respective LB areas.”

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.    There is no direct cost to council associated with the grant of a new lease. Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated will continue to take responsibility for all operational and renewal costs involved with its building and other improvements located on Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

42.    Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated at Shoesmith Domain Recreation Reserve, this will negatively impact the club’s ability to undertake all current and future activities. This would have an adverse impact on the achievement of the respective local board plan outcomes.

43.    A new lease would afford the club security of tenure, enabling it to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the club vacate its building, there would be a risk associated with lack of maintenance. In this scenario, council would be liable for the club’s building and other improvements regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals. Similarly, the required building renewals does not appear in the annual work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.    If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

GIS aerial view showing lease area outlined in red

13

b

Warkworth Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated community outcomes plan

15

c

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer

17

      

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Grant a community lease to West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, 2 Tapu Road, Huapai

File No.: CP2022/11293

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval for a new community lease to West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, 2 Tapu Road, Huapai.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Western United Football and Sports Club Incorporated currently holds a lease for land on which its clubrooms and associated improvements are located. The lease commenced 1 February 1990 for an initial term of 13 years and provided for one right of renewal for 13 years, expiring 31 January 2016. The lease agreement is holding over on a month-by-month basis on its existing terms and conditions until terminated or a new lease is granted.

3.      In 2020, Western United Football and Sports Club Incorporated and Waitakere City Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated amalgamated and formed the new entity West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated.

4.      This lease project was originally approved as item 1848 in the Community Facilities 2016/2017 work programme (resolution number RODPC/2016/36) and subsequently deferred in the absence of an application by the West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated for a new lease.

5.      The West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated have formally applied for a new community lease to continue its occupation and operations at Huapai Recreation Reserve, 2 Tapu Road, Huapai.

6.      The West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated facilities support the activities that are involved in the game of football. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome five “our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community”.

7.      The West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds, and it is being managed appropriately. The West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability and building insurance, in place.

8.      In recent years, the West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated (along with other sports clubs in the Huapai/Kumeū areas) has tabled the potential to co-locate on Huapai Recreation Reserve.

9.      To allow for any future co-location, a new lease agreement needs to include:

·   an early termination clause for the benefit of the club to provide for this eventuality

·   a clause to require the West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated on 12 months written notice by council as landlord to remove its existing clubroom and remediate the subject land.

10.    This report recommends the local board grant West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated a new community lease for land at Huapai Recreation Reserve, terms and conditions to include as follows:

·   a term of 10 years commencing from 22 September 2022 with one 10-year right of renewal

·   an early termination clause to provide for any future shared facility and to require the West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated to remove its existing clubroom and associated improvements and remediate the subject land.

11.    If the local board resolves to grant the lease, staff will work with the West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated to finalise the lease agreement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated, under section 54(1)(b) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new community lease for land comprising 655 square metres (more or less) located at Huapai Recreation Reserve, 2 Tapu Road, Huapai legally described as described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan 54548 (Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – 10 years, commencing 21 September 2022, with one 10-year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      an early termination clause for the benefit of the West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated to provide council as landlord with 12 months written notice to allow for any future multi-sports co-location on the reserve

iv)      a community outcomes plan will be appended as a schedule to the lease agreement.

b)      approve West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan (Attachment B to the agenda report)

c)      note that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

12.    Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

13.    This item was originally approved as item 1848 in the Community Facilities 2016/2017 work programme (resolution number RODPC/2016/36) and subsequently deferred in the absence of an application by the West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated (the club) for a new lease.

14.    The Rodney Local Board approved the Customer and Community Services: Community Leases Work Programme 2022/2023 at its local board business meeting of 22 June 2022 (Resolution number RD/2022/79).

15.    The progression of a new lease to West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated at Huapai Recreation Reserve was listed on the approved work programme as item 3357. This report recommends the grant of a new community lease as approved on the work programme.

Land, building and lease

16.    Huapai Recreation Reserve is located at 2 Tapu Road, Huapai. The reserve comprises 12 land parcels totalling 17.0629 hectares. The land parcel occupied by the club is owned by the Crown and held through the Department of Conservation, legally described as Lot 1 Deposited Plan. The land is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is classified as recreation reserve.

17.    West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated (formerly Western United Football and Sports Club Incorporated) has occupied an area on Huapai Recreation Reserve since 1900 by way of a community lease originally entered into with the former Rodney District Council. The lease provided for the club to construct its building and associated improvements on the reserve.

18.    On 8 April 2022, staff undertook a site visit at which time the club’s building and associated improvements were found to be well managed and maintained.

19.    The lease commenced 1 February 1990 for one term of 13 years and provides for one right of renewal for 13 years. The club exercised its right of renewal, and the lease has now expired. The lease agreement is currently holding over on a month-by-month basis on the existing terms and conditions.

20.    The club has formally applied to council for a new lease term. Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 informs staff recommendations, including standard terms and conditions. For groups that own their improvements, council staff typically recommend an initial term of 10 years with one right of renewal for 10 years.

21.    The land is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is classified as recreation reserve. The classification legally supports a lease. The club’s activities are consistent with the operative Huapai Reserve Management Plan adopted on 4 November 1998 by the former Rodney District Council Rural and Townships Area Committee.

22.    As the club (along with other sports clubs in the Huapai/Kumeū areas) has tabled the potential to co-locate on Huapai Recreation Reserve, in this instance, staff has recommended an initial term of 10 years with one right of renewal for 10 years with the inclusion of a 12-month early termination clause. The clause would provide for any future shared facility and to require the club to remove its existing clubroom and associated improvements and remediate the subject land.

West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated

23.    In 2020, Western United Football and Sports Club Incorporated and Waitakere City Association Football and Sports Club Incorporated amalgamated and formed the new entity West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Inc.

24.    West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club was duly incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 22 October 2020. The club has a strong and active committee and is passionate about driving the club forward. The committee has recently completed works to improve its clubrooms (exterior and interior) and it is looking smart.

25.    The club is now the largest football club in west Auckland. The club boasts 1186 members with 1100 active players. The club is an affiliated member of the No 1 District Federation of New Zealand Soccer Incorporated T/A the Northern Football Federation.

26.    Additionally, the club is affiliated to New Zealand Football. It provides an essential part of the community delivery and player development pathway in the region. The club plays in the highest competitions organized by the No 1 District Federation and the Auckland Football Federation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

27.    Under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012, groups that own their buildings have an automatic right to re‑apply for a new lease at the end of their occupancy term. The club has exercised this right by applying for a new lease.

28.    As the lease to the club is contemplated and in conformity with the operative reserve management plan for Huapai Recreation Reserve, public notification was not required. Engagement with mana whenua has been undertaken as Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities to build relationships with Māori.

Assessment of the lease application

29.    The club has submitted a comprehensive application supporting its request for a new lease and is able to demonstrate its ability to manage and maintain its facility.

30.    The club has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet its liabilities. The club has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

31.    A Community Outcomes Plan has been negotiated with West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club to identify the benefits it will provide to the community. Subject to local board approval, the plan will be appended as a schedule to the new lease agreement.

32.    Staff recommend that the local board grant West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated a new lease for a term of 10 years commencing from 21 September 2022 with one 10-year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

33.    To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·   use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·   use eco labelled products and services

·   seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·   include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

34.    All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·   to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·   to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

35.    Climate change has an unlikely potential to impact the lease, as no part of the leased area is located in a flood-sensitive or coastal inundation zone (Attachment C to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.    Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted on the proposed new lease. The table below contains detailed feedback:

Relevant team

Feedback

Sport and Recreation Lead, Parks Sports and Recreation

Please include consideration of the potential for a new shared facility in the future.”

Sport and Recreation Lead, Sport and Recreation Team

“I have no concerns or issues with a new lease being granted.”

Senior Sports Park Maintenance Coordinator, Area Operations, Community Facilities

“I support this, the local board was talking about a new shared structure.”

37.    The proposed new lease has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

38.    The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

a)      Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need (outcome four).

b)      Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community (outcome five).

39.    The leasing staff provided a memorandum on progressing the proposed new community lease to West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated which was circulated to the local board on the 10 May 2022. The local board did not raise any concerns.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are outlined in council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan and local board plans.

41.    For the purposes of seeking feedback from mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in land in the local board geographical area, staff prepared a PowerPoint document containing detail on the proposed new lease.

42.    On 27 May 2022, staff emailed the document to key representatives for mana whenua as follows; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Maru, Ngati Pāoa, Ngāti Te Ata, Ngātiwai, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Patu Kirikiri and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua.

43.    The table below contains feedback received:

Iwi group

Feedback

Action taken

Te Ākitai Waiohua

 

“Further to the above, I have no feedback to offer, other than to say that I'll defer to those Iwi Mana Whenua, with a more focused interest in the respective LB areas.”

 

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

44.    There is no direct cost to council associated with the grant of a new lease. West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated will continue to take responsibility for all operational and renewal costs involved with its building and other improvements located on Huapai Recreation Reserve.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

45.    Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed community lease to West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated at Huapai Recreation Reserve, this will negatively impact the club’s ability to undertake all current and future activities. This would have an adverse impact on the achievement of the respective local board plan outcomes.

46.    A new lease would afford the club security of tenure, enabling it to attend to the scheduled maintenance of the facility. Should the club vacate its building, there would be a risk associated with lack of maintenance. In this scenario, council would be liable for the club’s building and other improvements regardless of whether budget is allocated to or identified for renewals. Similarly, the required building renewals does not appear in the annual work programme.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.    If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new community lease, staff will work with the club to finalise the lease agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

GIS aerial view showing the lease area outlined in red

25

b

West Coast Rangers Football and Sports Club Incorporated community outcomes plan

27

c

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer

29

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Table

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Grant a licence to occupy to Omaha Beach Community Incorporated (on behalf of The Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board) for land at Omaha Spit, Omaha North, for the location of a storage shed

File No.: CP2022/13613

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval for a new licence to occupy to Omaha Beach Community Incorporated (as umbrella group on behalf of The Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board) for 2.7 square metres of land at Omaha Spit, Omaha North, for the purposes of locating a storage shed to accommodate equipment used during shorebird protection activities.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Omaha Beach Community Incorporated as umbrella group on behalf of The Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board has applied to council for a new licence to occupy for 2.7 square metres of land at Omaha Spit. The purpose of the proposed licence to occupy is to locate a storage shed to accommodate Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board’s equipment used during its shorebird protection activities.

3.      To meet council’s eligibility criteria to apply for a formal occupancy agreement, lessees and licensees must carry a minimum of two million dollars public liability insurance cover and also have their respective assets insured. As Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board financials are modest, the annual costs involved in the required insurance cover are prohibitive. As such, Omaha Beach Community Incorporated has given an undertaking that it will act as licensee.

4.      Omaha Beach Community Incorporated has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds, and it is being managed appropriately. Omaha Beach Community Incorporated has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability, in place.

5.      This project was approved by the Rodney Local Board at its business meeting on 22 June 2022 in the Customer and Community Services 2022/2023 work programme (resolution number RD/2022/79).

6.      Omaha Beach Community Incorporated and Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board, respectively, support the activities that are involved in the protection of flora and fauna. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome two “our natural environment is healthy and protected” and outcome four; “our communities are resilient and have access to what they need.”

7.      If the local board resolves to grant the licence, staff will work with Omaha Beach Community Incorporated to finalise the licence agreement.


 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant Omaha Beach Community Incorporated, under section 61(2A)(a) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new licence to occupy for land comprising 2.7 square metres (more or less) at Omaha Spit, located off Ida Way, Omaha North, legally described as Lot 296 Deposited Plan 188414 (Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – five years, commencing 22 September 2022, with one five year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      a community outcomes plan will be appended as a schedule to the licence to occupy agreement

b)      approve the Omaha Beach Community Incorporated community outcomes plan (Attachment B to the agenda report)

c)      note that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

8.      Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

9.      This item was approved as item 3091 in the Customer and Community Services 2022/2023 work programme (resolution number RD/2022/79).

Land, building and licence

10.    Omaha Spit is accessed off Ida Way, Omaha North. The land parcel on which the storage shed is proposed to be located is legally described as Lot 296 Deposited Plan 188414. The land is owned in fee simple by Auckland Council. The land is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is classified as local purpose (wildlife protection) reserve. The classification legally supports a licence to occupy.

11.    The proposed storage shed will be a Duratuf ‘Fortress Tuf 400’ measuring 1.98 metres by 1.355 metres with a wooden base and high security options (Attachment C to the agenda report). Staff has recommended a licence to occupy (non-exclusive use) as opposed to a lease (exclusive use) as the proposed shed will be on skids/removable.

12.    The Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 inform staff recommendations, including standard terms and conditions. The society has formally applied to council for a licence to occupy. In accordance with the guidelines relating to the term of tenure for licence to occupy agreements, council staff recommend an initial term of five years with one right of renewal for five years.

Omaha Beach Community Incorporated (the society)

13.    Omaha Beach Community was duly incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 24 February 1975. The society is domiciled at the Omaha Beach Community Centre by way of a community lease. The society has stepped up, filled and submitted the licence to occupy application, supplied all relevant information and given an undertaking that it will act as licensee as umbrella group on behalf of the trust for the proposed new licence to occupy at Omaha Spit.

The Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board

14.    The Omaha Beach Shorebird Protection Trust Board (the trust) was duly incorporated under the Charitable Trusts Act 1957 on 11 February 2010.

15.    The trust members and volunteers actively check traps, monitor birds, advocate for birds and undertake fundraising as an integral part of their operations. The shed will be used to store spare predator traps and bait, fencing stakes, orange tape, heavy tools, wooden chick shelters and sandbags which are sometimes used to protect vulnerable nests. The trust also intends to keep a first aid kit in the shed.

16.    Currently the equipment for use by members and volunteers of the trust during its shorebird protection activities is stored in a member’s garage at their respective residence. This situation necessitates volunteers going back and forth with the equipment which is neither an efficient use of volunteer hours nor convenient.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.    The grant of a licence to occupy for flora and fauna protection purposes is consistent with the classification of the land under the Reserves Act 1977 (local purpose (wildlife protection) reserve)). Similarly, there is no provision under the Reserves Act to publicly notify the proposed grant of new leases and licences on reserve land classified as local purpose. Engagement with mana whenua has been undertaken as Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities to build relationships with Māori.

18.    On 12 July 2021, Auckland Council’s regulatory team, under its delegated authority, granted resource consent for the realignment of an 85 metre section of the southern-most portion of the existing predator fence, to construct a new shed and to undertake associated earthworks and vegetation removal. The resource consent was required due to the land use component under section 9 of the Resource Management Act 1991 (LUC60379691).

Assessment of the licence to occupy application

19.    The society has submitted a comprehensive application supporting its request for a new licence to occupy on behalf of the trust.

20.    The society has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet its liabilities. The society has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

21.    Staff recommend that the local board grant Omaha Beach Community Incorporated (the society) a new licence to occupy for a term of five years commencing from 22 September 2022 with one, five year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

22.    To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·        include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

23.    All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

24.    Climate change has a potential to impact the licence area as it is located adjacent to a coastal inundation zone. Any impact to the proposed storage shed is mitigated by virtue of its use and purpose and the fact that it will be on skids (Attachment D to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

25.    Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted on the proposed new licence to occupy. The table below contains detailed feedback:

Relevant team

Feedback

Principal Planner, Project Specialisation Office

Yes, resource consent for the shed was included with the application for the fence re-alignment. Please see the resource consent decision attached, granted 12 July 2021.

Parks and Places Specialist, Parks Sports and Recreation

 I have no concerns with this providing the shed is relocatable.

 

Strategic Broker, Connected Communities

All good with me.

Service and Asset Planning Specialist, Service Investment and Programming

Like the recent Mahurangi example, this proposal aligns with the proposed building policy (section 11.2) in the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan (LPMP), especially the policy about setting a clear time limit for structures like this.

 

Obviously this shed will support the Trust’s restoration efforts, which align nicely with the new local purpose (wildlife protection) classification. And the lease/licence contemplation for Omaha Beach Reserve (as outlined in the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan) also allows for this activity.

 

26.    The proposed new licence to occupy has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

27.    The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcomes:

a)      Our natural environment is healthy and protected (outcome two)

b)      Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need (outcome four).

28.    In early July 2022, leasing staff prepared a memorandum for the local board to inform it of the licence application and to seek its informal feedback on progressing the matter. The memorandum was circulated to local board members by way of email, at which time local board members did not raise any specific concerns.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

29.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are outlined in council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, and local board plans.

30.    For the purposes of seeking feedback from mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in land in the local board geographical area, staff prepared a power point document containing detail on the proposed non-exclusive licence to occupy.

31.    On 13 July 2022, staff emailed the document to key representatives for mana whenua as follows; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Maru, Ngati Pāoa, Ngāti Te Ata, Ngātiwai, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Patu Kirikiri and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua.

32.    The table below contains detail of feedback received:

Mana whenua

Feedback

Te Ākitai Waiohua

Further to the above, I defer to Ngāti Manuhiri in this matter, as they are clearly best placed to offer an opinion in going forward.

I trust this is satisfactory.

Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust

Thank you for providing information and details regarding two Licence to Occupy requests for the Mahurangi West Hall + Reserve and Omaha Community Inc. 

I am confirming that the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust support both applications.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

33.    There is no direct cost to council associated with the grant of a new licence to occupy. Omaha Beach Community Incorporated will take responsibility for all operational and renewal costs involved with the proposed shed to be located on Omaha Spit.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

34.    Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed licence to occupy to Omaha Beach Community Incorporated at Omaha Spit this will negatively impact the trust’s ability to undertake all current and future activities. This would have an adverse impact on the achievement of the respective local board plan outcomes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

35.    If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new licence to occupy, staff will work with the society to finalise the licence agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

GIS aerial view showing licence to occupy area outlined in red

37

b

Omaha Beach Community Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

39

c

Image showing proposed new shed (indicative)

41

d

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer in relation to coastal inundation

43

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

A picture containing text

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Table

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Grant landowner approval and a licence to occupy to Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated (on behalf of Mahurangi West Community Response Group) for land at Mahurangi West Reserve, for the location of a storage shed

File No.: CP2022/13626

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek landowner approval to Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated (as umbrella group on behalf of Mahurangi West Community Response Group) for a new storage shed to accommodate equipment used during an emergency event in Mahurangi West Reserve.

2.      To seek approval for a new licence to occupy to Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated (as umbrella group on behalf of Mahurangi West Community Response Group) for 20 square metres of land at Mahurangi West Reserve, Mahurangi West for the purposes of locating a storage shed to accommodate equipment used during an emergency event.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

Landowner approval

3.      Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated as umbrella group on behalf of Mahurangi West Community Response Group seeks landowner approver to locate a new storage shed onto Mahurangi West Reserve.

4.      The new storage shed will replace Mahurangi West Community Response Group’s current storage shed which is no longer fit for purpose.

Licence to occupy

5.      Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated as umbrella group on behalf of Mahurangi West Community Response Group has applied to council for a new licence to occupy for 20 square metres of land at Mahurangi West Reserve, 401 Mahurangi West Road, Mahurangi West. The purpose of the proposed licence to occupy is to locate a storage shed to accommodate Mahurangi West Community Response Group’s equipment for use during an emergency event.

6.      Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporatedhas given an undertaking that it will act as licensee (as umbrella group on behalf of Mahurangi West Community Response Group) to meet council’s eligibility criteria under the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012. The relevant criteria is detailed in the table below:

Relevant eligibility criteria

Satisfaction of requirement

A group must have legal status, i.e. be registered as either an incorporated society or a charitable trust. The Mahurangi West Community Response Group does not have legal status.

The society is incorporated.

Council requires lessees and licensees to carry a minimum of two million dollars public liability insurance cover and have their respective assets insured. As the group’s financials are modest, the annual costs involved in the required insurance cover are prohibitive.

The society has provided all required information, including financials showing that it has sufficient funds, and it is being managed appropriately. The society has all the necessary insurance cover, including public liability, in place.

 

7.      This project is in addition to the list of leasing projects approved by the Rodney Local Board Customer and Community Services 2022/2023 work programme at its business meeting of 22 June 2022 (resolution number RD/2022/79).

8.      Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated and Mahurangi West Community Response Group, respectively, work closely together to support the Mahurangi West community (and the general public) in the event of an emergency. These activities align with the local board plan 2020 outcome four; “our communities are resilient and have access to what they need.”

9.      If the local board resolves to grant the licence, staff will work with the society to finalise the licence agreement.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      grant landowner approval to Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated for the new storage shed and related planting.

b)      grant Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated, under section 61(2A)(a) of the Reserves Act 1977, a new licence to occupy for land comprising 20 square metres (more or less) at Mahurangi West Reserve, 401 Mahurangi West Road, Mahurangi West and legally described as Section 40 Block XV Mahurangi Survey District (Attachment A to the agenda report), subject to the following terms and conditions:

i)        term – five years, commencing 22 September 2022, with one five year right of renewal

ii)       rent – $1.00 plus GST per annum if demanded

iii)      a community outcomes plan will be appended as a schedule to the licence to occupy agreement

c)      approve the Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated community outcomes plan (Attachment B to the agenda report)

d)      note that all other terms and conditions will be in accordance with the Reserves Act 1977 and the Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.    Local boards have the allocated authority relating to local recreation, sport and community facilities, including community leasing matters.

11.    This project is in addition to the list of leasing projects approved by the Rodney Local Board Customer and Community Services 2022/2023 work programme at its business meeting of 22 June 2022 (resolution number RD/2022/79).

Landowner approval

12.    Landowner approval is required for construction of the new storage shed.

13.    The new storage shed will house the radios, generators, emergency equipment, plus blankets and food necessary to assist the Mahurangi West community during an emergency. It will also be used as the base for the group’s incident management team during an emergency.

14.    Mahurangi West Community Response Group volunteers will plant and maintain a surround of trees and shrubs to screen the shed from the road and the Hall.

15.    Council staff support the construction of the new shed subject to conditions of accidental discovery and health and safety of the site.

Land, storage shed and licence

16.    The land at Mahurangi West Reserve is held by the Crown through the Department of Conservation and vested in council, in trust, for local purposes. The land is located at 401 Mahurangi West Road, Mahurangi West and legally described as Section 40 Block XV Mahurangi Survey District.

17.    The reserve is subject to the provisions of the Reserves Act 1977 and is classified as local purpose (site for a public hall) reserve. The classification legally supports a licence to occupy for the purposes of storing equipment and supplies necessary to assist the community (and general public) in the event of an emergency.

18.    The new shed is a portable cabin and is approximately 2.6m x 8.0m. It consists of 75mm polystyrene sandwich panel, titanium roof, welded steel chassis resting on screw piles with insulated ceiling and walls, and 18mm marine ply floor. The shed will have fire alarms, fire extinguishers and security lighting.

19.    Staff has recommended a licence to occupy (non-exclusive use) as opposed to a lease (exclusive use) as the proposed shed will be on skids/removable.

20.    The Auckland Council Community Occupancy Guidelines 2012 inform staff recommendations, including standard terms and conditions. In accordance with the guidelines relating to the term of tenure for licence to occupy agreements, council staff recommend an initial term of five years with one right of renewal for five years.

Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated

21.    Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated occupies the site at Mahurangi West Reserve on which it owns its improvements (a community hall and other associated assets) by way of a community lease with council.

22.    Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve was duly incorporated under the Incorporated Societies Act 1908 on 3 October 2002.

23.    The society has filled and submitted the licence to occupy application, supplied all relevant information and given an undertaking that it will act as licensee, as umbrella group on behalf of the group for the proposed new licence to occupy at Mahurangi West Reserve.

Mahurangi West Community Response Group (the group)

24.    The group’s aim is to assist families and residents deal with emergency events arising from hazards such as prolonged power outages, slips, downed trees, tsunami, flooding, and pandemics. The group assists as follows:

a)      By helping residents make plans prior to being faced by an emergency.

b)      By providing help such as an evacuation centre and power supply during the emergency.

c)       By assisting residents to make the best possible recovery by working collaboratively with neighbours and emergency services. As there is only one road and one power line in and out of Mahurangi West, the need for the community to look after itself until emergency services can attend, is critical.

25.    The group works collaboratively with Auckland Emergency Management and other community response groups to help build resilience in Auckland’s communities.

26.    As civil defence preparedness is not an easy message to be constantly putting before a community, the group has recently started two new initiatives to help this process. The group has joined with another local group to hold community days where they can get its message across in a more collaborative and fun environment.

27.    The group has also started a bi-annual community booklet for new and existing residents in the area which contains emergency response information as well as promoting activities at the Mahurangi West Hall and information about other local organisations. The group plan to build other similar initiatives in the coming years.

28.    Currently the group stores its equipment (emergency generators, radios, blankets, food and other equipment) in a small shed on the edge of the parking lot at the Mahurangi West Reserve. The existing shed has reached the end of its useful life.

29.    A licence to occupy will legally allow the group to site a new, removeable storage building on the southeast corner of the parking lot. The group will share some of the storage space with the society.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

30.    The grant of a licence to occupy for emergency preparedness purposes is consistent with the classification of the land under the Reserves Act 1977 (local purpose (site for a public hall) reserve)). Similarly, there is no provision under the Reserves Act to publicly notify the proposed grant of new leases and licences on reserve land classified as local purpose.

31.    Engagement with mana whenua has been undertaken as Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities to build relationships with Māori.

Assessment of the licence to occupy application

32.    The society has submitted a comprehensive application supporting its request for a new licence to occupy on behalf of the trust.

33.    The society has provided financials which show that accounting records are being kept, funds are being managed appropriately and there are sufficient funds to meet its liabilities. The society has all necessary insurance cover, including public liability insurance, in place.

34.    Staff recommend that the local board grant Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated a new licence to occupy for a term of five years commencing from 22 September 2022 with one, five year right of renewal.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

35.    To improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts, the council advocates that the lessee:

·        use sustainable waste, energy and water efficiency systems

·        use eco labelled products and services

·        seek opportunities to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from lease-related activities

·        include any other outcomes that will improve environmental outcomes and mitigate climate change impacts.

36.    All measures taken are aimed at meeting council’s climate goals, as set out in Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which are:

·        to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to reach net zero emissions by 2050 and

·        to prepare the region for the adverse impacts of climate change.

37.    Climate change does not have the potential to impact the licence area as it is neither located within a flood plain nor adjacent to a coastal inundation zone (Attachment C to the agenda report).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.    Council staff from within the Customer and Community Services Directorate have been consulted on the proposed new licence to occupy. The table below contains detailed feedback:

Relevant team

Feedback

Facilities Manager

Nothing to add.

Parks and Places Specialist, Parks Sports and Recreation

No concerns from my perspective.

 

Strategic Broker, Connected Communities

I support this.

Service and Asset Planning Specialist, Service Investment and Programming

Seems like a good idea from a community outcome perspective. I like the shared use of the shed. This aligns with the proposed building policy (section 11.2) in the draft Rodney Local Parks Management Plan. In fact the entire proposal aligns well with all the objectives in this policy and with the policy about setting a clear time limit.

 

39.    The proposed new licence to occupy has no identified impact on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the advice in this report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

40.    The recommendations in this report support the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020 outcome four; Our communities are resilient and have access to what they need.

41.    In mid-June 2022, leasing staff prepared a memorandum for the local board to inform it of the licence application and to seek its informal feedback on progressing the matter. The memorandum was circulated to local board members by way of email, at which time local board members did not raise any specific concerns.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

42.    Auckland Council is committed to meeting its responsibilities under Te Tiriti o Waitangi which are outlined in council’s key strategic planning documents; the Auckland Plan, the Long-Term Plan 2021-2031, the Unitary Plan, and local board plans.

43.    For the purposes of seeking feedback from mana whenua groups identified as having an interest in land in the local board geographical area, staff prepared a power point document containing detail on the proposed non-exclusive licence to occupy.

44.    On 13 July 2022, staff emailed the document to key representatives for mana whenua as follows; Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki, Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Maru, Ngati Pāoa, Ngāti Te Ata, Ngātiwai, Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Ngāti Whatua Ōrākei, Te Ākitai Waiohua, Te Kawerau ā Maki, Te Patu Kirikiri and Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua.

45.    The table below contains detail of feedback received:

Mana whenua

Feedback

Te Ākitai Waiohua

Further to the above, I defer to Ngāti Manuhiri in this matter, as they are clearly best placed to offer an opinion in going forward.

I trust this is satisfactory.

Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust

Thank you for providing information and details regarding two Licence to Occupy requests for the Mahurangi West Hall + Reserve and Omaha Community Inc. 

I am confirming that the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust support both applications.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

46.    There is no direct cost to council associated with the grant of a new licence to occupy. Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated will take responsibility for all operational and renewal costs involved with the proposed shed to be located on Mahurangi West Reserve.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

47.    Should the local board resolve not to grant the proposed licence to occupy to Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated at Mahurangi West Reserve, this will negatively impact the group’s ability to assist Mahurangi residents (and the general public) in the event of an emergency. This would have an adverse impact on the achievement of the respective local board plan outcome.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

48.    If the local board resolves to the grant the proposed new licence to occupy, staff will work with the society to finalise the licence agreement in accordance with the local board decision.

49.    If the local board resolves to grant the landowner approval, a landowner approval letter will be issued to the society.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Aerial view showing licence to occupy area (indicative)

53

b

Mahurangi West Hall and Reserve Incorporated Community Outcomes Plan

55

c

GIS aerial view from Auckland Council's Hazard Viewer showing licence area in relation to flood plains

57

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Karen Walby - Community Lease Advisor

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Wellsford Centennial Park - approval of draft masterplan for public consultation

File No.: CP2022/06284

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To approve the draft Wellsford Centennial Park masterplan for public consultation.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Wellsford Centennial Park is a sports park servicing Wellsford and the surrounding rural area.

3.      In 2021, the local board received a needs assessment to inform development of a masterplan and guide future priorities for improving the park (resolution number: RD/2021/191).

4.      Staff have worked closely with Ngāti Manuhiri and key stakeholders to develop the key values and principles and to identify their aspirations for the park.

5.      The values and principles are manaaki (cherish and sustain identity), taiao (to encompass the natural environment), hauora (to be healthy, vigorous and in good spirits), and whanaugatanga (bringing family together, relationship, kinship and a sense of family connection).

6.      A range of initial short-term (1 – 5 years) and long term (5 - 10+ years) key moves have been developed in line with the values and principles for the park. These key moves focus on improving access to the park’s open space and assets, improving organised and casual sport and recreation opportunities, enhancing the natural environment of the park, and encouraging diverse use of the park.

7.      The draft masterplan’s priorities and actions will require funding and further project planning, designing and the necessary consents or tender processes.

8.      Mana whenua and key stakeholders such as the Wellsford Sport and Recreation Collective have reviewed the draft masterplan and are generally supportive.

9.      The draft masterplan is now ready for the community to provide feedback and to identify priority areas for investment.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)   approve the draft Wellsford Centennial Park masterplan (Attachment A to the agenda report) for public consultation in November 2022.

Horopaki

Context

Background information

10.    Wellsford Centennial Park (the park) is a 16.4 hectare sports park located on the south-eastern edge of Wellsford and is the largest park in the town. The park is held under the Reserves Act 1977 and classified a recreation reserve.

11.    The park provides for sport and recreation for the wider Wellsford area and includes a regional netball centre attracting teams from Matakana, Warkworth and southern Kaipara District.

12.    There are a range of organised and casual users of the park. Current user groups include Wellsford A&P Society, Rodney Netball, Wellsford Athletics, Wellsford Rugby Football Club, Wellsford Boxing Sport Club, Twin Coast Archery, and Wellsford Tennis.

13.    In February 2021, the local board received the findings of a needs assessment and endorsed the recommended approach and scope for development of a masterplan for the park (resolution number: RD/2021/191).

14.    The needs assessment found that many of the assets are in poor condition and the park has the potential to better provide for the community’s recreation and sport’s needs. Key recommendations included diversifying the courts to cater for other sports, supporting a shared clubrooms facility and providing a walking / cycling circuit.

15.    The draft masterplan responds to the needs assessment by guiding future decision making on investment for the park including general design direction and the approximate location of facilities and improvements.

16.    This report recommends the draft masterplan (Attachment A) be approved for public consultation.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

How we engaged with mana whenua, key stakeholders and the wider community

Mana whenua engagement

17.    Staff invited four mana whenua to be involved in the development of the masterplan: Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Te Uri o Hau, and Ngāti Wai. This opportunity was taken up by Ngāti Manuhiri.

18.    Staff have worked closely with Ngāti Manuhiri to develop values and principles that have guided the design of the draft masterplan for the park.

19.    The values and principles are manaaki (cherish and sustain identity), taiao (to encompass the natural environment), hauora (to be healthy, vigorous and in good spirits), and whanaugatanga (bringing family together, relationship, kinship and a sense of family connection).

20.    Staff have provided regular updates on the development of the draft masterplan to Ngāti Manuhiri. Staff presented the draft masterplan for feedback at a workshop on 25 July 2022 and the following feedback was provided:

·    implement a bilingual park map and bilingual wayfinding signs

·    create designated bus parking for events and sports

·    when the opportunity arises, collaborate with the local board regarding a themed playground

·    implement rain gardens in the car park to assist with removing pollutants and to slow down stormwater flow

·    use rubber material derived from recycled materials for the playground surface.

Key stakeholder and community consultation

21.    Staff have engaged with key stakeholders throughout the development of the draft masterplan including site visits and face-to-face engagement. Key themes from engagement are listed in the table below:

Support

Explore

Concern

For a new multi-use facility with shared communal spaces (e.g., lounge and kitchen) due to the poor condition of existing facilities and assets.

 

If shared courts may be better located on the northern side of the park to help improve park connectivity and drainage concerns.

A decrease in car parking availability if the existing netball courts are relocated to the tennis courts.

For shared use of courts with improved court drainage, multi-line markings, and lighting.

If there can be additional courts with tennis line markings.

The current location and condition of the playground.

For park amenities such as barbecue’s, picnic tables, dog bins and water fountains to be available at the park.

 

The current lack of adequate lighting around car parks and public toilets.

For the Wellsford Greenways Plan 2015 and improving connections to nearby roads and community facilities such as the Wellsford Squash and Golf Club.

 

Open drains near the existing courts and car park area.

 

 

Tennis feel that two permanent multi-marked tennis courts will not be enough to run tennis tournaments. 

22.    Staff have engaged with students from Rodney College and sought their feedback and ideas on their current park use, and the type of activities and improvements they would like to see at the park. Key themes from consultation included:

·    the park is appealing to students because of the large open space, the range of trees and plants, and the large car parking area

·    the students use the park for dog walking, driving lessons, athletics, rugby, netball, running, archery, and gymnastics

·    the students suggested the following improvements to the park:

upgrading the playground and public bathrooms to make them more appealing to park users

creating seating, barbecue and picnic spaces around the park

having safer crossings and connections from Wellsford Town Centre to Centennial Park

upgrading the condition of the tennis and netball courts and implementing line markings for basketball.

Desktop geotechnical assessment

23.    We have completed a desktop geotechnical assessment to provide direction on the proposed plans for re-locating the netball courts. Key findings from the geotechnical assessment were:

·      the park is located in a gully with overland flow paths intersecting within the park

·      topographical maps suggest that water from upslope neighbouring properties will naturally flow down towards the existing tennis and netball courts

·      aerial images from 1963 indicate that there might have been a drainage channel running through the existing netball court area

·      it is possible that drainage measures for the existing netball courts were not designed to account for the additional runoff caused by increased impervious area and climate change effects.

·      consider locating the new changing room away from low lying areas.

·      consider using sub-drains at the base of the hill to preclude sub-surface water from migrating under the tennis courts.

24.    Based on the findings from the geotechnical assessment, the draft masterplan suggests that:

a)    In the short to medium term, the existing tennis courts are resealed with asphalt and netball line markings are provided to allow Wellsford Netball to use both the tennis courts and existing netball courts. Two of the tennis courts will be multi-marked to provide for tennis and basketball.

b)    In the long-term relocating the existing netball courts to the tennis courts as this location is less vulnerable to flooding and away from known water courses. Upon relocation it is suggested that the tennis courts are refurbished with fill and new drainage is installed to protect the new courts.

c)    In the long-term the proposed new changing room and bathrooms are located away from low lying areas.

The draft masterplan in a nutshell

25.    A range of initial short-term and long-term key moves have been developed in line with the values and principles for the park.

26.    These key moves focus on improving access to the park’s open space and assets, improving organised and casual sport and recreation opportunities, enhancing the natural environment of the park, and encouraging diverse use of the park.

Short term (indicative 1-5 years)

27.    Key short-term moves identified in the draft masterplan include:

Category

Key Moves

Toilets/Changing rooms

·    refurbish, including adding an accessible toilet, and improving user privacy

·    improve lighting and access to toilets and changing rooms.

Courts

·    re-purpose two to three tennis courts for netball while further investigation is undertaken to determine feasibility of remediation or relocation

·    retain shelters for archery and provide a gate to the car park to secure the area.

Play

·    consider a potential new location for existing playground

·    consider hosting a mobile pump track and climbing wall to activate the park and gauge community interest in a permanent facility.

Passive Space

·    develop an area as a social space, including picnic area with seating and barbecue areas.

Connection

·    create safer, designated connections across car parks to buildings, courts, and fields

·    determine hierarchy of path / access connections for pedestrians and cyclists

·    designated car parking for kaumatua (elders) proximate to the facilities or fields.

Multi-use facility

·    further investigate the feasibility of a multi-use facility

·    explore through potential external partnerships and funders, the development of a new community multi-use building.

Trees

·    gradually replace existing exotic trees with appropriate native species from local nurseries were possible.

 

Long term (indicative 5-10+ years)

28.    Key long-term moves identified in the draft masterplan include:

 

Category

Key Moves

Courts

·    provide six courts including two multi-lined courts to allow for basketball and tennis

·    covering and lighting of one multi-lined court.

Play

·    when the opportunity to renew the playground arises, consider a new location, a themed playground with mana whenua, and providing for inclusive play for all ages and abilities

·    explore whether a pump track or pump trail route should be included at the park as part of the greenway loop.

Connection

·    advocate for funding to develop the greenway (G2) loop identified in the Wellsford Greenways Plan 2015. 

Multi-use facility

·    continue to explore through potential external partnerships and funders, the development of a new community multi-use facility to offer a variety of shared and versatile spaces use e.g., boxing and gym

·    explore if the changing rooms and public toilets can be catered for within a new multi-use building. 

Trees

·    continue replacement of exotic trees with appropriate native species from local nurseries where possible.

 

Consultation

Proposed approach

29.    Subject to approval of the draft masterplan from the local board, staff will seek community feedback on the draft masterplan including priority investments for four weeks beginning the end of November 2022.

30.    Staff will use the Have Your Say section on council’s website for feedback and provide feedback forms at the Wellsford Library.

31.    The Auckland region is currently in the ‘orange’ setting in the Covid protection framework which creates challenges for face-to-face consultation with the community. However, we are exploring additional ways to engage including:

·      conducting a ‘drop-in session’ at the park to answer any questions and to encourage feedback on the draft masterplan

·      working with local community organisations such as the Wellsford Sport and Recreation Collective to assist us with the community engagement to guide us in the best ways for people to be able to provide feedback both digitally and in person

·      working with external key sport and recreation organisations such as Harbour Sport, Sport Northland and Netball Northern to assist us with promoting public consultation and community engagement to their participants and stakeholders.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.    Water sensitive design has been identified as part of the master plan development and is critical because of the drainage issues and the watercourses on the park being tributaries to the Hoteo. Water sensitive design provides an opportunity to slow and treat water before it leaves the park.

33.    The draft masterplan encourages the reuse of existing buildings and assets where possible, including reusing the existing courts in the short term.

34.    The masterplan implementation, design and development provide the opportunity to include consideration of aspects such as water sensitive design, use of sustainable and ethical products, use of healthy products and construction waste. 

35.    Consulting on the draft masterplan will not have a climate impact. Climate impacts will be assessed in future work on the masterplan and will be aligned with Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland's Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

36.    The project has had input from various council departments including Parks, Sport and Recreation, Community Facilities, Local Board Services, Connected Communities, and Regional Services and Strategy. Additional resource from other council departments such as Communication and Engagement, and Healthy Waters have provided input as required. 

37.    The draft masterplan has been reviewed by staff from Parks, Sport and Recreation. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

 

38.    Existing lessees and clubs operating in the park have been involved in the development of the draft masterplan. These include the Wellsford Rugby Club, Netball Rodney Centre Incorporated, Wellsford A&P Society, Twin Coast Archers, and Wellsford Tennis.

39.    Staff presented the draft masterplan and park values to key stakeholders for feedback in August 2022. Most key stakeholders were supportive of the draft masterplan and the proposed key moves. The exception was one key stakeholder who wanted the plan to be more aspirational and ambitious.

40.    We provided an update and shared the draft values and principles of the park, and feedback received from mana whenua and key stakeholders on the development of the draft masterplan to the local board on 8 June 2022.

41.    A further workshop was held with the local board on 7 September 2022 to provide an update on the draft masterplan. Local board members expressed their support for the draft masterplan. 

42.    Community engagement on the draft masterplan is scheduled from late November. We have designed a programme to seek feedback from the local community on the draft masterplan.

43.    The Auckland Sport and Recreation Strategic Action Plan (2014-2024) states: access to open spaces and a fit-for-purpose network of facilities enables physical activity, recreation and sport at all levels. A key initiative of this outcome is to continue to improve access to facilities and open spaces, and to provide quality fit-for-purpose facilities for informal recreation and sport for parks such as Wellsford Centennial Park.

44.    Outcome 5 of the Rodney Local Board Plan (2020) states: Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing community. A key initiative of this outcome is to continue to develop and deliver plans for key parks such as Wellsford Centennial Park.

45.    The Greater Wellsford District Sport and Recreation Plan prepared by the community includes an action to advocate for Wellsford Centennial Park to be the key sports and recreation hub for Wellsford.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

46.    Sport and leisure contribute to outcomes under three directions in the Māori Plan for Tāmaki Makaurau (2017). The plan, published by the Independent Māori Statutory Board (IMSB), provides a framework to Auckland Council for implementing desired cultural, economic, environmental and social outcomes for Māori:

·        Direction – Whanaungatanga: social outcome, Māori communities are connected and safe; action, wellbeing of tamariki through provision of facilities and services such as libraries, community centres, swimming pools

·        Direction – Manaakitanga: social outcome, Māori enjoy a high quality of life

·        Direction – Wairuatanga: social outcome, Māori social institutions and networks thrive.

47.    Ngāti Manuhiri noted their support of the draft masterplan on 25 July 2022.

48.    We will invite Ngāti Manuhiri, Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara, Te Uri o Hau, and Ngāti Wai the opportunity to provide feedback on the draft masterplan during the public consultation period.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

49.    The development of a masterplan is funded by Rodney Local Board locally driven initiative (LDI) opex funding of $30,000 which was approved in the 2020/2021 local board work programme.

50.    Implementing the masterplan is subject to the availability of funding. The amount and timing of funding is subject to the Annual Budget 2023/2024 and associated work programme development.

51.    Asset renewal is the main funding mechanism available to the local board to invest in Wellsford Centennial Park. In the current local board work programme, there is approximately $2 million allocated for renewal of existing council-owned assets within the park over the next five years.

52.    If the local board wish to fund improvements to assets above the renewal condition or fund new assets on the site, LDI capex funding will need to be allocated to these projects.

53.    Many of the buildings and the netball courts are owned by clubs and there is an expectation that clubs will be involved in raising funds to maintain and improve their assets on the park.

54.    The masterplan will consider staging development and estimated investment requirement

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

55.    The following table outlines relevant risks and mitigations.

Risk

Mitigation

COVID-19

COVID-19 presents a risk to our ability to engage with the community. Widespread community transmission of COVID-19 might affect the ability of the community to engage with us as well as our services, service delivery, our people and customers. Auckland Council departments have business continuity plans in place however delays may occur.

If there is widespread community transmission of COVID-19, we can offer an online question and answer session.

Community and stakeholder expectations of opportunities

The development of a masterplan has the potential to raise community and stakeholder expectations that the ideas in the master plan will be delivered. Any engagement on the masterplan will need to clearly communicate the need for detailed needs assessment and feasibility studies, timeframes and budgets to deliver on the opportunities identified.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

56.    Following the local board’s approval of the draft masterplan, staff will begin community engagement with the community from late November 2022.

57.    Staff will present community feedback on the draft masterplan to the local board at a workshop in February 2023, with approval of the masterplan scheduled for March/April 2023. Following the adoption of the masterplan, staff will work with the local board to identify priority key moves to include in the local board work programme.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Wellsford Centennial Park Masterplan (Draft)

69

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sheryne Lok - Service and Asset Planner

Authorisers

Justine Haves - General Manager Regional Services Planning, Investment and Partnership

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Development of Reserve within Stage 4, Milldale subdivision

File No.: CP2022/12636

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval of the proposed reserve concept design within the Stage 4 area of the Milldale subdivision, at a park site addressed 61 Maryvale Road, Pine Valley (legal description – LOT 9006 DP 565038).

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      Development of the reserve within Stage 4 of the Milldale subdivision is proposed to be constructed by Fulton Hogan Land Development Ltd, the resource consent holder.

3.      Fulton Hogan have engaged Bespoke Landscape Architects to design the reserve to the satisfaction of Parks and Community Facilities staff who have reviewed the proposal. The concept design was presented to the Rodney Local Board at a workshop on 8 June 2022.

4.      Auckland Council has $1.25m of growth funding allocated as contribution towards a total estimated $4.9m worth of parks enhancement and development. Delivery of the reserve concept by Fulton Hogan will provide the community with a multi-use park at a fraction of the overall cost to council and well in excess of council’s investment.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve Auckland Council entering into an infrastructure funding agreement for the Stage 4 reserve development

b)      delegate to the General Manager, Parks and Community Facilities authority to negotiate the infrastructure funding agreement on terms acceptable to council’s infrastructure funding team

c)      approve the concept plan (Attachment A to the agenda report) and subsequent construction of the reserve at 61 Maryvale Road, Pine Valley by the consent holder with the asset to be vested in council at practical completion

d)      delegate to the General Manager, Parks and Community Facilities authority to approve detailed design drawings.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      Fulton Hogan Land Development Ltd (Fulton Hogan) holds a resource consent to develop the properties in Stage 4 of the Milldale subdivision in the Wainui Precinct. This includes a suburb park in the centre of the development area which will be vested to council as land in lieu of reserve.

6.      The local board reviewed the concept plan and provided feedback at an initial workshop in August 2021.

7.      Following this workshop, staff liaised with the developer in regard to local board members feedback on the concept design. In particular the importance of shade, riparian planting management/maintenance and the informal stream crossing.

·    the developer has incorporated shaded areas into the design

·    clarification that robust vegetation maintenance and management plans will be prepared and assessed by staff for the riparian revegetation

·    further detail on the proposed stream crossings have been provided and assessed by staff in the former Community Facilities and Parks Sport and Recreation departments.

8.      A subsequent workshop was held with the local board on 8 June 2022 to present the revised concept plans to which the local board provided some comments and questions with regard to picnic table configuration near the proposed toilet, toilet façade treatment and the colour of play equipment. Staff have noted these elements with the developer and will ensure appropriate design outcomes for these aspects of the proposal through detailed design evaluation. 

9.      Developing this reserve aligns with the  Rodney Local Board Plan 2020, Outcome 5: “Our local parks and recreation facilities meet the needs of our growing communities”.

10.    Growth funding has been allocated through the growth programme approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on 7 July 2022. As part of the infrastructure funding agreement (IFA) and Auckland Council’s contribution of circa $1.25m, a total estimated $4.9m worth of parks enhancement and development will be delivered at the site.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

11.    Fulton Hogan have engaged Bespoke Landscape Architecture to design the concept plan for the future park.

12.    The concept plan as presented by Fulton Hogan contains conventional playground equipment and design, public toilets, kick around space, stream crossings, walkways, riparian restoration planting, a basketball court, a pump track and other associated landscaping features.

13.    Council staff agree that additional play provision in the location is a good outcome for the local community due to the impending demand from the surrounding development. Auckland Council’s Parks and Places Specialist, has advised that the proposed concept plan presents an appropriate mix of play and recreation opportunities that caters to a variety of age groups which is commensurate to the town centre like activities and development in the immediate area. The proposed concept plans are consistent with the anticipated outcomes for the reserve as outlined in the Milldale Open Space Play and Recreation Network Study and Strategic Advice document.

14.    Consequential opex for the maintenance of the proposed reserve development will be incorporated into the Parks and Community Facilities operational budget.

15.    Council’s contribution to the IFA is capped to the $1.25m of growth funding allocated to this project. Mitigating construction risks, once signed, Fulton Hogan will deliver the full package. The IFA also covers warranties, maintenance and defects periods for all deliverables and provides a final handover date to council.

16.    Delivery of this reserve concept will provide the community with a multi-use park at a fraction of the overall cost to council, well in excess of council’s investment. If council had to fully fund the delivery of the concept plan it would be many years before a park of that calibre would be fully funded. There would also be significant cost increases and a risk of less overall being delivered for the community.

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.    In June 2019, Auckland Council declared a climate emergency and a commitment to the community to look at ways on how we can consider climate implications in everything that we do. The Parks and Community Facilities department at Auckland Council is committed to the regional sustainability targets of Te-Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri-Auckland's Climate Plan.

18.    Any formal development of parks infrastructure will contribute to climate change through carbon emissions, particularly during construction and renewal phases, and through ongoing maintenance. This needs to be carefully considered when creating new parks assets.

19.    The plan outlines actions to ensure co-location of built infrastructure to minimise its footprint and encourages multifunctional use of buildings and spaces. This more integrated approach to park development and facility management will ensure improved climate outcomes.

20.    Improvements to stormwater management, including naturalisation of the channelised stream through the park will increase the resilience of the park, the wider area, and the catchment as a whole as climate change increases the intensity and likelihood of flooding and rain events. A significant amount of revegetation is proposed within the reserve which will contribute to carbon sequestration.

21.    This strategic approach to identifying opportunities for future development within this park will ensure that if progressed, actions would provide greatest value to local communities and the wider network. This ensures investment is targeted appropriately and therefore minimises impact on the climate and environment.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

22.    The Parks and Community Facilities department have provided input on the concept plan considering how the playground will be maintained. Council landscape architecture staff have advised on planting locations and species and the Parks and Places Specialist has provided recommendations in regard to appropriate play and recreational equipment.

 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.    The local board has allocated decision making responsibility for the development of local parks within the Rodney Local Board area. The local board provided feedback at a workshop on 8 June indicating they were generally satisfied with the concept plan with some comments on the proposed picnic table configuration, building façade treatment and colours of play equipment.

24.    Staff have communicated these matters with the developer and will ensure the appropriate design outcomes are achieved through staff assessment of the detailed design plans.  

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.    The proposed park does not contain any known sites or places of significance or value to mana whenua but the contribution of park outcomes is of significant importance to tangata whenua, their wellbeing, values, culture and traditions.

26.    It is noted that the applicant consulted Ngati Manuhiri and the Te Kawerau Iwi Tribal Authority at the time of the original subdivision, who both provided cultural impact assessments (CIAs).

27.    When the reserve is named, staff recommend that both Iwi are consulted over the reserve naming as per their requests and recommendations.

 

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

28.    The local board has allocated decision making for the development and management of the future reserve land at 61 Maryvale Road, Pine Valley (legal description – LOT 9006 DP 565038).

29.    One million, two hundred and fifty thousand dollars was allocated specifically to the proposed project through the 2022-2025 growth programme approved by the Parks, Arts, Community and Events Committee on 7 July 2022 (31411 – Waterloo Reserve Milldale – develop a new suburb park). As part of the IFA and Auckland Council’s contribution of circa $1.25m, a total estimated $4.9m worth of parks enhancement and development will be delivered at the site. Council’s contribution to funding of the works is capped with any cost escalations to be absorbed by Fulton Hogan.

30.    If approved annual maintenance will be paid for by the consequential opex budget administered by Parks and Community Facilities.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.    Due to the scale of the proposed reserve development, there is significant risk of cost escalations impacting its delivery. Council’s financial contribution towards the development of the reserve is capped at $1.25m. An IFA will be entered into by both the developer’s representative and council to ensure that cost escalations are absorbed by the developer and the concept plans are delivered in their entirety.

32.    Other risks associated with the development of the reserve include inadequate maintenance and hand over processes.

33.    These items will be managed via an IFA that will be entered into by both the developer’s representative and council to ensure that proper handover of all documents, warrantees, as-builts and producer statements occurs. The IFA will also place all responsibility for delivery of the reserve on the developer who will be responsible for absorbing any and all cost escalations in order to deliver the complete reserve development.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

34.    Fulton Hogan wishes to develop the reserve as soon as possible following the local board’s approval. Council staff will review detailed engineering design plans to ensure the proposal meets council’s park construction standards.

35.    Following local board approval of the concept design staff will finalise the IFA with Fulton Hogan.

 

 

 

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Milldale - Reserve Concept Package for Approval

91

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Sean Stirling - Senior Parks Planner

Authorisers

Taryn Crewe - General Manager Community Facilities

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport update on the Local Board Transport Capital Fund

File No.: CP2022/13957

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To confirm which activities can be delivered under the reduced Local Board Transport Capital Fund for the Rodney Local Board following the Auckland Council Annual Budget 2022/2023.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      On 29 June 2022, Auckland Council adopted the Annual Budget 2022/2023.  Auckland Transport is facing significant pressure on operational expenditure principally due to slower recovery of public transport patronage than expected. 

3.      To address these challenges Auckland Transport, in discussion with the Auckland Council finance team, requested a moderate increase in operating funding in the 2022/2023 financial year, whilst at the same time agreeing to defer capital expenditure by $223 million over the next three years, to support this request.

4.      The impact of these reductions for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund is a reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for the current, 2022/2023 financial year.

5.      For the Rodney Local Board, this means the 2022/2023 financial year allocation has reduced from $1,180,531 to $607,383.  Rodney has $411,380 in current commitments.

6.      A ‘carry over’ budget of $917,931 has been approved which will increase the total budget this financial year to $1,525,314.  It is important to note the ‘carry over’ funding will be subject to there being underspend in other Auckland Transport work programmes.

7.      The below table outlines the current status of projects resolved by the Rodney Local Board (Resolution number RD/2021/336):

Table

Description automatically generated

8.      Due to budget reductions, three of these projects (Kaipara Coast Highway, Kaukapakapa; Rodney Street raised zebra crossing; and the Leigh School crossing) will need to be deferred until budget becomes available.  These have also been submitted for funding consideration under the Climate Emergency Response Fund.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      progress the following projects from the Local Board Capital Transport Fund:

i)        Matua Road/Tapu Road intersection

ii)       Mansel Drive raised pedestrian crossing

iii)      Warkworth Primary School raised crossing

iv)      Coatesville Riverhead Highway pedestrian crossing (outside shops)

v)       Taupaki Road pedestrian crossing outside Harry James Reserve

vi)      Coast Road safety improvements investigation (investigation complete)

vii)     Point Wells Village traffic calming measures

viii)    Motutara Road driver feedback signs

ix)      Puhoi Village Red Carpet

 

b)      defer the following projects until the next 2023/2024 financial year or until budget becomes available:

i)             Kaipara Coast Highway, Kaukapakapa

ii)            Rodney Street raised zebra crossing

iii)           Leigh School crossing/school zone signage.

 

Horopaki

Context

9.      The financial implications for the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (LBTCF) is a reduction from $20 million to $10.3 million for this 2022/2023 financial year.

10.    For the Rodney Local Board, this means the current financial year’s LBTCF allocation has reduced from $1,180,531 to $607,383.  At present the local board has $411,380 in current commitments and a ‘carry over’ of $917,931 which increases the total budget for this financial year to $1,525,314.

11.    It is recommended the following projects continue to be delivered:

·    Matua Road/Tapu Road intersection

·    Mansel Drive raised pedestrian crossing

·    Warkworth Primary School raised crossing

·    Coatesville Riverhead Highway pedestrian crossing (outside shops)

·    Taupaki Road pedestrian crossing outside Harry James Reserve

·    Coast Road safety improvements investigation (investigation complete)

·    Point Wells Village traffic calming measures

·    Motutara Road driver feedback signs

·    Puhoi Village Red Carpet.

 

12.    It is recommended that investigation for the following projects be deferred until next 2023/2024 financial year or when budget becomes available. These have also been submitted for consideration under the Climate Emergency Response Fund (CERF).

·    Kaipara Coast Highway, Kaukapakapa

·    Rodney Street raised zebra crossing

·    Leigh School crossing/school zone signage.

Strategic alignment

13.    The Auckland Transport Regional Land Transport Fund budget allows for the LBTCF as a capital budget provided to all local boards by Auckland Council and delivered by Auckland Transport (AT).

14.    Local boards can use this fund to deliver transport infrastructure projects that they believe are important to their own local board plan but are not part of AT’s work programme.

15.    Any LBTCF projects selected must be safe, must not impede network efficiency, and must be located in the road corridor or on land controlled by AT (though projects running through parks can be considered if there is a transport outcome).

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

16.    During a workshop held on 7 September 2022, the Rodney Local Board supported the recommendations of Auckland Transport, noting to continue to progress those projects previously resolved and defer three projects (Kaipara Coast Highway, Kaukapakapa, Rodney Street raised zebra crossing and Leigh School crossing/school zone signage) until the following, 2023/2024 financial year or when further budget becomes available.

17.    Auckland Transport explained that the three projects have been submitted for consideration under the CERF.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.    Auckland Transport is committed to minimising the effects that transport operations have on climate change. This includes encouraging emission-neutral modes (walking and cycling) and low-emission modes (public transport and ride-sharing).

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.    The impact of information in this report is mainly confined to AT.

20.    Where LBTCF projects are being progressed by Auckland Council’s Community Facilities department, engagement on progress has taken place. Any further engagement required with other parts of the council group will be carried out on an individual basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

21.    On 7 September 2022, AT workshopped with the local board the impacts of budget reductions on the LBTCF projects in the Rodney Local Board area.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

22.    The proposed recommendations in the report have no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

23.    There will not be enough budget to deliver all projects this financial year as previously planned.

24.    Auckland Transport has sought direction on which projects the local board would like to proceed with this financial year and which projects are to be deferred.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.    The financial impact on the construction industry and reduced AT income from the drop in public transport use has had a domino effect on the delivery of all AT projects including projects within the LBTCF.

26.    This report explains those projects recommended to the Rodney Local Board to progress within the reduced funding envelope.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.    Once the local board resolutions are finalised, AT will work to contract out the projects as soon as possible.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Matthew Ah Mu – Principal Project Manager

Authorisers

Paul Thompson - Head of Community Engagement (North)

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport update on the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate - September 2022

File No.: CP2022/13410

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To update the Rodney Local Board on the programme being delivered by Auckland Transport using the funding from the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

2.      To seek approval from the Rodney Local Board to the defer the following footpath projects:

·   Waimauku Station Road, Waimauku

·   Newton Road, Riverhead

·   Cambridge Road and Queens Street, Riverhead

·   Duke Street, Riverhead

·   Falls Road, Warkworth.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate was introduced by Auckland Council in 2018 after extensive community consultation. An annual rate of $150 is collected from all Rodney ratepayers by Auckland Council, and the programme is delivered by Auckland Transport on behalf of the Rodney Local Board.

4.      The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate is ring-fenced for transport projects in the Rodney Local Board area that are not included in the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031. It was established on the basis that the fund is to support:

·   new bus stops and bus services

·   new community transport hub facilities

·   new footpaths.

5.      The $150 per annum rateable property charge is projected to raise $46 million over 10 years. As of the 30 June 2022, $43,008,547 has been allocated across the Rodney Local Board area for the projects within the targeted rate’s scope.

6.      The targeted rate has been allocated across all four subdivisions in the Rodney Local Board area: Wellsford, Warkworth, Kumeū and Dairy Flat with total expenditure to date totalling $14,819,495.

7.      The Warkworth Community Transport Hub has now been completed and is fully operational. Funds have been allocated for the for the investigation, design and construction of the Huapai Community Transport Hub.

8.      A detailed update on bus services will be covered in a separate report presented at the 21 September business meeting.

9.      The Rodney Local Board approved funding to deliver 35 footpath projects in total; four have been completed and the remaining 31 projects are progressing through the investigation and design phases.

10.    The investigation and design phases of five of the footpath projects in Waimauku, Riverhead and Warkworth highlighted a number of issues. Auckland Transport is seeking local board approval to defer these projects:

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the status and progress of the delivery of the projects being funded under the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

b)      approve the deferral of the following footpath projects:

i)     Waimauku Station Road, Waimauku

ii)    Newton Road, Riverhead

iii)    Cambridge Road and Queens Street, Riverhead

iv)   Duke Street, Riverhead

v)    Falls Road, Warkworth.

 

Horopaki

Context

Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

11.    In May 2018, the local board recommended (resolution number RD/2018/61) that the Governing Body approve a targeted rate to accelerate investment in transport in the Rodney Local Board area. The recommendation was accepted, and the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate (RLBTTR) is currently scheduled to run for 10 years (2018 – 2028).

12.    The local board is the decision-maker regarding funds raised through the rate. Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport (AT) provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

13.    The RLBTTR is ring-fenced for transport projects in the Rodney Local Board area that are not included in the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031. It was established on the basis that the fund is to support:

·   new bus stops and bus services

·   new park-and-ride community hub facilities

·   new footpaths.

14.    The targeted rate must be spent on these items and any material changes to spending priorities may require further public consultation.

15.    The rate was established on the principle that each subdivision within the Rodney Local Board area receives the revenue collected within their subdivision to be used for projects delivered within their area.

16.    As the projects develop and firmer cost estimates are prepared, changes will be required to the projects proposed within each subdivision to ensure proportionality is maintained. The Rodney Local Board monitors the performance of the projects and determines whether to re-prioritise its expenditure based on the stated purposes of the funds raised.

 

 

 

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

17.    The table below shows the total amount to be allocated by subdivision based on the number of separately used or inhabited part of a rating unit (SUIP) as at 1 July 2018 until the end of the RLBTTR.

Targeted rate total amount allocated based on SUIPs as at July 2018

Wellsford

Warkworth

Kumeū

Dairy Flat

Total

No of SUIPs as on 1 July 2018

3,185

12,673

12,280

2,660

30,798

Targeted rate in total for 10 years based on 1 July 2018 # of SUIPs

$4,777,500

$19,009,500

$18,420,000

$3,990,000

$46,197,000

 

18.    The following table outlines the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate full budget allocations as at 30 June 2022.

Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate

full budget allocations as at 30 June 2022

Total budget allocation for programme

46,197,000

 

 

Notes

 

Programme pipeline

Footpaths programme

 

 

$24,098,000

Includes all tranches of approved footpaths

Community Transport Hub programme

 

$10,500,000

Includes approved budget of $6.5M for Huapai CTH

Bus services

 

$7,565,234

Excludes costs for next tranche of bus services

Bus stops

 

$845,313

 

Total budget allocation except new bus services

 

$43,008,547

 

Remaining funds of RTTR budget

 

$3,188,453

 

Totals

$46,197,000

$46,197,000

 

 


 

19.    The following table details the total actual expenditure to date by subdivision.

Total Actual expenditure to date by Subdivision (from July 2018)

 

Wellsford

Warkworth

Kumeū

Dairy Flat

Total

Footpaths

$282,349

 

$1,472,068

 

$217,993

 

$641,630

 

$2,614,041

 

Community Transport Hubs

$0

 

$3,884,846

 

$204,283

 

$0

 

$4,089,129

 

Bus services

$682,467

 

$682,467

 

$5,220,616

 

$677,784

 

$7,263,334

 

Bus stops

$42,650

 

$0

$725,044

$85,299

$852,993

Total expenditure to date by subdivision

$1,007,465

$6,039,381

$6,367,936

$1,404,713

$14,819,495

 

Community Transport Hub Projects

20.    The local board selected Warkworth and Huapai for community transport hubs.

21.    The local board approved (resolution number RD/2020/75) the construction of the Warkworth Community Transport Hub. The Warkworth Community Transport Hub is fully operational following the local board opening on 30 June 2022.

22.    In July 2022 the local board approved $6.5million of funding for the investigation, design and construction of the Huapai Community Transport Hub (resolution number RD/2022/4).

23.    The table below outlines the progress for the Huapai Community Transport Hub.

Huapai Community Transport Hub (Kumeū Subdivision)

Phase: Investigation

Next Milestones:

·     Auckland Council Parks endorsement to progress landowner approval and Reserve land reclassification to enable design to advance

·      Mana Whenua Engagement

·      Procurement of Professional Services for Design.

Timeline for next milestones: October 2022

Bus Services and Bus Stops

24.    Bus stop infrastructure was installed under the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate Programme to support the roll out of the new bus services, the 128, 126 and 998 introduced in 2019.

25.    The bus services update will be covered in a separate report to the Rodney Local Board on 21 September 2022.

Footpath Projects

26.    The Rodney Local Board approved funding to deliver 35 footpath projects in total; four have been completed and the remaining 31 projects are progressing through the investigation and design phases.

27.    The Rodney Local Board approved funding to deliver footpath projects across the Rodney Local Board area under the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.  The table below outlines the local board resolutions for the footpath projects being delivered by Auckland Transport.

 

Project description

Resolution number

 

$7.68 million for investigation, design and construction of 12 new footpaths.

RD/2022/1

18 May 2022

Additional $1.574 million to complete detailed design and construction of the Rodney Street, Wellsford, footpath (inclusive of a pedestrian bridge over the rail corridor).

RD/2022/2

18 May 2022

Kaukapakapa footpath connections

RD/2021/367               

1 December 2021

Additional $223,200 to the previously approved $645,000 budget to deliver the footpath on Omaha Drive

RD/2021/267

16 June 2021

Additional $100,000 to the previously approved $440,000 budget to deliver the footpath outside Dairy Flat School on Dairy Flat Highway.

RD/2021/247

19 May 2021

Funding for Tranche 1 footpaths as follows:

Dairy Flat Highway footpath (Dairy Flat) - allocate $1,007,000

Goodall Road footpath (Warkworth) – allocate $458,000

Leigh Road footpath (Warkworth) – allocate $363,000

Puhoi Road footpath (Warkworth) – allocate $757,000

Rodney Street (Wellsford) – allocate $1,426,000

RD/2020/181

9 December 2020

Funding for Tranche 1 footpaths as follows:

Coatesville Riverhead Hwy (Dairy Flat) footpath - allocate $340,000

Dairy Flat Highway (Dairy Flat) footpath - allocate $440,000

Newton Road (Riverhead) footpath - allocate $763,000

Alice Street (Riverhead) footpath - allocate $474,000

Omaha Drive (Omaha) footpath - allocate $645,000

Hudson Rd (Warkworth) footpath - allocate $398,000

School Road (Wellsford) footpath - allocate $257,000

RD/2020/162

18 November 2020

 

Funding for the Tranche 2 footpaths as follows:

Cambridge Road footpath (Kumeū) – allocate $453,000

Duke Street footpath (Kumeū) – allocate $282,000

King Street footpath (Kumeū) – allocate $238,000

Matua Road footpath (Kumeū) – allocate $630,000

Princes Street footpath (Kumeū) – allocate $198,000

Queen Street/York Terrace (Kumeū) – allocate $335,000

Waimauku Station Road (Kumeū) – allocate $196,000

Albert Street, Leigh footpath (Warkworth) – allocate $172,000

Wech Drive (Warkworth) – allocate $543,000

Pakiri Road footpath (Warkworth) – allocate $502,000

RD/2021/205

17 March 2021

 

 

28.    The table below outlines the progress of footpath projects.

 

Project Name and

Tranche (T1, T2 and T3)

Subdivision

Progress

 

Dairy Flat Highway (Dairy Flat) - Just outside Dairy Flat School – T1

 

Dairy Flat

 

Complete – all the following have been issued:

·    practical completion

·    asset creation

·    As-Built documentation

Road assessment and Maintenance Management (RAMM) data

Coatesville Riverhead Highway – footpath element included in new bus stops - T2

Dairy Flat

Complete – all the following have been issued:

·    practical completion

·    asset creation

·    As-Built documentation

Road assessment and Maintenance Management (RAMM) data

Dairy Flat Highway (Dairy Flat) - From the school to Postman Road – T1

 

Dairy Flat

 

Phase: Detailed Design Internal and external consultation completed; Road Safety Audit completed.

Current Risks: Traffic Control Committee approval might take longer than expected to start the construction.

Next Steps: Finalise the detailed design drawings, apply for Traffic Control Committee approval and go out to market for tender.

Timeline: Construction due to commence in November 2023

Coatesville Riverhead Hwy (Dairy Flat) Parking Bay plus raised table – T1

 

Dairy Flat

 

Phase: Investigation and Design

Next Steps: Engage consultant to begin preliminary design, optioneering and costing

Timeline: Detailed design December 2022

Alice Street (Riverhead) (including King Street) – T1

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Detailed Design.  Detailed design progressing which includes developed cost estimates.

Next Steps: Finalise detailed design drawings and issue construction drawings

Timeline: Construction from November 2022

Newton Road (Riverhead) – T1

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: On hold

Next Steps: Consultation with local board on proceeding with project

Timeline: Design phase due to start in October upon approval

Cambridge Road and Queens Street (Riverhead) – T2

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Detailed Design Consultation in progress – detailed design has gone through final review and comments are received from subject matter experts

Current Risks: Plan change and developer plans impact on footpaths to be constructed by developers, affecting scope.
Managing residents’ expectations in line with agreed changes after the inform-only consultation

Next Steps: Construction tender

Timeline: Construction tender in October 2022

Duke Street Footpath (Riverhead) – T2

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Detailed Design Consultation in progress – detailed design has gone through final review and comments are received from subject matter experts

Current Risks: Flooding and stormwater matters to resolve. Plan change and developer plans impact on footpaths to be constructed by developers, affecting scope.
Managing residents’ expectations in line with agreed changes after the inform-only consultation.

Next Steps: Construction tender

Timeline: Construction tender in October 2022

Queen Street/York Terrace (Riverhead) - T2

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Detailed Design Consultation in progress – detailed design has gone through final review and comments are received from subject matter experts

Next Steps: Construction tender

Timeline: Construction tender in October 2022

King Street (Riverhead) (delivered part of the Alice St scope) – T2

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Detailed Design.  Detailed design progressing which includes developed cost estimates.

Next Steps: Finalise detailed design drawings and issue construction drawings

Timeline: Construction from November 2022

Matua Road and Tapu Road (Huapai) – T2

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Detailed Design. Consultation in progress – detailed design has gone through final review and comments are received from subject matter experts

Next Steps: Construction tender

Timeline: Construction tender in October 2022

Princes Street (Kumeū) – T2

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Detailed Design. Consultation in progress – Detailed design has gone through final review and comments are received from subject matter experts

Current Risks: Managing residents’ expectations in line with agreed changes after the inform-only consultation.

Next Steps: Construction tender

Timeline: Construction tender in October 2022

Waimauku Station Road (Waimauku) – T2

Kumeū

 

Phase: Project closed due to insufficient funding for scope

Kaukapakapa Improvements (Kaukapakapa) – T3

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Investigation and Design

Current Risks: Landowner private properties encroaching into road corridor (state highway) owned by Waka Kotahi being resolved.

Next Steps: Blue Barn, the consultants are developing the design

Timeline: Detailed design due for completion in March 2023.

Karoha Road (Kumeū) – T3

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022

Timeline: Separable Portion (SP) 2 - design completion due May 2023

Riverhead Road (Riverhead) – T3

 

Kumeū

 

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022

Timeline: Separable Portion 2 - design completion due May 2023

Sussex Terrace (Riverhead) – T3

Kumeū

 

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of Professional Services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022

Timeline: Separable Portion 2 - design completion due May 2023

Hudson Road – T1

Warkworth

Complete – all the following have been issued:

·    practical completion

·    asset creation

·    As-Built documentation

·    RAMM data

Omaha Drive – T1

Warkworth

Complete – all the following have been issued:

·    practical completion

·    asset creation

·    As-Built documentation

·    RAMM data

Leigh Road (Whangateau) T1

 

Warkworth

Phase: Detailed Design.  Detailed design progressing which includes developed cost estimates.

Next Steps: Finalise detailed design drawings and issue construction drawings

Timeline: Construction from November 2022

Pakiri Road (Leigh) – T2

 

Warkworth

Phase: Scheme Design. Scheme design complete and resource consent has been lodged

Next Steps: Detailed design

Timeline: Construction tender in November 2022

Wech Drive (Warkworth) – T2

 

Warkworth

Phase: Scheme Design. Scheme design complete

Next Steps: Lodge resource consent

Timeline: Construction tender in November 2022

Goodall Road (Snells Beach) – T1

 

Warkworth

Phase: Detailed Design. Schematic design completed. Internal consultation is ongoing.

Current Risks: Resource consents potential delays. Road widening and vehicle crossing for school might be required which will result in additional costs and time for consents and construction.

Next Steps: External consultation, Draft detailed design and Traffic Control Committee approval.

Timeline: Construction from January 2023

Puhoi Road (Puhoi) – T1

 

Warkworth

Phase: Detailed Design. Schematic Design completed. Internal consultation is ongoing.

Current Risks: Resource consent potential delays. Reconstruction of driveway at Slowater Lane might increase the construction costs.

Next Steps: External consultation, draft detailed design and Traffic Control Committee approval.

Timeline: Construction from January 2023

Albert Street (Leigh) - T2

 

Warkworth

Phase: Detailed Design. Schematic design completed. Internal consultation is ongoing.

Current Risks: vehicle crossing requirement from the tennis and bowls clubs might result in additional costs and time for consents and construction.

Next Steps: External consultation, draft detailed design and Traffic Control Committee approval.

Timeline: Construction from January 2023

Point Wells Road (Point Wells) - T3

 

Warkworth

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 1 – design completion due March 2023

McKinney Road (Warkworth) – T3

 

Warkworth

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 3 – design completion due July 2023

Mason Heights (Warkworth) T3

 

Warkworth

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 3 – design completion due July 2023

Kaipara Flats Road (Kaipara Flats) – T3

 

Warkworth

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 3 – design completion due July 2023

School Road (Kaipara Flats) – T3

 

Warkworth

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 3 – design completion due July 2023

Old Woodcocks Road (Kaipara Flats) – T3

 

Warkworth

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 3 – design completion due July 2023

Ahuroa Road (Puhoi) – T3

 

Warkworth

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 1 – design completion due March 2023

Falls Road (Warkworth) – T3

 

Warkworth

NB This has been removed from the programme as the adjacent developer is required to complete the full length of footpath under its resource consent.  

School Road (Wellsford) T1

Wellsford

Phase: Detailed Design. Detailed design progressing which includes developed cost estimates.

Next Steps: Finalise detailed design drawings and issue construction drawings

Timeline: Construction from November 2022

Rodney Street (Wellsford) – T1

 

Wellsford

Phase: Scheme Design

Current Risks: Approved budget is $3.4m (this includes $3m from Rodney Local board Targeted Rate and $400,000 from Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency). 
Design consultant has signaled that the estimated construction cost may be higher than $3.4m

Next Steps: The project team is investigating the construction cost estimate and looking to mitigate while progressing the design. Lodge resource consent and complete detailed design

Timeline: Detailed design completion due in December 2022

Olympus Road (Wellsford) -T3

 

Wellsford

Phase: Investigation

Next Steps: Procurement of professional services. Award for professional services contract planned for mid-November 2022.

Timeline: Separable Portion 1 – design completion due March 2023

 

            Note: The 11 sites in Tranche 3, excluding Kaukapakapa Improvements, have been divided into       three separable portions labelled Separable Portion 1, Separable Portion 2 and Separable Portion 3            in the table above; this will provide efficiencies and cost savings with the projects bundled together.

 

Footpath projects requiring deferral

29.    Auckland Transport has investigated cost estimates and carried out analyses for the design and construction of the following footpath projects:

·   Waimauku Station Road, Waimauku

·   Newton Road, Riverhead

·   Cambridge Road and Queens Street, Riverhead

·   Duke Street, Riverhead

·   Falls Road, Warkworth.

30.    The investigation and design phases of the above footpath projects highlighted the following issues:

·   external factors requiring change to the scope of projects

·   cost escalation

·   technical and design issues e.g., road widening requirements

·   private plan changes and developer plans requiring footpaths to be constructed by developers

·   pedestrian safety

·   existing stormwater issues.

31.    Due to the identification of these issues, Auckland Transport recommends mitigating these risks by deferring the following footpath projects detailed in the table below:

 

Project (tranche)

Subdivision and resolution

Status

Project investigation outcome

Waimauku Station Road (Waimauku) – T2

Kumeū

RD/2021/205

17 March 2021

Phase: Project closed due to insufficient funding for scope

Insufficient funding for scope; investigation indicated a cost estimate of $1.4m against a budget of $196,000

Newton Road (Riverhead) – T1

 

Kumeū

RD/2020/162

18 November 2020

 

Phase: On hold

Next Steps: Consultation with local board on proceeding with project

Timeline: Design phase due to start in October upon approval

Road corridor constraints impacting on the delivery of both a footpath and a two-way road

Cambridge Road and Queens Street (Riverhead) – T2

Kumeū

RD/2021/205

17 March 2021

 

Phase: Detailed Design Consultation in progress – detailed design has gone through final review and comments are received from subject matter experts

Current Risks: Plan change and developer plans impact on footpaths to be constructed by developers, affecting scope.
Managing residents’ expectations in line with agreed changes after the inform-only consultation

Next Steps: Construction tender

Timeline: Construction tender in October 2022

Plan change and developer plans impact on footpaths to be constructed by developers, affecting scope

Duke Street Footpath (Riverhead) – T2

 

Kumeū

RD/2021/205

17 March 2021

 

Phase: Detailed Design Consultation in progress – detailed design has gone through final review and comments are received from subject matter experts

Current Risks: Flooding and stormwater matters to resolve. Plan change and developer plans impact on footpaths to be constructed by developers, affecting scope.
Managing residents’ expectations in line with agreed changes after the inform-only consultation.

Next Steps: Construction tender

Timeline: Construction tender in October 2022

Plan change and developer plans impact on footpaths to be constructed by developers, affecting scope.

Flooding and stormwater issues to be resolved

Falls Road (Warkworth) – T3

 

Warkworth

RD/2022/3

18 May 2022

NB: This has been removed from the programme as the adjacent developer is required to complete the full length of footpath under its resource consent.  

Adjacent developer is required to complete the full length of footpath under the resource consent 

 

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

32.    The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate supports the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan, the Rodney Local Board Plan and Auckland Council priorities regarding mitigating the effects of climate change and reducing the council’s carbon emissions. The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate funds projects that enable better access to active and public transport, namely footpaths, bus services, bus infrastructure and community transport hub facilities.

33.    Auckland Transport strives to provide attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reduce the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian and/or cyclist safety, therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

34.    The appropriate council group inputs were sought by Auckland Transport in the formulation of this update report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

35.    The Rodney Local Board is the decision-maker for funds collected through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate. Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

36.    The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

37.    The Dairy Flat subdivision has completed the allocation of funds to projects under the programme. There are therefore no further funds available for additional services or capital projects.

38.    The Kumeū subdivision has completed the allocation of funds to projects under the programme. There are therefore no further funds available for additional services or capital projects.

39.    The Wellsford subdivision currently has a remaining allocation of $695,000; however the approved budget for the Rodney St Footpath project is $3.4 million (this includes $3 million from Rodney Local board Targeted Rate and $400,000 from Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency).  The design consultant for the project has signaled that the estimated construction cost may be higher than the provision in the $3.4 million budget.  The project team is investigating the construction cost estimate and looking to mitigate this issue.  Therefore, Auckland Transport would advise delaying any decisions on the allocation of the remaining budget.

40.    The Warkworth subdivision has $4,915,000 budget remaining for allocation.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

41.    Any increases in the cost estimate in any projects agreed by the local board will need formal approval via resolution at a business meeting.

42.    The reclassification of the reserve land required for the Huapai Community Transport Hub Project is a risk to the delivery of this project.  The reclassification follows a statutory process under the Reserves Act that includes public notification and iwi consultation.  To mitigate this risk AT is working in partnership with Auckland Council Parks and the Auckland Council Land Advisory Team to ensure AT meets all the necessary requirements and obligations to progress with reclassification of the reserve land and the landowner approval application.

43.    The projects being developed under the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate Programme are subject to the usual project risks including scope changes and cost escalation associated with the development of detailed design plans.  To mitigate this risk AT will monitor, manage and report significant potential risks and seek approval from the local board on changes.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

44.    Auckland Transport will start work on the direction resolved by the Rodney Local Board.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.    

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jeremy Pellow – Programme Director

Authorisers

Paul Thompson – Head of Community Engagement (North)

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Auckland Transport update on the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate Bus Services - September 2022

File No.: CP2022/13884

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To report back on the investigation commissioned by the local board into on-demand and local shuttle services for potential funding by the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

2.      To provide a recommendation on which of the services identified in the report could be funded using the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate.

3.      To provide an update on the 128-bus service from Helensville to Hibiscus Coast Bus Station.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

4.      In March 2022, the local board approved funding to investigate the viability of further public transport services for all four subdivisions: Wellsford, Warkworth, Dairy Flat and Kumeū.

5.      This report provides a summary of the findings of this investigation that was conducted by ‘Via Mobility’ consultants – Rodney On-demand and Fixed Route Shuttle Planning Study - (Attachment A to the agenda report).

6.      The investigations show that a combination of on-demand rideshare and shuttles (small vehicles running to a fixed route timetable) would best suit Warkworth, including Leigh and Sandspit. This will give better coverage to Warkworth including the area to the west of State Highway 1.

7.      The 128-bus service from Helensville to Hibiscus Coast Bus Station is currently funded by the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate. Patronage has increased steadily since it began in 2019.

8.      Auckland Transport confirms funding for the 128-bus service from September 2022 to June 2024 through the Climate Action Targeted Rate funding. The Climate Action Targeted Rate will be provided on the basis that the Rodney Local Board approve funding through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate for the new Warkworth on-demand services linking Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit for a period of three years so there is no loss of Climate Action Targeted Rate money.

9.      The Rodney Local Board Transport targeted rate will stop funding the 128-bus service from 30 September 2022. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      agree to allocate $2,550,000 ($850,000 per year) from the Warkworth subdivision portion of the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate to fund an on-demand bus service linking Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit for three years

b)      agree that the new service would include and on-demand service for Warkworth, and a fixed-route, fixed timetable shuttle for travel to Leigh and Sandspit

c)       agree that the service would likely require two vehicles: one of these vehicles would always be available to complete on-demand trips within Warkworth, while the second vehicle would be used to operate shuttle runs to Leigh (seven days per week) and Sandspit (Friday-Sunday), and to cover for the first vehicle during driver breaks; this will maintain continuous on-demand service in Warkworth

d)      request that Auckland Transport provides regular updates to the local board on the service and its performance

e)      agree that there would be an annual review of the service to assess effectiveness, uptake of the services and any issues, and that the local board could agree to terminate the service if it fails to meet passenger demand expectations

f)       note that Auckland Transport confirms funding for the continuation of the 128-bus service from September 2022 to June 2024 through the Climate Action Targeted Rate funding; the Climate Action Targeted Rate will be provided on the basis that the Rodney Local Board approve funding through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate for the new Warkworth on-demand services linking Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit for a period of three years so there is no loss of Climate Action Targeted Rate money

g)      agree to cease funding the 128-bus Service from Helensville to Hibiscus Coast Station on the 30 September 2022.

Horopaki

Context

10.    In May 2018, the local board recommended (resolution number RD/2018/61) that the Governing Body approve a targeted rate to accelerate investment in transport in the Rodney Local Board area. The recommendation was accepted, and the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate (RLBTTR) is currently scheduled to run for 10 years (2018 – 2028).

11.    The local board is the decision-maker for funds raised through the RLBTTR. Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport (AT) provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

12.    The RLBTTR is ring-fenced for transport projects in the Rodney Local Board area that are not included in the Regional Land Transport Plan 2021-2031. It was established on the basis that the fund is to support new bus stops and bus services, new park-and-ride community hub facilities and new footpaths.

Investigation into further public transport services

13.    In March 2022, the local board approved funding (resolution number RD/2022/11) to investigate the viability of the following public transport services for future funding as follows:

a)   Wellsford Subdivision

i)        an on-demand service from Wellsford town centre to Te Hana.

b)   Warkworth Subdivision

ii)       local shuttle loop of the Warkworth area on weekdays to connect residents to the Warkworth Community Transport Hub, retail and services

iii)      shuttle runs to Leigh and Sandspit from Warkworth on Saturdays and Sundays.

iv)  Dairy Flat Subdivision

i)       a new bus or shuttle service between Milldale and Hibiscus Coast Station via the Pine Valley Road and Argent Lane extension.

v)   Kumeū Subdivision

i)       an on-demand shuttle service loop from Muriwai Beach to Riverhead, connecting people to Waimauku, Huapai and Kumeū along the way.

128 Bus service from Helensville to Hibiscus Coast Bus Station

14.    At the 20 September 2018 business meeting, the Rodney Local Board (resolution number RD/2018/115):

a)      approved funding to investigate and design the new bus route from Wellsford to Warkworth, planned to start no later than by February 2019

b)      approved funding to investigate and design the new bus route from Helensville to Silverdale (via Kaukapakapa), planned to start no later than February 2019

c)       requested that Auckland Transport continues to work on the other public transport services as part of the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate programme, including options for Riverhead and Huapai to Albany services.

15.    Bus routes 128 (Helensville to Hibiscus Coast Station) and 998 (Wellsford to Warkworth) were introduced in February 2019. The 126-bus route (Westgate to Albany via Riverhead and Coatesville) was introduced in May 2019.

16.    In May 2022, AT took over the costs to run the 126 and 998 bus services previously funded by the targeted rate. This was due to patronage levels reaching the agreed level to make the service economical for AT to fund.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Investigation into on demand and local shuttle services

17.    Following Rodney Local Board's approval of funding to investigate the viability of the following public transport services for future funding, Auckland Transport commissioned the consultant ‘Via Mobility’ to provide an On Demand and Local Shuttle Planning Study.

18.    The four focus areas for this study were provided by the local board as detailed in Figure 4 below.

Map

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19.    One area was selected from each of the four Rodney Local Board subdivisions:

·   Wellsford area - includes Wellsford and Te Hana

·   Warkworth area - includes Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit

·   Dairy Flat area - includes Milldale subdivision and part of the Hibiscus Coast Highway

·   Kumeū area - includes Riverhead, Kumeū, Huapai and Muriwai.

Planning Study Summary

20.    Wellsford - Te Hana: An on-demand service is best suited for this zone due to its small size and moderate population density. A single vehicle could accommodate expected demand in this area. Due to the small population served, this zone is generally less promising than the others studied. As with the Dairy Flat - Milldale service described above, a single-vehicle operation would require a second vehicle as contingency.

21.    Warkworth - Leigh - Sandspit: An on-demand service is best suited for Warkworth, while a fixed route, fixed timetable shuttle is best suited for travel to Leigh and Sandspit, due to the long travel times and rural nature of this route. This zone would likely require two vehicles. One of these vehicles should always be available to complete on-demand trips within Warkworth, while the second vehicle would be used to operate shuttle runs to Leigh (seven days per week) and Sandspit (Fri-Sun), and to cover for the first vehicle during driver breaks. This will maintain continuous on-demand service in Warkworth.

22.    Dairy Flat - Milldale: An on-demand service is best suited for this zone due its small size and moderate population density. Simulations indicate that this zone is only likely to require a single vehicle. However, an additional vehicle would be required for contingency (breakdown, regular servicing etc.). An on-demand service would provide connections to the Northern Busway and nearby shopping destinations.

23.    Kumeū - Riverhead - Huapai - Muriwai: An on-demand service is best suited for Kumeū, Riverhead and Huapai, while a fixed-route fixed-timetable shuttle is best suited for travel to Muriwai, due to the long travel times and rural nature of this route. This zone would likely require two vehicles. One of these vehicles should always be available to complete on-demand trips within Kumeū, Riverhead and Huapai, while the second vehicle would be used to operate shuttle runs to Muriwai (Friday to Sunday), on-demand service during peak hours (two vehicles operating at the same time), and to cover for the first vehicle during driver breaks.

Auckland Transport bus service recommendation

24.    The Rodney Local Board has previously expressed interest in improving public transport within Warkworth. The two current bus routes that serve Warkworth provide connections outside Warkworth to the Hibiscus Coast Station (995) and Wellsford (998) but they do not provide local connections within the Warkworth Township.

25.    The local board have also expressed a desire to serve the area on the western side of State Highway 1 including the commercial areas of The Grange and Woodcocks Road and the Summerset Falls Retirement Village. Such a loop was considered in the study undertaken but the nature of the Warkworth catchment resulted in on-demand rideshare being recommended for this area.

26.    There has been feedback from residents in Leigh requesting a public transport service, as a petition was presented to the Rodney Local Board in early 2019 with such a request. There have been subsequent individual requests to Auckland Transport. The local board has also received requests to serve Sandspit, primarily to provide connections to the Kawau ferry.

27.    The planning study results from Via Mobility suggest a solution whereby two vehicles can provide the on-demand rideshare service for Warkworth, using the same vehicles to provide fixed-route timetabled services for Leigh (seven days a week) and Sandspit to meet connect with the ferry Friday through Sunday.

28.    The estimated cost of providing a three-year on-demand and local shuttle services for the Warkworth subdivision is $2,550,000. This service could be funded from the Warkworth subdivision RLBTTR allocations. Auckland Transport would recommend conducting an annual review on patronage, cost and ongoing viability of the services to be brought to the Rodney Local Board for consideration.

29.    The Warkworth subdivision is the only subdivision in the local board area that still has unallocated funding from the RLBTTR. The remaining Warkworth subdivision budget as of August 2022 is $4,915,000 which could sufficiently provide for the proposed three-year on-demand and local shuttle services.

Update on 128 bus service

30.    The 128-bus service (Helensville to Hibiscus Coast) has picked up patronage steadily since 2019, however patronage targets have not yet been met.

31.    The 128-bus service is an essential service for school students and the equity of public transport service provision for the Rodney area.

32.    The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate has been funding the 128-bus service since it started in 2019.

33.    The Climate Action Targeted Rate (CATR) has a $14 million allocation for bus services in the Rodney area which includes services within the Warkworth subdivision. The RLBTTR has funds available in the Warkworth subdivision to fund bus services for Warkworth.

34.    Auckland Transport confirms funding for the continuation of the 128-bus service from September 2022 to June 2024 through the Climate Action targeted rate (CATR) funding.  The CATR will be provided on the basis that the Rodney Local Board approve funding through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate for the new Warkworth on-demand services linking Warkworth, Leigh and Sandspit for a period of three years so there is no loss of CATR money.

35.    Figures 1, 2 and 3 below show the boarding numbers for the 126, 128 and 998 bus services from 2019 to 2022.

Chart, bar chart, histogram

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Figure 1, 126 Bus Service Boardings from 2019 to 2022

 

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Figure 2, 128 Bus Service Boardings from 2019 to 2022

 

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Figure 3, 998 Bus Service Boardings from 2019 to 2022

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

36.    The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate supports the outcomes sought by the Auckland Plan 2050, the Auckland Climate Action Plan, the Rodney Local Board Plan and Auckland Council priorities regarding mitigating the effects of climate change and reducing council’s carbon emissions. The Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate funds projects that enable better access to active and public transport, namely footpaths, bus services, bus infrastructure and community transport hub facilities.

37.    Auckland Transport strives to provide attractive alternatives to private vehicle travel, reduce the carbon footprint of its own operations and, to the extent feasible, that of the contracted public transport network. These projects all support pedestrian and/or cyclist safety, therefore contributing to climate change actions.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

38.    The appropriate council group inputs were sought by Auckland Transport in the formulation of this update report.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

39.    The local board is the decision-maker for funds raised through the Rodney Local Board Transport Targeted Rate; Auckland Council receives the rates payments, and Auckland Transport provides technical advice and administers the funds on behalf of the local board.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

40.    The proposed decision of receiving the report has no impacts or opportunities for Māori.  Any engagement with Māori, or consideration of impacts and opportunities, will be carried out on an individual project basis.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

41.    The Dairy Flat subdivision has completed the allocation of funds to projects under the programme. There are therefore no further funds available for additional services or capital projects.

42.    The Kumeū subdivision has completed the allocation of funds to projects under the programme. There are therefore no further funds available for additional services or capital projects.

43.    The Wellsford subdivision currently has a remaining allocation of $695,000.  However the approved budget for the Rodney Street Footpath project is $3.4 million (this includes $3 million from Rodney Local board Transport Targeted Rate and $400,000 from Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency).  The design consultant for the project has signaled that the estimated construction cost may be higher than the provision in the $3.4 million budget.  The project team is investigating the construction cost estimate and looking to mitigate this issue.  Therefore, AT would advise delaying any decisions on the allocation of the remaining budget.

44.    The Warkworth subdivision has $4,915,000 budget remaining for allocation.

45.    Any increases in the cost estimate in any projects agreed by the local board will need formal approval via resolution at a business meeting.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

46.    The on-demand and local shuttle service proposed for the Warkworth subdivision will have risks associated with performance, operation and patronage. To mitigate these inherent risks Auckland Transport will provide regular updates to the Rodney Local Board on the service and its performance. In addition, Auckland Transport will carry out an annual review of the service to assess its overall performance and in the event that the service fails to meet agreed targets the Rodney Local Board could agree to terminate the service.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

47.    Auckland Transport will start work on the direction resolved by the Rodney Local Board.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney On-demand and Fixed Route Shuttle Planning Study

141

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Dave Hilson – Principal Service Network Planner – Auckland Transport

Authorisers

Paul Thompson – Head of Community Engagement (North)

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

File No.: CP2022/12419

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek local board adoption of the 2021/2022 Annual Report for the Rodney Local Board, prior to it being adopted by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Annual Report 2021/2022 is being prepared and needs to be adopted by the Governing Body by 29 September 2022. As part of the overall report package, individual reports for each local board are prepared.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      adopt the draft 2021/2022 Rodney Local Board Annual Report as set out in Attachment A of the agenda report

b)      note that any proposed changes after the adoption will be clearly communicated and agreed with the chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body on 29 September 2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

3.      In accordance with the Local Government (Auckland Council) Act 2009 and the Local Government Act 2002, each local board is required to monitor and report on the implementation of its Local Board Agreement. This includes reporting on the performance measures for local activities and the overall funding impact statement for the local board.

4.      In addition to the compliance purpose, local board annual reports are an opportunity to tell the wider performance story with a strong local flavour, including how the local board is working towards the outcomes of their local board plan.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

5.      The annual report contains the following sections:

Section

Description

Mihi

The mihi is an introduction specific to each local board area and is presented in Te Reo Māori and English.

About this report

An overview of what is covered in this document.

Message from the chairperson

An overall message introducing the report, highlighting achievements and challenges, including both financial and non-financial performance.

Local board members

A group photo of the local board members.

Our area – projects and improvements

A visual layout of the local board area summarising key demographic information and showing key projects and facilities in the area.

Performance report

Provides performance measure results for each activity, providing explanations where targeted service levels have not been achieved. Includes the activity highlights and challenges.

Our performance explained

Highlights of the local board’s work programme which contributed to a performance outcome.

Local flavour

A profile of either an outstanding resident, grant, project or facility that benefits the local community.

Funding impact statement

Financial performance results compared to long-term plan and annual plan budgets, together with explanations about variances.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

6.      The council’s climate change disclosures are covered in volume four of the annual report and sections within the summary annual report.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

7.      Council departments and council-controlled organisations comments and views have been considered and included in the annual report in relation to activities they are responsible for delivering on behalf of local boards.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

8.      Local board feedback will be included where possible. Any changes to the content of the final annual report will be discussed with the local board chairperson before the report is submitted for adoption by the Governing Body.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

9.      The annual report provides information on how Auckland Council has progressed its agreed priorities in the Long-term Plan 2021-2031 over the past 12 months. This includes engagement with Māori, as well as projects that benefit various population groups, including Māori.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

10.    The annual report provides a retrospective view on both the financial and service performance in each local board area for the financial year 2021/2022.

11.    There are no financial implications associated with this report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

12.    The annual report is a legislatively required document. It is audited by Audit New Zealand who assess if the report represents information fairly and consistently, and that the financial statements comply with accounting standard PBE FRS-43: Summary Financial Statements. Failure to demonstrate this could result in a qualified audit opinion.

13.    The annual report is a key communication to residents. It is important to tell a clear and balanced performance story, in plain English and in a form that is accessible, to ensure that council meets its obligations to be open with the public it serves.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

14.    The next steps for the draft 2021/2022 Annual Report for the local board are:

·        Audit NZ review during August and September 2022

·        report to the Governing Body for adoption on 29 September 2022

·        release to stock exchanges and publication online on 30 September 2022

·        physical copies provided to local board offices, council service centres and libraries by the end of October 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board Annual Report 2021/2022

177

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mark Purdie – Manager Local Board Financial Advisory

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Reallocation of 2022/2023 Rodney Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme - Civic Events

File No.: CP2022/12201

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval of the 2022/2023 Rodney Local Board Customer and Community Services work programme – Local Civic Events fund.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Rodney Local Board approved $10,000 for local civic events as part of the Customer and Community Services 2022/2023 work programme adopted on 22 June 2022 (Resolution number RD/2022/79), attachment A to the agenda report.

3.      Since adoption staff identified and presented playground renewal opening options for the local board to spend this budget in the 2022/2023 financial year.

4.      Local board feedback indicated low priority for renewal openings and requested the reallocation of this budget to enhancing engagement on the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023 as a higher priority.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the reallocation of $10,000 from the Local Civic Events Fund (Line item 395) to enhancing engagement with the community on the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      The 2022/2023 work programme line 395 Local Civic Events Rodney has an allocated budget of $10,000 to deliver and or support local civic events.

6.      The local board have given direction that the playground renewal openings presented to spend this budget are of low priority, as it is not standard practice to deliver openings on renewal projects within the local board area.

7.      A discussion was had that identified the importance of community engagement during the development of the local board plan and direction was given by the local board to reallocate this budget to enhance engagement with the community on the Rodney Local Board Plan 2023.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

8.      To fully implement a successful engagement strategy the reallocation of this budget will support the delivery of an enhanced local board plan community engagement event programme.

9.      Staff will workshop with the local board on developing the local board plan engagement strategy in October-November 2022.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

10.    The proposed work programme re-allocation does not impact on the increase of greenhouse gas emissions.  

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

11.    When developing the work programmes council group impacts and views are presented to local boards. There are no further impacts to be considered with this reallocation of funding.

12.    Relevant departments within Auckland Council have been consulted regarding the reallocations and no objections or concerns have been raised by delivery staff.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

13.    The reallocation of funding within the local board’s operational work programme supports strong delivery and optimisation of the local board’s available budget for 2022/2023.

14.    The nature of the reallocation aligns with the local board’s work programme and the Rodney Local Board Plan 2020.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

15.    Where aspects of the proposed work programme are anticipated to have a significant impact on activities of importance to Māori then appropriate engagement will be undertaken.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

16.    Re-allocation of funding is regarded as a prudent step for the local board to take in order to optimise the locally driven initiatives (LDI) opex budget for the 2022/2023 financial year.

17.    Should the local board choose not to support the re-allocation of the funding, additional conversations will take place in the new term and re-allocation included in the quarter one performance report.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

18.    There is a low risk that this budget will remain unspent at the end of the financial year.

19.    Should the local board choose not to reallocate the local civic event budget, it will reduce the ability to deliver a fully comprehensive local board plan engagement strategy.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

20.    The funding will be reallocated according to the local board’s resolution, and the relevant department will progress with the delivery of the next steps.

21.    The Rodney Local Board 2022/2023 work programme will be updated to reflect the local board’s formal decisions and any variations will be reflected from the quarter one performance report onwards.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Customer and Community Services Work Programme 2022-2023 (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Robyn Joynes – Local Board Advisor

Authorisers

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

New private road name at 289 Sharp Road, Sandspit

File No.: CP2022/10963

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval from the Rodney Local Board to name a new private road, being a commonly owned access lot, created by way of a subdivision development at 289 Sharp Road, Sandspit.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.      On behalf of the developer and applicant, Jasco Properties Limited, agent Tony Hayman of Buckton Consulting Surveyors Ltd has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the Guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245.  The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

5.      The proposed names for the new private road at 289 Sharp Road, Sandspit are:

Preferred Name

Alternatives

Ridgewater Lane

Eastridge Lane

 

Tidal View Way

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the name ‘Ridgewater Lane’ for the new private road created by way of subdivision undertaken by Jasco Properties Limited at 289 Sharp Road, Sandspit, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60313419 and SUB60313430-A).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.      Original resource consent reference BUN60313419 (subdivision ref; SUB60313430) was issued in October 2018 to create 12 residential lots and one commonly owned access lot (COAL). SUB60313430-A was issued in February 2022 to vary the conditions of resource consent BUN60313419 in order to change the lot configuration, staging and location of building platforms, and to realign the access road and site entrance.

7.      Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B to the agenda report.

8.      In accordance with the standards, any road including private ways, commonly owned access lots, and right of ways, that serve more than five lots generally require a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical and efficient street numbering.

9.      The new commonly owned access lot therefore requires a road name because it serves more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the COAL that requires a name is highlighted in red.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland region. The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval

11.    The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.    Theme: The proposed names demonstrate a linkage to the existing landscape in the locality (being the ridgeline feature).

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Ridgewater Lane (applicant’s preference)

The names reflect the main geographical feature of this property, which is a ridge line on which the private road is located. The road follows the route of an existing driveway leading to the house at No 289 Sharp Road, Sandspit. This ridge drops from Sharp Road down towards the Matakana River.

Eastridge Lane (alternative)

See meaning above.

 

Tidal View Way (alternative)

See meaning above.

 

 

13.    Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity.  It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.    Road Type: ‘Lane’ and ‘Way’ are acceptable road types for the new private road, suiting the form and layout of the COAL.

16.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change. Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.    To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate. The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.    On 22 June 2022 mana whenua were contacted by council on behalf of Jasco Properties Limited, through the Resource Consent department’s central facilitation process, as set out in the guidelines. Representatives of the following groups with an interest in the general area were contacted:

·        Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Whātua

·        Ngāti Whātua o Kaipara

·        Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei

·        Ngāi Tai Ki Tāmaki

·        Te Kawerau ā Maki

·        Ngāti Paoa Trust Board

·        Ngāti Te Ata Waiohua

·        Ngāti Paoa Iwi Trust

·        Ngāti Maru

·        Ngāti Whanaunga

·        Ngāti Manuhiri

·        Ngāti Wai.

22.    By the close of the consultation period, the following iwi groups provided a response: Ngāti Manuhiri and Te Kawerau ā Maki.

23.    Delma O’Kane on behalf of Ngāti Manuhiri, provided the following response:

·      “The Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust do not support the names suggested by the developer and will provide more suitable alternates.”

24.    Te Kawerau ā Maki provided the following response:

·        “Te Kawerau a Maki support Ngati Manuhiri to gift names for this kaupapa.”

25.    No other responses were received. The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

26.    The applicant’s agent contacted Ngati Manuhiri on 9 August 2022 by email to engage about the possible gifting of names and again on 31 August 2022. A further phone message was left on 31 August 2022 detailing the site location, a request for road names and the time constraints. No response was received by 2 September 2022.

27.    Following the initial feedback from Ngāti Manuhiri there has no further contact and no alternate names have been provided. Jasco Properties Limited has therefore requested that the road names they have suggested be put forward for consideration by the local board.

28.    This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua and no Te Reo Māori names are proposed.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

29.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for the council.

30.    Jasco Properties Limited has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

31.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

32.    Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database. Land Information New Zealand provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

289 Sharp Road Sandspit - Scheme Plan

199

b

289 Sharp Road Sandspit - Location Map

201

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jo Michalakis – Align Planning Limited

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

New private road names and a road name extension at 217 Matua Road and 46 Gilbransen Road, Huapai 

File No.: CP2022/12928

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To seek approval from the Rodney Local Board to name two new private roads, being commonly owned access lots, and extend an existing public road name for a subdivision at 217 Matua Road and 46 Gilbransen Road, Huapai.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines set out the requirements and criteria of council for proposed road names. The guidelines state that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider /developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

3.      On behalf of the developer and applicant, C & R Property Development Ltd, agent Michael Liu of Maven Associates Ltd has proposed the names presented below for consideration by the local board.

4.      The proposed road name options have been assessed against the guidelines and the Australian & New Zealand Standard, Rural and Urban Addressing, AS NZS 4819:2011 and the guidelines for Addressing in-fill Developments 2019 – LINZ OP G 01245. The technical matters required by those documents are considered to have been met and the proposed names are not duplicated elsewhere in the region or in close proximity. Mana whenua have been consulted in the manner required by the guidelines.

5.      The proposed names for the new private roads at 217 Matua Road and 46 Gilbransen Road are:

Proposed names

Road 1 (COAL 202)

Karepe Lane (applicant’s preference)

Kareao Lane (alternative)

Manatawa Lane (alternative)

Road 2 (COAL 211)

Tereina Lane (applicant’s preference)

Rerewē Lane (alternative)

Kāreti Lane (alternative)

Lot 207 (Public Road)

Mcindoe Road - extension of existing public road name

 


 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      approve the names ‘Karepe Lane’ (Road 1) andTereina Lane’ (Road 2) for the two new private roads and ‘Mcindoe Road’ (Lot 207) for the extension of the same road for the subdivision undertaken by C & R Property Development Limited, at 217 Matua Road and 46 Gilbransen Road, Huapai, in accordance with section 319(1)(j) of the Local Government Act 1974 (resource consent references BUN60348979 and SUB60349119).

 

Horopaki

Context

6.      Resource consent reference BUN60348979 (subdivision ref; SUB60349119) was issued in August 2020 to create 63 vacant residential lots, including five commonly owned access lots (COALs).

7.      Site and location plans of the development can be found in Attachment A and B to the agenda report.

8.      In accordance with the standards, every public road and any private way, commonly owned access lot or right of way, that serve more than five lots generally requires a new road name in order to ensure safe, logical, and efficient street numbering.

9.      The new commonly owned access lots and public road therefore require a road name because they serve more than five lots. This can be seen in Attachment A, where the commonly owned access lots and road that require a name are highlighted in yellow and are labelled.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

10.    The Auckland Council Road Naming Guidelines (guidelines) set out the requirements and criteria of the council for proposed road names. These requirements and criteria have been applied in this situation to ensure consistency of road naming across the Auckland Region.  The guidelines allow that where a new road needs to be named as a result of a subdivision or development, the subdivider/developer shall be given the opportunity of suggesting their preferred new road name/s for the local board’s approval.

11.    The guidelines provide for road names to reflect one of the following local themes with the use of Māori names being actively encouraged:

·   a historical, cultural, or ancestral linkage to an area

·   a particular landscape, environmental or biodiversity theme or feature

·   an existing (or introduced) thematic identity in the area.

12.    Theme: Many existing roads in the area surrounding this development reference Huapai’s legacy for wine growing, as well as reflecting the meaning of ‘Huapai’.  Roads within the locality also reflect features of the locality. ‘Station Road’, ‘Fruitlands Road’ and ‘Waina Drive’ are some examples of road names close by. C & R Property Development Ltd has chosen names to compliment this existing local theme, as detailed in the table below:


 

Proposed name

Meaning (as described by applicant)

Road 1 (cOAL 202)

Karepe Lane

(applicant’s preference)

‘Karepe’ translates to grapes and is significant to the name ‘Huapai’ which means “good fruit”. The area is also known for wine growing. Grapes are significant to the area as they were first planted in Huapai in 1943 by Nikola Nobilo.

Kareao Lane

(alternative)

‘Kareao’ is a common rainforest vine native to New Zealand and produces clusters of red berries throughout the year.  This relates to the Huapai area as ‘Huapai’ means ‘good fruit’.

Manatawa Lane

(alternative)

‘Manatawa’ translates to a black kernel of a tawa berry and relates to the Huapai area as Huapai means “good fruit”.

Road 2 (COAL 211)

Tereina Lane (applicant’s preference)

‘Tereina’ translates to the word ‘train’, and is proposed as there is a train track near the Commonly Owned Access Lot

 

Rerewē Lane (alternative)

‘Rerewē’ translates to the word for ‘railway’ and is proposed as the Commonly Owned Access Lot is in close proximity to a railway.

Kāreti Lane (alternative)

Kāreti translates to the word ‘carriage’ and is proposed as it is relates to the nearby railway.

Public Road (Lot 207)

Mcindoe Road

Existing road name to be extended to Lot 207.

 

13.    Assessment: All the name options listed in the table above have been assessed by the council’s Subdivision Specialist team to ensure that they meet both the guidelines and the standards in respect of road naming. The technical standards are considered to have been met and duplicate names are not located in close proximity. It is therefore for the local board to decide upon the suitability of the names within the local context and in accordance with the delegation.

14.    Confirmation: Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has confirmed that all of the proposed names are acceptable for use at this location.

15.    Road Type: ‘Lane’ is an acceptable road type for the new private roads, suiting the form and layout of the commonly owned access lots.

16.    Consultation: Mana whenua were consulted in line with the processes and requirements described in the Guidelines. Additional commentary is provided in the Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori section that follows.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

17.    The naming of roads has no effect on climate change.  Relevant environmental issues have been considered under the provisions of the Resource Management Act 1991 and the associated approved resource consent for the development.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

18.    The decision sought for this report has no identified impacts on other parts of the council group. The views of council-controlled organisations were not required for the preparation of the report’s advice.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

19.    The decision sought for this report does not trigger any significant policy and is not considered to have any immediate local impact beyond those outlined in this report.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

20.    To aid local board decision making, the guidelines include an objective of recognising cultural and ancestral linkages to areas of land through engagement with mana whenua, particularly through the resource consent approval process, and the allocation of road names where appropriate.   The guidelines identify the process that enables mana whenua the opportunity to provide feedback on all road naming applications and in this instance, the process has been adhered to.

21.    On 22 June 2022 local mana whenua were contacted by Michael Liu of Maven Associates Ltd on behalf of C & R Property Development Ltd.

22.    By the close of the consultation period (6 July 2022), Delma O’Kane on behalf of Ngāti Manuhiri / Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust provided the following response on 22 June 2022:

“We would support our whanaunga Te Kawerau a Maki in the first instance and then Nga Maunga whakahii ki kaipara in the second.”

23.    No other responses were received.  The level of feedback received from mana whenua is often dependent on the scale of the development and its level of significance.

24.    Following the initial feedback from Ngāti Manuhiri there has been no further contact and no alternate names have been provided.  C & R Property Development Ltd has therefore requested that the road names they have suggested be put forward for consideration by the board.

25.    This site is not listed as a site of significance to mana whenua.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

26.    The road naming process does not raise any financial implications for council.

27.    C & R Property Development Ltd has responsibility for ensuring that appropriate signage will be installed accordingly once approval is obtained for the new road names.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

28.    There are no significant risks to council as road naming is a routine part of the subdivision development process, with consultation being a key component of the process.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

29.    Approved road names are notified to Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) which records them on its New Zealand wide land information database.  Lan Information New Zealand provides all updated information to other users, including emergency services.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

217 Matua Road and 46 Gilbransen Road - Scheme Plan

209

b

217 Matua Road and 46 Gilbransen Road - Location Map

211

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Mira Narula – Align Planning Limited

Authorisers

Trevor Cullen - Team Leader Subdivision

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 



Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Map

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Council-controlled Organisations quarterly update: quarter four 2021-2022

File No.: CP2022/13881

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide the Rodney Local Board with an quarter four update on council-controlled organisation work programme items in the local board area for financial year 2021/2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The 2022/2023 Council-controlled Organisation Local Board Joint Engagement Plans were agreed in 2022. However, this quarter four update is for the 2021/2022 council-controlled organisation engagement plan.

3.      Updates will be provided to local boards each quarter to show both changes to the plan itself, and to provide updates on the work programme items included in the attachments to the plan.

4.      Work programme updates from Auckland Transport, Tātaki Auckland Unlimited, Eke Panuku Development Auckland and Watercare are provided as Attachments A-D to the agenda report. 

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the council-controlled organisations quarterly update for quarter four 2021/2022.

 

Horopaki

Context

5.      Each local board has agreed an engagement approach with the four council-controlled organisations (CCOs) for the 2022/2023 local work programme. 

6.      While the local board approves their Joint CCO Engagement Plan each year, it remains a live document and CCOs are encouraged to keep the document up to date.

7.      Changes are also proposed by Local Board Services, where improvements can be made to all 21 engagement plans, and to keep information up to date.

8.      This update may include the following types of changes:

·      additional work programme items, and proposed engagement level

·      proposed changes to the engagement approach with the local board

·      proposed changes to the extent of community engagement.

9.      In addition, the four CCOs provide a quarterly update on projects listed in the engagement plan.

 

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Auckland Transport

10.    Auckland Transport’s work programme updates for quarter four are provided as Attachment A to the agenda report.

Updates to the Auckland Transport work programme

Additional activities

11.    No additional activities have been added.

Deferred, completed or removed activities

12.    These following activities were included in the engagement plan but have been completed

Activity

Status

Sandspit Road Safety Crash Barriers (Road Safety)

Completed

42 School Road, Wellsford, 35 Dawson Road, Snells Beach, 396 Mahurangi East Road (Road Safety)

Completed

 

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited

13.    Tātaki Auckland Unlimited’s work programme updates for quarter four are provided as Attachment B to the agenda report.

Updates to the Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme

Deferred, completed or removed activities

14.    The following activity was included in the engagement plan but have been removed:

Activity

Supporting local boards’ economic work programmes – Locally Driven Initiatives (LDI)

Eke Panuku Development Auckland

15.    Eke Panuku’s work programme updates for quarter four are provided as Attachment C to the agenda report.

Updates to the Eke Panuku work programme

16.    No updates have been made.   

Watercare

17.    Watercare’s work programme updates for quarter four are provided as Attachment D to the agenda report.


 

Updates to the Watercare work programme

Additional activities

18.    The following activity has been added since the last update, and are provided alongside the suggested engagement approach:

Activity

Engagement approach

Helensville wastewater treatment plant upgrade

Inform

 

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

19.    Updating the Joint CCO Engagement Plan between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive Council-Controlled Organisations does not have a direct impact on climate, however the projects it refers to will.

20.    Each CCO must work within Te Taruke-a-Tawhiri: Auckland's Climate Action Framework and information on climate impacts will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

21.    Receiving the updated Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 addresses key elements of recommendations made by the CCO Review, including ensuring the communication of clear, up to date information from CCOs to local boards on projects in their area.

22.    These plans will be shared with the integration teams that implement local board work programmes and will give council staff greater ongoing visibility of CCO work programmes.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

23.    Local board engagement plans enable local boards to signal to CCOs those projects that are of greatest interest to the local board, and to ensure that engagement between the local board and the four CCOs is focussed on those priority areas.

24.    Joint CCO engagement plans also give local boards the opportunity to communicate to CCOs which projects they expect to be of most interest to their communities.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

25.    Updating and adopting the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 may have a positive impact on local engagement with mana whenua and mataawaka.

26.    While both CCOs and local boards have engagement programmes with Māori, the engagement plan will allow a more cohesive and coordinated approach to engagement, with more advance planning of how different parts of the community will be involved.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

27.    The adoption of the Joint CCO Engagement Plan 2022/2023 between the local board and Auckland Council’s substantive council-controlled organisations does not have financial impacts for local boards.

28.    Any financial implications or opportunities will be provided to local boards on a project or programme basis.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

29.    It is likely that there will be changes made to work programme items in the engagement plan during the year, or to the level of engagement that the board or the community will have. This risk is mitigated by ensuring that the document states clearly that it is subject to change, contains a table recording changes made since it was signed, and will be re-published on the local board agenda quarterly, to ensure public transparency.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

30.    The local board will receive the next quarterly update for quarter one of the 2022/2023 engagement plan in late 2022.

31.    A workshop will be held in early 2023 to begin development of a new engagement plan for 2023/2024.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Auckland Transport Quarter Four 2021-22 Report - Rodney Local Board (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Tātaki Auckland Unlimited work programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

Eke Panuku work programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Watercare work programme (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Jacob van der Poel - Advisor Operations and Policy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Local Board input on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management

File No.: CP2022/13455

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The purpose of this report is to seek high-level input from local boards on the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020. This includes:

·    long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

2.      This report also provides an overview of the feedback received through the first stage of the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement that ran from 13 June to 17 July 2022.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

3.      The National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 provides national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991. The fundamental concept of the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

4.      Auckland Council is required to change the Auckland Unitary Plan to give full effect to Te Mana o te Wai, which must be reflected in all decisions made under the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Changes to the Auckland Unitary Plan must be notified by December 2024. Action plans must also be prepared and published as soon as practicable to achieve environmental outcomes and freshwater management objectives.

5.      The National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 sets the National Objectives Framework and steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow when implementing the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland.

6.      The first stage of National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value and use freshwater bodies and the environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

7.      Feedback from the first stage engagement will be used, along with existing information and further research and analysis, to develop freshwater management options that will be brought back for a second stage of engagement in the second half of 2023.

8.      There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the engagement period.

9.      Local boards are now invited to provide input to the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020. Local boards can view the feedback form provided during consultation to assist in preparation of feedback at Attachment A to the agenda report.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the feedback received from communities through the first stage of public engagement with the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020, in Attachment D, Attachment E and Attachment F to the agenda report

b)      provide feedback on the National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 values including the:

i)        long-term visions for freshwater management

ii)       proposed Freshwater Management Units

iii)      values and use of freshwater and the environmental outcomes sought for freshwater, either generally or for a specific water body.

 

Horopaki

Context

10.    The National Policy Statement -Freshwater Management 2020 (NPS-FM) is a mandatory national direction for freshwater management under the Resource Management Act 1991 (RMA). The Policy Statement applies to all freshwater (including groundwater) and, to the extent they are affected by freshwater, to receiving environments (which may include estuaries and the wider coastal marine area).

11.    The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM is Te Mana o te Wai, which is a hierarchy of obligations that prioritises:

·    first, the health and well-being of water bodies and freshwater ecosystems

·    second, the health needs to people (such as drinking water)

·    third, the ability of people and communities to provide for the social, economic and cultural wellbeing.

12.    Regional councils and unitary authorities are required to change regional policy statements and regional plans to give effect to the requirements of the NPS-FM, including Te Mana o te Wai.

13.    Auckland Council is required to engage with communities and mana whenua to determine how Te Mana o te Wai applies to water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in Auckland. A plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan (AUP) is required for the NPS-FM implementation. The AUP plan change must be notified by December 2024. The NPS-FM also requires the preparation of action plans to manage the effects of the use and development of land, freshwater and on receiving environments. Action plans must be prepared and published as soon as practicable.

14.    Every council must develop long-term visions for freshwater in its region and include those long-term visions as objectives in its regional policy statement. Long-term visions:

a)      may be set by Freshwater Management Units (FMU), be part of a FMU, or at a catchment level; and

b)      must set goals that are ambitious but reasonable (that is, difficult to achieve but not impossible); and

c)       identify a timeframe to achieve those goals that is ambitious and reasonable (for example, 30 years after the commencement date).

15.    The National Objectives Framework (NOF) is a core part of the NPS-FM, and includes a series of steps that every regional council or unitary authority must follow on implementation, including to:

·    identify FMU in the region

·    identify values for each FMU

·    set environmental outcomes for each value and include them as objectives in regional plans

·    identify attributes for each value and set a baseline for those attributes

·    set target attribute states, environmental flows and levels, and other criteria to support the achievement of environmental outcomes

·    set limits as rules and prepare action plans (as appropriate) to achieve environmental outcomes.

16.    FMUs are essentially the spatial arrangements adopted by council for the management of freshwater. All fresh waterbodies and their related catchments must be within an FMU.  While the NPS-FM is primarily concerned with the management of freshwater, it does also require an integrated management approach – ki uta ki tai – including consideration of the relationship of freshwater and its management to the coastal receiving environment. 

17.    A public engagement under the heading “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 (te Mana o te Wai) for Auckland” was undertaken from 13 June to 17 July 2022 through AK Have Your Say and other engagement activities including library events and online webinars. Feedback was sought on:

·    the long-term visions for freshwater management

·    the proposed Freshwater Management Units

·    how people value freshwater in FMUs and environmental outcomes people would like to see achieved for these values.

18.    The public engagement on AK Have Your Say comprised the following:

·    the NPS-FM 2020

·    an overview of the NPS-FM implementation programme

·    NPS-FM implementation timeline

·    the proposed Auckland FMU map

·    the map of the Pukekohe specified vegetable growing area (when implementing the NPS-FM, the council must have regard to the importance of this area for domestic vegetables and food security, and may temporarily have a less stringent approach to water quality issues to ensure this is appropriately recognised)

·    an online feedback form with consultation questions and opportunity to provide comments on the proposed FMUs (also translated into numerous languages)

·    a social pinpoint map allowing people to provide feedback to a water body or within an area

·    Ministry for the Environment factsheets, infographics, and videos on freshwater management

·    access to freshwater planning enquiry service for questions and further information.

19.    Two online webinars and six library drop-in events were undertaken through the engagement period. These engagement activities introduced Auckland Council’s NPS-FM implementation programme and provided opportunities to the public to ask questions and to provide feedback directly.

20.    There were 626 pieces of feedback received through the consultation period, including:

·    128 online feedback forms

·    343 site-specific comments (from 84 submitters) via the Social Pinpoint mapping tool

·    12 hard copy feedback forms

·    23 emails

·    120 comments via library displays where feedback could be provided on post-it notes.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

21.    The NPS-FM has a focus on the identification and management of freshwater values. It includes four compulsory values (ecosystem health, human contact, threatened species, and mahinga kai) that must be applied and managed in each FMU. There are also other values that must be considered in managing freshwater if they are relevant to Auckland. The list of compulsory values and other values are provided in Attachment C to the agenda report (and are identified as Appendices 1A and 1B of the NPS-FM). Additionally, the council must identify any other relevant values (i.e. additional to those specifically identified in the NPS-FM) including any additional Māori Freshwater Values as identified by mana whenua.

22.    Overall, submitters raised over 200 individual sites of value to them, while many talked more generally about particular types of, or all, freshwater bodies. The sites named were most commonly located in the Franklin, Rodney, Waitākere Ranges, and Waitematā local board areas.

23.    The values most commonly raised in relation to how submitters use, and would like to use, those freshwater bodies related to:

·    ecosystem health – including water quality and habitat (both generally and for threatened species) in particular

·    natural form and character

·    drinking water supply

·    human contact (that is, for recreational purposes such as swimming, boating, or fishing).

24.    Given the importance of the coastal environment in Auckland, and the impacts from key freshwater issues, such as sediment and E. coli, three FMUs have been proposed for freshwater management based on the three coastal receiving environments for catchments: the Kaipara Harbour, the Manukau Harbour and the Hauraki Gulf (map provided in Attachment B to the agenda report). This proposed approach provides the opportunity to both address the management of freshwater for its own sake, while also explicitly considering its relationship to the coastal environment.

25.    While submitters were not asked directly whether they supported the Freshwater Management Units or not, comments were provided on a range of matters, including suggestions around amending the proposed boundaries, or rationale behind the boundaries, having more or fewer FMUs, more location specific detail, and having the Waitākere Ranges Heritage Area as a separate FMU.

26.    Other submitters commented on non-FMU specific matters including wetlands, the need for more transparency and action, concern about water quality, the need to prioritise ecosystem health, farming/vegetable growing, and flooding.

27.    The NPS-FM provides for a specified vegetable growing area in Pukekohe that sits within the Manukau FMU. Some comments related to the provision for horticultural land use in Pukekohe.

·        three supported the provision for continued horticultural use, including irrigation

·        three expressed concerns about the impact of horticultural activities on water quality (streams, and aquifers) particularly from fertiliser and nitrates.

28.    Demographic information from those submitters who provided it is detailed in Attachment D to the agenda report.

29.    Data tables naming sites, and their number of mentions by local board area is provided in Attachment E to the agenda report. A full Summary of Feedback report is provided in Attachment F to the agenda report.

30.    Staff are currently undertaking data analysis and a summary report of feedback will be published on AK Have Your Say.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

31.    The fundamental concept of the NPS-FM Te Mana o te Wai is about restoring and preserving the balance between the water, the wider environment, and the community. This concept is in line with the natural environment priority of Te Tāruke-ā-Tāwhiri: Auckland’s Climate Plan, which sets the goal:

Oranga taiao, oranga tāngata: a healthy and connected natural environment supports healthy and connected Aucklanders. The mauri (life essence) of Tāmaki Makaurau is restored”.

32.    The NPS-FM includes the following policy direction in response to climate change:

Policy 4: Freshwater is managed as part of New Zealand’s integrated response to climate change.

33.    Every council must have regard to the foreseeable impact of climate change in following areas:

·    when setting limits on resource use, every regional council must:

3.14(2)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when setting environmental flows and levels, every regional council must:

3.16(4)(a)(ii) have regard to the foreseeable impacts of climate change

·    when assessing and reporting, as part of each review required by section 35(2A) of the RMA, every regional council must prepare and publish:

3.30(2)(g) predictions of changes, including the foreseeable effects of climate change, that are likely to affect water bodies and freshwater ecosystems in the region.

34.    The implementation of the NPS-FM will help to promote the resilience of freshwater ecosystems to the effects of climate change. The development of freshwater action plans will require sustainable land and water management practices to enhance the mauri and health of waterways, which is in line with actions prioritised in the Auckland Climate Plan.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

35.    The NPS-FM is relevant to all of the council’s functions. All relevant council departments and council-controlled organisations (CCOs) are involved in the NPS-FM implementation, including participation in a steering committee overseeing the development and implementation of the programme. This includes having an ongoing role in supporting the NPS-FM engagement, and providing input and review of responses developed to give effect to the NPS-FM. 

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

36.    Under the Local Government Act 2002, local boards are responsible for identifying and communicating to Auckland Council the interests and preferences of the people in its local board area in relation to the content of council’s strategies, policies, plans, and bylaws.  Local boards have a detailed understanding of their areas including freshwater values and issues and are in a position to provide important input to the development of NPS-FM responses, including in relation to the matters covered by this round of public engagement. 

37.    Prior to the public engagement, a memo titled “Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland” was provided to all local boards on 26 May 2022. The memo advised the key principles, consultation and timeframe requirements of implementing the NPS-FM, and the opportunities for local board input through the process (Attachment G to the agenda report).

38.    A webinar presentation titled “National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020” was also presented to local boards in the meeting on 3 June 2022. In response to feedback from elected members, the period for providing input had been extended for local boards to September 2022 to allow local boards time to provide feedback following the close of public engagement.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

39.    The NPS-FM says the council must “actively involve tangata whenua (to the extent they wish to be involved) in freshwater management” including in identifying Māori values and decision-making processes relating to Māori freshwater values.

40.    Engagement with mana whenua in Auckland is being undertaken through an on-going process, directly with mana whenua entities throughout the preparation of a plan change and development of action plans.

41.    Engagement with the mana whenua of Tāmaki Makaurau about the NPS-FM has also been undertaken in the broader context of Three Waters Reform and the development and implementation of the council’s Water Strategy, to enable mana whenua to provide a more holistic consideration of the management of water.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

42.    The first stage of the NPS-FM engagement was undertaken within the business-as-usual planning budget. This budget covers primarily staff time and the public engagement.

43.    The budget required for NPS-FM engagement in 2023, and for implementation of the project through to 2026 is presently under discussion.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

44.    The government has set a deadline of December 2024 for the council to publicly notify the AUP plan change in response to the provisions of the NPS-UD. Given the scale and complexity of the work, and limited resources, there is a risk that the council may not receive sufficient quality feedback from a wide range of interests. There is also a risk that Aucklanders and key stakeholders are unclear about the mandatory requirements of the NPS-FM and how the NPS-FM engagement links to previous water related engagements, for example the Auckland Water Strategy engagement and the Three Waters Reform engagement.

45.    These risks have been mitigated to date by communicating communications with communities and stakeholders during the engagement period, through meetings, emails, and online Question & Answer sessions. There will be further and ongoing communication to obtain quality engagement results to progress the NPS-FM implementation.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

46.    The feedback received from the first stage engagement on the values and the environmental outcomes sought, together with the NPS-FM requirements, will inform the development of objectives and proposed management options to achieve the objectives.

47.    A second phase of public engagement will be undertaken to seek feedback on the proposed objectives and management approaches for FMUs and water bodies. This will be undertaken in the second half of 2023 to provide opportunity for communities and stakeholders, and local boards for further involvement.  

48.    The feedback received from the second phase of engagement will further inform the development of a proposed plan change to the Auckland Unitary Plan and the development of action plans.

49.    Elected representatives will have opportunities to review the proposed plan change and action plans as they evolve, and before the plan change is approved for public notification in the second half of 2024 to meet the NPS-FM deadline of notification before December 2024.

50.    Submissions to the plan change will be heard by an independent Freshwater Hearing Panel who will make recommendations back to council by 2026.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Feedback Form (Under Separate Cover)

 

b

Map of Proposed Freshwater Management Units (Under Separate Cover)

 

c

NPS-FM freshwater values (Under Separate Cover)

 

d

Who we heard from (Under Separate Cover)

 

e

Local Board breakdowns (Under Separate Cover)

 

f

Summary of Feedback Report (Under Separate Cover)

 

g

Memo to local boards on 26 May 2022: Implementing the National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management 2020 for Auckland (Under Separate Cover)

 

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Authors

Monica Xu - Senior Analyst NES

Jenny Fuller - Team Leader Planning

Authorisers

Warren Maclennan - Manager - Planning, Regional, North, West & Islands

John Duguid - General Manager - Plans and Places

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

2022 local government elections - meetings and decision-making until new local board members make their declarations

File No.: CP2022/12585

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide for appropriate arrangements for decision-making between the final local board meeting of the current electoral term and the inaugural meeting of the new local board.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      The last meeting of the Rodney Local Board in this current term is scheduled for 21 September 2022. Between that meeting and the first meeting of the local board in the new term, decisions may be needed from the local board. As for each of the previous terms, temporary arrangements for making these decisions need to be confirmed.

3.      The term of office of the current local board members ends the day following the official declaration of election results. Following the declaration, which is expected to be Friday 14 October 2022, the term of office for members elected to the local board will commence.

4.      For the period from the commencement of their term of office until their inaugural meeting where members are sworn in (interregnum), decisions may be made by the Auckland Council Chief Executive under existing delegations.

5.      The existing local boards delegation to the chief executive requires, amongst other things, that staff consult with the allocated local board portfolio holder/lead on certain decisions. As a temporary measure, this report seeks to allow staff to make decisions without complying with the requirement for consultation during the interregnum. 

6.      Staff also seek confirmation of arrangements for making decisions at the local board level in the period between the final local board meeting and the official end of term. The urgent decision delegations and process that is already in place adequately caters for this scenario.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      confirm that the local board’s existing urgent decisions delegations process will be utilised where decisions are required from the local board between the final local board business meeting (21 September 2022) and the end of term (15 October 2022)

b)      note that from the commencement of the term of office of new members until the inaugural meeting of the incoming local board (interregnum), all decision-making will be undertaken by the chief executive under current delegations

c)      note that the chief executive will not be required to comply with consultation requirements in the local boards’ delegation protocols when making decisions during the interregnum

d)      request that the chief executive exercise restraint when making decisions during the interregnum and to consider referring significant decisions to the first meeting of the incoming local board.

 

 

Horopaki

Context

7.      Current elected members remain in office until the new members’ term of office commences, which is the day after the declaration of election results (Sections 115 and 116, Local Electoral Act 2001). The declaration will be publicly notified on 14 October 2022, with the term of office of current members ending and the term of office of new members commencing on 15 October 2022.

8.      The new members cannot act as members of the local board until they have made their statutory declaration at the inaugural local board meeting (Clause 14, Schedule 7, Local Government Act 2002).

9.      Following the last local board meeting of the current electoral term, decisions may be needed on urgent matters or routine business as usual that cannot wait until the incoming local board’s first business meeting in the new electoral term.

10.    As with each of the previous electoral terms, temporary arrangements need to be made and/or confirmed for:

·    making urgent decisions before the end of term

·    making decisions that require consultation with local board/local board members during the interregnum.

Tātaritanga me ngā tohutohu

Analysis and advice

Urgent decisions – arrangement for remainder of the term

11.    Between the last business meeting and the declaration of results expected around 14 October 2022, current local board members are still in office and can use their existing urgent decisions delegations to make decisions that are required from the local board during this time.

12.    The urgent decisions process includes a delegation to the chairperson and deputy chairperson that enables them to make decisions on behalf of the local board where it is not practical to call the full local board together.

13.    All requests for an urgent decision will need to be supported by adequate staff advice and information and clear recommendations.

Decision-making during the interregnum

14.    All local boards have made a general delegation to the chief executive. During the interregnum, any decisions that will be required from the local board, and which cannot wait until a local board meeting, will be undertaken by the chief executive under his existing delegations.

15.    The delegation to the chief executive is subject to a requirement to comply with the delegation protocols, which require consulting with the local board on some decisions that are made by staff under delegated authority. Consultation is often done through a local board lead (referred to as a portfolio holder in the delegation protocols). The most common area requiring consultation is landowner consents relating to local parks. Parks staff receive a large number of landowner consent requests each month that relate to local parks across Auckland.

16.    During the current term, while the elected members remain in office, staff will continue to consult with leads/portfolio holders as required by the delegation protocols (or chairperson where there is no portfolio holder). However, during the interregnum, staff will be unable to comply with this requirement due to the absence of appointed portfolio holders/lead/chairpersons to consult with.

17.    As a temporary measure, it is recommended that staff continue to process business as usual decisions that cannot wait until the local board’s first business meeting without consultation. Following the election of chairpersons at the inaugural meetings, staff will consult with the chairperson when and if required and can resume consultation with appointed representatives once new arrangements for leads/portfolio holders are in place.

Tauākī whakaaweawe āhuarangi

Climate impact statement

18.    This report relates to procedural matters and has no quantifiable climate impacts.

Ngā whakaaweawe me ngā tirohanga a te rōpū Kaunihera

Council group impacts and views

19.    The arrangements proposed in this report enable the council to proceed with necessary business during the election period. During the interregnum, staff will exercise restraint and ensure that any significant decisions are deferred to the incoming local board.

20.    These arrangements apply only to local boards. The reduced political decision-making will be communicated to the wider council group.

21.    The governing body has made its own arrangements to cover the election period, including delegating the power to make urgent decisions between the last governing body meeting of the term and the day the current term ends, to any two of the mayor, deputy mayor and a chairperson of a committee of the whole. From the commencement of the term of office of the new local board members until the governing body’s inaugural meeting, the chief executive will carry out decision-making under his current delegations.

Ngā whakaaweawe ā-rohe me ngā tirohanga a te poari ā-rohe

Local impacts and local board views

22.    This is a report to all local boards that proposes arrangements to enable the council to process routine local matters during the election period. This will enable the council to meet timeframes and provide good customer service.

Tauākī whakaaweawe Māori

Māori impact statement

23.    A decision of this procedural nature is not considered to have specific implications for Māori, and the arrangements proposed in this report do not affect the Māori community differently to the rest of the community.

Ngā ritenga ā-pūtea

Financial implications

24.    This report and decision being sought relates to a procedural matter and does not have any financial implications.

Ngā raru tūpono me ngā whakamaurutanga

Risks and mitigations

25.    There is a risk that unforeseen decisions will arise during this period, such as a decision that is politically significant or a decision that exceeds the chief executive’s financial delegations.

26.    This risk has been mitigated by scheduling meetings as late as possible in the current term and communicating to reporting staff that significant decisions should not be made during October 2022.

Ngā koringa ā-muri

Next steps

27.    The decision of the local board will be communicated to senior staff so that they are aware of the arrangements for the month of October 2022.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

There are no attachments for this report.     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Shirley Coutts - Principal Advisor - Governance Strategy

Authorisers

Louise Mason - General Manager Local Board Services

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Project Leads update

File No.: CP2022/12038

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      To provide an opportunity for local board project leads to update on their appointed projects.

Whakarāpopototanga matua

Executive summary

2.      On 20 November 2019 the Rodney Local Board approved the report on Local board governance work management for the 2019-2022 triennium (RD/2019/142) which established a project lead structure to empower members to progress local board initiatives.

3.      Project leads are appointed by agreement of local board.

4.      Being a project lead allows members to pursue particular priorities and initiatives of the local board without the need to require staff or officers to meet with the entire local board in a formal setting.

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive the local board project lead updates for September 2022.

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Project Lead update - Member Bailey

231

b

Project Lead update - Member Houlbrooke

233

c

Project Lead update - Member Johnston

235

d

Project Lead update - Member Kenny

237

e

Project Lead Danielle Hancock

239

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Natasha Yapp - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Rodney Ward Councillor update

File No.: CP2022/10304

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      The Rodney Local Board allocates a period of time for the Ward Councillor, Greg Sayers, to update them on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      receive Councillor Sayers’ update on the activities of the Governing Body.

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Councillor Greg Sayers Accountability Report: August - September 2022

243

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Natasha Yapp - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager

 

 


Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

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Rodney Local Board

21 September 2022

 

 

Rodney Local Board workshop records

File No.: CP2022/10306

 

  

 

Te take mō te pūrongo

Purpose of the report

1.      Attached are the Rodney Local Board workshop records for 7 and 14 September 2022.

 

Ngā tūtohunga

Recommendation/s

That the Rodney Local Board:

a)      note the workshop records for 7 and 14 September 2022.

 

 

Ngā tāpirihanga

Attachments

No.

Title

Page

a

Rodney Local Board Workshop Records for September 2022

249

     

Ngā kaihaina

Signatories

Author

Natasha Yapp - Democracy Advisor

Authoriser

Lesley Jenkins - Local Area Manager